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7 hours ago, Amati said:

About TH wearing more than hat?  Good lord, during the last series, the many hats that TH was wearing discussed ad nauseum.  On NBC, at any rate. Were the commentators wrong?

I have no f@cking idea what you're on about. 

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Having a race like that is why the committee was correct in postponing the race so many times. I think that the race was worth the wait.  Cheers to the Race Committee!

Semi Final Race 1 book is open - hit like for an AM win, dislike for LRPP.  Don’t sit on the fence now!

Please just stick to the facts and not your opinion.  You have a fundamental misunderstanding of how this all works.  The flu is down because of all the hand washing, social distancing, mask wearing,

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Dean Barker always looked uncomfortable with his cockpit position and the change over process, I don’t think they had a good layout like Ineos, is there any real advantage of having one more crew to windward? The Italians look very comfortable compared to DB.

I agree the whole set up looked darn uncomfortable for AM.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Jandals said:

I have no f@cking idea what you're on about. 

‘Wearing a hat’ is American (at least) business slang for what job you have in an organization.  So, wearing many hats means performing many jobs, having many responsibilities, or even what authority you have for different jobs in that organization.  

My example of Billy Joel’s advice that a maximum of 3 hats was a good rule of thumb meant ‘3 hats’ = 3 jobs or 3 responsibilities: his advice was having having more than 3 can lead to problems down the line.

TH hats, or jobs, as far as I can tell were, Executive Director, Skipper, Tactician, and Grinder.  4 jobs, or 4 hats.  I don’t know what his specific responsibilities were as Executive director were, so it may have been more.  What I was wondering is if this was too many responsibilities (or ‘hats).  Some here seem to know TH, so I was asking what anybody thought.

here’s an article about responsibilities (or ‘Wearing Hats’) that might help explain this:

https://beingfa.com/category/management/

a more specific article, with examples

https://www.outfieldleadership.com/are-you-wearing-too-many-hats

another article, specific to TH

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.capitalgazette.com/sports/ac-cs-american-magic-terry-hutchinson-crew-20200629-s6oiqfhy6bah3frc2xeiwgvrby-story.html%3foutputType=amp

 


 

 

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52 minutes ago, Amati said:

‘Wearing a hat’ is American (at least) business slang for what job you have in an organization.  So, wearing many hats means performing many jobs, having many responsibilities, or even what authority you have for different jobs in that organization.  

My example of Billy Joel’s advice that a maximum of 3 hats was a good rule of thumb meant ‘3 hats’ = 3 jobs or 3 responsibilities: his advice was having having more than 3 can lead to problems down the line.

TH hats, or jobs, as far as I can tell were, Executive Director, Skipper, Tactician, and Grinder.  4 jobs, or 4 hats.  I don’t know what his specific responsibilities were as Executive director were, so it may have been more.  What I was wondering is if this was too many responsibilities (or ‘hats).  Some here seem to know TH, so I was asking what anybody thought.

here’s an article about responsibilities (or ‘Wearing Hats’) that might help explain this:

https://beingfa.com/category/management/

a more specific article, with examples

https://www.outfieldleadership.com/are-you-wearing-too-many-hats

another article, specific to TH

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.capitalgazette.com/sports/ac-cs-american-magic-terry-hutchinson-crew-20200629-s6oiqfhy6bah3frc2xeiwgvrby-story.html%3foutputType=amp

 


 

 

I know what hats mean. It has zero to do with my response re: TH being fired as CEO of Artemis when he wasn't the CEO. 

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I think we were all so impressed by AM's early performance in the ACWS we did not look carefully at the roles and responsibilities within the team.  I recall there was a lot of early concern among AM supporters even prior to the ACWS that the sailing talent of the team might not match the technical talent of the boat design. But it was not until Prada RR that folks started  askingabout how the roles were allocated. 

I agreed with those questions.  I was not in any way impugning TH's skills and qualities as a tactician but that it compromised his objectivity as head of the sailing program.  We (AM) needed somebody who was off the boat, analyzing the communication and decision making preprocess, studying the debrief and making tough decisions about changes that might need making. 

Russell Coutts fulfilled this role in SF.  Oracle was losing.  When losing you have to make changes.

NYYC can come back. They can regroup and use this as a platform for the next challenge . If the funding is there, they will look at leadership structure. 

Its all good.

 

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5 minutes ago, Jandals said:

I know what hats mean. It has zero to do with my response re: TH being fired as CEO of Artemis when he wasn't the CEO. 

I wasn’t talking about that, even remotely.

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46 minutes ago, Jandals said:

Which is why I was asking what the hell you were on about when you quoted me. 

I apologize for my response/question involving your quote.  It was not my intent.  I apparently goofed.  When I discovered this I edited it, I think.  Some slack would be appreciated.  
 

Edit: I just looked at #4108 again, and I was clear I was talking about  this series cup.  You seem to have knowledge about the cup in general, so I was asking you a specific question that had little or nothing to do with a past cup.  But again, If my post offended you, I apologize.

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9 hours ago, Priscilla said:

When and not if the Kiwis defend the AC out on the sparkling Waitemata should we not be taking the historical lead of the Americans and renaming the 100 Guinea Cup the Aotearoa Cup.

Te Rehutai's Cup, if we are talking historical stuff, no?

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22 hours ago, mad said:

Dean Barker always looked uncomfortable with his cockpit position and the change over process,

Dean Barker looked much more uncomfortable, stressed, nervous than Jimmy who looked concentrated and under control, but we don't know the cause:

1) small cockpit ?

2) wheel, over sensitive or hard do control ?

3) the personnality of the person ?

It will be interesting to know, perhaps later.

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3 hours ago, Amati said:

I apologize for my response/question involving your quote.  It was not my intent.  I apparently goofed.  When I discovered this I edited it, I think.  Some slack would be appreciated.  
 

Edit: I just looked at #4108 again, and I was clear I was talking about  this series cup.  You seem to have knowledge about the cup in general, so I was asking you a specific question that had little or nothing to do with a past cup.  But again, If my post offended you, I apologize.

Just confused. 

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51 minutes ago, NSP said:

Best not suggest the Ineos campaign is turning to custard as some around here won't be happy :D

And don't mention two girls with that cup ;)

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T.Hutch is a brilliant tactician, but you don't put your best tech guy in a management role.  He should be like chief RD scientist at a research firm, in his lab (looking at numbers and the course, making calls).  Get a trained mgt guy doing the organizing, and fer Pete's sake off the grinder.

Too late now...

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14 hours ago, Priscilla said:

When and not if the Kiwis defend the AC out on the sparkling Waitemata should we not be taking the historical lead of the Americans and renaming the 100 Guinea Cup the Aotearoa Cup.

Maybe get a record similar to the US first? We will talk after 100 years of dominance.

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16 minutes ago, dullers said:

Maybe get a record similar to the US first? We will talk after 100 years of dominance.

The Americans changed the name after one race.......:lol:

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On 1/31/2021 at 6:08 AM, Horn Rock said:

Did anyone else notice in the last race on the final leg, LR dropped two boards down to slow up, to let AM cross in front - they were still on the upwind leg, and LR was half way down the final run.

Effective.

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4 hours ago, Priscilla said:

True Te Rehutai’s Cup it is.

You know if there is no American challenge in AC37 it would be a first there has always been an american team involved in every cycle....

Can it be called the America's Cup if they don't give a fuck anymore?......

Te Rehutai's Cup 2024

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On 1/30/2021 at 9:08 AM, Horn Rock said:

Did anyone else notice in the last race on the final leg, LR dropped two boards down to slow up, to let AM cross in front - they were still on the upwind leg, and LR was half way down the final run.

They dropped down a bit too, and got the struts in the water- wonder if LR managed the dip, or if the slow down from the struts itself did it?  Either way, ManFred Curry is smiling up there, somewhere.

 

C3D12B2F-769A-4DD1-AADF-9C462AE4C1F0.jpeg

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10 hours ago, Wandering Geo said:

Wasn't that in recognition of the name of the boat rather than country? 

So the Te Rehutai Cup then?

Doesn't quite have the same ring to it really.

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5 minutes ago, jaysper said:

So the Te Rehutai Cup then?

Doesn't quite have the same ring to it really.

Britannia Cup sounds better. And will be more appropriate.

Unfortunately that name is already on a cup at Cowes week

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12 minutes ago, jaysper said:

So the Te Rehutai Cup then?

Doesn't quite have the same ring to it really.

The "You Fast Foiling Fucker" cup?

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43 minutes ago, strider470 said:

Maybe it will be called Prada Cup, and LV Cup will come back for the challengers :-D

Like your style Strider.  We New Zealanders sometimes get a bit full of ourselves.

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11 hours ago, uflux said:

The Americans changed the name after one race.......:lol:

Well give it a go. See how you do...Only 2 countries have put names to that race and you aint one of them.

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1 hour ago, jaysper said:

So the Te Rehutai Cup then?

Doesn't quite have the same ring to it really.

I mean not many have heard of the Americas cup either so it might not work to well. Reminds me when the Royal Mail changed its name to "Consigner" or something.

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19 hours ago, bgytr said:

T.Hutch is a brilliant tactician, but you don't put your best tech guy in a management role.  He should be like chief RD scientist at a research firm, in his lab (looking at numbers and the course, making calls).  Get a trained mgt guy doing the organizing, and fer Pete's sake off the grinder.

Too late now...

 

I would like to see him remain in senior role on the program but put together a stronger after guard.

Goodsion, Slingsby Outerridge and various up and coming US talent can be found. Problem with US is that we do not have a  feeder pipe into talent for AC. Our Olympic program is truly terrible.  If NYYC want to win the AC, they need to have $100m budget for the each campaign and $5-10m per year invested in US Olympic and moth sailor development so that we discover our own talent. 

The UK is a serious contender because it has 2 or 3 astonishing sailing talent. Same with NZ .  Aus probably has talent but currently no billionaires interested.

Problem with US is that our sailors are typically from yacht club demographic that would have to give up $200 k-$500k+ per year careers to sail.  Very different from other countries. WE produce great footballers and baseball players because the small chance is worth the upside.

 

A serious campaign requires a very rare combination of talent and money.   US had money but not the same access to talent as NZ and UK.  

UK had talent but until Ineos stepped in, it didnt have the right amount of money.

NZ had talent and GD found the money.

Italy has the money and we'll see how they do in terms of recruiting the talent.   Winning the AC is hard and a bit of a design lottery but something in kiwi water that keeps producing.

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2 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

Problem with US is that our sailors are typically from yacht club demographic that would have to give up $200 k-$500k+ per year careers to sail.  Very different from other countries.

You think that kind of remuneration isn't available in the finance industry in other countries? If so, you are mistaken.

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2 minutes ago, dogwatch said:

You think that kind of remuneration isn't available in the finance industry in other countries? If so, you are mistaken.

Other countries provide sailing to a wider demographic.

Most of our junior sailors come from expensive yacht clubs with training programs paid for by well heeled parents

We do very very well in Junior world championships because no expense is spared

But when college time approaches, we tell our children to get a good degree (at a great university with a sailing program) and then a well paid job. 

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1 hour ago, EYESAILOR said:

But when college time approaches, we tell our children to get a good degree (at a great university with a sailing program) and then a well paid job. 

 

The smart ones can think for themselves.., and I think we can assume that it's their choice to become a banker rather than a professional sailor.

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2 hours ago, us7070 said:

 

The smart ones can think for themselves.., and I think we can assume that it's their choice to become a banker rather than a professional sailor.

IIRC, following the GFC, banks that flogged all those toxic securities got bailed out from public funds, and the bankers still received their mega bonuses.

Don't think you get rewarded in sailing for such screw ups.

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7 minutes ago, MaxHugen said:

IIRC, following the GFC, banks that flogged all those toxic securities got bailed out from public funds, and the bankers still received their mega bonuses.

Don't think you get rewarded in sailing for such screw ups.

And therein lies the connundrum :)

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18 minutes ago, MaxHugen said:

Don't think you get rewarded in sailing for such screw ups.

Well...inexplicably to many, some still keep getting hired. ;-)

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31 minutes ago, Kiwing said:

Enough is the secret.

Funny how I always find I could do with a little more though, Kiwing.

I guess billionaires feel the same, no?

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5 hours ago, EYESAILOR said:

Most of our junior sailors come from expensive yacht clubs with training programs paid for by well heeled parents

 

I’ve no personal experience of sailing in the USA but afaik, whereas UK sailing clubs aren’t on the whole nearly as expensive as in the USA, membership is firmly dominated by the affluent. What you don’t seem to have is the highly structured system to develop Olympic sailors who go on to the AC and elsewhere. To develop young international level sailors, it is that difference that needs to be addressed, rather than positing societal differences which are not necessarily real.

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3 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Funny how I always find I could do with a little more though, Kiwing.

I guess billionaires feel the same, no?

I would not know @Sailbydate.  But I know enough is plenty for me.  Just being lucky enough to live in NZ at the moment when a lot of billionaires can't is pretty good.

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55 minutes ago, dogwatch said:

I’ve no personal experience of sailing in the USA but afaik, whereas UK sailing clubs aren’t on the whole nearly as expensive as in the USA, membership is firmly dominated by the affluent. What you don’t seem to have is the highly structured system to develop Olympic sailors who go on to the AC and elsewhere. To develop young international level sailors, it is that difference that needs to be addressed, rather than positing societal differences which are not necessarily real.

Afraid the real issue in the US is the lack of support for adult athletic sailing - young sailors move from Optis to slow dinghies in college to the rail on keel boats

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2 hours ago, dogwatch said:

I’ve no personal experience of sailing in the USA but afaik, whereas UK sailing clubs aren’t on the whole nearly as expensive as in the USA, membership is firmly dominated by the affluent.

Our Club on the Sweetwater Seas costs about $1300 per year total for a 27 ft keeler. 

Stop by and we will get you on a boat !! 

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As a LR fan, I didn't appreciate much Bruni's & Spithill statements at the end of race 4. Bossy. Better to keep low-profile, this saves your reputation, in case of a defeat.

Apart from this, Ineos has a stronger afterguard, and manoeuvres are PERFECT,  see the impressibve enclosed video. It looks like tacks are controlled by an automated system. A gift from the McLaren-designd hydraulic system).

 

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So nothing  since the semi's ended prematurely  (fnarr, fnarr).

All they all taking a break?  Upgrading? Or our are local spies under the misapprehension that we pay them to have a few days off?

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Question: Would you rather be Prada, and have had the chance to test your performance against another boat, albeit a hobbled one, or would you rather be Ineos, who has had the chance to test and tune the entire time without the setup and ancillary time spent on racing?  I know the shore team and engineeers would prefer to be testing and sailing on their own schedule.  

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3 minutes ago, RMac said:

Question: Would you rather be Prada, and have had the chance to test your performance against another boat, albeit a hobbled one, or would you rather be Ineos, who has had the chance to test and tune the entire time without the setup and ancillary time spent on racing?  I know the shore team and engineeers would prefer to be testing and sailing on their own schedule.  

Easy one: GB.

They got more then enough data on race speeds, turns etc from the RRs. Racing off against AM was going to prove nothing (except maybe give you false confidence).

If what they are telling us is true that they had loads of mods backed up in the pipeline then doubly so.

 

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On the other hand, LR started with a faster platform, but more issues in handling and decision making on board - for those having a few more race days might actually have been more productive

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36 minutes ago, RMac said:

Question: Would you rather be Prada, and have had the chance to test your performance against another boat, albeit a hobbled one, or would you rather be Ineos, who has had the chance to test and tune the entire time without the setup and ancillary time spent on racing?  I know the shore team and engineeers would prefer to be testing and sailing on their own schedule.  

The teams are refining their boats and crew preparation, and the gains, while huge at the beginning will be smaller and smaller, towards the limits posed by their original design. The maximum number of possible foils, already reached, impedes any revolution. I think that for Prada it has been better to have more competition because they had things to adjust in their crew work and afterguard communication and tactics. For GB it has been better to have more time for development (in my opinion) since they had to rush after the disastrous Christmas race and on the other hand, already had perfect crew work with even better afterguard. So in the end I think both teams had the best choice.

I hope for good and close racing in the final.

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Interesting viewpoints, I guess I had only thought about it from the GB pov. I see the logic, but do you think AM tested them sufficiently to be sure that their new methods of working are robust under pressure?

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Just now, enigmatically2 said:

Interesting viewpoints, I guess I had only thought about it from the GB pov. I see the logic, but do you think AM tested them sufficiently to be sure that their new methods of working are robust under pressure?

Probably not, but it was evident that LR had to change something in their approach. Nobody knew the level of AM after the repairing, but before the capsize they were quite faster than LR in strong winds.and LR had huge pressure on them, because going home so soon would have been a disaster.  And I think that the new role of Sibello (who is a really great sailing talent) needed some more races to refine the interaction with the helmsmen.

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Thank you for the interesting responses.  My own feeling is the GB would have benefitted more.  For whatever reason, they seem to have had some much needed mods coming in just in time for the start of the Prada Cup. They seem to have a boat with decent top end that they've managed to get a handle on. They have already showed a very good system of communication loops during real racing, so I can imagine that having time to test hardware and software in a setting where they define the timing and pace was probably quite helpful.

For LR it does seem like the sailing in anger was beneficial, as they cleaned up their handling and comms so they can probably focus a bit more on racing instead of head-in the boat a bit.  Likewise racing with all the external stimulus present was probably beneficial; getting some close starts and crosses, figuring out weird details like the heli-puff, all probably helped, but keep in mind they have not been able to make as many changes to the boat, being constrained by measuring in and also all the extra time spent prepping and racing. 

My own guess is that both boats will be improved, with the bigger delta going to Ineos to win the final.  I feel like the proportion of light to heavy air will define the final scoreline, but hey then again we thought Amway was the strongest challenger going away so what do we know!

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On 02/02/2021 at 12:36 AM, Rhumline said:

Like your style Strider.  We New Zealanders sometimes get a bit full of ourselves.

That's for sure . Especially losers that sail at the Evans Bay boozeing club. 

A club where there are more drinkers than sailors.... Or the nearly dead RPNYC.

Wellington used to have quit a big fleet until the latest generation of idiots ruined it.

I hear now it's a harbours void of boats except for about 8 idiots in old trailer sailors.

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7 hours ago, enigmatically2 said:

So nothing  since the semi's ended prematurely  (fnarr, fnarr).

All they all taking a break?  Upgrading? Or our are local spies under the misapprehension that we pay them to have a few days off?

SPY DEPT. UPDATE: This morning AM have their crane up!

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7 hours ago, strider470 said:

The teams are refining their boats and crew preparation, and the gains, while huge at the beginning will be smaller and smaller, towards the limits posed by their original design. The maximum number of possible foils, already reached, impedes any revolution. I think that for Prada it has been better to have more competition because they had things to adjust in their crew work and afterguard communication and tactics. For GB it has been better to have more time for development (in my opinion) since they had to rush after the disastrous Christmas race and on the other hand, already had perfect crew work with even better afterguard. So in the end I think both teams had the best choice.

I hope for good and close racing in the final.

I mostly agree with this answer, but the one that proved otherwise was AC34 in San Francisco.  Oracle made such incredible gains in the final itself, that it was clear from about race 6 (IIRC) that Oracle would eventually overhaul ETNZ.  The gains being made - even if not reflected in the delta changes, were incredible to watch as OR learned to sail upwind on foils.   Given the early part of the cycle in this class - I think it's still possible for any team to crack a code somewhere that has not been investigated yet, to find some corner of moding, to make huge gains.  I don't think this Prada cup, nor Americas cup, is pre-ordained in terms of result.

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3 hours ago, aucklander said:

I mostly agree with this answer, but the one that proved otherwise was AC34 in San Francisco.  Oracle made such incredible gains in the final itself, that it was clear from about race 6 (IIRC) that Oracle would eventually overhaul ETNZ.  The gains being made - even if not reflected in the delta changes, were incredible to watch as OR learned to sail upwind on foils.   Given the early part of the cycle in this class - I think it's still possible for any team to crack a code somewhere that has not been investigated yet, to find some corner of moding, to make huge gains.  I don't think this Prada cup, nor Americas cup, is pre-ordained in terms of result.

Herbie??

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20 hours ago, RMac said:

Thank you for the interesting responses.  My own feeling is the GB would have benefitted more.  For whatever reason, they seem to have had some much needed mods coming in just in time for the start of the Prada Cup. They seem to have a boat with decent top end that they've managed to get a handle on. They have already showed a very good system of communication loops during real racing, so I can imagine that having time to test hardware and software in a setting where they define the timing and pace was probably quite helpful.

For LR it does seem like the sailing in anger was beneficial, as they cleaned up their handling and comms so they can probably focus a bit more on racing instead of head-in the boat a bit.  Likewise racing with all the external stimulus present was probably beneficial; getting some close starts and crosses, figuring out weird details like the heli-puff, all probably helped, but keep in mind they have not been able to make as many changes to the boat, being constrained by measuring in and also all the extra time spent prepping and racing. 

My own guess is that both boats will be improved, with the bigger delta going to Ineos to win the final.  I feel like the proportion of light to heavy air will define the final scoreline, but hey then again we thought Amway was the strongest challenger going away so what do we know!

I agree with the above. Ineos's sailors have already shown that with the right kit they do not need that much time to be able to tactically apply the boat. Certainly if they make substantive changes they are going to need time to achieve consistent boat handling. I believe that Ineos still has material improvements to come in terms of boat speed i.e. areas that they couldn't implement due to fundamental issues being addressed up to the round robin.

Assessing the knowns today, I remain to be convinced that LR have found addressed their boat handling, helm coordiation and tactical deficiencies. Basically we got to see 4 races in which LR were cruising, and never put under pressure in any real way, certainly nothing like the race with Ineos; in those circumstances, anyone can sail smoothly, communicate, pick shifts. I think we as outsiders we can hardly imagine how stressful it is each time these boats leave the start in terms of knowing whether your opposition has somehow pulled a rabbit out of the hat; once that pressure goes in the first minute, LR psychologically unburdened, and they start sailing like heros......for that reason, the first minutes/races against Ineos are going to be critical. If Ineos are competitive i.e. close to parity, then all the pressure is going to come back onto LR....If either of them have found a decisive edge, then so be it, well done them. If not, its going to be fascinating, but my money would be on Ineos.......because when it comes to sailing,,,,,,,Ben is er.....The Matrix.

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5 minutes ago, Chris UK said:

I agree with the above. Ineos's sailors have already shown that with the right kit they do not need that much time to be able to tactically apply the boat. Certainly if they make substantive changes they are going to need time to achieve consistent boat handling. I believe that Ineos still has material improvements to come in terms of boat speed i.e. areas that they couldn't implement due to fundamental issues being addressed up to the round robin.

Assessing the knowns today, I remain to be convinced that LR have found addressed their boat handling, helm coordiation and tactical deficiencies. Basically we got to see 4 races in which LR were cruising, and never put under pressure in any real way, certainly nothing like the race with Ineos; in those circumstances, anyone can sail smoothly, communicate, pick shifts. I think we as outsiders we can hardly imagine how stressful it is each time these boats leave the start in terms of knowing whether your opposition has somehow pulled a rabbit out of the hat; once that pressure goes in the first minute, LR psychologically unburdened, and they start sailing like heros......for that reason, the first minutes/races against Ineos are going to be critical. If Ineos are competitive i.e. close to parity, then all the pressure is going to come back onto LR....If either of them have found a decisive edge, then so be it, well done them. If not, its going to be fascinating, but my money would be on Ineos.......because when it comes to sailing,,,,,,,Ben is er.....The Matrix.

I hope LR has a performance edge because Ben is the best.

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Agreed, against all the opposition, i think if you give Ben, Giles and co a boat that has parity, or even very close to parity, I believe they can win. Their only Sail GP is a case in point. So I hope that the boats will be close and it will be down to how well they are sailed

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Just now, strider470 said:

Whoever will win the Prada Cup, what chance do you think will stand against ETNZ?

Again, parity is all GB need. And I think these boats are converging on similar performance faster than we might have expected. So I have hopes. But hopes rather than confidence

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It’s going to be fascinating to watch. Ben maybe better all round, Jimmy maybe better starter. LR probably a smoother progressing campaign but with a crew setup no-one much likes. Rita no-one knows how much progress she will have made: could be loads could be none but with a crew setup getting the most positive reviews. Both gone down same route with foils and maybe the hull designs are more similar than they first appear with Rita’s boxey shape and LR’s smooth lines and extra appendage achieving similar concept. 

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1 hour ago, idontwan2know said:

God, that site is horrible. Literally nothing has happened to justify the headline at all.

....slow sports week here in NZ!! But I do think they have a point, its all been very sweet and kind up to this point.....lets see what happens if things get tight in just under 8 days time!!

 

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3 minutes ago, **ONTOIT** said:

....slow sports week here in NZ!!

Yes, they are struggling to come up with material and tend to go for clickbait shit-fighting wherever they can smell a whiff of it. Am guessing the sport coverage in general down there tends that way? 
 

A few folks poked fun at a recent TV interview with guests ‘Sailing Professor’ Mark Orams and Phil Robertson but I thought it pretty good. 

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4 hours ago, Kiwing said:

There is good cricket news little old NZ is second in the world and might come to Lords to play the world final against India?

Confirmed world test championship finalists and (currently) with No1 world test ranking!

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1 hour ago, SCARECROW said:

if you want NZ sport news your should probably be discussing the fact that they're selling 15% of the All-blacks for ever!

no problem

wait till the cash is banked and call them the silver ferns

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1 hour ago, SCARECROW said:

if you want NZ sport news your should probably be discussing the fact that they're selling 15% of the All-blacks for ever!

It'll never happen in my lifetime...

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2 minutes ago, SCARECROW said:

probably still beat the Wallabies 3 times out of 4

so your saying it would cost them a lot of win's ?

 

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15%? So the yanks will own 2 and a quarter players. 2 props and one of the hooker's legs or something?

You may still beat the Aussies but i reckon Argentina would be feeling confident for the next championship

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16 minutes ago, enigmatically2 said:

15%? So the yanks will own 2 and a quarter players. 2 props and one of the hooker's legs or something?

You may still beat the Aussies but i reckon Argentina would be feeling confident for the next championship

The Argies will have to wait another 35 years if not longer for another dip in the well...

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21 minutes ago, Chris UK said:

......

He says the strength of the British team, who have already beaten the Italians three times in a row, is in their sailing skills, something that was very obvious in the round-robin phase. “I don’t think the Ineos guys necessarily had the best or the fastest boat out there,” he said. “They had some really tricky conditions and those guys were just sailing really, really well.

“I give a heap of credit to Ben and Giles for the way they managed the racecourse and managed the starts, and all the guys on board for how well they were sailing the boat compared with two or three weeks before that.”

The key to the outcome against Italy, Goodison believes, may be the choice of racecourse each day by the regatta director, the 62-year-old Australian veteran America’s Cup sailor Iain Murray. Each day he will select from five course areas, choosing the one that offers the best prospect of fair racing based on the wind forecast.

If the Prada Cup final is predominantly staged on the more inshore courses on the Hauraki Gulf, which are surrounded by land and feature streaky and shifty winds, then Goodison believes the British team will out-sail the Italians. However, if the courses farther out to sea are used, where the breeze is more stable, then the Italians may be able to impose themselves in a boatspeed contest.

.....

As to whether any of the challengers can beat TNZ, Goodison says he still believes the Kiwis have the edge in performance terms on all their rivals and may yet still have one more foil upgrade to come, which is a worrying thought. But he believes that the crew skippered by Peter Burling will inevitably suffer from not having raced against another boat for many weeks by the time the Cup match starts.

“I think they will have a speed advantage when it comes to the Cup, but I think they will be at a big disadvantage from the lack of racing they have done. I can see either Ben or Jimmy [Spithill, co-helm of Luna Rossa] giving them a really hard time in the starts. They will be difficult to beat, but whoever comes out of the Prada Cup final will be well-prepared to race well against them.”

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