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Both vessels failed to avoid a collision, so arguably both are 100% wrong

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8 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Both vessels failed to avoid a collision, so arguably both are 100% wrong

Yes, nevertheless the entitled attitude of the ferry is as shocking as the lack of lookout, he acts as if he was the privileged boat (last minute action) whereas he should be altering course first.

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11 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

Yes, nevertheless the entitled attitude of the ferry is as shocking as the lack of lookout, he acts as if he was the privileged boat (last minute action) whereas he should be altering course first.

In at least some waters (Sydney Harbour) ferries have right of way. Either by statute or tradition.

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My wife suffered 4 broken ribs, punctured lung and a broken foot. She has not left the house since getting home. She is in severe pain. The driver crushed his eye orbital and broke hus back at T8 ( he is a former F-2 racer with APBA). Another passenger who raced professionally for many years broke his pelvis in several places and is in a wheelchair. One of the other girls crushed her eye orbital also. The guy from lake tv fractured his hip and broke his wrist. My injuries were minor compared, busted my head open and damaged a rib or two. Everyone is black and blue.

 

Typical self centered powerboater. Not a single fuck given about the very tragic and painful fingernail broken before the mass devastation...

 

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Did you notice at the very end of the Ozzyman tube there appears to be a face down dead body on the back deck? Or was he just reaching into the beer cooler?

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I'm dead.  That was hilarious. 

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On 2/21/2021 at 12:07 PM, Se7en said:

In at least some waters (Sydney Harbour) ferries have right of way. Either by statute or tradition.

Same here in Finland. 

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25 minutes ago, Pertsa said:

Same here in Finland. 

Here (Western channel), it is true when they are in restrained waters (effectively in the entrance channel for a small ferry or in a bay for a cargo ship or a big ferry).

A quick google led me to this video, ferry in the UK (Solent ? not sure, I don't recognise the place) goes to port to let a sailing boat on a steady course, no fuss, no 5 horn blasts, just a passenger who feels uneasy about it!

The US video scares me because I could be the guy in this sailing boat and the US ferry from the previous video would obviously not slow down in time.

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23 hours ago, Willin' said:

 

Typical self centered powerboater. Not a single fuck given about the very tragic and painful fingernail broken before the mass devastation...

 

What i find amazing is that he's done this on a flat lake, probably he's oversteering but on the sea I am not sure how you could keep the thing upside up.

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what was mister eraser head trying to acomplish?  he just went WOT and held it as it started to bang and crash. what was the experience they were after...pain?  even before the crash it was uncomfortable , what with the pinched finger and everybody hanging on for dear life.

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44 minutes ago, chester said:

what was mister eraser head trying to acomplish?

For some, speed is its own reward.

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Fuel prices will eventually make a rebound and chain these things to the dock.

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28 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Fuel prices will eventually make a rebound and chain these things to the dock.

That would be nice, but unfortunately, unlikely. There is serious money, and even more serious exhibitionism.

Redundant women, noisy boats, dead manatees. Welcome to Floriduh.

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35 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Submitted without comment

 

 

A grand compilation of tackiness.  And there's just something kind of sad about seeing B-grade (maybe C) models at an event, trying to look appealing. 

Boats bombing through the mangrove guts. Bet every last fish swam the Hell out of there!

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10 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Das sum funny shit. Why does he jack the throttle lock to lock?

Jumping waves - the props ventilate at the top and let the engines over rev..

Sort of like wheelspin

The big, really fast ocean racers have a dedicated throttle man.

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Thanks. I’ve played throttle man on the way home after a long day fishing. Really helps reduce fatigue. Had no idea they were airborne. 
 

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1 hour ago, Max Rockatansky said:
2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Fuel prices will eventually make a rebound and chain these things to the dock.

That would be nice, but unfortunately, unlikely. There is serious money, and even more serious exhibitionism.

At European fuel prices, the serious money would baulk.  E.g. in Ireland the current average price of petrol is €1.333/litre = ~US$5.90/USgallon.  That more than twice the current price in Florida

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

Fuel prices will eventually make a rebound and chain these things to the dock.

Nah. These boats are half a million to well over a million once fitted out. Fuel costs aren't a consideration.  

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4 hours ago, 2airishuman said:

For some, speed is its own reward.

well sure, I acknowledge that as self evident.  I often observe this with jetskis:  they will blast out of the bay with the beach and launch ramp at WOT and steer directly out into the lake.  They hold WOT for 20 seconds,  30, a minute or so and then let off an initiate some circles.  It's like they're "ya, speed!" but it only takeas a minute at WOT before they subconciously realize that just hanging on to the ski at full throttle is fucking boring!  then they are off WOT for another minute...burn a few circles, repeat.

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25 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Nah. These boats are half a million to well over a million once fitted out. Fuel costs aren't a consideration.  

The guy who built Restive went to the Dark Side, 67' custom Lyman-Morse motorboat. Cruising speed he burns 34 gph.

 

Per engine. 

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The guy who built Restive went to the Dark Side, 67' custom Lyman-Morse motorboat. Cruising speed he burns 34 gph.

 

Per engine. 

I've seen that boat. It's maritime furniture motivated by large diesels. I can see why he picked it after Restive. 

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The guy who built Restive went to the Dark Side, 67' custom Lyman-Morse motorboat. Cruising speed he burns 34 gph.

 

Per engine. 

That fuel burn is quite low.

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54 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

That fuel burn is quite low.

In another life I was once responsible for performing a 'fuel consumption trial' on a Navy ship.  I think it worked out to something like 600 feet per gallon.  

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

That fuel burn is quite low.

Our vet bought an ex-government 62 foot displacement boat - ex forestry or fisheries or suchlike.

8 GPH at 8 - 10 knots. :D

He was thinking about taking it back to South Africa from here.

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32 minutes ago, Bugsy said:

In another life I was once responsible for performing a 'fuel consumption trial' on a Navy ship.  I think it worked out to something like 600 feet per gallon.  

The cheap old motor yachts with twin V-12 Detroit Diesels probably go about 1500 feet per gallon, so getting a whole ship 600 feet isn't all THAT bad.

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7 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

the props ventilate

They cavitate.  And it's terrible for the props. 

You're supposed to go off at the top of the wave, then hammer it just as the bow starts to drop.  If you do it right you won't catch air or slow down.  With a good driver you won't feel a thing as a passenger.  It's pretty easy in west coast swell.  It's exhausting in the short and steep stuff in Georgia Strait/English Bay. 

I first saw this video when I was learning to drive really fast boats really fast in the really rough stuff.  I'm my opinion he's trimmed too high and started chine walking - you can tell from the trees in the background.   Can be as dangerous as a power wobble on a motorcycle if you don't know what to do. 

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You drive at those speeds around here?

With all the crap in the water you are living on luck if you do.

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6 hours ago, Elegua said:

Nah. These boats are half a million to well over a million once fitted out. Fuel costs aren't a consideration.  

Most people are on some kind of a budget, at every level.

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40 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

You drive at those speeds around here?

With all the crap in the water you are living on luck if you do.

I hit a deadhead last summer. Didn't even see it. My boat went from 6.5 knots to full stop. It felt like I hit a rock but I was in 600 ft. of water in Howe Sound so it was impossible. 2.5 grand at Race Rocks Services later and back in over 5 days. Thank god for Navis! I thought our cruising season was over. With all the time for racing/cruising/powerboating/deliveries it's amazing we don't get more of it. 

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43 minutes ago, Maxx Baqustae said:

It felt like I hit a rock but I was in 600 ft. of water in Howe Sound so it was impossible

Even in 600 ft of water, you still gotta be wary of submarines

 

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3 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I first saw this video when I was learning to drive really fast boats really fast in the really rough stuff.  I'm my opinion he's trimmed too high and started chine walking - you can tell from the trees in the background.   Can be as dangerous as a power wobble on a motorcycle if you don't know what to do. 

So what should one do in this situation ?

I would also be a taker for the motorcycle wobble cos I only know how to get out of a push bike wobble and I am pretty sure that it wouldn't work on a motorbike!!! :D

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4 hours ago, Bugsy said:
5 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

That fuel burn is quite low.

In another life I was once responsible for performing a 'fuel consumption trial' on a Navy ship.  I think it worked out to something like 600 feet per gallon.  

Actually that would be pretty good fuel economy. The tin can I rode around on.... actually I was Oil King for a bit over a year and all but the first couple weeks of a Med deployment... burned a gallon a minute sitting pierside just keeping steam up. IIRC we burned somewhere between 4,000~10,000 gallons a day... fuel pump 150psi through 6 burners, each with an orifice big enough to put your finger in.

And I was also the control system/calibration tech, got the system tuned up (and the boiler firesides were clean) enough that we actually earned a medal for best fuel economy in the class/type. We burned less fuel making a high speed transit to Spain and back than a sistership did doing slow circles off Sicily and spending every other night in port. Our port call in Spain was fun but short. If my shipmates had known I was responsible for that little trip, I'd have had to swim home.

FB- Doug

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I drove what I derisively called "aluminum war canoes" in the UAE for a year. Riding in these things during an Arabian summer was like being cooked alive in a bean tin. Open wheel house, no seats, no head. 15 hours at a time without a break.

Anyway, they were equipped with twin 200hp  Volvo Penta turbo diesel I/O's. They were pretty fast considering that they were shaped like a brick. The water was so damned hot that we ran them without thermostats. We'd escort military sealift command vessels, destroyers and cruisers in and out of port. Well, at full blat a US Arleigh Burke class destroyer can out pace us and leaves a massive wake while doing it. Even the MSC cargo ships would race out of port to make it difficult for the suicide jockeys to blow a hole in them.

One day we're escorting this MSC ship out and they just keep pouring it on. Their wake built and built. We asked the liaison officer onboard if we were released from escort but they refused to let us go and we had to keep up. Us two trailing boats ended up zipping over the crest of their wake...we saw each other's props, hulls in mid-air. It was impressive. We came down with a mighty crash that popped the side windows right out of the wheel house. My gunners had no seats. They just stand on a flat aft deck, with a strap around their hips connected to the gun mounts. I was terrified that I was going to lose someone overboard.

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15 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I drove what I derisively called "aluminum war canoes" in the UAE for a year

Ah yes, the United Arab Emirates.  A confederation of religious dictatorships.

Did any of you ask why you were defending a non-democracy?

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5 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Ah yes, the United Arab Emirates.  A confederation of religious dictatorships.

Did any of you ask why you were defending a non-democracy?

Wrong forum for that - PA awaits.

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15 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:
21 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Ah yes, the United Arab Emirates.  A confederation of religious dictatorships.

Did any of you ask why you were defending a non-democracy?

Wrong forum for that - PA awaits.

If the three paras of my-glorious-service-in-defence-of-religious-dictatorship belongs here, then a quick question about that belongs here too.

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1 minute ago, TwoLegged said:

If the three paras of my-glorious-service-in-defence-of-religious-dictatorship belongs here, then a quick question about that belongs here too.

I like PA shitfights over in PA as much as anyone, but lets keep CA the kinder gentler place to relax ;)

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49 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I drove what I derisively called "aluminum war canoes" in the UAE for a year. Riding in these things during an Arabian summer was like being cooked alive in a bean tin. Open wheel house, no seats, no head. 15 hours at a time without a break.

Anyway, they were equipped with twin 200hp  Volvo Penta turbo diesel I/O's. They were pretty fast considering that they were shaped like a brick. The water was so damned hot that we ran them without thermostats. We'd escort military sealift command vessels, destroyers and cruisers in and out of port. Well, at full blat a US Arleigh Burke class destroyer can out pace us and leaves a massive wake while doing it. Even the MSC cargo ships would race out of port to make it difficult for the suicide jockeys to blow a hole in them.

One day we're escorting this MSC ship out and they just keep pouring it on. Their wake built and built. We asked the liaison officer onboard if we were released from escort but they refused to let us go and we had to keep up. Us two trailing boats ended up zipping over the crest of their wake...we saw each other's props, hulls in mid-air. It was impressive. We came down with a mighty crash that popped the side windows right out of the wheel house. My gunners had no seats. They just stand on a flat aft deck, with a strap around their hips connected to the gun mounts. I was terrified that I was going to lose someone overboard.

Yeah, but what was your fuel burn at full chat? 

 

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8 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I like PA shitfights over in PA as much as anyone, but lets keep CA the kinder gentler place to relax ;)

I quite agree.  So please direct your efforts to the person who posted the my-military-activities-tale in CA rather than in PA.

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16 minutes ago, Elegua said:

 

Yeah, but what was your fuel burn at full chat? 

 

Never paid attention to it. Fuel was at taxpayer expense.  When the ships were in port, we formed a security cordon around the ships and idled the engines constantly. Sometimes they never shut off once for weeks or a month at a time.

Anyway, the point of the post wasn't so much the military antics much as high speed boat maneuvering. I thought our ride was rough but the Fountain in the video is far faster and far more dangerous. I much prefer the peace of sailing. So much so, that I hate running my puny, 3 cylinder auxiliary.

I'm curious about what's inside the length of those really long, enclosed Fountains? There's no windows or hatches. I imagine there's at least a seat, a tiny sink and a porta-potty, right? Seems like an enormous void.

 

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23 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I'm curious about what's inside the length of those really long, enclosed Fountains?

more of this, sans suits

Fountain 48 Express CruiserBoat Review: | Yachting

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22 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Never paid attention to it. Fuel was at taxpayer expense.  When the ships were in port, we formed a security cordon around the ships and idled the engines constantly. Sometimes they never shut off once for weeks or a month at a time.

Anyway, the point of the post wasn't so much the military antics much as high speed boat maneuvering. I thought our ride was rough but the Fountain in the video is far faster and far more dangerous. I much prefer the peace of sailing. So much so, that I hate running my puny, 3 cylinder auxiliary.

I'm curious about what's inside the length of those really long, enclosed Fountains? There's no windows or hatches. I imagine there's at least a seat, a tiny sink and a porta-potty, right? Seems like an enormous void.

 

The well appointed ones have a stabilization system, a generator, the usual fresh water plumbing for warm, fresh swim showers, AC, big multi-zone sound system, TVs, GPS  "hover systems", joystick docking, master suite suitable for 3P....lots of fuel....etc... 

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Elegua said:

master suite suitable for 3P

When Reggie Fountain built his house next to the boat works, the word from the local electronics supplier was that there was an amazing amount of audiovisual equipment installed in the bedrooms. "I'd never get naked in that house" was the quote I think...

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Wow. So this is what people with money do.

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

 

Yeah, but what was your fuel burn at full chat? 

 

A really rough guess is HP/10, so 20 gallons per hour per engine. Diesels can be better than this, gas engines can be a bit worse. The measurement for hp/gal/hr or hp/pound/hr is BSFC and believe it or not the best BSFC numbers come from the huge diesels in merchant ships.

Also note power comes from the WEIGHT of the fuel burned, not the volume, so diesel being heavier than gasoline gives you a bit of GPH advantage right there and merchant ships, once warmed up and out of sight of port officials, can switch from diesel to heavy bunker fuel and get more power from the same volume of fuel while also stinking up the place. There are occasional campaigns to make ships run on diesel all the time.

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If you want to dive into it:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake-specific_fuel_consumption

They don't rate every single engine, but they put the Rotax 582 at the low end, which isn't surprising. I hate those noisy things to start with and high revving gasoline 2-strokes tend to waste gas for several reasons. Big ship diesels got almost all the top spots with one big stationary engine at #1.

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19 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

That fuel burn is quite low.

That all depends on whose credit card you use when you refuel.

The owner once asked why I insist on paying for dinner when we go out. I'm apparently the only person who has bought him dinner in the last 30 years. 

I told him "so you won't ask me to pay the fuel bill." 

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Wow. So this is what people with money do.

Well before that they all bought Chris Craft or Hatteras 50-60 somethings that sort of halfway planed with two 12 cylinder diesels going full blast leaving a wake about 6 feet high and a cloud of black smoke, so this is actually an improvement :rolleyes:

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2 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

That all depends on whose credit card you use when you refuel.

The owner once asked why I insist on paying for dinner when we go out. I'm apparently the only person who has bought him dinner in the last 30 years. 

I told him "so you won't ask me to pay the fuel bill." 

The only way to do a whole lot better than that at that size range is to travel at displacement speeds.

 

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1 minute ago, Cruisin Loser said:

 I'm apparently the only person who has bought him dinner in the last 30 years.

Spends $100's an hour entertaining people and they don't even spring for food & booze?

He needs to find new friends.

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6 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

If the three paras of my-glorious-service-in-defence-of-religious-dictatorship belongs here, then a quick question about that belongs here too.

I read something about fast boats and big wakes.  The location was given to describe the water temp. 

 

 

 

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25 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I read something about fast boats and big wakes.  The location was given to describe the water temp. 

 

 

 

Kind like how "I was flying my F-18 to Bermuda and there was a GPS outage, so we took our last good fix and plotted a course from there and flew until we got into VOR range or maybe we had the last plane with an ADF still installed and took a bearing on ZBM" is a post about navigation methods, not the Air Force or whatever :rolleyes:

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I've played with and owned sail and power boats my entire life. I have covered about 85k miles on powerboats, and a bit more on sailboats. So don't hate me for saying this:

I owned a Fountain for a decade. It was a very slow sport fish cruiser (same stepped bottom, but with a cuddy cabin and open cockpit for fishing ahead of the same big engine compartment), with only 770 hp total in twin fuel injected big block engines, so topped out at only 55 knots. Which meant we could go faster on the water than on the trailer.

The paint would get stripped from the outdrives at speed: Not bottom paint, but the paint Mercury put on the drives. Tore the depth transducer off the bottom running flat out.

The typical fuel burn per weekend was $1000, for about 40 weekends per year. The maintenance on the engines was about half the fuel cost, with a total cost of operation of about $60k each and every year for a boat that cost $250k new in 2000. My Olson 40 is almost free by comparison. Especially now that I went with electric propulsion.

The level of attention required to operate the Fountain safely at high speed was very, very high. But at 18-25 knots, which was a nice cruising speed, it was not too complicated, so my kids could and did do everything except put the hammers down. That was why we owned powerboats during those years: it's important for kids to be able to safely do everything aboard. Sailboats I like tend to be potentially dangerous for kids and friends who are just out for a fun day.

I did have to radically re-rig the Olson to reduce risks so I can still take non-sailing or non-attentive people out for a good time.

A short search of these forums will find several deaths and grave injuries of sailors, even extremely good and fit sailors.

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35 minutes ago, carcrash said:

I've played with and owned sail and power boats my entire life. I have covered about 85k miles on powerboats, and a bit more on sailboats. So don't hate me for saying this:

I owned a Fountain for a decade. It was a very slow sport fish cruiser (same stepped bottom, but with a cuddy cabin and open cockpit for fishing ahead of the same big engine compartment), with only 770 hp total in twin fuel injected big block engines, so topped out at only 55 knots. Which meant we could go faster on the water than on the trailer.

The paint would get stripped from the outdrives at speed: Not bottom paint, but the paint Mercury put on the drives. Tore the depth transducer off the bottom running flat out.

The typical fuel burn per weekend was $1000, for about 40 weekends per year. The maintenance on the engines was about half the fuel cost, with a total cost of operation of about $60k each and every year for a boat that cost $250k new in 2000. My Olson 40 is almost free by comparison. Especially now that I went with electric propulsion.

The level of attention required to operate the Fountain safely at high speed was very, very high. But at 18-25 knots, which was a nice cruising speed, it was not too complicated, so my kids could and did do everything except put the hammers down. That was why we owned powerboats during those years: it's important for kids to be able to safely do everything aboard. Sailboats I like tend to be potentially dangerous for kids and friends who are just out for a fun day.

I did have to radically re-rig the Olson to reduce risks so I can still take non-sailing or non-attentive people out for a good time.

A short search of these forums will find several deaths and grave injuries of sailors, even extremely good and fit sailors.

Great post, and you've had some interesting toys!

My guess is that risks are highly site-specific, and family risk assessments are hard to guess right. Growing up in the 60s, my old man (a lifelong sailor and the local medical examiner) would preach to my brother and me about the danger of being run over by an outboard (he knew we were hydroplaning and skiing with friends). The waterway was busy where we lived, and Dad described a couple of accidents he'd seen in grisly detail. But he had no problem with us sailing right out into the Atlantic by ourselves - and I never told him about scaring the shit out of myself in the shipping lane, or catching tides wrong, and other dumb mishaps. Looking back, hard to know which behaviors were the riskiest.

One thing probably everyone can agree on - jetskis just suck as risk factors. Neighbors here lost a son who was swimming when a kid came roaring back to shore and hit him in the head. When the kid cut the throttle back, he lost steering ability to avoid the collision. You can point to multiple issues in accidents like that, but I wish the damn things just didn't exist.

 

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@Israel Hands those are good stories! Thanks for sharing. Reminded me of another:

When I was 10, so 4th grade, my parents moved to a house with 100 feet of deep water dock in the back. We had a fleet of sail and power boats. My Dad, a pilot, had a "check-out ride" defined for each boat: how to rig, put away, operate, anchor, navigate (1967, so just compass, divider, parallel rulers, charts), safety equipment (life jackets, whistle, horn, flares), everything that was appropriate for each boat. We had to pass the check-out, and then we were allowed to take the boat by ourselves. I passed all the check-out rides over the summer, so the entire fleet was at my disposal, including a couple of 8' sailing dinghies, an Aqua Cat, a single seat hydroplane with a 6hp outboard, a 14' skiboat with a 35hp outboard, and the Cal 24. Same was true for all my siblings, all five of us. Eventually the fleet swelled to a lot of boats including ocean racers we raced to Mexico and Hawaii, faster powerboats, olympic classes, and more. I spent nearly every day on the water, and have continued this practice when not in the office.

One day in November, family seated around the dining table for dinner, my Mom said, "The Shell gas card bill came today. There were charges on Tuesday and Thursday at the Avalon fuel dock. Anyone know why?" So I said, "There was no wind on Tuesday and Thursday, so I took the ski boat over to play pinball in the arcade." No further comment.

For those not in SoCal, Avalon is a town on Catalina Island, about 25 miles offshore. I took a friend from 4th grade with me, he had never been to Catalina before. The ski boat was a 14' Glastron with a 35 hp Mercury outboard, and had a compass, and of course life jackets, horn, and those silly little flares, so no problem. Filled both 6 gallon tanks, and off we went. It was in the 1960s, so there was the typical 2-3 mile visibility on a clear sunny day due to the constant smog of the era. We waited for a Catalina Express boat, and followed its wake. Soon, of course, we could see nothing beyond the grey horizon, and the wake of the boat we were following. About 2/3 of the way across, the engine sputters to a stop as the first tank is empty. The boat slows to a stop, rolling in the long Pacific swell. Silence, broken only by the fading sound of the Catalina Express boat continuing on at 20 knots, disappearing into the haze. I switch the fuel line to the other tank, open the tank vent, squeeze the bulb until firm, restart the engine, and continue on following the compass course. Eventually, the island gradually appears in the haze. We play some pin ball, refuel at the dock, and return the same way we went over.

Oddly, this friend never went to Catalina with me again. He did not act scared, but clearly, he was.

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7 hours ago, carcrash said:

I've played with and owned sail and power boats my entire life. I have covered about 85k miles on powerboats, and a bit more on sailboats. So don't hate me for saying this:

I owned a Fountain for a decade. It was a very slow sport fish cruiser (same stepped bottom, but with a cuddy cabin and open cockpit for fishing ahead of the same big engine compartment), with only 770 hp total in twin fuel injected big block engines, so topped out at only 55 knots. Which meant we could go faster on the water than on the trailer.

The paint would get stripped from the outdrives at speed: Not bottom paint, but the paint Mercury put on the drives. Tore the depth transducer off the bottom running flat out.

The typical fuel burn per weekend was $1000, for about 40 weekends per year. The maintenance on the engines was about half the fuel cost, with a total cost of operation of about $60k each and every year for a boat that cost $250k new in 2000. My Olson 40 is almost free by comparison. Especially now that I went with electric propulsion.

The level of attention required to operate the Fountain safely at high speed was very, very high. But at 18-25 knots, which was a nice cruising speed, it was not too complicated, so my kids could and did do everything except put the hammers down. That was why we owned powerboats during those years: it's important for kids to be able to safely do everything aboard. Sailboats I like tend to be potentially dangerous for kids and friends who are just out for a fun day.

I did have to radically re-rig the Olson to reduce risks so I can still take non-sailing or non-attentive people out for a good time.

A short search of these forums will find several deaths and grave injuries of sailors, even extremely good and fit sailors.

I don't have them at hand and google failed me, but I remember reading statistics of accidents at sea here in France and it was mostly powerboat / jetski accidents.

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5 hours ago, carcrash said:

When I was 10, so 4th grade, my parents moved to a house with 100 feet of deep water dock in the back. We had a fleet of sail and power boats. My Dad, a pilot, had a "check-out ride" defined for each boat: how to rig, put away, operate, anchor, navigate (1967, so just compass, divider, parallel rulers, charts), safety equipment (life jackets, whistle, horn, flares), everything that was appropriate for each boat. We had to pass the check-out, and then we were allowed to take the boat by ourselves. I passed all the check-out rides over the summer, so the entire fleet was at my disposal, including a couple of 8' sailing dinghies, an Aqua Cat, a single seat hydroplane with a 6hp outboard, a 14' skiboat with a 35hp outboard, and the Cal 24. Same was true for all my siblings, all five of us. Eventually the fleet swelled to a lot of boats including ocean racers we raced to Mexico and Hawaii, faster powerboats, olympic classes, and more. I spent nearly every day on the water, and have continued this practice when not in the office.


Carcrash, in boat terms, that's the equivalent of growing up clothed in gold leaf.  It is a huge privilege to grow up with doorstep access to all those boats ... but above all, to grow up with parents who had such a wonderful approach to risk. 

I thought I had it lucky with access to boats from age ten onwards, but you had even more boats and much more freedom to use them.  It's a rare and wonderful thing to find parents who have both the resources to provide such facilities, and the confidence to let their children develop their own risk management skills.

Have you been able to help another generation grow up the same way?

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