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Worst anchor design I've ever seen


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Those are called river anchors. I see lots of them advertised on CL here for people fishing on the Fraser.

I have no idea why they are designed like that but they seem to be the preferred style for the river.

Something to do with a silty bottom maybe?

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I have no idea why they are designed like that but they seem to be the preferred style for the river.

Something to do with a silty bottom maybe?

Maybe the river bottom has been machined with slots to fit those anchors

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This is what we use on our mostly, slow moving, muddy bottomed rivers and Broads

image.jpeg.db0d279768345c7b72bee7b2e283f802.jpeg

 

or if attaching to a river bank, use a Rhond anchor, you swing it like an axe to get the point into the grass, if that doesn't work you hammer the flat at the bend till it does..

See the source image

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In an muddy environment the forces you can achieve from suction are bigger than what you can get from letting a hook dig in.

I believe that some oil rigs standing on the bottom of the sea rely on the same principles.

Like trying to walk in quicksand - it sucks.

 

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It may be that some of these anchors are not intended to do what sailboat anchors typically do... hold the boat in a fixed place. Fishing anchors just hold the boat bow into the current and let the boat drag slowly downstream while you cast.

FB- Doug

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6 hours ago, silversurfer said:

In an muddy environment the forces you can achieve from suction are bigger than what you can get from letting a hook dig in.

I believe that some oil rigs standing on the bottom of the sea rely on the same principles.

Like trying to walk in quicksand - it sucks.

 

There are zero similarities between the advertised "anchors" and SEPLA's or suction piles

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On 1/6/2021 at 12:52 AM, The Q said:

This is what we use on our mostly, slow moving, muddy bottomed rivers and Broads

image.jpeg.db0d279768345c7b72bee7b2e283f802.jpeg

 

 

All the hardware I have that looks like that is 1” in diameter.  OK, some of it is 1 1/8”........

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I didn't realize there was a use case for these at all. I just think of anchor as something you use cruising. So you want something that won't drag on the sea floor.

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On 1/6/2021 at 12:52 AM, The Q said:

This is what we use on our mostly, slow moving, muddy bottomed rivers and Broads

image.jpeg.db0d279768345c7b72bee7b2e283f802.jpeg

I remember the mud-weight as a child on Norfolk Broads holidays.  My job was to get it clean before hoisting it on deck.  And then scrubbing the inevitably filthy deck with several buckets of water as we moved off. 

That's when I learned how properly to tie the line to the bucket handle, and how to tie a figure eight in the end.  And not to wrap the bucket line round your hand else your little body went overboard when the bucket filled with water.  Happy days.

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On 1/6/2021 at 2:52 AM, The Q said:

or if attaching to a river bank, use a Rhond anchor, you swing it like an axe to get the point into the grass, if that doesn't work you hammer the flat at the bend till it does..

See the source image

Look like evidence in a murder investigation

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10 hours ago, P_Wop said:

I remember the mud-weight as a child on Norfolk Broads holidays.  My job was to get it clean before hoisting it on deck.  And then scrubbing the inevitably filthy deck with several buckets of water as we moved off. 

That's when I learned how properly to tie the line to the bucket handle, and how to tie a figure eight in the end.  And not to wrap the bucket line round your hand else your little body went overboard when the bucket filled with water.  Happy days.

A simpler way is you hoist it up to just below the water line, then start moving and let the water wash the mud off..

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14 hours ago, Amati said:

All the hardware I have that looks like that is 1” in diameter.  OK, some of it is 1 1/8”........

The main barrel is normally 6 to 9 inch in diameter,

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2 hours ago, sailronin said:

I find that a '57 Buick makes a great mooring...

A friend got anchored by his Backstay  to a BMW... We both had our masts down as we paddled under a Bridge. his back stay got caught until they reversed a bit and tried again. (We were in Yeoman Class keelboats )

A later investigation by a diving team found a BMW  that had been stolen reported missing about 5 years before.., the damage to the roof of the BMW indicates it had been hit by keels and Motor cruiser hulls many times..

There's a spot nearby where it could have been pushed off the road..

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7 hours ago, The Q said:

A simpler way is you hoist it up to just below the water line, then start moving and let the water wash the mud off..

I tried that, but as you know the Norfolk Broads mud can be incredibly sticky stuff and didn't all come off.  Also having the weight bonking against the hull in the bow-wave wasn't much appreciated by the skipper (my dad).

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19 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

I tried that, but as you know the Norfolk Broads mud can be incredibly sticky stuff and didn't all come off.  Also having the weight bonking against the hull in the bow-wave wasn't much appreciated by the skipper (my dad).

And lets be realistic, on a broads holiday finding extra stuff for the kids to do is part of the fun for the parents :). The number of 'essential' tasks I had to do as a kid on cruising holidays was shocking, as a parent I'm convinced that 80% of the essential element was to keep me occupied...

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On 1/6/2021 at 12:52 AM, The Q said:

This is what we use on our mostly, slow moving, muddy bottomed rivers and Broads

image.jpeg.db0d279768345c7b72bee7b2e283f802.jpeg

 

 

The 7/8” version

1A313B6B-E057-4282-AC5E-45F9A8427C4B.jpeg

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11 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

WOW!!! 2 Large Vintage Cast Iron Steam Radiators - Detroit original 

You ever tried to pick up one of those MoFo's?

It would make a good mooring anchor.

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20 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

You ever tried to pick up one of those MoFo's?

It would make a good mooring anchor.

what my brother and his neighbors use for their floating docks on a lake in Vermont.

Work really well.

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On 1/7/2021 at 4:12 PM, Navig8tor said:

Great for mooring but fugly on your bow roller especially once they rust.

Nhaaa, you use an aluminum big block...  ;<)

https://donovanengines.com/donovan-engineering-aluminum-big-block/

 

image.png.00c48eb801bc5ab34d7d0dedf179da5a.png

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6 minutes ago, retroSail said:

My mooring I built last summer. Was a bitch to move.

IMG_0176.jpg

Well. "Easy To Move" is really.... REALLY!! ... not on the list of top features for a mooring.

;)

FB- Doug

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Among the other random junk being sold on Craigslist as "boat anchors"

01212_kJLs34qE9DT_07K0ak_600x450.jpg

https://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/bpo/d/portland-drift-boat-anchor/7259726554.html

 

There are always tons of grapple-style "river anchors" on the PDX ads.  One came with my boat, but I've never used it.  The fishermen have a technique with a buoy and block such that they gun the motor to lift the anchor and tow it to a new location then drop it again without ever pulling it in to the boat.  It doesn't get "set" like you would for a traditional anchor.  There are vids on YouTube explaining how to do it.    It can be a little disconcerting, when you try to tack past the end of a hog line that you assume is stationary. Then all of a sudden, they're off and running and towing crap across your  path.  Most of them are a bit more sophisticated than the ones in the OP - some homemade varieties are made from old car springs.  

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2 hours ago, Al Paca said:

Canada. First bullrails, now this. Way to go guy. 

Those are not exclusively Canadian - they have them on the Columbia as well.

We need to get some river fishermen on here to explain them to us.

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5 hours ago, toddster said:

Among the other random junk being sold on Craigslist as "boat anchors"

01212_kJLs34qE9DT_07K0ak_600x450.jpg

https://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/bpo/d/portland-drift-boat-anchor/7259726554.html

For those of you living in tropical climes... Florida, Queensland, southwestern BC... those are tire chains, used to drive on icy roads.

They aren't cheap, but what happens is you buy a set for your vehicle, and then when you get another vehicle, it has different sized tires, so you buy a new set of chains. Doesn't take long before you have a garageful of them, and start dreaming up ways to repurpose them.

It has been raining onto snow here for a day and a half. When it freezes up again, it will be like someone zambonied the world. Chains will be essential.

 

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We only a few left, back in the late 1970s early 80s, the UK shoe manufacturing industry was collapsing , there were many big manufacturers in Norwich, now there's just a couple of specialist makers left. Quite a few members worked in the big companies, and brought to them to the  club as scrap.

If you went magnet fishing there's a few in the river and broads mud where the ropes failed or got cut when run over..

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15 hours ago, mcmurdo said:

For those of you living in tropical climes... Florida, Queensland, southwestern BC... those are tire chains, used to drive on icy roads.

They aren't cheap, but what happens is you buy a set for your vehicle, and then when you get another vehicle, it has different sized tires, so you buy a new set of chains. Doesn't take long before you have a garageful of them, and start dreaming up ways to repurpose them.

It has been raining onto snow here for a day and a half. When it freezes up again, it will be like someone zambonied the world. Chains will be essential.

 

When I sell a vehicle, I wait until the buyer starts trying to haggle about the price.  Then I bring out the tire chains - and progressively, other spares and parts, shop manuals, etc. that are of no further use to me. “Here! I’ll throw this in for free, but I really can’t go any lower on price.”

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On 1/13/2021 at 12:12 PM, toddster said:
On 1/12/2021 at 8:27 PM, mcmurdo said:

For those of you living in tropical climes... Florida, Queensland, southwestern BC... those are tire chains, used to drive on icy roads.

They aren't cheap, but what happens is you buy a set for your vehicle, and then when you get another vehicle, it has different sized tires, so you buy a new set of chains. Doesn't take long before you have a garageful of them, and start dreaming up ways to repurpose them.

It has been raining onto snow here for a day and a half. When it freezes up again, it will be like someone zambonied the world. Chains will be essential.

 

When I sell a vehicle, I wait until the buyer starts trying to haggle about the price.  Then I bring out the tire chains - and progressively, other spares and parts, shop manuals, etc. that are of no further use to me. “Here! I’ll throw this in for free, but I really can’t go any lower on price.”

Bingo

I have run out of patience with people who think they are master negotiators. Basically they are just arguing for the sake of negation, and because it leaves them with more pennies in the pocket. "You really want to buy a car?" Yes. "Then go buy a different one, because you're not buying this one."

Of course I'm in the luxurious position of not NEEDing to sell. But I've had the same thing play out selling boats, where it's assumed that the equipment of the boat goes with it, but of course I have a lot of 'stuff' that could go with it. I sold a very nice small (on a trailer) daysailer and pointed out that at the price the buyer wanted to give me, he would not be getting any of the equipment beyond the minimum lines and hardware actually fastened to the boat. He said "I've already got a garage full of boat stuff." So money and the boat changed hands. The very next weekend he was back to try and wheedle me out of the fenders that actually stowed on the boat, a drifter/cruising spinnaker (and the lines for it), the battery, the boom crutch, etc etc. Because all that stuff, if bought, would have cost a lot more than the amount he beat me down on the boat price.

I was busy with chores and said "No." Then when he tried to follow me around, arguing, I said "I'm working. You don't have any business on my property. Please leave."

But I was glad to get that boat out of the side yard because I already had another one in mind.

BTW I have lived in the south eastern US most of my life but have been around enough to know what tire chains are. ^_^

- DSK

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On 1/7/2021 at 10:42 AM, ROADKILL666 said:

0F301C31-B22B-4DE7-8C7A-F95C0B76E9DC.jpeg.0ee6fdcd2276d0f426015d7e686089ab.jpeg

Set one of those in a muddy/silty harbor as a mooring and it didn't budge an inch with a 36' sailboat on it in 60+ breezes.  1 1/2" chain through the cylinders, some swivels and and good to "not go" anywhere.

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