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35 minutes ago, chester said:

crickets

yep....I stayed away from camping for years but in Oct. I did the NE BDR (North East Backcountry Discovery Route) with my friend and cousin in law.   We camped out ....I  re-enjoyed setting up a camp site, and doing the last fall camping thing. Then a few close (in the bubble) friends went and did a weekend in the Catskills in early December.  I needed a new sleeping bag that was warm enough.  enjoyed that too.  Next week, going again with 2 close friends and hiking up into the snowy woods once again.

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5 minutes ago, dacapo said:

yep....I stayed away from camping for years but in Oct. I did the NE BDR (North East Backcountry Discovery Route) with my friend and cousin in law.   We camped out ....I  re-enjoyed setting up a camp site, and doing the last fall camping thing. Then a few close (in the bubble) friends went and did a weekend in the Catskills in early December.  I needed a new sleeping bag that was warm enough.  enjoyed that too.  Next week, going again with 2 close friends and hiking up into the snowy woods once again.

excellent, have a blast. 

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I used to do a lot of winter backpacking trips in the southern Appalachians. I'm kind of over it now. Cold weather means I have to carry too much weight and my wife has developed a strong aversion to any temperature below about 60F, so we don't do it any more. 

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1 hour ago, VWAP said:

P8jRMUt.jpg

Someone could lose an eye with that.

 

Two if you're lucky.

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Did a winter “snow camping” weekend trip in Boy Scouts in Wisconsin as a yoot.......supposed to be a mini survival skills learning trip of sorts...........I do not remember one enjoyable moment. Not one. 

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Did some late fall early spring camping as a Boy Scout.  One trip it snowed at night.   I brought an wool army blanket as a backup for just that very thing.  Turns out my idiot friend (his Dad wasnt too attentive) only brought  "space blanket" (one of those stupid tin foily things) so of course he gets the extra blanket that would have kept me warm.    Froze my butt off.  Never again.

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Depends a bit on where you live...  In Texas, I hate camping in August, but January is nice...

Although honestly, I grew up in the Northern US and my favorite Boy Scouts campouts were in the cold in Illinois and Wisconsin.  I remember waking up one morning with a foot of snow on the tent.  That night, we had one of my all time favorite camping dinners...  put your ground beef, cheese, corn, and whatever else in a ball of foil, chuck it in the campfire, pull it out little while later, and enjoy.  Amazing how good something like that tastes when you've been out in subfreezing weather for 30 hours or so.

A lot of it is a matter of having the right gear and habits to stay warm.  Sleeping in the cold is great if you're bundled up nicely...  but miserable if you aren't.  It's important to be wearing fresh dry layers when trying to sleep, instead of the same socks you wore all day, for example.  Also, it's hard to stay warm in cold weather with a full bladder, so if you need to go, don't delay.  You'll be much warmer afterward.

I find that dampness is the killer...  50 degrees (F) and wet can be far colder than 20 and dry.  And the damp can get you no matter how much gear you have on.

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22 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

Depends a bit on where you live...  In Texas, I hate camping in August, but January is nice...

Although honestly, I grew up in the Northern US and my favorite Boy Scouts campouts were in the cold in Illinois and Wisconsin.  I remember waking up one morning with a foot of snow on the tent.  That night, we had one of my all time favorite camping dinners...  put your ground beef, cheese, corn, and whatever else in a ball of foil, chuck it in the campfire, pull it out little while later, and enjoy.  Amazing how good something like that tastes when you've been out in subfreezing weather for 30 hours or so.

A lot of it is a matter of having the right gear and habits to stay warm.  Sleeping in the cold is great if you're bundled up nicely...  but miserable if you aren't.  It's important to be wearing fresh dry layers when trying to sleep, instead of the same socks you wore all day, for example.  Also, it's hard to stay warm in cold weather with a full bladder, so if you need to go, don't delay.  You'll be much warmer afterward.

I find that dampness is the killer...  50 degrees (F) and wet can be far colder than 20 and dry.  And the damp can get you no matter how much gear you have on.

i bring a pringles can to piss in at night.  Don't want to leave the tent :ph34r:   

I'm contemplating trying out the ice fishing tent and wood stove for winter camping

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43454BC2-250A-4544-AF49-5F99167C7743.thumb.jpeg.3e598418d1e05d2a1c98997160a030df.jpeg

When I was young and dumb I used to work up in Northern Ontario. ‘Spring Camping’ would often involve a few weeks of sub zero tenting. Now I find it’s better to have a cabin with a wood burning stove in close proximity for any type of winter leisure.

If you must tent, get a -20C rated sleeping bag, not the cocoon style if you can handle a tiny bit of extra weight/bulk (car camping), and wear as little as possible underneath the sleeping bag. Put your clothes on in the morning inside the sleeping bag. Keep your pack and boots outside the tent(under tent porch) to avoid condensation.

I forget which explorer got his ship iced in up in the arctic for a winter. His crew were basically getting sick and dying from sleeping at night in their wool clothes. He sought advice from the locals...Inuit...they gave the crew seal skins to sleep with the instructions that no clothes be worn underneath. Apparently it was a game changer.

 

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I tolerate winter camping, summer is better, but winter is okay, it can be a lot of fun with a hammock. I make a folding gear sled for my customers, they seem to like it for winter camping ...

im_HS_hs_pix1.jpg

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In my youth I did lots of winter camping - lots of snow and VERY cold.  Cross-country ski to a remote location, shovel the snow out, and pitch a tent.  Not any more. 

One of the challenges is that the days are short.  Camping is fun but what to do when its 5:00 pm and dark and cold?  Keeping busy and entertained is a challenge.  

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4 hours ago, dacapo said:

Who likes to camp in the winter/snow? 
 

I took my daughter when she was three.  I take my granddaughter now and she is five.  I guess she's a late bloomer.

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I did a lot of it in the Pine Barrens of NJ til about 10 years ago due to raising kids and camping with them in the summer a few times. 
 

Me and a few friends would drive deep into the woods and set up a camp with tarps hung over the tents on rainy or snowy nights. We kept warm with a proper stone ringed fire, beer and whiskey. It got dark around 5 but we had the light from the campfire so we could stick our empty beer cans and plink at them with a few bb and pellet guns. I took my dog with us every time (in fact, I took him everywhere with me) and he loved it.

I’ll be doing more in the future and I’m not really fond of sitting in the woods scorching in the summer. 

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I’ve done Xmas camping in Joshua.  Tourists usually hiding elsewhere.   Just a lot, a whole Lot of rock climbers tho.   It’s their season.   Usually go to the smaller campsites like White Tank which are too small for the RV generator crowd.    Desert is great in winter.  Cold af at nite.   Bring plenty firewood - nothing there you can legally burn,

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I used to like hiking the AT in Ct. through S. Vt. in winter when I was in High school, and even into my college years. But it lost it's allure as I got older.

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47 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

I used to like hiking the AT in Ct. through S. Vt. in winter when I was in High school, and even into my college years. But it lost it's allure as I got older.

Yep. Don’t know if we get smarter or turn into wusses as we get older. For me it was the progression of attitude toward my years of 5am paddle out dawn patrol surf session.

Starts out: YEAH WAVES!!! Sprints out of car running to water pulling up wet suit as you run. Surf in the early twilight and well toward lunch.

A couple years later: drinking a cup of coffee in the front seat looking out at the break. You think.....”is that good enough to head out?” So you sit till the sun comes up and finally paddle out after slowly getting all your stuff on. Oh, and you’ve added webbed gloves and booties to your attire.

A  few more years: you arrive at the beach around 8 or 9. The sun is well up. You sit with your second cup of coffee (already had one at home and took a leisurely bathroom reading break first. You look out at the break and then get out of the car and stand around with the guys of a similar vintage wearing sweats and discuss the merits of whether the waves merit paddling out. Around 10 you finally slowly get dressed (having added a hood and earplugs to your kit to keep from losing all your hearing to the case of surfers ear you have developed) and paddle out. 

A few more years: Same as above, but half the time the quality of the waves do not merit getting wet. You now have a thermos of coffee to span a couple hours of debate and tall tales of the “ you shoulda been here last Wednesday.....it was epic” sort of conversations. You eventually decide to paddle out about 1/2 the time. The other half of the time it’s too cold, too crowded, too small, too big.

Finally: the alarm goes off and you turn it off, think “it’s probably blown out” and roll over for another couple hours of shut eye.

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12 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Yep. Don’t know if we get smarter or turn into wusses as we get older. For me it was the progression of attitude toward my years of 5am paddle out dawn patrol surf session.

Starts out: YEAH WAVES!!! Sprints out of car running to water pulling up wet suit as you run. Surf in the early twilight and well toward lunch.

A couple years later: drinking a cup of coffee in the front seat looking out at the break. You think.....”is that good enough to head out?” So you sit till the sun comes up and finally paddle out after slowly getting all your stuff on. Oh, and you’ve added webbed gloves and booties to your attire.

A  few more years: you arrive at the beach around 8 or 9. The sun is well up. You sit with your second cup of coffee (already had one at home and took a leisurely bathroom reading break first. You look out at the break and then get out of the car and stand around with the guys of a similar vintage wearing sweats and discuss the merits of whether the waves merit paddling out. Around 10 you finally slowly get dressed (having added a hood and earplugs to your kit to keep from losing all your hearing to the case of surfers ear you have developed) and paddle out. 

A few more years: Same as above, but half the time the quality of the waves do not merit getting wet. You now have a thermos of coffee to span a couple hours of debate and tall tales of the “ you shoulda been here last Wednesday.....it was epic” sort of conversations. You eventually decide to paddle out about 1/2 the time. The other half of the time it’s too cold, too crowded, too small, too big.

Finally: the alarm goes off and you turn it off, think “it’s probably blown out” and roll over for another couple hours of shut eye.

Good start to a chapter in your book...

:)

 

WL

 

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49 minutes ago, White Lightning2 said:

Good start to a chapter in your book...

:)

 

WL

 

I like the chapter that starts out with PB running face first into a Golden orb weaver's web in a citrus grove, and after they have the patient (I believe it was a knife wound) in the ambulance, his partner tells him there's a spider on his head..... :D

 I still laugh my ass off thinking of that one every time I closely avoid a fucking spider web.

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I like it just fine now in my 4 season 4wd RV. .... did quite a bit of in high school at the ski areas near DC. a lot of van camping.. some tent camping. enjoyed it. 

Not sure I'm all about hiking into the frozen tundra and pitching a tent anymore... but the RV is fun.

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57 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

I like the chapter that starts out with PB running face first into a Golden orb weaver's web in a citrus grove, and after they have the patient (I believe it was a knife wound) in the ambulance, his partner tells him there's a spider on his head..... :D

 I still laugh my ass off thinking of that one every time I closely avoid a fucking spider web.

:lol:

Dude.......and people claim I can’t dance! I promise you my spider somewhere on me dance rivals anything you’ve seen to date. Absolutely true story.......

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2 hours ago, Point Break said:

(having added a hood and earplugs to your kit to keep from losing all your hearing to the case of surfers ear you have developed)

Funny, nowadays whenever I get my ears examined the ear doc is sure to comment about the long and winding road in my ear. I explain about surfer's ear and a lifetime of cold water immersion and he looks at me like I'm nuts. In Calif, surfer's ear is a well documented thing. In the rest of the world, not so much.

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could bring yer Old Bag to stay warm sleeping = storage of Much Heat

image.png.ceb7422870c2889353e543552e43554f.png

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2 hours ago, White Lightning2 said:

Good start to a chapter in your book...

:)

 

WL

 

PB will have a best seller.

 

I've always said Im going to write a book "The World according to Me" maybe my family would buy it ;-)

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26 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

I like it just fine now in my 4 season 4wd RV. .... did quite a bit of in high school at the ski areas near DC. a lot of van camping.. some tent camping. enjoyed it. 

Not sure I'm all about hiking into the frozen tundra and pitching a tent anymore... but the RV is fun.

Ive wanted to do the van camping thing out west....someday.

When I go away on my boat it seems like camping most of the time

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6 minutes ago, dacapo said:

PB will have a best seller.

 

I've always said Im going to write a book "The World according to Me" maybe my family would buy it ;-)

Why would they buy it, you have recited it to them for years...

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5 hours ago, mikewof said:

I tolerate winter camping, summer is better, but winter is okay, it can be a lot of fun with a hammock. I make a folding gear sled for my customers, they seem to like it for winter camping ...

im_HS_hs_pix1.jpg

 

Call me a wimp, but I would rather be tortured, than sleep outside in the cold winter weather!!  My idea of camping is a 35 foot or larger sailboat or power boat, a motorhome, or an Air B'nB in Europe or the Caribean!!!  Friend of ours is about to complete his 5000 sq. ft home in St. John, with an accessory apartment for himself, when he rents it out.  We will assemble 3 or 4 couples for the various bedroom suites and spend some time down there next winter.  That is our idea of camping!!

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Does van camping qualify as actual winter camping? Hell, I snuck into many, many KOAs in my van back in the 70s in the rocky mountains in the winter. You pull into an empty site after dark, plug in, run the heater and electric blanket and sleep toasty all night and flee before daylight.

I don't think that's what the OP is talking about.

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1 hour ago, dacapo said:

Ive wanted to do the van camping thing out west....someday.

When I go away on my boat it seems like camping most of the time

I bought this thing for skiing. Most of the places I went  req'd having another vehicle I could drive around in to go skiing. I had a jeep liberty to tow behind and use for storage LOL

It helps that I have a couple places to park in Vail and BC. Great campgrounds for an RV near Park City that provides access to the SLC areas.. Jackson was another place with easy camping. considerably less expensive to live out of the RV than to rent lodging. 

WIsh there was a campground anywheres near Big Sky. 

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In my youth, I did six day treks from Yellowstone to the north side of the Beartooths on nordic gear. (bad nordic gear). Have spent time in snow caves. Mostly spent winter camps on Lake Michigan at Nordhouse Dunes wilderness area. Not really roughing it when you can carry in a 12 pack. 

Proper equipment can make it enjoyable. Bad equipment can make it a bear.

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3 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

Call me a wimp, but I would rather be tortured, than sleep outside in the cold winter weather!!  My idea of camping is a 35 foot or larger sailboat or power boat, a motorhome, or an Air B'nB in Europe or the Caribean!!!  Friend of ours is about to complete his 5000 sq. ft home in St. John, with an accessory apartment for himself, when he rents it out.  We will assemble 3 or 4 couples for the various bedroom suites and spend some time down there next winter.  That is our idea of camping!!

As long as you stay dressed, and have a good 20-below bag, it's not a big deal. Some of my customers shitcan the tent, and they do "hut touring" instead, where they load up their folding sleds with beer, food, and gear, and then x-country ski from hut to hut. I think they were originally built for the 10th Mountain Division, a light infantry division in the Army, they set up the Camp Hale for WWII training.

 I haven't done one yet, but I'm told it's fun ... they get up early, ski until afternoon to one of the huts, then get shitfaced with a bunch of fellow ski bums, sometimes get laid, pass out, wake up early, repeat for the whole hut circuit or until they run out of alcohol and weed.

10th-Mountain-Division-Fowler-Hilliard-H

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18 hours ago, mikewof said:

As long as you stay dressed, and have a good 20-below bag, it's not a big deal...

 

20 below???  One still has to breath!  My nose and lips would freeze and fall off......

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13 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

20 below???  One still has to breath!  My nose and lips would freeze and fall off......

Not in a good mummy bag.

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23 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

20 below???  One still has to breath!  My nose and lips would freeze and fall off......

a friend did a lot back in the day.  he like to tell the story of camping in far northern saskatchewan at -40 and it being so still a candle flame stood straightup with nary a flicker 

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18 hours ago, longy said:

I did a lot of winter camping/surfing growing up - in shorts & t shirt.    

 

Hawaii

Roger that.

Long pants @ marriage & funeral.

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2 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

20 below???  One still has to breath!  My nose and lips would freeze and fall off......

That's the coldest point.

So you get a 20-below bag, and you bed down when maybe it's 15-degrees Fin the afternoon, not really miserable, but cold. Then by midnight or so, the temperature plummets, possibly because you're already at ten thousand some feet, maybe it hits zero, maybe even a little colder, your bag is there and capable. A good bag will hold in a lot of heat, and it funnels up through the hole where your face is, it's manageable.

But boy howdy, does it suck when you have to take a piss a couple times in the night, with a bladder full of beer and tequila.

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33 minutes ago, mikewof said:

That's the coldest point.

So you get a 20-below bag, and you bed down when maybe it's 15-degrees Fin the afternoon, not really miserable, but cold. Then by midnight or so, the temperature plummets, possibly because you're already at ten thousand some feet, maybe it hits zero, maybe even a little colder, your bag is there and capable. A good bag will hold in a lot of heat, and it funnels up through the hole where your face is, it's manageable.

But boy howdy, does it suck when you have to take a piss a couple times in the night, with a bladder full of beer and tequila.

 

Only one more reason to ONLY camp on a heated, air-conditioned boat, motorhome, or Caribbean Air BnB!!

IIRC the old time, hard hat, deep sea divers, with leaden shoes, carried narrow olive bottles inside there suits, to piss in when they were on a long lasting deep diving job!  Just another thing I will never miss that I didn't ever have to do!!  I think some small general aviation pilots use a similar system....

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Winter 1970, Mount Washington NH. Fashionable chamois leather facemask. I'm the bearded one. Friggin' cold and windy tenting on the summit. Mikewof- that's why God invented spare water bottles- to piss in at night without leaving the sleeping bag. 

Climbing2a.jpg

Climbing1a.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Grizz said:

Mount Washington NH.

I xc skied up to the summit sometime in the 80s. Stayed on my ass most of the way down.

Ski camped in Michigan's UP, but I'll bet Mount Washington was colder.

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1 minute ago, justsomeguy! said:

I xc skied up to the summit sometime in the 80s. Stayed on my ass most of the way down.

Ski camped in Michigan's UP, but I'll bet Mount Washington was colder.

The following year we went up on XC skis too. First time on skis- note to self- practice turning beforehand! 

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4 hours ago, Grizz said:

First time on skis- note to self- practice turning beforehand! 

Downhill telemark was never my forte. Besides, the snow that day was trampled to bits.

Hey, I lived. ;)

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I learned winter camping through Scouting (and the associated groups for older teens).  Good times for kids.  

I once went on 'winter exercise' with the army.   It was way easier!  The army had stoves inside the tents for heat, inflatable air mattresses that could be stacked to make a couch, huge tents and trucks to haul around all the stuff.   

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16 hours ago, Bugsy said:

I learned winter camping through Scouting (and the associated groups for older teens).  Good times for kids.  

I once went on 'winter exercise' with the army.   It was way easier!  The army had stoves inside the tents for heat, inflatable air mattresses that could be stacked to make a couch, huge tents and trucks to haul around all the stuff.   

Yeah, with the right gear, it's no big deal ... I had a night in July, 30 degrees, no big deal, but I grabbed the wrong sleeping bag in my rush to get out the door. It was a child's sleeping bag about four feet long, that was a long night, I couldn't get warm, that 30 degrees in the bed of my truck felt like zero. Nowadays, just running from the Jacuzzi into the house is a lot colder than being out all night with the right winter gear.

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The only time I've camped in a tent in the winter, was in the RAF, eight man 2inch alloy tube heavy canvas framed tents.. sleeping bags on the floor liner.. so cold we couldn't roll the door flaps back in the morning, you sort of folded them back cracking the ice formed on them.

Me I had a battery electric shaver, so shaved inside the sleeping bag ( so officialdom couldn't hear it), others.. well everyone had to wash in plastic bowls on a table outside, cold water from  Jerry cans. So my shave with the wet razer was a quick formality for show,  before parade. Then breakfast and a ten mile route march.

The nearest otherwise was sleeping on board my 17ff sailing cruiser. Arm out of the all seasons sleeping bag in the morning, reach across to the cooker. Turn on and light the gas, arm back in the sleeping bag and watch the ice melt down the inside of the windows, as the cooker heated the kettle for the first muggacoffee of the morning.. After steam up, the frying pan would be slid across to cook the bacon for breakfast.. everything prepared the night before... By the time the bacon was cooking I'd be sat up still in sleeping bag. And after both coffee and bacon butty were consumed it was warm enough to consider getting up.

These days? No chance, I hate the cold, and it causes me breathing difficulties.. Hence the timer on the workshop will turn the fan heater on at 08:30, and I will arrive at 09:00 clutching muggacoffee number 2.

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As far as real cold nites in a tent we snack on bars to keep the body metabolism fired up.  Cardboard boxes are good insulating ground cover.

David Roberts has written some fine books on climbing and surviving in the mountains.

https://www.google.com/search?q=david+roberts+climber&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-us&client=safari

A6C7D7CC-5CDE-42CD-8D45-8E1996C2C154.jpeg

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On 2/4/2021 at 4:57 PM, Grizz said:

Winter 1970, Mount Washington NH. Fashionable chamois leather facemask. I'm the bearded one. Friggin' cold and windy tenting on the summit. Mikewof- that's why God invented spare water bottles- to piss in at night without leaving the sleeping bag. 

Climbing2a.jpg

Climbing1a.jpg

you look kinda Grizzly

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Be Careful no matter how otherwise prepared you may be

I signed up for Nevada Search & Rescue notifications when Steve Fossett went missing

in the winter they rarely post Warm Fuzzy stories - Summer more Grim stories But at least it's not Kold

ya might be 120 degrees on open desert but still better than -20

https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/02/05/at-least-1-skier-dead-in-sierra-nevada-avalanche/

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I’ve slept many many nights (and days) in various tents and sleeping bags. Coldest probably only in mid 30’s and that’s not common.......hottest easily over 100......I just want to say....I HATE mummy bags.....even when it’s butt ass cold.......

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3 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

you look kinda Grizzly

Yep- Grizzly was my CB handle in the ‘70s. Now I just look like a fatter version of my avatar. Sic transit gloria etc.

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3 hours ago, Point Break said:

I’ve slept many many nights (and days) in various tents and sleeping bags. Coldest probably only in mid 30’s and that’s not common.......hottest easily over 100......I just want to say....I HATE mummy bags.....even when it’s butt ass cold.......

- 26F on the shore of Lake Superior. The moisture in the air was freezing like sparkles in front of your eyes. Went to a gas station in Canada and the guy comes out in a tee shirt to pump the gas. It's all relative to what you are use to.

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7 hours ago, Point Break said:

I’ve slept many many nights (and days) in various tents and sleeping bags. Coldest probably only in mid 30’s and that’s not common.......hottest easily over 100......I just want to say....I HATE mummy bags.....even when it’s butt ass cold.......

They suck. Just a dumb-ass ploy to save weight and money for the high-loft bags.

Of course, if you're drunk enough, they work fine.

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10 minutes ago, mikewof said:

Of course, if you're drunk enough, they work fine.

Unfortunately not one single night or day was “off the clock”......so I was never drunk.......that’s not to say I never had a little.....nippy......but that’s another story. ;)

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Agreed I detested mummy bags as well. Rather then use my service issued cold-weather down mummy bags, I bought a polyester bag I could stretch out in a bit more then the mummy bags confined fit.

Never like getting drunk either, after having to many at a party before I went in the service. Then in BU - A school in Port Hueneme my older brother a Corpsman stationed at Balboa Naval Hospital came up to Port Hueneme to celebrate New Years of '72, and brought a bottle of Jack Daniels to go with the Colt 45 I purchased. I swore never again, after the wake up the next day.

From then on one or two was fine - anything more just wasn't fun.

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How about Supprised Winter Camping

https://www.wrcbtv.com/story/43301635/man-spends-seven-days-stranded-after-his-gps-directed-him-to-an-unplowed-mountain-pass

 

NEWS

Man spends seven days stranded after his GPS directed him to an unplowed mountain pass

By Cheri Mossburg and Jessica Myers, CNN A man who became stranded during heavy snow in the backcountry of California's Sierra Nevada mountains for a week after following the directions on his GPS was rescued alive...
Friday, February 5th 2021, 9:05 PM EST
Updated: 
Friday, February 5th 2021, 9:20 PM EST
Image
By Cheri Mossburg and Jessica Myers, CNN

A man who became stranded during heavy snow in the backcountry of California's Sierra Nevada mountains for a week after following the directions on his GPS was rescued alive after surviving on a small supply of food and melted snow.

Harland Earls, 29, was traveling from Grass Valley to Truckee for a birthday party on January 24, a drive that would typically take less than two hours, when a heavy snowstorm shut down Interstate 80. Seeking an alternate route, Earls turned to his GPS, according to the Sierra County Sheriff's Office.

The device directed Earls to the shortest route on the map. But the GPS didn't account for Henness Pass Road being an unplowed mountain pass and Earls ended up being stuck for days in snow so deep he was unable turn his vehicle around, the sheriff's office said.

"The GPS doesn't know if there's six feet of snow on a road or if the road is clear and passable," Sierra County Sheriff Mike Fisher told CNN.

Stuck and unable to obtain a cell phone signal, Earls tried tying small branches to the tires of his pickup truck to gain some traction, his mother, Julie Earls told CNN. In the process, his cell phone got wet and stopped working. The resourceful man found some dry spaghetti noodles and handwarmer packets in his truck, and popped them into a Ziploc bag with his phone. It took three days, but the phone finally dried out enough to for him to charge it and make a call. But finding cell service wasn't as easy.

While Earls survived on two cans of beans, some sausages and a few pieces of stale, moldy bread, the man's family reported him missing and assembled search parties to hunt for him. Law enforcement was alerted and various agencies were on the lookout for Earls and his pickup truck.

The sheriff's office said that Earls' pickup truck had a camper that provided some shelter and he had winter clothing and some propane for a camp stove.

In the meantime, another storm moved through the region, dumping even more snow, his mother said

Yet she wasn't about to give up on finding her son.

"I will not wait until spring to find his body. I will find him now if I have to go out there myself," Julie Earls said, noting that her son had always been interested in survival skills and that as a boy, she would often find him reading a survival skills book with a flashlight in the middle of the night.

 

Earls was able to cut wood for a fire, and used a small propane camp stove to melt snow into drinking water, which he drank out of a small dog dish. He tried hiking out a few times, but couldn't make it far enough to find a cell phone signal as he kept sinking into the deep snow. He had now been stuck for seven days

"And then on Sunday (January 31), he really was desperate and he was out of provisions and ... his phone was finally charging up to at least 50%," his mother said. "So it gave him the chance to hike up to the highest point."

Earls strapped two snowboards to his feet to use as makeshift snowshoes to hike to a place where he could get cell service. The connection was bad and the call quickly dropped, but it lasted long enough for him to give the 911 operator his name and birth date.

Law enforcement was able to pinpoint the GPS location of his phone and launched ground search and rescue teams as well as a helicopter. After scouring the area, the California Highway Patrol helicopter crew located him "almost immediately," Fisher said.

His mother said Earls declined any medical attention once he was rescued.

"He just wanted to get home. He was hungry, cold and tired, very weary as I met him at the sheriff's station," she said.

Earls is physically doing well, his mother said.

"I've been feeding him all of his favorite foods and vitamins and rehydrating," she said. "He drank probably a gallon of water the first day that he got here."

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Not exactly winter camping, but my mate and I did an overnighter at 11,500' on the summit of Mt. San Gorgonio one October . There was still some of  last winter's  snow in shady patches.

I decided my 6 month old pup was old enough to make the trek with us. Bad idea, by about 4pm she was exhausted and I wound up carrying her the rest of the way up. Then it was blowing about 30 knots at the summit and setting up the tent was a challenge as we couldn't stake it down so Kenny had to stay inside or we'd lose it. He also decided the dog couldn't come inside because he uses the tent in the Sierras and didn't want dog scent on it in bear territory. So Hooky and I slept outside in the lee of the tent which was now eliptical shaped from the wind.

Actually, I think we were more comfy outside as he had that flapping tent up against him all night long. All I had was a shivering dog trying to climb inside my skin. She was frightened of big wind for the rest of her life. Come to think of it, that's probably why she didn't like being on the sail boat.

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It's blowing a hoolie outside 55mph, and snowing, there's a border collie cuddled up to my feet, he hates the wind howling round the house.

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42 minutes ago, Willin' said:

Not exactly winter camping, but my mate and I did an overnighter at 11,500' on the summit of Mt. San Gorgonio one October . There was still some of  last winter's  snow in shady patches.

I decided my 6 month old pup was old enough to make the trek with us. Bad idea, by about 4pm she was exhausted and I wound up carrying her the rest of the way up. Then it was blowing about 30 knots at the summit and setting up the tent was a challenge as we couldn't stake it down so Kenny had to stay inside or we'd lose it. He also decided the dog couldn't come inside because he uses the tent in the Sierras and didn't want dog scent on it in bear territory. So Hooky and I slept outside in the lee of the tent which was now eliptical shaped from the wind.

Actually, I think we were more comfy outside as he had that flapping tent up against him all night long. All I had was a shivering dog trying to climb inside my skin. She was frightened of big wind for the rest of her life. Come to think of it, that's probably why she didn't like being on the sail boat.

San Gorgonio is a ways in from the trailhead yes?   Read stories of similar summit conditions - that’s gnarly stuff for a pup.

Getting nearly blown off Baldy or Gorgonio is always a crowd favorite.

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3 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

San Gorgonio is a ways in from the trailhead yes?   Read stories of similar summit conditions - that’s gnarly stuff for a pup.

Getting nearly blown off Baldy or Gorgonio is always a crowd favorite.

Yupper, it's a full day's hike from the carpark.  There's no shelter from the wind anywhere up there. Yeah, I was a fool taking that poor dog along. Sadly, the year before she died we took her on a hike to Devil's Postpile and I had to carry her most of the way back from that one too. I guess I'm a bad judge of dog fitness.

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I've spent 100s if not 1000s of nights sleeping outdoors, including many in winter, often at high altitude. I spent the winter of 1976 sleeping in a tent in Camp 4 Yosemite. I have plenty of stories of extreme discomfort but the worst was a winter trip to the Bugaboos.

Upon arrival we were immediately hit with a severe storm that went on for ten days. Only left the tent to shovel it out, to get water, and to shit. Terrified  day and night of avalanches.

Hands down the worst part though was being in a two man mountaineering tent for ten days with my motherfucking friend. By the time we got out we hated each other. It got so bad I would fantasize about cutting his throat while he was eating. You see, his jaw popped when he chewed. You have no idea how irritating something as innocent as that can be until you spend ten days within inches of someone else.

Even years later when we used to hang out together I couldn't go to a restaurant with him...no way.

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On 2/3/2021 at 8:49 PM, dyslexic dog said:Have spent time in snow caves. Mostly spent winter camps on Lake Michigan at Nordhouse Dunes wilderness area. Not really roughing it when you can carry in a 12 pack. 

Proper equipment can make it enjoyable. Bad equipment can make it a bear.

Nordhouse is our last-minute-idea winter “hey let’s go camping for a few days” destination. An hour or two drive up the coast, short walk in, and plenty of deadfall to set up crawl-in shelters and provide firewood; I’ve never brought a tent there in the winter. Pigeon River Forest a few hours further north is another great winter snowshoe camping destination and fun wildlife tracking destination, especially when the elk bulls are shedding beginning about now.

The fortunate thing about this region is the amount of wooded/forested land makes it relatively easy to set up natural shelter pretty much anywhere in the winter. It’s one of my favorite things about winter camping, along with no bugs and towing your pack on a small sled with a harness rather than on your back (I actually pack LESS gear in the winter, go figure). It’s always amazed me how comfortable it can be, there are so many “tricks” to making camping in sub-freezing and sub-zero weather quite comfortable. One of them being: take it easy on the booze. Good thread!

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6 hours ago, WhoaTed said:

Nordhouse is our last-minute-idea winter “hey let’s go camping for a few days” destination. An hour or two drive up the coast, short walk in, and plenty of deadfall to set up crawl-in shelters and provide firewood; I’ve never brought a tent there in the winter. Pigeon River Forest a few hours further north is another great winter snowshoe camping destination and fun wildlife tracking destination, especially when the elk bulls are shedding beginning about now.

The fortunate thing about this region is the amount of wooded/forested land makes it relatively easy to set up natural shelter pretty much anywhere in the winter. It’s one of my favorite things about winter camping, along with no bugs and towing your pack on a small sled with a harness rather than on your back (I actually pack LESS gear in the winter, go figure). It’s always amazed me how comfortable it can be, there are so many “tricks” to making camping in sub-freezing and sub-zero weather quite comfortable. One of them being: take it easy on the booze. Good thread!

It's a wilderness area. Do no harm. Leave no trace. I sure hope you are not cutting branches off trees and such. Take a bivy sack and use that or a tarp. 

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34 minutes ago, dyslexic dog said:

It's a wilderness area. Do no harm. Leave no trace. I sure hope you are not cutting branches off trees and such. Take a bivy sack and use that or a tarp. 

There are a few favorite natural deadfalls that we’ve used repeatedly at Nordhouse that make excellent shelters to sleep under with a light tarp draped over, the only trace left are the few pine boughs that were slept on. Deadfall cut for poles if needed. Same up at Pigeon River and further up in the UP, there’s plenty of natural dead material to create shelter with and no need to do harm or “leave trace”. Been “roughing it” regularly for 50 years and know how to treat the earth the way it should be, thanks for your concern.

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7 hours ago, WhoaTed said:

Nordhouse is our last-minute-idea winter

take it easy on the booze. Good thread!

ya Lost Me there

give me a HAWT Day on the River with KOLD Drinkies any day

but WTF You get Free Ice without needing a Chilly Bin

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Took the ice fishing tent out of storage. ( I’ve used this as home base for iceboating as well. ) it has a small wood burning stove that vents outside with a sturdy metal flu. The only prob is there is no floor. 

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10 hours ago, WhoaTed said:

There are a few favorite natural deadfalls that we’ve used repeatedly at Nordhouse that make excellent shelters to sleep under with a light tarp draped over, the only trace left are the few pine boughs that were slept on. Deadfall cut for poles if needed. Same up at Pigeon River and further up in the UP, there’s plenty of natural dead material to create shelter with and no need to do harm or “leave trace”. Been “roughing it” regularly for 50 years and know how to treat the earth the way it should be, thanks for your concern.

You are rationalizing. Cutting pine boughs is not good. You walk into places as I do there, and I can spot all the branches cut from the trees. The place is getting overused. I've spotted your camps a few times hiking in there. You really are doing damage in my view. Please rethink your "roughing it".  Hell, I don't even do fires in the winter (or summer). There are so many fire rings being built now.  Like I said, a bivy sack or a tarp and an air mattress eliminates the need for any of your "roughing it" crap.

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4 hours ago, dyslexic dog said:

You are rationalizing. Cutting pine boughs is not good.  a bivy sack or a tarp and an air mattress eliminates the need for any of your "roughing it" crap.

as does a compass, map and the weather Chanel

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On 2/8/2021 at 9:27 AM, dyslexic dog said:

You are rationalizing. Cutting pine boughs is not good. You walk into places as I do there, and I can spot all the branches cut from the trees. The place is getting overused. I've spotted your camps a few times hiking in there. You really are doing damage in my view. Please rethink your "roughing it".  Hell, I don't even do fires in the winter (or summer). There are so many fire rings being built now.  Like I said, a bivy sack or a tarp and an air mattress eliminates the need for any of your "roughing it" crap.

Apparently you mistake me for someone else, with the exception of footprints in the snow you haven’t spotted my camps (although I’ve seen the same “camps” you mention). You don’t know me, my abilities outdoors, nor my knowledge and stewardship of nature; for example I sustainably manage a small 6 acre wood lot so I know a few things about trees. But you go ahead and bang away at your keyboard; I suspect that your trigger finger is itchin’ so have the last word and we’ll call you the winner so you can move on to lecturing someone else.

Then you can fuck right off.

btw Pigeon River up north was great last week, the elk aren’t quite to shedding yet but some fun tracking and more bobcat sign this year than usual.

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5 hours ago, WhoaTed said:

Apparently you mistake me for someone else, with the exception of footprints in the snow you haven’t spotted my camps (although I’ve seen the same “camps” you mention). You don’t know me, my abilities outdoors, nor my knowledge and stewardship of nature; for example I sustainably manage a small 6 acre wood lot so I know a few things about trees. But you go ahead and bang away at your keyboard; I suspect that your trigger finger is itchin’ so have the last word and we’ll call you the winner so you can move on to lecturing someone else.

Then you can fuck right off.

btw Pigeon River up north was great last week, the elk aren’t quite to shedding yet but some fun tracking and more bobcat sign this year than usual.

Whats wrong with Coppin wood?

 

 

 

 

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Her Pimp, and her shoes, really detract from what otherwise would be a really sad attempt to convince people she's hot.

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Ah yes.... Bringing back memories.

Freshman year in college. A new friend and I talked two new female student friends in to going out for an overnight hike on the AT near by. I knew the trail well, having hiked that portion at least 6 times previously.

 At the last moment, one of the young women opted out, but her room mate was all for it. NYC girl out in the woods, with two young guys, and a 6 pack of beer, a bottle of wild turkey, a couple of joints, some food of some kind... 3 sleeping bags..... What could possibly go wrong!?

 We got to the AT shelter at Stratton pond by mid late afternoon. Early enough to find deadfall wood, and start a fire. We ate something (pretty sure) drank some beer, I'm sure the other two drank some wild turkey. I'm pretty sure a joint got smoked.... And then it was dark, and getting cold. My new friend, and the new female friend decided that we should all zip our sleeping bags together to stay warm. I had a mummy bag. They both had childhood blanket bag style sleeping bags.

 Somehow all 3 got zipped together. I was trying to be discreet, as I slid my hands over her stomach, and up. I heard her mutter, and sigh. I slid my hand down over her taught, flat belly, and..... Found another hand already there!

 I was mortified, and quickly withdrew, and rolled over and tried not to hear anything else for the rest of the night!

 Come to think of it, that was the last time that I intentionally went camping in subfreezing weather....

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On 2/3/2021 at 5:04 AM, dacapo said:

Who likes to camp in the winter/snow? 
 

Apparently the entire population of Texas read you post and decided to try it out.  

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23 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

Who teaches bellies?

Taut.

 Sorry. Spell check is as much of a cock blocker as another guy's hand in the warm female crotch you were reaching for in the dark.....

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