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I just found this Family Guy spoof of our favorite idiot powerboat video. I'm dying: 

 

 

Here's the original for those who've never seen it:

 

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I never noticed before that the green bikini bends the shit out of the throttle levers when she goes down.

Bet she had sore ribs the next day.

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Dumbasses gotta dumbass

I'm just glad they didn't crunch their way thru/over any small sailboats in their little cruise to disaster

Years ago I had some brief experiences with a really high powered racing motorboat...surface drives, the whole bit... it was unpleasant to ride in and if handled less than VERY carefully, it was scary as fuck.

FB- Doug

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Wow, I never noticed that she bent the throttles. Impressive.

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A regular in my Bermuda return crews is a lifelong bachelor named Jack. Back in my Sparky days, we were daysailing on Narragansett Bay when one of those boats went by, complete with surgically enhanced peroxide blondes. I mentioned that, if he got one of those boats, he maybe could get some girls. His answer was priceless.

" I happen not to like the kind of girls who like those kind of boats."

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TIL Blue shirt got his head bashed in by the bull work 2-3 times...  LOL

Also, the boobage staying in place was impressive...  Someone has to give speedo a medal.  

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Dumbasses gotta dumbass

I'm just glad they didn't crunch their way thru/over any small sailboats in their little cruise to disaster

Years ago I had some brief experiences with a really high powered racing motorboat...surface drives, the whole bit... it was unpleasant to ride in and if handled less than VERY carefully, it was scary as fuck.

FB- Doug

I had a brief ride in a Ferrari Enzo some years back. The owner got us out on a cleared frontage road and stood on it. I felt like my eyeballs were going through the back of my skull, I'm certain that my brain got compressed and I lost a couple of IQ points. I told him to PLEASE just take me back to the party. 

 

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I dunno....this seems like the ICW down here on any given weekend. 

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4 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

A regular in my Bermuda return crews is a lifelong bachelor named Jack. Back in my Sparky days, we were daysailing on Narragansett Bay when one of those boats went by, complete with surgically enhanced peroxide blondes. I mentioned that, if he got one of those boats, he maybe could get some girls. His answer was priceless.

" I happen not to like the kind of girls who like those kind of boats."

Well, maybe for a night.... :ph34r:

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Dumbasses gotta dumbass

I'm just glad they didn't crunch their way thru/over any small sailboats in their little cruise to disaster

Years ago I had some brief experiences with a really high powered racing motorboat...surface drives, the whole bit... it was unpleasant to ride in and if handled less than VERY carefully, it was scary as fuck.

FB- Doug

I learned decades ago in an aquaintances Donzi that once you are over about 50 or so in a powerboat you are living on luck.

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40 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:
5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Years ago I had some brief experiences with a really high powered racing motorboat...surface drives, the whole bit... it was unpleasant to ride in and if handled less than VERY carefully, it was scary as fuck.

 

I learned decades ago in an aquaintances Donzi that once you are over about 50 or so in a powerboat you are living on luck.

This boat was handed over as part of a debt settlement. Just like an abused-then-neglected sailboat, it was all fucked up and basically unsellable, a offshore racer similar to the production Donzi but stripped out, added bracing, etc etc. I'm not sure this boat would even go as slow as 50 without choking the engines. It was a deafening bone-jarring ride, with anything less than a mile of empty water in front of you, you elbowed the engine-minder and cut the throttle. I spent my time aboard trying to watch a row of temperature gages. The thing didn't like to turn either. But it would have easily outrun anything short of a better-tuned-up sistership or an airplane.

Not sure what the business owner sold it for, but I'm sure it was nowhere near what the boat cost.

Fountain used to sell some hybrid deep-V cats that would go over 100, I'm sure their ride was a lot more plush. They also ran a school on how to drive the things without killing yourself, your passengers, and a bunch of luckless bystanders.

 

1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I had a brief ride in a Ferrari Enzo some years back. The owner got us out on a cleared frontage road and stood on it. I felt like my eyeballs were going through the back of my skull, I'm certain that my brain got compressed and I lost a couple of IQ points. I told him to PLEASE just take me back to the party. 

 

Somewhere along the way, in the quest for PERFORMANCE!, comfort and even survivability start falling by the wayside!

 

57 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I dunno....this seems like the ICW down here on any given weekend. 

Yep, lotta Miami Vice wanna-bees in the world. I've often wondered if they could try the real thing, if they'd like it.

FB- Doug

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With powerboat friends, I’ve found that a hull capable of doing 70 or 80 powered to run a fast cruise of 55-60 is pretty comfortable in the right conditions. A 50 knot hull trying to go 80 in any conditions is scary as shit. 

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A 40 plus foot' quad with stabilization and a Carolina hull will get to the Bahamas really quick without spilling the drinks. 

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Had a boat in Barnegat Bay that did 193mph named Jet Set. It had a surplus military helicopter jet turbine engine. It was supposed to do 190 and didn’t, it got to 187 out on, I think, Lake Tahoe and the client who commissioned it bailed. My neighbor bought it, installed the turbine himself (retired military helicopter mechanic) and got it to its top speed numerous times until fuel prices skyrocketed. He got the boat at a “good” price and knew it hadn’t reached speed in Nevada because it was run in fresh water. The salinity/ density of our bay gave the boat the lift it needed to make speed. 
 

The boat produced a 40’+ concentrated flame just like a jet and the smell of jet fuel as it roared past lingered on. It had to stop and idle under the bridge to the barrier island and then take off again to do a 30 mile round trip down bay in 10 minutes.

 

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Thanks to Skrillex for the musical interpretation 

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19 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Had a boat in Barnegat Bay that did 193mph named Jet Set. It had a surplus military helicopter jet turbine engine. It was supposed to do 190 and didn’t, it got to 187 out on, I think, Lake Tahoe and the client who commissioned it bailed. My neighbor bought it, installed the turbine himself (retired military helicopter mechanic) and got it to its top speed numerous times until fuel prices skyrocketed. He got the boat at a “good” price and knew it hadn’t reached speed in Nevada because it was run in fresh water. The salinity/ density of our bay gave the boat the lift it needed to make speed. 
 

The boat produced a 40’+ concentrated flame just like a jet and the smell of jet fuel as it roared past lingered on. It had to stop and idle under the bridge to the barrier island and then take off again to do a 30 mile round trip down bay in 10 minutes.

 

Just saw a couple of Reggie Fountain's old boatbuilding crew eating lunch at the local Italian joint a few minutes ago. The go-fast folks are still around, but they are getting older.

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19 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

49638E1E-B52A-4EA0-B7E1-99ADB338F958.jpeg

 

From an engineering standpoint, it's impressive.

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20 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

49638E1E-B52A-4EA0-B7E1-99ADB338F958.jpeg

A bit too much flame for grilling.

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21 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Thanks to Skrillex for the musical interpretation 

Real folks with real injuries. I guess I feel that ist poor taste to keep making fun of these folks years later. According to one of the passengers:

Hey guys, I was a passenger in this boat during the accident. Yes, there are many cardinal rules broken. The most important one I feel is no life jackets worn. As crazy as it seems, we had jackets for each person but as the poker run began we realized no one else was wearing them..... How foolish we were. I have read so many nasty comments on YouTube and other sites I am in shock. My wife suffered 4 broken ribs, punctured lung and a broken foot. She has not left the house since getting home. She is in severe pain. The driver crushed his eye orbital and broke hus back at T8 ( he is a former F-2 racer with APBA). Another passenger who raced professionally for many years broke his pelvis in several places and is in a wheelchair. One of the other girls crushed her eye orbital also. The guy from lake tv fractured his hip and broke his wrist. My injuries were minor compared, busted my head open and damaged a rib or two. Everyone is black and blue. This was a very upsetting event for everyone involved. I have been around powerboats for many years and it only takes on unguarded minute to loose a life or permanently hurt people you love. I am very thankful this did not end up worse. I hope everyone learns from this. I know I will boat differently. All of the guys in the boat are members of OSO. I think it is necessary to break down the accident and discuss this, just remember these are real people who like you who love power boating and do it every weekend."

 

 

 

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59 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Real folks with real injuries. I guess I feel that ist poor taste to keep making fun of these folks years later. According to one of the passengers:

Hey guys, I was a passenger in this boat during the accident [snip] I think it is necessary to break down the accident and discuss this, just remember these are real people who like you who love power boating and do it every weekend."

The first line of IB's post had me wondering if we weren't being too hard to them.   But then I read the passenger's post, and my sympathy evaporated.

That passenger is whining about all their injures, but accepts no responsibility for having caused them.  Look at the video: nobody is shouting slow down or stop.  Nobody is trying to signal to the driver.  Nobody is even wearing a lifejacket.

If they want sympathy, then they better accept some responsibility for something other than the lack of lifejackets.

But even worse is the comment that "like you" they "love power boating and do it every weekend".  I guess that was written for a powerboat audience, but no we are not all powerboaters.  Most people in this world are not powerboaters at all, let alone every weekend.  Not even most water users are powerboats.  People sail, kiteboard, paddle canoes, row, swim, wade and countless other things on the water ... and that's only the human users.  Birds, fish and all sorts of other wildlife use the waters ...

... but these feckers in their fast powerboats go out there every damn weekend to burn up fossil fuel, disturb the peace with the roar of their hideous engines, send out a huge wake to disrupt any other water users who dont actually collide with or push off the water, and leave a tail of nasty emissions behind them.

The poor taste here is these unrepentant anti-social eejits still whining that for once, they actually paid a price for their routinely antisocial behaviour.

The one good thing they have ever done is to serve as a warning to others.  So I reckon it would be in very poor taste to desist from mocking them ... and a dereliction of duty to refrain from using them as example of idiocy.

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5 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:
1 hour ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Real folks with real injuries. I guess I feel that ist poor taste to keep making fun of these folks years later. According to one of the passengers:

Hey guys, I was a passenger in this boat during the accident [snip] I think it is necessary to break down the accident and discuss this, just remember these are real people who like you who love power boating and do it every weekend."

The first line of IB's post had me wondering if we weren't being too hard to them.   But then I read the passenger's post, and my sympathy evaporated.

That passenger is whining about all their injures, but accepts no responsibility for having caused them.  Look at the video: nobody is shouting slow down or stop.  Nobody is trying to signal to the driver.  Nobody is even wearing a lifejacket.

If they want sympathy, then they better accept some responsibility for something other than the lack of lifejackets.

But even worse is the comment that "like you" they "love power boating and do it every weekend".  I guess that was written for a powerboat audience, but no we are not all powerboaters.  Most people in this world are not powerboaters at all, let alone every weekend.  Not even most water users are powerboats.  People sail, kiteboard, paddle canoes, row, swim, wade and countless other things on the water ... and that's only the human users.  Birds, fish and all sorts of other wildlife use the waters ...

... but these feckers in their fast powerboats go out there every damn weekend to burn up fossil fuel, disturb the peace with the roar of their hideous engines, send out a huge wake to disrupt any other water users who dont actually collide with or push off the water, and leave a tail of nasty emissions behind them.

The poor taste here is these unrepentant anti-social eejits still whining that for once, they actually paid a price for their routinely antisocial behaviour.

The one good thing they have ever done is to serve as a warning to others.  So I reckon it would be in very poor taste to desist from mocking them ... and a dereliction of duty to refrain from using them as example of idiocy.

And collisions from a powerboat that ejected the driver, or simply careened out of control going over a wake, are too common.

I have some sympathy for their injuries, although that's tempered by my feeling that it could have been worse and that they are largely self-inflicted. But I've got zero sympathy whatever for self centered fuck heads blasting around the water putting others in danger.

FB- Doug

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If you want to race cars there are designated areas specifically setup for that and with good reasons. For power boaters there are no such areas or restrictions and they feel it's there right to run as fast as possible anywhere they want to. I consider them a scourge on boating in general both from the safety concerns and the noise they pollute all of us with. Rant off.

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Not that I wish them harm or anything, but this is what passes for entertainment is SE Floriduh.  More power, less experience, current contrary with wind = good times for all.  I do squirm when it's kids/GF on the bow with no lifejacket. 

But personal watercraft...I must admit I wish them harm. 

And what pandemic? 

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2 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Real folks with real injuries. I guess I feel that ist poor taste to keep making fun of these folks years later. According to one of the passengers:

Hey guys, I was a passenger in this boat during the accident. Yes, there are many cardinal rules broken. The most important one I feel is no life jackets worn. As crazy as it seems, we had jackets for each person but as the poker run began we realized no one else was wearing them..... How foolish we were. I have read so many nasty comments on YouTube and other sites I am in shock. My wife suffered 4 broken ribs, punctured lung and a broken foot. She has not left the house since getting home. She is in severe pain. The driver crushed his eye orbital and broke hus back at T8 ( he is a former F-2 racer with APBA). Another passenger who raced professionally for many years broke his pelvis in several places and is in a wheelchair. One of the other girls crushed her eye orbital also. The guy from lake tv fractured his hip and broke his wrist. My injuries were minor compared, busted my head open and damaged a rib or two. Everyone is black and blue. This was a very upsetting event for everyone involved. I have been around powerboats for many years and it only takes on unguarded minute to loose a life or permanently hurt people you love. I am very thankful this did not end up worse. I hope everyone learns from this. I know I will boat differently. All of the guys in the boat are members of OSO. I think it is necessary to break down the accident and discuss this, just remember these are real people who like you who love power boating and do it every weekend."

Darwin is a harsh taskmaster.

AFAIAC something similar should happen to all the loud, obnoxious assholes who run muscleboats. If they aren't ruining everyone else's day with unmuffled engines and big wakes they are ruining anchorages with loud stereos blasting shitty music.

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On 1/27/2021 at 1:16 PM, Al Paca said:

I love it when Captain Lurch goes down. 

I thought he looks like Max Headroom!

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I've always said that IB is a better man than I. 

I just can't seem to muster any sympathy. 

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13 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

just remember these are real people who like you who love power boating

wrong .

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If you could only provide one item of evidence that there should be a qualification, possibly including an IQ test, to be able to operate anything then this video would be it. That's coming from someone who doesn't really like regulation.

It's also quite persuasive that sterilisation isn't actually a disproportionate penalty for some rule breakers.

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I moved into a waterfront neighborhood in April, 2006. The out of towners who summered there brought their 35’+ Scarabs, Cigarettes and Baja’s with them. About 30 of those bastards would fire up their motors early in the morning and head out to screw the rest of the world for hours with noise and sun tan oiled guidos and guidettes.

By 2008 the gas prices skyrocketed and all the boats dissappeared. It was nice to sleep in on a Saturday or Sunday after 7am after that.

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There are only one or two of those real canyon-shaking power boats in my area and fortunately they're not out very often.  Probably not often calm enough for them. Whenever I see (more often hear) one, my first thought is, "Wow, that guy must have a very small penis."  

I used to live in a place that's on the jet boat race circuit, but comparatively, those aren't really that loud.  And it's only two days a year.  But when they wipe out, they really wipe out.

16tc.jpg

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Still feel pretty sorry for the injured. Broken ribs are no fun, spine injuries can linger. Not my idea of fun, but imagine a friend asks "want to go for a boat ride?" , and you end up in the hospital. For most of those people their only real mistake was trusting the driver. 

I'm skiing in Taos, was running pretty fast through steeps and trees yesterday. Perhaps not the smartest thing to do at age 66, but I've been doing it for decades and have convinced myself that I can control the risk. Maybe I'm making the same mistake of trusting the driver. :ph34r:

Got me thinking. There are by now a number of sailors, some of them here, who have sailed offshore with me. For some it was their first real blue water trip, and I think, fuck , wives entrusted their husbands, parents their children, children their parents, to me, usually without ever meeting me. Are we all crazy? 

I'm in the early stages of crew selection for the TransAtlantic race in 2023. Do I need to warn people about what a Loser I am?

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19 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Still feel pretty sorry for the injured. Broken ribs are no fun, spine injuries can linger. Not my idea of fun, but imagine a friend asks "want to go for a boat ride?" , and you end up in the hospital. For most of those people their only real mistake was trusting the driver. 

I'm skiing in Taos, was running pretty fast through steeps and trees yesterday. Perhaps not the smartest thing to do at age 66, but I've been doing it for decades and have convinced myself that I can control the risk. Maybe I'm making the same mistake of trusting the driver. :ph34r:

Got me thinking. There are by now a number of sailors, some of them here, who have sailed offshore with me. For some it was their first real blue water trip, and I think, fuck , wives entrusted their husbands, parents their children, children their parents, to me, usually without ever meeting me. Are we all crazy? 

I'm in the early stages of crew selection for the TransAtlantic race in 2023. Do I need to warn people about what a Loser I am?

Human are proven to be poor judges of risk. Best to let them find out empirically. 

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51 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Still feel pretty sorry for the injured. Broken ribs are no fun, spine injuries can linger. Not my idea of fun, but imagine a friend asks "want to go for a boat ride?" , and you end up in the hospital. For most of those people their only real mistake was trusting the driver. 

I'm skiing in Taos, was running pretty fast through steeps and trees yesterday. Perhaps not the smartest thing to do at age 66, but I've been doing it for decades and have convinced myself that I can control the risk. Maybe I'm making the same mistake of trusting the driver. :ph34r:

Got me thinking. There are by now a number of sailors, some of them here, who have sailed offshore with me. For some it was their first real blue water trip, and I think, fuck , wives entrusted their husbands, parents their children, children their parents, to me, usually without ever meeting me. Are we all crazy? 

I'm in the early stages of crew selection for the TransAtlantic race in 2023. Do I need to warn people about what a Loser I am?

Even when you are deathly ill you are great to sail with. I have gotten much more particular who I sail with, went out for a icicle (rum thing) race today, was blowing 20, gust close to 30 and skipper said let's bag it before we cleared the channel.

A man's got to know his limitations.

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Still feel pretty sorry for the injured. Broken ribs are no fun, spine injuries can linger. Not my idea of fun, but imagine a friend asks "want to go for a boat ride?" , and you end up in the hospital. For most of those people their only real mistake was trusting the driver. 

I'm skiing in Taos, was running pretty fast through steeps and trees yesterday. Perhaps not the smartest thing to do at age 66, but I've been doing it for decades and have convinced myself that I can control the risk. Maybe I'm making the same mistake of trusting the driver. :ph34r:

Got me thinking. There are by now a number of sailors, some of them here, who have sailed offshore with me. For some it was their first real blue water trip, and I think, fuck , wives entrusted their husbands, parents their children, children their parents, to me, usually without ever meeting me. Are we all crazy? 

I'm in the early stages of crew selection for the TransAtlantic race in 2023. Do I need to warn people about what a Loser I am?

Look, I'm not the most articulate fellow but I believe that there are clear differences between piling up a bunch of unsuspecting chicks into one of these boats and taking on crew for an ocean yacht race. I will attempt to elucidate;

As was pointed out, no one in the video wore or attempted to even find a PFD. No one in the video attempted to communicate with the driver.  No one was restrained. People were standing, barely holding onto anything.

When asked "Do you want to go for a burn in the cigarette boat?"  how much time do you think ANYONE spent thinking about whether it was safe, whether the skipper was competent, whether they, the passengers were physically up for the jostling ride? Moments? Seconds?  Did the skipper even attempt to prepare them verbally for the experience?

Now, when you ask people: "Would you like to crew for me in the Bermuda Race?"  I'll bet you don't make the offer lightly. You consider what their skill level might be, what their attitude and personality makeup are. You tell them what to expect. There is a LOT more time for you AND the crew to consider the ramifications and consequences because it takes weeks or months to prepare for the ocean race. I'll also bet that you lay down certain safety rules that are non-negotiable: Tethers at night, no going forward on deck at night alone, etc.

Then there's the "impact to other people" factor:

As pointed out, the people in these boats greatly impact OTHER people with noise, wakes, navigational hazarding. They do it all summer long, sometimes oblivious sometimes intentionally ruining peoples' day, day after day.

You are in the middle of the Atlantic, moving in practical silence. Outside of your vessel, who are you hazarding? Who are you inconveniencing? No one, that's who.

Are people at risk crewing for you in an ocean race? Yes, but the risks are clearly explained, they are well considered by your crew and both you and the crew have ample time to reconsider. You employ safety mitigations to reduce the risk to an acceptable level.

I think those are pretty key differences and you shouldn't feel guilty about the people who've crewed for you.

 

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Jeez... I was reminded of a series of spinal injuries allegedly suffered by tourists on a PDX area jet boat tour a few years ago.  But instead of a nooz article, Google serves up two pages of lawyers specializing in lawsuits over such injuries. More fun and profit over Party Boats.  Apparently, it's common enough to even have a name: Deck Slap Injury.

http://website60s.com/upload/files/25-a-summer-wave-of.pdf  

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It is the norm (and the law) to use seatbelts even for a trip to Costco at 30 mph on a flat road. Why do people think it is a good idea to go 'boating' without seat belts. If you go through the list of injuries virtually all of them would not have happened if people were attached to the boat. Holding on to the wheel, a seat back or whatever is of little use with the forces involved.

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5 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

It is the norm (and the law) to use seatbelts even for a trip to Costco at 30 mph on a flat road. Why do people think it is a good idea to go 'boating' without seat belts. If you go through the list of injuries virtually all of them would not have happened if people were attached to the boat. Holding on to the wheel, a seat back or whatever is of little use with the forces involved.

Well this leads us down the garden path of "How much mitigation is reasonable?"

There are people who want laws requiring sailors to tether on in even mild weather conditions and wear helmets at all times in case of contact with the boom. I would never agree to that except under high speed racing conditions or really snotty weather.

I would not advocate seatbelts and helmets on an ordinary fish 'n ski powerboat with a 75hp Evinrude on it but it might be a good idea on a boat jumping wakes at speeds faster than most people drive on the interstate.

Problem is, "reasonable" is a sliding scale for a lot of people. I've always said- "There's no greater threat to Liberty than a crying mother standing in the well of a state legislative assembly."

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2 hours ago, d'ranger said:

Even when you are deathly ill you are great to sail with. 

I believe that misstates your experience. More correctly, when I am deathly ill my boats are still fun to sail, perhaps even better without me interfering.

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I believe that misstates your experience. More correctly, when I am deathly ill my boats are still fun to sail, perhaps even better without me interfering.

"Interfering" by destroying the toilet would be a bit of a faux pas. 

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4 friends went out to dinner on the water and decided to full throttle home drunk. They missed the turn under the bridge and ran 50MPH dead south into and 150 feet over Good Luck Point. Ribs, noses, arms and a leg were broken. They took full responsibility for their actions and took it easy on the powerboats after that. 
 

Its a painful lesson to remember forever

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40 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

4 friends went out to dinner on the water and decided to full throttle home drunk. They missed the turn under the bridge and ran 50MPH dead south into and 150 feet over Good Luck Point. Ribs, noses, arms and a leg were broken. They took full responsibility for their actions and took it easy on the powerboats after that. 
 

Its a painful lesson to remember forever

When I was living in Jax Fla a very similar case only the boat ran under a dock. IIRC there were six people in the boat, two or three were killed and all suffered life-changing head & spine injuries.

Then there's the every day stuff. Fishermen running 60+ thru a starting line. Big wakes tossing the boat... just a couple days ago, I was working in my engine room and a wake threw my toolbox off the deck flat into the bilge.

About 25 years ago, one of my best friends and crew was killed being run down by a motorboat. Last year there was an accident in Rhode Island that killed a woman racing a catamaran. In both these cases, the operator was not even charged under law.

I have sympathy for those peoples' injuries. The driver trying to claim that he was a skilled car racer just makes it harder to understand how he could be so clueless about the forces involved. But as for the danger these dumbasses pose to others.... sorry if this sounds harsh, but better that they kill themselves than others who are blameless but have the bad luck to be in front of them.

- DSK

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I was almost run down 100’ off the beach in my little 11’ sailing tender by a 38’ speedboat. I was standing on the gunwale ready to dive when they turned hard to port. The guy driving looked very scared at what he almost did. He wasn’t paying attention at 40knots. He could have missed me and run into a large dock and killed people.

He knew it and I won’t forget that power boaters don’t think or care at times and those are the most crucial times...

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4 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I believe that misstates your experience. More correctly, when I am deathly ill my boats are still fun to sail, perhaps even better without me interfering.

Since I know a number of people who have raced and sailed with you repeatedly as well as plenty who are the waiting list I can only say it's good that you didn't choose sales as your profession.  :D  Because nobody is buying that. 

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On 1/30/2021 at 3:18 PM, Ajax said:

As pointed out, the people in these boats greatly impact OTHER people with noise, wakes, navigational hazarding. They do it all summer long, sometimes oblivious sometimes intentionally ruining peoples' day, day after day.

There are certain categories of craft that cannot be operated in the fashion they are designed for, while still being operated:

  • Safely, writ large to include passengers, crew, other boaters, etc.
  • Reasonably courteously to other water users and individuals ashore
  • In an environmentally responsible way, at least in terms of shoreline erosion, streambed damage, and local effect on the ecosystem (leaving aside questions related to extraction and use of fossil fuels)

It's a diverse bunch.  The tunnel-hull jetboats that go up the river at 40 mph, wakeboats, speedboats, PWCs, all in that category afaic.

I think it is the 40' cabin cruisers plowing the water at 25 knots that scare me the most because the sightlines are so poor and the operators are surrounded by so many distractions.

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Daily occurrence when I go out paddle boarding in the summer. Ski or Wake boat driven at full throttle by bimbo looking over her shoulder at someone in the back, gracefully curving right into me.  Usually faster to turn and paddle at 90° than to dive off.  Except the rare one that looks forward in shock and jerks the wheel to head right for my new course. The vast majority never look up.  Hyper-entitled cunts.  

Actually, this time of year is bliss, as long as you like neoprene. 

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8 hours ago, 2airishuman said:

 

I think it is the 40' cabin cruisers plowing the water at 25 knots that scare me the most because the sightlines are so poor and the operators are surrounded by so many distractions.

I have put mast up/down at Castleton on the Hudson River numerous times. They have a great setup but it is on river itself so you are exposed to wakes. The cabin cruisers are the worst, either they just keep going at normal speed (looks less than 25 btw) and make a bigger wake or they think they are being courteous and slow down to the point where they are just off plane (10-12 knots?) where they make an even bigger bow wave. I get a sense that they do not really understand what their boat is doing. At least the river is straight north and south and you can see threats and time the delicate parts of the operation.

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I was almost run down twice last year in my tender-once while sailing it and both times the driver wasn’t paying a bit of attention. One boat was a sheriff’s boat after a Memorial Day boat blessing ceremony...

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3 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

 they do not really understand what their boat is doing.

That's the crux of it.

Turn the key and go is what they know.

Around here, for as far back as I can remember, all or nearly all the pleasure craft disasters and fatalities are power boat related.

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23 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Around here, for as far back as I can remember, all or nearly all the pleasure craft disasters and fatalities are power boat related.

Not around here. Plenty of both to go around.

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We get late night powerboat fatalities and one or two jet skier collisions a year around here. No sailboat collision fatalities as far back as I can remember to the early 70’s.

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21 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

We get late night powerboat fatalities and one or two jet skier collisions a year around here. No sailboat collision fatalities as far back as I can remember to the early 70’s.

except when the sailboat gets run over by a power boat and kills some one

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I’m lucky enough to have avoided that and I haven’t heard of any others

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

I’m lucky enough to have avoided that and I haven’t heard of any others

i was refering to the clear lake CA incident when the local sherriff ran over the sailboat out on the lake.  one of the people on the small sailboat died.

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Yea, that was bad and I felt pretty shitpants scared as I stood on the gunwale of my 11’ ready to jump both times. There is very little room to escape. Of course, the first thing you do when you see them coming at you is to ditch your life jacket so you can dive deep...

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Carry a flare gun and aim it at the bridge of the morons boat.

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We just eliminated wake surfing from downtown PDX to Willamette Falls with “pass thru” high traffic zones where you can only maintain speed while traversing. Very good news for paddling and sailing if enforced 

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^IIRC, the driver of that boat pled "not guilty" because the construction of his boat made it impossible to see forward from his wheelchair.  It was the manufacturer's fault. :blink:

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It's always somebody else's fault.

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22 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

It's always somebody else's fault.

This refusal to accept responsibility or accountability in my national culture infuriates and depresses me. It transcends age, race, gender or any other boundary one might think of.

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The combination of this thread and the regular parade of douchebags in powerboats I encounter while sailing Biscayne Bay with my family is going to give me nightmares tonight. I'm replaying in my head last weekend when it looked like a sizeable cabin cruiser was going to T-bone our F27 with the kids down below until it turned way too close. And I was reaching for my whistle ... what a joke. I like the idea of a flare gun.

 

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3 hours ago, J_Grove said:

The combination of this thread and the regular parade of douchebags in powerboats I encounter while sailing Biscayne Bay with my family is going to give me nightmares tonight. I'm replaying in my head last weekend when it looked like a sizeable cabin cruiser was going to T-bone our F27 with the kids down below until it turned way too close. And I was reaching for my whistle ... what a joke. I like the idea of a flare gun.

 

That's terrible, feel for ya for what you were feeling in that moment.  

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We had a similar situation a couple years back where a large (45' ish) flybridge cruiser ran smack bang into a large steel fishing trawler. The fishing boat was on anchor, in a known anchorage location... the fishermen had to jump off the boat prior to the impact. 

The driver of the powerboat's excuse was that the glare of the setting sun impaired his vision to such an extent that he couldn't see the anchored fishing boat. Christ on a fucking skateboard... if you can't see, why the fuck come barrelling into the bay at 20ish knots. That robust steel fishing boat could have been a smaller boat full of  a family with kids, or a lone kayaker or The Fonz water-skiing 

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3 hours ago, J_Grove said:

The combination of this thread and the regular parade of douchebags in powerboats I encounter while sailing Biscayne Bay with my family is going to give me nightmares tonight. I'm replaying in my head last weekend when it looked like a sizeable cabin cruiser was going to T-bone our F27 with the kids down below until it turned way too close. And I was reaching for my whistle ... what a joke. I like the idea of a flare gun .50 cal.

 

FIFY

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I've had two really close calls with large, flashy power boats in fog in the last two years. I don't have AIS, but have the top rated radar reflector on the top of my mast and a foghorn and bright lights. Both "yachts' were going fast in the fog with dual radars spinning. Neither changed corse at all even though I had to do a sharp 180 to avoid them at very close range. The last one was last fall crossing to the San Juan's with my wife, going upwind in light air with the motor off so that I could hear traffic. I could hear it coming (fast) and we came close to jumping off the boat because it was thick fog and we couldn't see it until it was close and the hard turn we did didn't really get us out of the way. He never changed corse or slowed and passed close enough that I could probably recognize the fucker behind the wheel going 18 or 20 in thick fog. I was so angry that I had to force it out of my mind. Is that entitlement in the extreme or what is it?

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We even see the same thing in Tassie, I blame autopilots and fornicatoria...

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1 hour ago, olaf hart said:

We even see the same thing in Tassie, I blame autopilots and fornicatoria...

The flybridge cruiser / fishing boat incident I mentioned 4 posts up took place Recherche Bay, Tasmania.

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2 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I've had two really close calls with large, flashy power boats in fog in the last two years. I don't have AIS, but have the top rated radar reflector on the top of my mast and a foghorn and bright lights. Both "yachts' were going fast in the fog with dual radars spinning. Neither changed corse at all even though I had to do a sharp 180 to avoid them at very close range. The last one was last fall crossing to the San Juan's with my wife, going upwind in light air with the motor off so that I could hear traffic. I could hear it coming (fast) and we came close to jumping off the boat because it was thick fog and we couldn't see it until it was close and the hard turn we did didn't really get us out of the way. He never changed corse or slowed and passed close enough that I could probably recognize the fucker behind the wheel going 18 or 20 in thick fog. I was so angry that I had to force it out of my mind. Is that entitlement in the extreme or what is it?

Stupidity on a Darwinian scale.

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Another classic NW collision video.

 

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It's easy to knock the stink potters, because frankly the outcome of their errors is potentially more serious, but we see it in yachters as well.

Not long ago we were motoring in a 35 for yacht with the main up in virtually no wind and perfect vis. A large cruising yacht was approaching from directly astern with no sails up motoring much faster than us.

About 50 yards away I gave them a yell to no effect.  We dodged aside and they came past half a length away. The 4 'crew' were sat in the cockpit drinking coffee and chatting while the AP drove the boat. From the close distance I explained their obligations and failures to them. That seemed quite surprised and a little upset.

Pointless cunts drive yachts as well.

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3 hours ago, European Bloke said:

It's easy to knock the stink potters, because frankly the outcome of their errors is potentially more serious, but we see it in yachters as well.

Not long ago we were motoring in a 35 for yacht with the main up in virtually no wind and perfect vis. A large cruising yacht was approaching from directly astern with no sails up motoring much faster than us.

About 50 yards away I gave them a yell to no effect.  We dodged aside and they came past half a length away. The 4 'crew' were sat in the cockpit drinking coffee and chatting while the AP drove the boat. From the close distance I explained their obligations and failures to them. That seemed quite surprised and a little upset.

Pointless cunts drive yachts as well.

That's true, I've met with a number of people in big sailboats that were not just dangerously clueless but arrogant about it. In fact I beaned one guy with an apple when he was motoring his 45-ish foot center cockpit cruiser through our starting line, loudly saying he didn't give a fuck about the rules. I hope he thought differently about it afterward but usually people like that don't learn until they are forced to.

- DSK

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When encountering sailors who blunder through race starting areas, I always tell them "You ARE in accordance with the COLREGS but that doesn't mean that you couldn't be courteous and amiable to other sailors. The COLREGS don't mean that you MUST be an asshole."

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Being a jackwagon is predominant, but not exclusive to, powerboaters. 

For me, most times it's some cruiser with their face down in the chartplotter in the fog (why I don't like chartplotters at the binnacle). Other times it's been sailors under who don't understand COLREGS under power.  A lot of, ahem, older single handers, think that they can just put the autopilot on in the fog and zone out because I guess it's a big ocean.  The sailboats don't show up on my old etch-a-sketch radar until they get pretty close.  

One time I was going DDW with the main prevented and the genoa poled out - some member of the CCA - was slowly overtaking me from astern, motor-sailing with his genoa up and his wife at the helm proceeded to get with 20' of me while yawing in the swells and forcing me down into an obstruction because he wanted to head offshore to head for the Cape. I stood up and raised my arms in the international symbol for WTF and he just waved me off.  Maybe he couldn't understand I was sailing.

Poweryachts tend to do stuff like this, "Securite, Securite...this is the vessel Obstreperous AHole...uh...doin' 22kts ...uh....east of Pemaquid...going ....North."  And you'll hear that only once in 10m viz.  

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6 hours ago, hobot said:

Another classic NW collision video.

 

That powerboat has the most appropriate name ever: Nap Time...

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1. LADY ELGIN

The sinking of the Lady Elgin on September 8, 1860 resulted in the most open water deaths in the history of the Great Lakes. During a strong gale, the 252-foot wooden hulled steamship was rammed by a much smaller vessel, the 129-foot schooner Augusta, at a speed of 11 knots. Though the Augusta’s second mate had reportedly spotted the Lady Elgin half an hour before the collision, the schooner did not correct its course until just 10 minutes before impact.

The captain of the Augusta sailed away, believing that his schooner had in fact sustained more damage than the sturdy steamer, and according to the clerk of the Lady Elgin, at the moment of impact there was music and dancing in the forward cabin. But the Augusta had torn a hole in the port side of the Lady Elgin. Fifty cows in the cargo hold were pushed over the side in order to lighten the ship, while appliances and other heavy items were moved in an attempt to bring the gash left by the Augusta above the water level. A lifeboat was lowered, but not secured, and it floated away before passengers could board it.

All told, over 300 people lost their lives in the disaster. As a result, a law was passed a few years later mandating that all ships crossing the Great Lakes must have running lights. The wreck of the Lady Elgin was largely forgotten until the mid-1970s, when a shipwreck enthusiast named Harry Zych began searching for it, and discovered the wreck in 1989. Today, the majority of the shipwreck lies several miles off the Illinois coast in four main wreckage sites, which can be explored by the public, with permission from Zych.

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/83964/8-famous-shipwrecks-lake-michigan

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39 minutes ago, alphafb552 said:

That powerboat has the most appropriate name ever: Nap Time...

the collision didn't kill him, the irony should have...

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14 hours ago, hobot said:

Another classic NW collision video.

 

Love how the autopilot brought it back on course and it kept going for a good 15 seconds.

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That had to be coitus interruptus.

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Nap Time was hauled out at a local marina after that incident.  The owner is a real piece of work.

The boat was blocked with the transom a few feet away from the marina office window and front door.  The owner and his two small dogs live aboard.

Every person that approached the office was subject to the dogs barking and yelping like it was the end of the world.

Yard-" Can you keep the dogs inside the cabin?"  "Customers are complaining about the barking"

NT - "My dogs are fine, they don't bark...."

Yard - "They are barking now, I am having trouble hearing you.  Please...

NT - "I didnt chose to be here, I got hit by a ferry!"

A few days later he is in the office, with both dogs.  Complaining.  One dog is running thru the stock room, lifts it leg on the rag bin.  He sets down the one he is holding to yell at the one running around.  The one he set down, dropped a deuce right in the middle of the office. 

Bad pet owner and even worse skipper.  

He would park in a handicap spot because it was closest to his boat, no placard.  One day during the repair, he was ticketed for parking, and blamed the yard for calling the cops on him.

Yard - " You do know the PD has a boat here in the marina?"  

Dealing with him at every turn was difficult, I feel sorry for the dogs

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Not the fake Quattro said:

Nap Time was hauled out at a local marina after that incident.  The owner is a real piece of work.

The boat was blocked with the transom a few feet away from the marina office window and front door.  The owner and his two small dogs live aboard.

Every person that approached the office was subject to the dogs barking and yelping like it was the end of the world.

Yard-" Can you keep the dogs inside the cabin?"  "Customers are complaining about the barking"

NT - "My dogs are fine, they don't bark...."

Yard - "They are barking now, I am having trouble hearing you.  Please...

NT - "I didnt chose to be here, I got hit by a ferry!"

A few days later he is in the office, with both dogs.  Complaining.  One dog is running thru the stock room, lifts it leg on the rag bin.  He sets down the one he is holding to yell at the one running around.  The one he set down, dropped a deuce right in the middle of the office. 

Bad pet owner and even worse skipper.  

He would park in a handicap spot because it was closest to his boat, no placard.  One day during the repair, he was ticketed for parking, and blamed the yard for calling the cops on him.

Yard - " You do know the PD has a boat here in the marina?"  

Dealing with him at every turn was difficult, I feel sorry for the dogs

 

 

 

15 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

That had to be coitus interruptus.

Sounds like with his right hand, if at all. 

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Sounds like the yard should have moved his boat to the most distant and inconvenient spot in the yard.  Who in that area allows living aboard on the hard?  

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He still believes the ferry was at fault. 

" I was in the right!" 

He has admitted he was in the head when the ferry failed to yield.

The marina manager did find a reason to move his slip.  He is now at the end of the dock, no one has to walk past the dogs that don't bark.

 

He was finally convinced to move off the boat during the repairs

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On 2/3/2021 at 4:19 PM, Weyalan said:

The Fonz water-skiing 

jumped the wshark on that one.. LOL

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