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The USA needs to spend lot more on mental health care.....

Qnuts , are against underage sex trafficking , except it's a GOP  politician ie: Gaetz  then it's OK

If it was me she'd probably be missing some teeth. What fucking scum.

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here is a link to the newest article by my friend at Paste. He is writing a once monthly article to keep people up to date on the latest psycotreason from the Anons (what they call themselves)
 

https://www.pastemagazine.com/politics/qanon/qanon-conspiracy-theories-vaccines-covid-latest-march-20/?fbclid=IwAR2p7TwdJmx30rlfqfTLvQW_qLffuxbBqrGxFetXV6yEj6aEYXMr69sIVkQ#the-painful-cognitive-dissonance-of-q-believers

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21 minutes ago, 2slow said:

here is a link to the newest article by my friend at Paste. He is writing a once monthly article to keep people up to date on the latest psycotreason from the Anons (what they call themselves)
 

https://www.pastemagazine.com/politics/qanon/qanon-conspiracy-theories-vaccines-covid-latest-march-20/?fbclid=IwAR2p7TwdJmx30rlfqfTLvQW_qLffuxbBqrGxFetXV6yEj6aEYXMr69sIVkQ#the-painful-cognitive-dissonance-of-q-believers

Nice work there.  "Dispatches from Q-Land". Classic.  Similar nomenclature to Michael Yon's feel-good Dispatches from Iraq, albeit with a reality based view of fantasy, instead of a fantasy based view of reality. 

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55 minutes ago, 2slow said:

here is a link to the newest article by my friend at Paste. He is writing a once monthly article to keep people up to date on the latest psycotreason from the Anons (what they call themselves)
 

https://www.pastemagazine.com/politics/qanon/qanon-conspiracy-theories-vaccines-covid-latest-march-20/?fbclid=IwAR2p7TwdJmx30rlfqfTLvQW_qLffuxbBqrGxFetXV6yEj6aEYXMr69sIVkQ#the-painful-cognitive-dissonance-of-q-believers

Good read.  Doggy in steroids.  "Change your user name to Traitor or go back to twitter and keep sucking on china joes cock and be with your soy boy libertard friends...."  You can't make this shit up.  From their own elk at that...  

 

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22 minutes ago, shaggy said:
1 hour ago, 2slow said:

here is a link to the newest article by my friend at Paste. He is writing a once monthly article to keep people up to date on the latest psycotreason from the Anons (what they call themselves)
 

https://www.pastemagazine.com/politics/qanon/qanon-conspiracy-theories-vaccines-covid-latest-march-20/?fbclid=IwAR2p7TwdJmx30rlfqfTLvQW_qLffuxbBqrGxFetXV6yEj6aEYXMr69sIVkQ#the-painful-cognitive-dissonance-of-q-believers

Good read.  Doggy in steroids.  "Change your user name to Traitor or go back to twitter and keep sucking on china joes cock and be with your soy boy libertard friends...."  You can't make this shit up.  From their own elk at that...  

Sure. They're like a bunch of 11 year old mean girls, one of whom has just expressed dislike for their favorite boy band.

Odd for a bunch of "independent thinkers" who also love to rally under the banner "Where we go 1, we go all"

unless you see thru the sham and realize that they are just childish assholes.

If they ever did actually form an army, within a couple of days they'd start shooting each other.

- DSK

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1 minute ago, Steam Flyer said:

If they ever did actually form an army, within a couple of days they'd start shooting each other.

The true q storm??

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1 hour ago, 2slow said:

here is a link to the newest article by my friend at Paste. He is writing a once monthly article to keep people up to date on the latest psycotreason from the Anons (what they call themselves)
 

https://www.pastemagazine.com/politics/qanon/qanon-conspiracy-theories-vaccines-covid-latest-march-20/?fbclid=IwAR2p7TwdJmx30rlfqfTLvQW_qLffuxbBqrGxFetXV6yEj6aEYXMr69sIVkQ#the-painful-cognitive-dissonance-of-q-believers

Thanks for that, it's enlightening.

One word to your friend:

Quote

Getting riled up about “censorship” (while also calling for public executions of their enemies and expecting no consequences for it) has always been a QAnon tenant

The correct word is "tenet".

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:
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Getting riled up about “censorship” (while also calling for public executions of their enemies and expecting no consequences for it) has always been a QAnon tenant

The correct word is "tenet".

Maybe the author was referring to David Tennant?

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It bears asking what created the conditions for something like Q to exist and flourish.  I submit that it is western world disillusionment with life, resulting in a search for some greater meaning, and belonging.  Perhaps being a Christian as many Q's are just isn't enough anymore, or perhaps the Joel Osteens of the world have removed the meaning from being Christian. 

Or, maybe these people are just stupid and gullible.  Or all the above.

I bet Q has no traction in Asia, Europe, Africa or South or Central America.  Not sure about Australia and NZ.  It does exist up here in Canada, surprisingly.

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1 hour ago, Rain Man said:

It bears asking what created the conditions for something like Q to exist and flourish.  I submit that it is western world disillusionment with life, resulting in a search for some greater meaning, and belonging.  Perhaps being a Christian as many Q's are just isn't enough anymore, or perhaps the Joel Osteens of the world have removed the meaning from being Christian. 

Or, maybe these people are just stupid and gullible.  Or all the above.

I bet Q has no traction in Asia, Europe, Africa or South or Central America.  Not sure about Australia and NZ.  It does exist up here in Canada, surprisingly.

We have our share of whack jobs, but it's a very small share compared to the people on the other side of the border hedge.

lynn-beyak.jpg

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https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-03-18/post-trump-qanon-conspiracy-side-effects-divide-families

Evelyn, whose husband has been gone for two months, isn’t sure if anything can fix the past year for her family. 

“Everyone just tells me I should change the locks on the house and file for divorce, and I am not willing to do that yet,” she said. “I keep praying he comes out of this somehow.”

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QAnon now pushes alarming conspiracy myths targeting China and Jewish people

Experts on extremism are warning about a troubling shift in the right-wing QAnon movement toward a new vein of conspiracy that blends anti-Chinese and anti-Jewish tropes with fears of vaccines and a global plot to take over the world.

Broadly collected under the idea of a “new world order,” it’s a QAnon rebranding, said researcher Joel Finkelstein, director of Rutgers University’s Network Contagion Research Institute, allowing conspiracy theorists to pivot after a year of political upheaval, scrutiny and disappointing predictions. 

It marks a shift from the wild lies the movement spread before the election and in subsequent efforts to keep former President Trump in office, even after he lost to Joe Biden. Finkelstein and others said the switch, and the emphasis on suspicion toward Asians and Jews, could lead to more violence.

Following the November election, Finkelstein, Miller-Idriss and other extremism trackers noticed a shift in memes and codes words used by conspiracy peddlers. They appeared to be seizing upon a decades-old fear that tumultuous events in people’s lives — such as the pandemic and its subsequent lockdowns — are part of a master plan to subjugate the masses and replace legal norms with the totalitarian rule of a select few. 

Those who study extremism said the transition by QAnon story peddlers is expected, but also signals that lies, racism and propaganda in American politics will continue to have staying power. 

It is a “large tent of distrust of government and authority” that allows for “a variety of followers who oftentimes have general fears and grievances but not necessarily more specific types of commonalities,” said Brian Levin, professor of criminal justice and director of the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino. 

“It really creates an attractive opportunity for extremists to ensconce themselves into divisive, emotionally charged issues where they can focus on the grievances and the villain and not necessarily their own baggage,” Levin said. “QAnon is like a newt’s tail. It can constantly reconstitute itself.”

____

Levin said conspiratorial politics are growing not just at the national level, but in state and local issues as well. Finkelstein’s group recently found that Southern California is “the hottest of hot spots,” when it comes to such conspiracy.

The reasons why some Southern Californians have latched onto new world order rhetoric are complex. Finkelstein’s organization found a correlation between places with high incidence of both Black Lives Matter activity and what he terms as pushback against it in the form of anti-mask, anti-lockdown rallies — a mix that fed new world order activity online. Los Angeles County had the greatest abundance of both types of protests, followed by San Diego and Orange counties.

“Where the Black Lives Matter protesters showed up, the quarantine became sort of a counter-cause,” he said. “This idea that ‘we are the ones being victimized.’”

Mia Bloom, professor of Communication at Georgia State University and an expert on QAnon, also pointed out that Southern California is a hotbed of wellness culture, where anti-vaccine sentiment has found a foothold. Last summer, conspiracy theories jumped to Instagram, she said, where women previously more interested in lifestyle content were drawn in, creating an unlikely bridge between liberal and conservative movements.

Aside from the Capitol insurrection in January, QAnon believers have been implicated in more than a dozen acts of violence across the United States, and hate crimes against Asian Americans have surged. As virus restrictions ease, the pent-up vitriol of online politics will likely spill elsewhere. 

“It’s not just a prospect,” said Miller-Idriss. “It’s a reality.”

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'Nobody actually died': QAnon fans already claiming Boulder mass shooting is a false flag

'Nobody actually died': QAnon fans already claiming Boulder mass shooting is a false flag

 

"'No question Boulder, Co incident today was a false flag. The only question is by which side?,' one QAnon profile, who has more than 260,000 subscribers on Telegram, wrote. 'False flag means it's fake. Nobody actually died. Was this false flag to try and take your guns or scare the s**t out of you?'"

"An account with more than 58,000 Telegram followers added: 'This Boulder situation reeks of false flag. Anons will pick this apart in a matter of hours if it is,'" continued the report. "Another Telegram user wrote: 'Nobody died. I was there for an actual shooting. This was 100% fake fake.'"

https://www.rawstory.com/boulder-shooting-2651180367/

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fairly sure you would be taken to task in Oz for that sort of shit .

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3 hours ago, Mid said:

fairly sure you would be taken to task in Oz for that sort of shit .

There may be ramifications for bullshitting of that sort here in the US too. Watch how the Alex Jones Sandy Hook trial plays out. He does great on the airwaves, slinging bullshit to bullshitters, but he has not done so well in court yet. Bullshit doesn’t play so well in the room where people have to take the oath. 

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A summary of Reich's "The Mass Psychology of Fascism" seems relevant these days:

"Nazism systematically manipulated the collective unconscious. A repressive family, a baneful religion, a sadistic educational system, the terrorism of the party, fear of economic manipulation, fear of racial contamination, and permitted violence against minorities all operated in and through individuals' (the collective) unconscious psychology of emotions, traumatic experiences, fantasies, libidinal economies, and so on, and Nazi political ideology and practice exacerbated and exploited these tendencies.[5]"

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6 hours ago, Sol Rosenberg said:

There may be ramifications for bullshitting of that sort here in the US too. Watch how the Alex Jones Sandy Hook trial plays out. He does great on the airwaves, slinging bullshit to bullshitters, but he has not done so well in court yet. Bullshit doesn’t play so well in the room where people have to take the oath. 

"No reasonable person should believe what Alex Jones says."

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2 minutes ago, Nice! said:

"No reasonable person should believe what Alex Jones says."

That will be an interesting dance when questions get asked about candor toward the tribunal. 

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20 minutes ago, Sol Rosenberg said:

That will be an interesting dance when questions get asked about candor toward the tribunal. 

It worked for Tucker, so it's going to become the go-to defense for the whole lot of them. At least until somebody loses with it - hopefully Ms Powell.

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12 minutes ago, Nice! said:

It worked for Tucker, so it's going to become the go-to defense for the whole lot of them. At least until somebody loses with it - hopefully Ms Powell.

Exactly.  He's a television bullshitter, and Foxy News used that as a defense. Sidney is an attorney who owes a duty of candor to the court.  By making that argument she just admitted that she breached that line. Good luck keeping her license. It might keep her from having to pay damages, but it might not. The reasonable person may have a different expectation of the President's attorneys than of a television bullshit spreader. And Rule 11 applies to cost her money for raising bullshit claims in court. I'm drafting a 57.105 Motion, or I was before fucking off and looking here, to address a bullshitting attorney at this very moment. That's Florida's version of Rule 11. 

Bullshitters have a tough time in court, but not so much outside of it. 

Re Fox's dismissal, there's also a difference in who committed the defamation. Foxy just gave the bad guy a platform and called him an entertainer. In this case, Sidney is no entertainer (except perhaps to lawyers, when she is in court), and she is the one doing the damage. It will be an interesting case to watch. 

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“After January 6, the QAnon brand was badly tarnished," DUH

 

Why QAnon Followers Are Suddenly Saying There's No Such Thing as QAnon

A lot of recent negative media attention has led to some backpedaling. 

By David Gilbert 
March 24, 2021, 10:01am 

The conspiracy movement QAnon has been around for nearly four years, and it’s never been more popular. But QAnon influencers and their followers now appear to be disavowing the group, telling anyone who’ll listen that “there is no QAnon.” 

At first glance, this might seem like members of QAnon are finally coming to their senses and realizing that former President Donald Trump will not return to power any minute to unmask a Satanic, child sex-trafficking ring run by liberal elites. But the reality is that surface-level QAnon disavowal is an effort by high-profile influencers to distance the conspiracy theory from the past few months of negative media coverage. 

“After January 6, the QAnon brand was badly tarnished," the anonymous founder of the Q Origins Project, which seeks to document how the movement came about, told VICE News. He added that by "claiming that QAnon was never really a thing," believers were trying to get rid of their bad reputation. But QAnon members seem to have forgotten that they’ve been referring to themselves both in name and ideology as “QAnon” for years, before the label became toxic. 

The name “QAnon” has been used since the anonymous leader “Q” first appeared on the message board 4chan. “Q” was the poster, and the “anons” were the anonymous 4chan users who followed the posts. Since then, the name has been used to describe not just the person posting the cryptic messages but also the wider movement, which relies on followers’ interpretations of Q’s clues, something previously unseen in conspiracy movements. 

more 
https://www.vice.com/en/article/88azmv/why-qanon-followers-are-suddenly-saying-theres-no-such-thing-as-qanon 

 

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3 hours ago, Sol Rosenberg said:

Exactly.  He's a television bullshitter, and Foxy News used that as a defense. Sidney is an attorney who owes a duty of candor to the court.  By making that argument she just admitted that she breached that line. Good luck keeping her license. It might keep her from having to pay damages, but it might not. The reasonable person may have a different expectation of the President's attorneys than of a television bullshit spreader. And Rule 11 applies to cost her money for raising bullshit claims in court. I'm drafting a 57.105 Motion, or I was before fucking off and looking here, to address a bullshitting attorney at this very moment. That's Florida's version of Rule 11. 

Bullshitters have a tough time in court, but not so much outside of it. 

Re Fox's dismissal, there's also a difference in who committed the defamation. Foxy just gave the bad guy a platform and called him an entertainer. In this case, Sidney is no entertainer (except perhaps to lawyers, when she is in court), and she is the one doing the damage. It will be an interesting case to watch. 

  The two notions that seem to have shaped this pretzel appear to me to be: One, if she maintains she still honestly, truly, cross-her-heart-and-hopes-to-die still believes in this stuff she can claim she is protected by the 1st Amendment, and two: One does not need a license to practice law on FOX News.  

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Batshit crazy, Rick bottom, etc.

Q nitwits are claiming that the ship stuck in the Suez Canal is being used by Hilary Clinton to traffic children as part of a sex ring.

If these people wrote fiction they would get rich.

https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/politics/a35927083/suez-canal-ship-qanon-hillary-clinton/

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1. They are writing fiction.

2. But it's bad fiction with plenty of plot holes that only morons would believe. Occam wouldn't get a blade anywhere near most of this bovine excrement.

3. Morons don't buy books, therefore not much profit in writing bullshit. 

4. The profit is to be made in RWNJ radio, podcasts, and tee vee for dumshits (AKA Fox News). 

 

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Why QAnon Flopped in Japan

For over 40 years, Japan’s leading purveyor of shadowy phenomena, Mu magazine, has peddled Bigfoot, U.F.O.s and the occult to a ravenous fan base. Alien civilizations and the biology of the Loch Ness Monster have been popular cover stories. A conspiracy theory doesn’t quite arrive in the country without a nod from the monthly publication.

Yet Mu, with almost 60,000 readers and devotees including a former prime minister, a celebrated anime director and J-Pop idols, held back from publishing the obvious feature on the era’s biggest conspiracy theory: QAnon.

That movement hit peak notoriety with the storming of the U.S. Capitol in January, and its baseless core narrative became widely familiar during the coronavirus pandemic. Its followers are convinced that a cabal of Satan-worshipping, child-molesting elites controls the world, unleashing Covid-19 and 5G technology as part of its plot. QAnon has found believers in more than 70 countries, from British mums against child trafficking to anti-lockdown marchers in Germany and even an Australian wellness guru.

But it flopped in Japan, a country that’s no stranger to conspiracy theories. Even as Western media has portrayed otherwise, there are hardly any Q followers among the Japanese and it has failed the test for the nation’s conspiracy connoisseurs. “It’s too naïve for our readership,” Takeharu Mikami, the editor of Mu since 2005, told the Asahi Shimbun newspaper last month.

Screen Shot 2021-03-26 at 11.47.04 AM.jpg

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9 minutes ago, hobie1616 said:

“It’s too naïve for our readership,” Takeharu Mikami, the editor of Mu since 2005, told the Asahi Shimbun newspaper last month.

It's too naïve for any rational person over three. I guess that's why its adherents seem to be drooling idiots.

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1 minute ago, Ishmael said:

It's too naïve for any rational person over three. I guess that's why its adherents seem to be drooling idiots.

Seem to be?

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Q-morans are just Foxy followers who will believe anything as long as the story has a Clinton or some other prominent democRAT playing the villain. 

Drink this and we'll all zoom into the tail of the comet and catch the Clintons in the act!

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On 3/26/2021 at 1:15 AM, Sol Rosenberg said:

Meeting of the Q Minds. 

7EDF5F49-3A5C-44D4-978C-923AC105556D.jpeg

And he smokes menthol Camels! These people are sick!

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Michael Flynn's family members file $75M lawsuit against CNN over QAnon video

Two family members of Michael Flynn, Donald Trump's short-lived national security adviser turned conspiracy-theory firebrand, filed a $75 million lawsuit Thursday against CNN, accusing the cable network of besmirching their reputations. This comes in response to CNN's accurate reporting on the Flynn family's recitation of a far-right, QAnon-associated pledge called "Oath of the Digital Soldier," which Flynn posted to Twitter last July 4.

Jack Flynn and his wife Leslie — Michael Flynn's brother and sister-in-law — claim in the 20-page lawsuit that CNN tarnished their reputation by reporting that the Flynn family recited the pledge, which featured the infamous QAnon slogan, "Where we go one, we go all" (often rendered on the internet as "WWG1WGA"). According to the lawsuit, "members of the Flynn family, including plaintiffs, took an oath to the United States Constitution, the same oath taken by members of Congress," although it far more closely resembled the QAnon oath than the oath of office sworn by elected officials.

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On 3/24/2021 at 7:16 AM, Sol Rosenberg said:

There may be ramifications for bullshitting of that sort here in the US too. Watch how the Alex Jones Sandy Hook trial plays out. He does great on the airwaves, slinging bullshit to bullshitters, but he has not done so well in court yet. Bullshit doesn’t play so well in the room where people have to take the oath. 

Made me look up how the trial is going.  Thank you.

I didn't know you could lose hundreds of thousands, before the trial even starts, like that.  Just by losing enough of your own preliminary motions.  

Must admit, he's creative.   

 

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11 hours ago, frenchie said:

Made me look up how the trial is going.  Thank you.

I didn't know you could lose hundreds of thousands, before the trial even starts, like that.  Just by losing enough of your own preliminary motions.  

Must admit, he's creative.   

 

You'll want to check out how is custody trial went after his divorce. Specifically, what he claimed under oath about his on-air persona.

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Wait till you see the class action suit the frogs are going to bang him with. They're planning to sink his bachelor pad right out from under him and leave him swimming in debt. 

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The Qnuts have been obsessed with the ship that was stuck in the Suez, it's full of girls being sex trafficked - and while I was wondering my usual WTF found it it's because:

EVERGREEN is the SS codename for Hillary.  YCMTSU.  I have decided to include this in my new book

Conspiracies for Dummies - soon to be available in dumpsters everywhere.

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1 hour ago, d'ranger said:

The Qnuts have been obsessed with the ship that was stuck in the Suez, it's full of girls being sex trafficked - and while I was wondering my usual WTF found it it's because:

EVERGREEN is the SS codename for Hillary.  YCMTSU.  I have decided to include this in my new book

Conspiracies for Dummies - soon to be available in dumpsters everywhere.

Evergreen Recycling Solutions, LLC - Newark, New Jersey | ProView

Tried to find one on fire...  LOL

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On 3/31/2021 at 12:48 AM, frenchie said:

Made me look up how the trial is going.  Thank you.

I didn't know you could lose hundreds of thousands, before the trial even starts, like that.  Just by losing enough of your own preliminary motions.  

Must admit, he's creative.   

 

Poor Alex.  It seems the US Supreme Court is not a bullshitter-friendly venue. 

https://thehill.com/regulation/court-battles/546485-supreme-court-declines-to-hear-alex-jones-appeal-in-sandy-hook-case 

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On 3/31/2021 at 11:50 AM, d'ranger said:

The Qnuts have been obsessed with the ship that was stuck in the Suez, it's full of girls being sex trafficked - and while I was wondering my usual WTF found it it's because:

EVERGREEN is the SS codename for Hillary.  YCMTSU.  I have decided to include this in my new book

Conspiracies for Dummies - soon to be available in dumpsters everywhere.

When does gossip become conspiracy??

When it’s on the web!
 

(Many people are saying that Q is into blow up dolls! :rolleyes:)

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On 3/26/2021 at 9:19 PM, hobie1616 said:

Michael Flynn's family members file $75M lawsuit against CNN over QAnon video

Two family members of Michael Flynn, Donald Trump's short-lived national security adviser turned conspiracy-theory firebrand, filed a $75 million lawsuit Thursday against CNN, accusing the cable network of besmirching their reputations. This comes in response to CNN's accurate reporting on the Flynn family's recitation of a far-right, QAnon-associated pledge called "Oath of the Digital Soldier," which Flynn posted to Twitter last July 4.

Jack Flynn and his wife Leslie — Michael Flynn's brother and sister-in-law — claim in the 20-page lawsuit that CNN tarnished their reputation by reporting that the Flynn family recited the pledge, which featured the infamous QAnon slogan, "Where we go one, we go all" (often rendered on the internet as "WWG1WGA"). According to the lawsuit, "members of the Flynn family, including plaintiffs, took an oath to the United States Constitution, the same oath taken by members of Congress," although it far more closely resembled the QAnon oath than the oath of office sworn by elected officials.

So by suing, if they win, Q anon will be legally judged bad?  
 

Immoral?  

Illegal?  

Cognitive dissonance as a legal tool?  :lol:  Yeah, baby!

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On 3/26/2021 at 11:58 AM, Ishmael said:

It's too naïve for any rational person over three. I guess that's why its adherents seem to be drooling idiots.

Nah.  They are sharp cookies!  They overthink low hanging fruit.

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QAnon HBO docuseries 'Into The Storm' is scary to watch.

I'd bet that most Qnutters are also bible thumpers!

If you can believe in genesis, immaculate conception, imaginary beings in the sky, prayer, walking on water, parting seas and resurrection then believing in insane conspiracies is not a big leap!

Faith gives one the ability to willfully suspend reality, the Q cult does the same thing for its followers. 

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Ron Watkins Slips Up, Suggests He Is Q, in HBO QAnon Documentary Series

GettyImages-1009769900_djrrko

Q is probably Ron Watkins, the administrator of the internet image board 8kun, formerly known as 8chan. The claim was made in the sixth and final episode of HBO’s Q: Into the Storm, which aired late Sunday, by filmmaker Cullen Hoback. Hoback concedes his theory “lacks definitive proof” but highlights an apparent slip-up that Watkins makes in his final videoconference conversation with Hoback. After briefly discussing his role in spreading conspiracy theories about voter fraud following the 2020 election, Watkins says, “It was basically three years of intelligence training, teaching normies how to do intelligence work. It was basically what I was doing anonymously before—” and then realizing his error quickly adds, “—but never as Q.” In the documentary, Watkins tries to convince Hoback that former Trump adviser Stephen Bannon is actually Q, the mysterious leader of the QAnon conspiracy theory that has a legion of increasingly violent adherents. Hoback muses, “In order to throw off anyone who came sniffing around, wouldn’t it be smart to create a fake digital forensics trail, one that leads to someone from Trump’s inner circle?”

 

https://www.thedailybeast.com/ron-watkins-slips-up-suggests-he-is-q-in-hbo-qanon-documentary-series

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DAMN! Looked for the show on Sunday & somehow missed it, I do see it listed on HBO Signature tonight.

I'll say this about Jim & Ron W, they make me ashamed to call myself Otaku.

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On 4/7/2021 at 11:15 AM, Liquid said:

QAnon HBO docuseries 'Into The Storm' is scary to watch.

I'd bet that most Qnutters are also bible thumpers!

If you can believe in genesis, immaculate conception, imaginary beings in the sky, prayer, walking on water, parting seas and resurrection then believing in insane conspiracies is not a big leap!

Faith gives one the ability to willfully suspend reality, the Q cult does the same thing for its followers. 

 To save y'all from 5 hours of tedious and painfully fruitless mental masturbation...just watch the 6th and last episode.

 

 You're welcome

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On 4/7/2021 at 7:24 PM, badlatitude said:

 

Ron Watkins Slips Up, Suggests He Is Q, in HBO QAnon Documentary Series

GettyImages-1009769900_djrrko

Q is probably Ron Watkins, the administrator of the internet image board 8kun, formerly known as 8chan. The claim was made in the sixth and final episode of HBO’s Q: Into the Storm, which aired late Sunday, by filmmaker Cullen Hoback. Hoback concedes his theory “lacks definitive proof” but highlights an apparent slip-up that Watkins makes in his final videoconference conversation with Hoback. After briefly discussing his role in spreading conspiracy theories about voter fraud following the 2020 election, Watkins says, “It was basically three years of intelligence training, teaching normies how to do intelligence work. It was basically what I was doing anonymously before—” and then realizing his error quickly adds, “—but never as Q.” In the documentary, Watkins tries to convince Hoback that former Trump adviser Stephen Bannon is actually Q, the mysterious leader of the QAnon conspiracy theory that has a legion of increasingly violent adherents. Hoback muses, “In order to throw off anyone who came sniffing around, wouldn’t it be smart to create a fake digital forensics trail, one that leads to someone from Trump’s inner circle?”

 

https://www.thedailybeast.com/ron-watkins-slips-up-suggests-he-is-q-in-hbo-qanon-documentary-series

That popped on CNN a few days ago.

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