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Anchoring gear for cruising on my race boat


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I have an Express 37 that we bought for racing and cruising. 

There is no anchor locker.  Today I keep the rode (in a big tote) and anchor as two separated pieces in the v-berth.  I pass them up through the forward hatch and connect them when it’s time to anchor. 

This has worked for 4 years, but I have two kids now and want something easier and that I can keep ready to deploy.

I think I need two things, a proper anchor roller than can store our Rocna Vulcan and a hawespipe to lead the rode into the empty space forward of the V-berth. 

My bow pulpit leaves very little room for an anchor roller (picture attached). The only one that I’ve seen on an Express 37 was custom made out of aluminum U-channel and fits under the starboard pulpit leg.  I’m curious to see how others have handled this on their boats. My solution with a small anchor roller won’t work for anchor storage. 

I’m wondering if anyone has mounted a hawsepipe into a deck plate? I like the idea of having it be fully sealed when we aren’t cruising, and it’s one less thing in the way of bow crew. 

Finally, how do I keep the anchor rode from stinking up the V-berth?  There is a huge opening. 

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A0820573-A067-4C91-BFE2-AF586866ABBA.jpeg

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It should be fairly easy to fit a cover over the big hole, it probably doesn't need to be on hinges unless you plan on opening it a lot. Four turnbuttons would do the trick if you wanted to keep it really simple. A mesh or wicker insert might be a good idea if there is no other ventilation into the locker.

As to your bow...you don't have a lot of real estate up there to work with.

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Back in the day, we had a temporary/removable SS bow roller that attached to the stb tack fitting. Wouldn't hold a big load, but you lead it back to the chocks after setting.  that boat had a deckplate for a chain pipe. We had pvc insert for dopes like me wouldn't ruin the threads. 

The only way to avoid smell is was wash the rode care carefully. 

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Well you could make a U shaped s.s. tubing bow extension...look at the Niagara 35. Just don't put all the the railings on it, but put your anchor roller out there. It's kind of heavy and $$ to get fabbed up, but it's handy..

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Keep the anchor and rode in cockpit locker?  When time to anchor, pitch it over the side then walk the rode forward, cleat it off and set the anchor. 

Depends on how often you plan to anchor, depth, weather, etc.    

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1 hour ago, Bugsy said:

Keep the anchor and rode in cockpit locker? 

Express 37s don’t have cockpit lockers, so this is effectively what I do now just using the V-berth and forward hatch. I use keep it as two pieces (anchor and rode) because they are pretty heavy (over 50lbs) to move together. 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

Back in the day, we had a temporary/removable SS bow roller that attached to the stb tack fitting. Wouldn't hold a big load, but you lead it back to the chocks after setting.  that boat had a deckplate for a chain pipe. We had pvc insert for dopes like me wouldn't ruin the threads. 

The only way to avoid smell is was wash the rode care carefully. 

Do you have any photos of that bow roller?  That sounds interesting and like something that I could make.

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1 hour ago, Alan H said:

Well you could make a U shaped s.s. tubing bow extension...look at the Niagara 35. Just don't put all the the railings on it, but put your anchor roller out there. It's kind of heavy and $$ to get fabbed up, but it's handy..

This is what a neighboring Olson 34 has done.  It would bump me out of my slip length though, so that would cost about $500/year.

Another option that I've considered is having the bow pulpit modified so that one or both support legs aren't so far forward to give me more real estate for a bow roller.

I may start by just trying to make an aluminum bow roller like my friend's Express 37 and notching it to work around the pulpit.

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

It should be fairly easy to fit a cover over the big hole, it probably doesn't need to be on hinges unless you plan on opening it a lot. Four turnbuttons would do the trick if you wanted to keep it really simple. A mesh or wicker insert might be a good idea if there is no other ventilation into the locker.

There isn't any real ventilation, just a tiny (15mm or so) drain hole out to the bilge.  Now I'm wondering if a small fan in it blowing positive pressure into that compartment and letting it vent out of the hawsepipe would solve any smell issues.  Our kids will be sleeping in the v-berth while cruising so we don't want it too stinky.  

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What if you made a removable platform for those couple weeks/year when you need it?

 

https://www.cruisingworld.com/how/how-retrofit-anchor-platform/

 

For the smell, a "kayak hatch" panel to cover and 4 "dogs" to secure it might make a simple solution.  

CLC has plans for hatches, and gasket material, and our own Russell Brown sells these through them

https://www.clcboats.com/shop/products/boat-building-supplies-epoxy-fiberglass-plywood/delrin-hatch-toggles.html

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Vincent DePillis said:

Or a stubby carbon sprit with an integrated bow roller-- that you could also use to fly some of furling downwind cruising sail...

Exactly. That's alway what we're doing for our boat. I've not figured out the storage for anchor, etc, yet. I might keep a bin on deck by the mast.

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12 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Exactly. That's alway what we're doing for our boat. I've not figured out the storage for anchor, etc, yet. I might keep a bin on deck by the mast.

Razr - any chance you have a photo you can share?

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A flat panel with turn buttons will work to cover the locker opening. Cut a few slots for ventilation. I don't think a fan is required unless your bottom is REALLY muddy and stinky. 

A hawse pipe mounted in a deck plate will probably require a 6" inspection port but these exist.

The anchor could be lashed to a leg of the pulpit and just use the roller strictly for holding the rode and retrieving it.  OR

You do a roller with slots instead of bolt holes. Have carriage bolts with the head on deck side. Before leaving the slip, extend the roller and fit the anchor (having already put the anchor on the deck).

Then just one bolt with a wing nut to hold the roller in the extended position. Does not have to be below deck. Just an piece of aluminum angle and 2 holes in the roller for the stowed and deployed state.

image.thumb.png.4cb8bc2375efdb78f943f37ef9124bbc.png

I'm assuming you will train a child to flake the rode as needed by climbing into the V-berth. 

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What's your rode and are you pulling by hand? Deck chocks with some pad eyes can work for securing the anchor but a Vulcan would be tough. A zip up sausage bag on deck could work for the rode and be tidy and out of the way, provided it's only a small amount of chain. I would stay away from using the locker more headache than it's worth. If the anchor is small enough the old school reverse attachment can work where you bring the body aft to a strap or attached point.

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1 hour ago, Alex W said:

Do you have any photos of that bow roller?  That sounds interesting and like something that I could make.

Sorry, long before digital photography. It was very basic and yeas - it was tacked up at home from some plate. 

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Well if you were REALLY into it, you could put together a fiberglass lined, plywood locker yourself and tab it in there. Add a few supports to the bottom, glassed into the hull. I'd make sure that it tilts forward, and drill a little 3/8 inch hole at the bow to let it drain.  Personally, I'd seal in a little s.s. U-bolt to shackle the end of the rode to.   If you REALLY glass the inside to take abuse, it should last for a while. Then add  a hawsepipe through the deck. If the hawsepipe is big enough to get your hand into it, you can sorta clean it out. If I did this, I'd make dropdead sure I sealed the deck core.

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31 minutes ago, Alan H said:

Well if you were REALLY into it, you could put together a fiberglass lined, plywood locker yourself and tab it in there. Add a few supports to the bottom, glassed into the hull. I'd make sure that it tilts forward, and drill a little 3/8 inch hole at the bow to let it drain.  Personally, I'd seal in a little s.s. U-bolt to shackle the end of the rode to.   If you REALLY glass the inside to take abuse, it should last for a while. Then add  a hawsepipe through the deck. If the hawsepipe is big enough to get your hand into it, you can sorta clean it out. If I did this, I'd make dropdead sure I sealed the deck core.

If you need a hawsepipe at all.

You could put in a Nicro deck plate and shackle the end of the rode to a hook just inside. Open the deck plate and hook the rode to the anchor. This way you can also replace the deck plate with a cowl that will ventilate the locker, and with the plate installed there is no water ingress. You could lead the rode out the cowl in wet weather at anchor or while motoring if you don't want to unhook the anchor.

Where to put the anchor is another question entirely.

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No good solution. On extended cruises the forward locker can really get a stench going. But the v-berth on a E-37 is not used underway and the stinky bits are overboard when anchored so there is some hope. I cruise a SC50, not unlike a E-37 in this issue. PO had fitted a monstrous roller abomination with a windlass and hawse into the v-berth. Did I say abomination? Do not do that.

I’ve cruised with a Light Fortress and the rode in a bag. Workable for Mexico. Would not work in the tropics where a long chain and windlass is a must.

I built a completely removable roller thing to replace the permanent abomination. For short protected water legs I tended to leave it and the anchor in place. It all went below for any serious sailing. Worked well. Rested-on/lashed-to the aluminum toe-rails. Yours might go outside the pulpit base pictured and lash to something else a bit more aft.

Rather a pain to load the removable roller thing with a heavy steel new-gen anchor, though. Usually load the anchor chain into the roller and then toss the anchor overboard. Often works :-(

I have restored the destroyed v-berth and now plan to mount a windlass and hawse far aft where the chain can fall to storage near the mast step. Will fit an improved removable roller device.

Anchoring gear is incompatible with sailing light boats, and especially so with racing.

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13 minutes ago, El Borracho said:

No good solution. On extended cruises the forward locker can really get a stench going. But the v-berth on a E-37 is not used underway and the stinky bits are overboard when anchored so there is some hope. I cruise a SC50, not unlike a E-37 in this issue. PO had fitted a monstrous roller abomination with a windlass and hawse into the v-berth. Did I say abomination? Do not do that.

I’ve cruised with a Light Fortress and the rode in a bag. Workable for Mexico. Would not work in the tropics where a long chain and windlass is a must.

I built a completely removable roller thing to replace the permanent abomination. For short protected water legs I tended to leave it and the anchor in place. It all went below for any serious sailing. Worked well. Rested-on/lashed-to the aluminum toe-rails. Yours might go outside the pulpit base pictured and lash to something else a bit more aft.

Rather a pain to load the removable roller thing with a heavy steel new-gen anchor, though. Usually load the anchor chain into the roller and then toss the anchor overboard. Often works :-(

I have restored the destroyed v-berth and now plan to mount a windlass and hawse far aft where the chain can fall to storage near the mast step. Will fit an improved removable roller device.

Anchoring gear is incompatible with sailing light boats, and especially so with racing.

I eagerly await the first carbon fiber anchor.

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7 hours ago, Vincent DePillis said:

Or a stubby carbon sprit with an integrated bow roller-- that you could also use to fly some of furling downwind cruising sail...

That is also on my to-do list and would benefit from changing the bow pulpit design.  I have about 10' of 4" carbon spinnaker pole that has sprit potential for me, or might do a Trogear...

 

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57 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Try to find the owner of Selkie, another E37 here in Vancouver.  I think he had something sorted out.

Thanks, I know him and will send him a note asking how he did it.  He sold Selkie a few months back and moved up to an XP-44.

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2 hours ago, Alan H said:

Well if you were REALLY into it, you could put together a fiberglass lined, plywood locker yourself and tab it in there. Add a few supports to the bottom, glassed into the hull.

I thought about this, but it doesn't sound light.  The boat has a very fine entry and I don't want to add any weight to the bow.

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10 minutes ago, Alex W said:

Thanks, I know him and will send him a note asking how he did it.  He sold Selkie a few months back and moved up to an XP-44.

Oh, you don't have to tell me it sold!  I drooled over it for a couple of months wondering how long I could swing owning two boats while I got my current one into a selling condition.  Then whatever day it was about six weeks ago I watched it motor right by me while I was at work.  With her new owner at the helm. 

There was never any chance but I was still pretty bummed.

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My Tartan 30 had the set up you are contemplating, a hawsepipe in the deck to the same type of open locker in the v berth. As you know a lot of our local anchorages are thick mud, great for holding but smell is a big issue. When pulling anchor I would pile the rode and chain on deck, tie it up in a bundle, and lash it down. Once back at the dock it got a good fresh water rinse before storing back in the locker. Keep in mind feeding all the line and chain into the pipe while pulling the anchor by hand is difficult in the best conditions, and impossible short handed in any wind or current. Another issue is the gunk that drains off it will perk into the bilge over time, so the mess and smell will not be contained to the locker. If I had to do it again I would use a heavy canvas bucket straped down on foredeck and pile the rode there. If conditions got snotty you could bring it back the cockpit.

For anchor storage Mantus makes a rail mount. Pretty clunky, but probably ok for a cruise and easy to remove for racing. It would need to go on the stern but you could launch from the back as long as you were super carefull. Steve likes the mantus anchors too, and they break down for storage. 

image.png.60c8849af8512db728ab41321b57662b.png

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18 hours ago, Alex W said:

Express 37s don’t have cockpit lockers, 

Well, I learned something today - I had no idea about that.  I wish you success in finding the best solution that works for you.  

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@steele That is an interesting anchor bracket and might fit our Vulcan, I'll check one out.

I think your point about the annoyance of a hawsepipe and smell are valid.  I might try just to install an anchor roller that can store the anchor on the bow and continue to store the rode in the cockpit or down below and connect them when it is time to anchor.  

@Bugsy I hope I didn't offend.  The lack of cockpit lockers on the Express 37 is unique.  It was done to save weight, leave space for pipe berths, and to reduce potential ways for water to get below.  There is just a small cubby hole (roughly 50cm cubed) at the aft end of the cockpit that we use for easy access stuff while sailing.  

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I asked Selkie's former owner what their anchor roller looked like.  I'm putting a photo below.  This is a little too much for the racer in me, and Selkie's owner said he felt the same way.  His boat was configured as a cruiser by the previous owner.  I like Zonker's drawing and will probably make something similar.  I just ordered 4' of 2" aluminum channel and will see what I end up doing with that.

Interesting to see that Selkie's solution goes outside of the pulpit instead of inside.  That might be the best way to go.

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If you considering putting all that weight in the bow (Anchor, chain/rope rode) when cruising, and Steele is correct that many of your anchorages are muddy/smelly, and you don't have a crew with a high power hose to rinse the rode and anchor as its is raised and stowed, then maybe you're overthinking this?

Can you essentially make/buy a couple of milk bottle crates to form a rectangular storage shape that can be temporarily attached (ubolts?  big zip ties?) to a couple lifeline stantions on the port bow.  Rode flaked into bin, with anchor on top for cruising?  That way when hauling up a dirty muddy anchor, it can go in the bin, and get hosed off at your convenience, and keeps the anchor close and ready to deploy without have to lug bags up from below...

If it fouls the foot cruising jib too much, you could get jib recut and fly off a pennant so its foot is high enough to clear the bin...which would improve vis forward when cruising anyway...

For racing, go back to anchor stowed below in its bags (or get a fortress aluminum one with all rope rode to meet racing requirement), and bin gets removed from foredeck.  Presto, back in racing mode with no extra weight on boat, no holes cut thru deck, no smell below.

I know it doesn't look as elegant, but...

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For the family fun Cruising it's worth looking at when you will be doing it and what the typical scenario is.  Summer time usually light air and if you are going north lots of bow stern business.  In that case a light fortress which stows super easy even on a rail might be the way to go. As you won't be swinging not a concern and on the event you park somewhere for a bit where you will can always dig out the Vulcan. Your back will really like the fortress too.

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@SASSAFRAS I have a Fortress and use it as our lunch hook and race anchor.  I haven't been comfortable spending the night on it because there are always tidal currents here and so swinging is the norm not the exception.

I appreciate the advice from everyone.  I think that just a lightweight anchor roller capable of holding the anchor while cruising and keeping my rode elsewhere will do the job.  I'll post when I figure out the anchor roller part of the equation.  Our current anchor roller is removable all from above deck, so I'll do the same with the new one.  Once removed the only excess weight are 3 bolts and anchor nuts on top.

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Interest topic - there was a young French guy from Seattle I met on the dock in Honolulu who did the Singlehanded Transpac a few years back in an old Olson 30.  And then he continued on, through the SoPac, eventually cruising to Australia where he sold the boat.  I always wondered how one would set up a reliable, easy to use anchoring set up on a race boat like that...I can’t remember his set up.

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30 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Interest topic - there was a young French guy from Seattle I met on the dock in Honolulu who did the Singlehanded Transpac a few years back in an old Olson 30.  And then he continued on, through the SoPac, eventually cruising to Australia where he sold the boat.  I always wondered how one would set up a reliable, easy to use anchoring set up on a race boat like that...I can’t remember his set up.

Jud, on a lightweight 30-footer. anchoring gear can be much simpler.  A 10kg version of a modern anchor is a viable option for non-storm use, and with a mostly-rope rode the anchor and rode can be raised by hand, carried off the bow and stored somewhere else.  It's not the most convenient option, but it is doable if you are fit and determined.  In my youth i did a lot of cruising on small light boats, anchoring out all the time without even a bow roller.

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If you do commit to the locker, I made a ply glassed insert for ours that has been going strong. Could make two side by side to fit without cutting, no need to fasten, weight keeps it in place.  It's right in front of our bed and odor has never been a issue. The cat sleeps in it most of the time. Never used a door just a canvas curtain with a wood dowel on the bottom.

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Consider a hefty bag which can be tied to foredeck while cruising & holds all the rode & chain. Anc stored separately. No water or stink below. Mesh material to allow for air dry/ water draining. When I cruised a J-44, we used the primary winches to bring up the anchor

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Thanks Alex W, this is a timely thread since we're in process of converting our Aloha 30 from shorthanded racing to short-term cruising.  Job #1 is a ground tackle upgrade from the 7.5kg Bruce currently in the anchor locker (we're already better off than Alex since we have one built in to the foredeck!).

Switching up to a 9kg Vulcan, and have ordered a bow roller to fit the anchor - yes it's clunky but we're not getting any younger and simple deployment and recovery trumps all else.

KV-915-01_1400x.png?v=1544546629

There isn't much real estate to work with at the Aloha's pointy end, we need to remove the tack hoop from the forestay chainplate and the toy roller that came as original equipment to fit the new assembly.

686068644_IMG_0564(2).thumb.JPG.9655d80e1e1aee0a15ab1400f79f35d6.JPG

Any thoughts on the fact the roller will be offset to fit into the narrow gap between pulpit and forestay but still leave space for a chain stopper and a true lead to an existing bow cleat?

Cheers!

 

 

KV-915-01_1400x.webp

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On 12/22/2020 at 11:34 AM, Alex W said:

 

Finally, how do I keep the anchor rode from stinking up the V-berth?  There is a huge opening. 

 

A0820573-A067-4C91-BFE2-AF586866ABBA.jpeg

Could you cut some ply to fit the shape and then buy a small deck hatch or large port-light to mount in the space.  This would give you access and a way to seal the opening to keep the stench at bay. The only way keep the water from draining into the bilge  would be to plug the limber hole and install an over board drain with a shell cover over the hole to prevent waves from splashing water into the locker space.

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39 minutes ago, CriticalPath said:

Switching up to a 9kg Vulcan, and have ordered a bow roller to fit the anchor - yes it's clunky but we're not getting any younger and simple deployment and recovery trumps all else.

In the scheme of bow rollers, that new one is still a tiddler compared with some of the stuff on cruising boats.  I don't mean that as a criticism -- I am sure it will be plenty strong enough for the job, so long as it is secured to solid backing — just that it is not a clunky mutilation of your raceboat.

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25 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

In the scheme of bow rollers, that new one is still a tiddler compared with some of the stuff on cruising boats.  I don't mean that as a criticism -- I am sure it will be plenty strong enough for the job, so long as it is secured to solid backing — just that it is not a clunky mutilation of your raceboat.

Absolutely (and thanks), we don't intend to be caught on a lee shore in Patagonia so gear's being selected appropriately.  It's all about horses for courses!

Plans are for 1-2 week cruises in the reasonably protected waters of eastern Lake Ontario and 1000 Islands, but squalls, unexpected weather patterns, and the need to run for cover are gonna happen.  Our boat's a small 30' 6800lb racer/cruiser with low windage.  A windlass would be overkill and complicated to install without compromising the boat's purpose and ability.

Cheers!

 

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I don't have a windlass so I switched to a large Fortress.  The other thing that I did was to make up a spectra strop with a chain hook on one end and a loop for the bow cleats.  When I take up the anchor I can quickly drop the chain hook onto the chain when I am right over the anchor and power over the anchor to break it loose.  If I still need to take up a bit more chain by hand I can pull the chain to me and the chain hook is right by my hands.  I can just reach forward and drop it 3 or 4 feet farther up on the chain.

  I haven't tried a chain stopper but this is pretty easy to use if you are mostly pulling up rope until you get to the chain.

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I solved this problem by taking a plastic tub big enough to hold my desired anchor & first shot of chain, and another to carry the rode (2nd shot of chain then 250 ft rope).

~ 7k lb 30-footer, lotta windage though. Your area is a lot of rock so I would pick a different anchor, also. I used a 25lb Bruce which is a pretty good all-arounder.

I screw chocks of wood to the tubs, with rope strops. These tubs could be carried individually up to the foredeck and secured there while I handled the anchor. Kept mess to a minimum and allowed me to stow the anchor below and aft where it didn't catch on sails/rigging or cause poor behavior by the boat. And it was removable while racing.

For the record, I also carried a 15lb Hi-Tensile on a reasonable (but lesser) amount of chain while racing. Lots of PHRF racers I know don't carry anchors, which is contrary to the spirit if not the letter of the rules.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

Good thinking, @CriticalPath.  No point in using a sledgehammer to crack a nut.

And I like your choice of a Vulcan.  That or a Spade seem to be the best of new gen anchors.

Seems like the popular and effective choices in our conditions are Rocna, Vulcan, or trusty old Bruce.  Spade doesn’t have much market penetration in Canada.  Old-style plot and Danforth types don’t handle the typical conditions well.

I liked the Vulcan’s compact size and modern design / engineering.  We’ll see how it all pans out...

Cheers!

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20 hours ago, CriticalPath said:

Thanks Alex W, this is a timely thread since we're in process of converting our Aloha 30 from shorthanded racing to short-term cruising.  Job #1 is a ground tackle upgrade from the 7.5kg Bruce currently in the anchor locker (we're already better off than Alex since we have one built in to the foredeck!).

Switching up to a 9kg Vulcan, and have ordered a bow roller to fit the anchor - yes it's clunky but we're not getting any younger and simple deployment and recovery trumps all else.

KV-915-01_1400x.png?v=1544546629

686068644_IMG_0564(2).thumb.JPG.9655d80e1e1aee0a15ab1400f79f35d6.JPG

Any thoughts on the fact the roller will be offset to fit into the narrow gap between pulpit and forestay but still leave space for a chain stopper and a true lead to an existing bow cleat?

Cheers!

 

 

KV-915-01_1400x.webp

Having the roller more or less in line with the port or stbd bow cleat will work well.  No need for a chain stopper use a piece of dynema with a eye on the cleat, take to the anchor shackle and back to the cleat.  Roller will feed nicely to the cleat for a snubber as well.  The shape of a Vulcan shank should fit well on the bow and probably don't have to go very far out with the roller.

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12 hours ago, CriticalPath said:

Seems like the popular and effective choices in our conditions are Rocna, Vulcan, or trusty old Bruce.

I am surprised that the Bruce is still in vogue.  It was a big step fwd in the 1970s, but @Panope's tests showed the genuine Bruce be massively outclassed by the new generation of anchors, and the clones to be a bit of a disaster.

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On 12/22/2020 at 10:34 AM, Alex W said:

I have an Express 37 that we bought for racing and cruising. 

There is no anchor locker.  Today I keep the rode (in a big tote) and anchor as two separated pieces in the v-berth.  I pass them up through the forward hatch and connect them when it’s time to anchor. 

This has worked for 4 years, but I have two kids now and want something easier and that I can keep ready to deploy.

I think I need two things, a proper anchor roller than can store our Rocna Vulcan and a hawespipe to lead the rode into the empty space forward of the V-berth. 

My bow pulpit leaves very little room for an anchor roller (picture attached). The only one that I’ve seen on an Express 37 was custom made out of aluminum U-channel and fits under the starboard pulpit leg.  I’m curious to see how others have handled this on their boats. My solution with a small anchor roller won’t work for anchor storage. 

I’m wondering if anyone has mounted a hawsepipe into a deck plate? I like the idea of having it be fully sealed when we aren’t cruising, and it’s one less thing in the way of bow crew. 

Finally, how do I keep the anchor rode from stinking up the V-berth?  There is a huge opening. 

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I have almost the exact same problem. I sail a C&C Mega 30 OD. I have a hawsehole with a notch cut so it will hold a chain link. I keep a Fortress anchor below in a tote stored under the cockpit. I also don't have cockpit lockers but I can lay in the rear berths and reach around a bulkhead to get under the cockpit. I modified the bulkhead to be removal able but as it is a structural piece it bolts in so I only remove it for large items. So the process is drag the anchor up onto the foredeck. I have 10' of anchor chain then rope rode. From the deck I can pull the chain link free and attach it to the anchor. I have learned to flake the required amount of rode out before wetting the anchor so it doesn't become stuck while running out. To pull the anchor I bring it in by hand leaving the rode on the deck. Unhook the anchor place in the tote. Use a canvas bucket to scoop up water and a brush to clean the anchor. The tote has large holes for water to drain out. Take the anchor below and store. Return to the bow and again with the bucket and brush clean the rode. Stow the bucket and brush (toss down the hatch to worry about later). Shove the rode down the hawsehole hooking the chain onto the spot on the hawsehole that holds a link. All of this is done while my wife motors away slowly. If single handing I leave the anchor attached and tie it down before making my way to the helm. I don't have a V-berth the head is in the bow. The rode is stored in a small compartment above and forward of the sail storage and I have a small bulkhead coming up about 2 foot above the waterline between the head and the sail storage/Anchor rode area. It is a sealed bulkhead so the water draining off rode runs under the sails. The sails are hung about 6" off the bottom in a net. That compartment has a small bilge pump with a solid state switch.  As long as I clean the rode the smells aren't too bad. Mega's have a very flat hull bottom and no limber holes between all the small compartments that the ribs form.  The Anchor rode smells are no worse than the smells that the wet bilges generate. The Mega has a lifting 2,400 pound keel so when up the open hole in the bottom of the boat allows water to splash into the boat. Just enough so the compartments stay wet. So I am working on a idea for a dry bilge system using a large diaphragm pump that will cycle when on shore power.  Hopefully the anchor rode smells won't be more noticeable after I get the bilge's dry.

JJ

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On 12/24/2020 at 8:30 AM, Marcjsmith said:

Could you cut some ply to fit the shape and then buy a small deck hatch or large port-light to mount in the space.  This would give you access and a way to seal the opening to keep the stench at bay. The only way keep the water from draining into the bilge  would be to plug the limber hole and install an over board drain with a shell cover over the hole to prevent waves from splashing water into the locker space.

I suggested that. "Too Heavy" was the verdict.

If it were me, I'd make it out of 1/2 in plywood and glass some tuff stuff on the inside to take the abrasion. A small u-bolt or s.s. eye bolt set into it could shackle to the end of the rode.  All up, it would probably be about 12-15 pounds.

...So worrying about the weight, when you can take the anchor and rode out on race day,  seems odd to me, but hey, it's the man's boat!  He should do what he wants!

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If you plan on cruising the boat successfully you're going to need proper ground tackle.

Plan on about a 33# Rocna, 100' of chain, 200' of rode, a substantial anchor roller, a windlass to deposit all this on the ocean bed or back inside the boat and a secure and well ventilated locker.  This is all going to be heavy and robust gear if you want to anchor the boat safely.

If you have a high capacity water maker on board you'll be able to wash the rode and chain as it comes aboard and it will greatly reduce odor.  Do not allow the locker to drain into the bilge.

Anchoring as a race boat is totaling different from anchoring as a cruising boat.  The photo of the other E37 looked about right if you plan on anchoring often.

Good luck.

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7 hours ago, Alan H said:

I suggested that. "Too Heavy" was the verdict.

 

Not really sure how to make it any lighter unless they went with lighter material. Like a foam core hatch...

ive got a similar situation on my moody... it I’m. It going to as concerned about weight...

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It sounds like I need to clarify a few things.  One is that we still intend to race the boat.  The other is that our cruising is a few weeks of cruising annually, we aren't setting off for a circumnavigation.  The farthest that I expect we'd go in the next decade is up to desolation sound, which I've cruised before and know what ground tackle I'll need.  100' of chain is not a part of it.

It's important to avoid adding weight to the pointy end of the boat.  Because this boat is narrow at the bow and pretty wide at the stern adding 20# of fiberglass in the bow forward of the waterline will sink the bow by an inch or more.  Just storing a couple of spinnakers in the V-berth (roughly 8' back from where this anchor locker would be added) makes a noticeable change to the weight distribution at-rest.  Not a big deal when cruising, but not something that I want to do for racing.

The anchor locker also strikes me as an expensive project.  It is something that I'd want to have professionally done to make sure that the fiberglass work is up to the quality standards of the boat.  I haven't had this quoted, but wouldn't be surprised to find it come in at $5k or more.

This is why I think the hybrid solution of an anchor roller at the bow that can store the anchor while cruising and bringing my rode forward in a container that I lash to the bow is a good one for my needs.

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1 hour ago, Alex W said:

It sounds like I need to clarify a few things.  One is that we still intend to race the boat.  The other is that our cruising is a few weeks of cruising annually, we aren't setting off for a circumnavigation.  The farthest that I expect we'd go in the next decade is up to desolation sound, which I've cruised before and know what ground tackle I'll need.  100' of chain is not a part of it.

It's important to avoid adding weight to the pointy end of the boat.  Because this boat is narrow at the bow and pretty wide at the stern adding 20# of fiberglass in the bow forward of the waterline will sink the bow by an inch or more.  Just storing a couple of spinnakers in the V-berth (roughly 8' back from where this anchor locker would be added) makes a noticeable change to the weight distribution at-rest.  Not a big deal when cruising, but not something that I want to do for racing.

The anchor locker also strikes me as an expensive project.  It is something that I'd want to have professionally done to make sure that the fiberglass work is up to the quality standards of the boat.  I haven't had this quoted, but wouldn't be surprised to find it come in at $5k or more.

This is why I think the hybrid solution of an anchor roller at the bow that can store the anchor while cruising and bringing my rode forward in a container that I lash to the bow is a good one for my needs.

I'm with you Alex, neither of us needs a world-class solution for a few weeks' cruising in protected waters.

Regardless of how you decide to handle your rode, any anchor roller is going to add 10+ pounds up high and far forward (much more with an external setup like Selkie).  I haven't found a solution to that issue.  Didn't some J/Boats (109?) have removable bow rollers?  How'd that work?

Cheers!

 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, CriticalPath said:

any anchor roller is going to add 10+ pounds up high and far forward

The one on Perplexity (also an Express 37) is made of aluminum channel and weighs about 3lbs.  I ordered aluminum channel (6063 in 2" x 2" channel with 1/4" walls) to make a similar one.

steele has a really nice roller on his J109 but it doesn’t look like a quick removal.  The J/109 has a nice little area right at the bow to install one that is out of the way of the pulpit.  Overall the 109 has many details like that which are well thought out for a racer/cruiser. 

I should be able to make the roller come off pretty easily by inserting bolts through the bottom and locking them between a threaded G10 plate and locknuts underneath. This allows removal of the anchor roller from above with just a socket and the only thing staying behind are the bolts and some acorn nuts.  That is how my current tiny roller is installed.

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The yield strength on 6061-T6 aluminium is actually quite close to stainless steel IF YOU DON'T WELD IT. So a roller made of extruded aluminium channel is a good idea.

The beauty of fiberglass is the difference between a pro job and decent amateur is about 3 hours of sanding and $20 more if filler and sandpaper ;)

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