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Old Fart Solo Up The U.S. East Coast?


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My need to escape the Florida summer heat has me pondering taking the boat to Michigan and keeping it there for summers.  The SO works so this would probably be done solo.

Odds are pretty slim this would actually happen but I was wondering if anyone here has done something like that. 

If so, how old were you?  I'll be 70 in April and a bad knee has me wondering if I'd need to do the ICW or could I handle going outside with the occasional need to jump up and handle a problem.  No plans for any overnight sailing.

The other thing I was wondering is would there be any concerns for a woman doing this solo?  I've never had any issues docking or anchoring overnight but I've never done it alone.

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35 minutes ago, Jules said:

My need to escape the Florida summer heat has me pondering taking the boat to Michigan and keeping it there for summers.  The SO works so this would probably be done solo.

Odds are pretty slim this would actually happen but I was wondering if anyone here has done something like that. 

If so, how old were you?  I'll be 70 in April and a bad knee has me wondering if I'd need to do the ICW or could I handle going outside with the occasional need to jump up and handle a problem.  No plans for any overnight sailing.

The other thing I was wondering is would there be any concerns for a woman doing this solo?  I've never had any issues docking or anchoring overnight but I've never done it alone.

Coastal sailing short handed is stressful because of so much inshore small craft traffic and fishing gear 

stand offshore and this small craft traffic gets cut in half 

Don’t  make landfall at night 

 

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If you and the boat are in pretty good shape, doing day trips up the coast shouldn't be so bad.  Better that the boat is in top shape and you are in good enough shape.  I have done the route up and down the coast from Florida to Maine a few times, not solo, but if just traveling by day on a good boat, it seems like you should be ok.  If the boat is small enough to go on the icw while traversing the Hatteras region, that's a plus.  Picking weather windows, obviously.

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2 hours ago, Jules said:

My need to escape the Florida summer heat has me pondering taking the boat to Michigan and keeping it there for summers.  The SO works so this would probably be done solo.

Odds are pretty slim this would actually happen but I was wondering if anyone here has done something like that. 

If so, how old were you?  I'll be 70 in April and a bad knee has me wondering if I'd need to do the ICW or could I handle going outside with the occasional need to jump up and handle a problem.  No plans for any overnight sailing.

The other thing I was wondering is would there be any concerns for a woman doing this solo?  I've never had any issues docking or anchoring overnight but I've never done it alone.

I've made a couple of solo delivery trips on the ICW, but I was already familiar with the areas and the overall length was nowhere near as long. But yes, it can definitely be done. We were friends with an elderly Canadian man who took a small sailboat south every winter, spending 5 ~ 6 months going down and back.

I'd suggest a mix of inside/outside transits, and IMHO anchoring out is a lot less stressful and quicker to get on/off the conveyor belt towards your goal.

 

4 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

What kind of boat are we talking about? I think doing the Erie Canal singlehanded would be a challenge unless the boat is quite small.

You would need a solid, well-practiced docking routine, most of the tie-ups would be fairly easy but the locks could be a hassle.

FB- Doug

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Sure you can find plenty of small boat sailors who would want to do this trip as crew.  The one big crew hassle of being stuck with them for a extended passage isn't a worry. Unless you are wanting the solo portion seems like there is no reason not to take crew.

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Yes, the first question is What boat?  I took a several catamarans  (40 +/- )down the ICW with my wife.  Realistically, I was singlehanded, (but well fed).  The ICW will take more time except if you go offshore only during daylight, it likely won’t be any quicker either.  From a safety standpoint,  being female shouldn’t really matter but then, I have no experience with that perspective...

The last time I went I was early 60’s vs 50’s the first time.  If physically healthy in general, the only real limitation is getting tired a bit easier/sooner.  Keep your ‘well rested’ tank full.

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My thoughts are to ship the boat overland and buy a little dinghy for any sailing you might want to do in Florida. One that you and the spouse can enjoy together. 
 

You have to unstep the mast if you go through the Erie Canal and   motor with the mast on deck for a period of time. Repairs along the way can tie you up time wise and financially while a road haul is 2 days for a driver and the mast has to be stepped in Michigan after the boat is dropped in damage free. You can fly or drive in and step aboard your boat without getting beaten up across Pamlico Sound and the Jersey coast. 

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Get some crew for the trip.Even if you have to get several for stages.

At a minimum you'll need them for the canal after getting up the Hudson.

That trip is a big deal, not to be taken lightly.

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47 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Been a couple postings lately about the Jersey coast...the NJ inland waterway is really doable from Atlantic City to Manasquan, or if the one ooc bridge is fixed, from Cape May. Just bring a fly swatter for the salt marsh north of AC. It’s a easy two day trip at 5kts to Bay Head but, yes from there to Sandy Hook you’re about 25 nm or so outside. 

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The ICW from Florida to the Chesapeake can be done by a dead guy with one eye, hooked up to a dialysis machine. 

That part is easy. We never went to a marina the whole way. Just anchored along the way. Except for somewhere along the way we tied up to a free dock alongside a shopping mall.

Then up the Chesapeake, down the Delaware Bay and wait at Cape May. An overnighter to Sandy Hook then NY city up the Hudson etc.

Crew sounds good. The ICW is boring but safe enough. If you do it solo bathroom breaks become an issue (seriously; you can't just pull over in parts of it and drift).

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

 If you do it solo bathroom breaks become an issue (seriously; you can't just pull over in parts of it and drift).

Pee in a bottle. Pilots do it all the time. Take your dumps in the morning before weighing anchor.

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18 minutes ago, kinardly said:

Pee in a bottle. Pilots do it all the time. Take your dumps in the morning before weighing anchor.

Never hurts to keep a bucket with a stout line attached in/near the cockpit. It can come in handy for all types of occasions and/or purposes. :)

 

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Assuming you can do everything to handle your boat OK, it's not about physical ability but judgment. Crossing some of those inlets in FL and GA is not to be trifled with, but no amount of physical ability will make up for going when you shouldn't have.

In case you haven't noticed, most cruisers are well advanced in age, and seem to do OK. If you can drive your boat while tossing a line to a dockhand, you're probably OK too.

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Just to reiterate, the killer to doing this trip solo is the freshwater canal section.  Half as wide as the ICW, with three dozen locks.

It's tedious & exhausting with two people.  I've heard of singlehanders doing it, but in smaller boats and multiple clusters.

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The sail from Florida to NY can be very pleasant if you plan it right. First, you don't want to leave before mid April unless you are OK with cold nights. Second you should stand well offshore to avoid the coastal traffic - at least 50 miles.  The Gulf Stream will give you a free knot or so for the first two days which is pretty nice.  The voyage takes around 5 days.

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9 hours ago, kinardly said:

Pee in a bottle. Pilots do it all the time. Take your dumps in the morning before weighing anchor.

You aren't 70 are you? ;)

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10 hours ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Just to reiterate, the killer to doing this trip solo is the freshwater canal section.  Half as wide as the ICW, with three dozen locks.

It's tedious & exhausting with two people.  I've heard of singlehanders doing it, but in smaller boats and multiple clusters.

I have done the Erie/Oswego canals many times. It never occurred to me that it was exhausting. Really a very pleasant trip with lots to look at. Locks are not hard (not talking single-handed) once you figure out the routine.

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50 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:
11 hours ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Just to reiterate, the killer to doing this trip solo is the freshwater canal section.  Half as wide as the ICW, with three dozen locks.

It's tedious & exhausting with two people.  I've heard of singlehanders doing it, but in smaller boats and multiple clusters.

I have done the Erie/Oswego canals many times. It never occurred to me that it was exhausting. Really a very pleasant trip with lots to look at. Locks are not hard (not talking single-handed) once you figure out the routine.

I can see where some people would find it very frustrating and exhausting. It's difficult to push and make miles. It's slow and there's limited places to stop for the night, unless you want to risk tying up to a tree on the bank (which we were told is illegal).

OTOH most days runs were low stress and had at least some interesting scenery. Every stop we made was delightful. The dog loved walking the old canal path. The historic towns were friendly and interesting. We met a lot of east coast cruisers who considered the NY State Barge Canal to be a tedious stretch of "fly over" country but they all were interested solely in pushing on to some place else as quickly as possible. A delivery, not a cruise, in other words.

Some locks are a PITA but once you figure out how to cope, it's not bad. You need an engine that will easily and reliably restart when the gates open.

FB- Doug

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47 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

We met a lot of east coast cruisers who considered the NY State Barge Canal to be a tedious stretch of "fly over" country but they all were interested solely in pushing on to some place else as quickly as possible.

"The water is always bluer ... "

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

I can see where some people would find it very frustrating and exhausting. It's difficult to push and make miles. It's slow and there's limited places to stop for the night, unless you want to risk tying up to a tree on the bank (which we were told is illegal).

OTOH most days runs were low stress and had at least some interesting scenery. Every stop we made was delightful. The dog loved walking the old canal path. The historic towns were friendly and interesting. We met a lot of east coast cruisers who considered the NY State Barge Canal to be a tedious stretch of "fly over" country but they all were interested solely in pushing on to some place else as quickly as possible. A delivery, not a cruise, in other words.

Some locks are a PITA but once you figure out how to cope, it's not bad. You need an engine that will easily and reliably restart when the gates open.

FB- Doug

You can always tie up at a lock. They are usually quite pleasant although some are noisy from the trains and even the highways. Years ago we stopped in one small town and it was quite pleasant until the modified car races started quite close to where we were. We would usually tie up just after a lock so we could get an earlyish stop to next morning and run 5 or 10 miles to the next lock before it opened. Lake Oneida is not my favourite place.

If you want to tie up along a canal the Canal du Midi in the south of France is outstanding. When you rent a boat they include a couple of steel stakes and a small sledge. You can tie up where you want. The canal opened in 1680 and since this was before the Industrial Revolution the canal follows the topography of the land. They planted tens of thousands of these plane trees to stabilize the banks but in some areas many died, I assume old age, and were not replanted until recent years. You can also bike along the two path. If you are richer than I am you can go on a converted, crewed barge that is quite luxurious. Crew includes a (French) chef and you can go off bicycling to a vineyard for lunch and meet your boat at its next stop. We were going to go there for another charter this spring passed after playing in the world seniors' table tennis championship in Bordeaux but it was cancelled. We are not that good but you only need to enter - they had 5700 entries and a waiting list. Next one is in Oman of all places in January, 2023. May combine that with a rtw plane tickets.

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Yes, that's a trip I really really want to make. We've done a few canal boat trips in England and one in another French system. We take turns driving the boat. Renting a canal boat and a couple of bicycles seems to me to be by far the best way to travel. Getting into the big cities is still somewhat of a hassle, but overall I think I could live like that. Friends have done a river trip in Portugal and loved it, too

FB- Doug

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as someone else upthread said, the type of boat might inform the responses a little better. 

If draft isn't the issue and you've never done it, a trip up the ditch is kinda fun. parts of it are really only fun once LOL

and if you really want to get outside you can pick your windows. unless you want to come up the Chesapeake and visit Annapois and some of the other places on the bay, the trip up the outside there is quite manageable. and does provide a few escape routes. As does Jersey shore if wind has some westeryly in it at all. 

 

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21 hours ago, CapnK said:

Never hurts to keep a bucket with a stout line attached in/near the cockpit. It can come in handy for all types of occasions and/or purposes. :)

 

For the sake of historical terms, the “line” on the bucket is a rope and before the advent of plastic, it was a cedar bucket that didn’t rot or absorb smells.
 

Historical rant over

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Don't think she will mind my saying (know this from another common thread) but the boat is an Ahola 32.  Ellis designed keel stepped masthead rigged monohull sloop with less than 5 foot draft.  Good coastal cruiser that would not have issue with the voyage being discussed.  The question ain't the boat.  It really comes down to how comfortable the sailor is singlehanding.  If not wanting any overnight sails as I thought I read then you really are mostly limited to the ditch and not going outside.  How comfortable is the sailor anchoring or docking or fixing shit that breaks.  Anyway the other option is to put it on a truck or trailer and have it driven up.  Faster obviously if the $s can be spared.  Delivery captain is another option.  Only other thing to consider depending on your views of covid restrictions is that you will find more freedom in FL than you find up north.  Good luck!

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Aloha 32 is good either way, inside or outside.  Trucking is faster... assuming availability, but between de-rigging/haulout/ trip/ repeat, likely not cheaper.  Up the ditch might be cheaper but once you add in the trip south, supplies, fuel, occasional dockage and various odds and ends to attend to getting the boat ready, (but not refitting), you will spend pretty close to similar amounts of money.  Much more fun though.  Taking an unfamiliar boat offshore before knowing the 'oops, better fix that' list has some degree of risk but certainly is  viable if you don't mind overnights and have friends.   32' is pretty handy for the docking, boat handling stuff and 5' draft is nice and comfy on the inside (for a sailboat).  The ICW has its own appeal and its own boredom.  I've done it twice now, would do it again, but not twice a year too often...

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Day hops offshore area a waste as getting in and out of the inlets to an anchorage will take lots of time off your passage.  . Really not enough all weather inlets for a 5 knot boat.  Probably safe to run from Stewart to Charleston in one offshore shot northbound and maybe up to the Cape Fear Inlet.  Weather permitting, a bit further North to New River or Beaufort (NC) but will have to cross Frying Pan Shoal there.  Some here will have local knowledge of the inlets.  As Savior said, a run offshore with a push from teh stream is quickest but you have to commit to the offshore bit.  

Real issue would be southbound as you have to choose early an "inside the GS" and thread the needle or cross the GS and head all the way to slide past Little Bahama Bank to stay out of a foul stream and then cross to Stuart and the Okeechobee canal.  

You really are talking a journey, not a quick trip, particularly if you want to get to the Great Lakes.    

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A few thoughts I had as I read the thread are,  Maine would be less of a slog to get to. And there is plenty to explore.   Although I have thought it would be interesting to go up the Erie cannel so that could be interesting. Solo puts some limitations on going outside since you need somewhere to stop.  Not always easy due to conditions.  Hope you have fun doing it. 

 

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Maybe consider the western side of the Great Loop? Since you're starting from the gulf side of FL this option might have some appeal. Even more so if your destination was the Lake Michigan side of Michigan.

Anyway, a friend had to move his boat (a Hunter 380) from Detroit, MI to Mobile, AL this past fall. His first consideration was to go full St. Lawrence Seaway route then south around Florida. From a practical and timing standpoint, this was a no-go. Due to scheduled closures along the Erie canal the timing window he had obviated the ICW route, and the re-opening of some Chicago area locks made the Chicago to Mobile trip more feasible.

After sailing from Detroit to Chicago he had the boat yard in Chicago area drop the mast. They also transported the mast to Mobile by truck. This was a bit more expensive than having the mast stored on deck, but made handling the boat easier without the long overhangs and also made moving about on deck a nonissue.

Even though he often single-handed while sailing on the great lakes, he always had two people aboard at all times for the river/canal transit. He just felt it made sense to do that on the narrower canals.

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On 2/7/2021 at 6:24 AM, Jules said:

My need to escape the Florida summer heat has me pondering taking the boat to Michigan and keeping it there for summers.  The SO works so this would probably be done solo.

Odds are pretty slim this would actually happen but I was wondering if anyone here has done something like that. 

If so, how old were you?  I'll be 70 in April and a bad knee has me wondering if I'd need to do the ICW or could I handle going outside with the occasional need to jump up and handle a problem.  No plans for any overnight sailing.

The other thing I was wondering is would there be any concerns for a woman doing this solo?  I've never had any issues docking or anchoring overnight but I've never done it alone.

Are you talking about doing this ONCE or commuting?

It is a LONG way to be going back and forth. If doing this one time it could be a fine adventure - maybe. You can get from Florida to Cape May "inside" and then you need to go out in the Atlantic to get to Sandy Hook and then it is up the Hudson to the Erie Canal. You can split up the Jersey Coast with an overnight stop at Atlantic City.

Here is the problem - you are not going to be out in open ocean with not much around you. Running "The Ditch" is narrow channels, tides, currents, running aground, and lots of traffic. There are big sections of it that are not going to be Otto steering and you making coffee. It is also a metric-shit-ton of motoring and the Erie Canal is for sure motoring because you need the mast down. I am not sure it would be all fun.

I am not quite sure about this: concerns for a woman doing this solo?  Do you mean in the sense of walking around the hood after dark? There are some dodgy towns for sure along that route, but I can't imagine that there would be much of an issue unless you made a point to take off on shore excursions in the crappiest looking places on the ICW. Pirates are not fond of the ICW at all, so no worries there. Your biggest issue would be doing something dumb like sight-seeing in the crack selling parts of Atlantic City or otherwise doing things I am sure you are smart enough to not do.

If you mean the other issue of generally being smaller and not as strong as a man, if you can handle your boat solo now you can just keep on doing it.

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Remember the aviation (boating) advice that the most dangerous thing to have aboard a airplane (boat) is a schedule (calendar). There are lots of days you should stay tied to a dock.

I was on  delivery crew bringing a Tartan 33 back to Connecticut from the Newport, VA area. We spent a night in Cape May and awoke to a strong westerly. Great we thought. We discussed it with a retired couple on a 40'. Not gonna go, he said, she doesn't like it too windy.

About 6pm we reached Barnegat. The coastline turns a bit there, and wind increased and shifted more northeast. With darkness falling, we entered the Barnegat Inlet and found ourselves amid uncertainties of shoal water, and vaguely marked channels. 

We made out OK, but having a 5 guys aboard was part of the reason why. I remember thinking that the old guy back in Cape May probably made a good decision.

A guy from here in Stamford took his Hunter 34 to Chicago. Crew of 4, it took about 2 weeks. There are several route options. They ran the engine for the whole trip, even the southbound trip down Lake Michigan after the mast was restepped.

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The boat is an Aloha 32 (4'-9" draft).  This would be a one way trip for her.  We'd leave it up there for a summer getaway.  With my overwhelming love of the oppressive heat and humidity Florida brings every summer, I'd want to be up north on the boat 6-8 months a year.  I'm no hot house flower. 

In my younger days, I would have never even asked the question.  But this summer I was either going to have a knee replacement or get the hell out of here.  More than anything else, it's the knee that worries me.  I've sailed enough to appreciate the ability to jump up and go when the unexpected arises.  I can't do that now.

I appreciate all the great responses.  Lots of great information. 

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My wife is waiting on knee replacements.   She is pretty bad on the boat and has to be careful how she moves so that she does not aggravate her knees.  Would  getting the knee done and going a year later when your back in good shape be an option for you?

Food for thought

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9 hours ago, Jules said:

The boat is an Aloha 32 (4'-9" draft).  This would be a one way trip for her.  We'd leave it up there for a summer getaway.  With my overwhelming love of the oppressive heat and humidity Florida brings every summer, I'd want to be up north on the boat 6-8 months a year.  I'm no hot house flower. 

In my younger days, I would have never even asked the question.  But this summer I was either going to have a knee replacement or get the hell out of here.  More than anything else, it's the knee that worries me.  I've sailed enough to appreciate the ability to jump up and go when the unexpected arises.  I can't do that now.

I appreciate all the great responses.  Lots of great information. 

If you don't like heat, you'll want to be in the Chesapeake by May or early June. You are going to be up against some scheduling issues. If you leave Florida too early, you will likely get a lot of nasty cold and rain. Leave too late and the ditch is like a microwave oven 1,000 miles long. I did it in August, so I know. You seem to not have to worry about work, so you at least could hang on the hook waiting for weather to pass instead of making a slog out of it. If it were me I would be aiming to hit Norfolk by June 1 if possible.

Note also that from all accounts the Georgia and some of South Carolina sections of the ICW have a lot of shoaling and tricky currents besides for S-turning like a snake on LSD. We bypassed that by sailing from Jacksonville to Cape Fear.

Lastly, I have no idea what your money situation is, but it might be cheaper overall to just sell in Florida and buy in the Great Lakes or even get a truck to haul the boat. This trip would suck trying to do it fast for cheap, only do this if you want a Big Adventure. You are basically doing half a Great Loop, so these people will likely be a big help for you: https://www.greatloop.org/

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Jules said:

The boat is an Aloha 32 (4'-9" draft).  This would be a one way trip for her.  We'd leave it up there for a summer getaway.  With my overwhelming love of the oppressive heat and humidity Florida brings every summer, I'd want to be up north on the boat 6-8 months a year.  I'm no hot house flower. 

In my younger days, I would have never even asked the question.  But this summer I was either going to have a knee replacement or get the hell out of here.  More than anything else, it's the knee that worries me.  I've sailed enough to appreciate the ability to jump up and go when the unexpected arises.  I can't do that now.

I appreciate all the great responses.  Lots of great information. 

Even more now than what I said before, this is about you and not the boat, and nobody here can tell you about you. The only thing I will add is that while it sounds like you have done some single-handed sailing there is a huge difference between a single-handed day sail and a single handed voyage. Even if no overnight sails are involved.  An extended voyage, especially when single-handing leads to exhaustion and fatigue and that leads to mistakes.  Forgive me if I am stating the obvious.  If you have done any single handed cruising and enjoyed it then you already have your answer and you will enjoy this trip as well.  If you haven't then do a long weekend single handed cruise locally in FL and at the end you will know everything you need to know.

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On 2/7/2021 at 10:21 PM, SloopJonB said:

You aren't 70 are you? ;)

No, actually 75.

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On 2/8/2021 at 6:53 PM, Sail4beer said:

For the sake of historical terms, the “line” on the bucket is a rope and before the advent of plastic, it was a cedar bucket that didn’t rot or absorb smells.
 

Historical rant over

IIRC, the only other "rope" on a boat is the one used to ring the bell. Every other rope has a name accordning to its function, sheet, line, guy, brace, halyard, etc.

But I'm open to correction.

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1 hour ago, Black Sox said:

IIRC, the only other "rope" on a boat is the one used to ring the bell. Every other rope has a name accordning to its function, sheet, line, guy, brace, halyard, etc.

But I'm open to correction.

Rope in the store - line on the boat ;)

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On 2/8/2021 at 8:51 AM, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I have done the Erie/Oswego canals many times. It never occurred to me that it was exhausting. Really a very pleasant trip with lots to look at. Locks are not hard (not talking single-handed) once you figure out the routine.

If you take a week+ to lollygag in late Spring or Summer and stop at every little town along the way.

I've only done deliveries in the Fall when it's 4 days standing at the helm for 10 hours, in the rain, on the constant lookout for logs & deadheads with the occasional floating picnic table.  Even switching off every hour it was still pretty miserable.  Atleast the rain rinsed off all the slime from the lock cables.

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8 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Per here, 5 ropes on a sailing ship.

I’ve done a few trips on tall ships and there’s always one newbie who wants to impress by telling everyone about the ropes. Then some old salt will shut him up by asking how many animals are mentioned on ships.

Dolphin striker

Hounds

Dog watch

Cat (of nine tails)

......and it can go on for a full week.

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1 hour ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

If you take a week+ to lollygag in late Spring or Summer and stop at every little town along the way.

I've only done deliveries in the Fall when it's 4 days standing at the helm for 10 hours, in the rain, on the constant lookout for logs & deadheads with the occasional floating picnic table.  Even switching off every hour it was still pretty miserable.  Atleast the rain rinsed off all the slime from the lock cables.

To/from Oswego we would take four days. We weren't in a rush but also not tourists. We had the mast rigged so we still could use the dodger and Bimini so rain wasn't an issue. For floating crap in the spring than in the fall generally. One time when we wanted to go down the canal it was closed because of high water and floating hazards. Ended up going the long (2x as far) way to the Hudson via the St Lawrence and Champlain Canal. That was an interesting change from the norm.

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On 2/9/2021 at 12:10 PM, Wess said:

Even more now than what I said before, this is about you and not the boat, and nobody here can tell you about you. The only thing I will add is that while it sounds like you have done some single-handed sailing there is a huge difference between a single-handed day sail and a single handed voyage. Even if no overnight sails are involved.  An extended voyage, especially when single-handing leads to exhaustion and fatigue and that leads to mistakes.  Forgive me if I am stating the obvious.  If you have done any single handed cruising and enjoyed it then you already have your answer and you will enjoy this trip as well.  If you haven't then do a long weekend single handed cruise locally in FL and at the end you will know everything you need to know.

I used to take 2-4 weeks ib the summer going between Chicago and Mackinac Island.  On some legs there were only two of us and never an overnight with only two aboard.  But that was a long time ago and that body is now somewhat hobbled. 

Shipping the boat up there would be the most economically practical choice.  And that has always been on the table.  My SO (who is still working) and I have a lot to talk about. 

Thanks again to all for your input.

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3 hours ago, Jules said:

I used to take 2-4 weeks ib the summer going between Chicago and Mackinac Island.  On some legs there were only two of us and never an overnight with only two aboard.  But that was a long time ago and that body is now somewhat hobbled. 

Shipping the boat up there would be the most economically practical choice.  And that has always been on the table.  My SO (who is still working) and I have a lot to talk about. 

Thanks again to all for your input.

We moved our 28' sailboat up and down the East coast, 4 times total. The cheapest trip - by far - was over the road from West Palm Beach to Burlington Vermont. The boat waited until the trucker needed a back-haul (meaning he wasn't booked both ways).

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50 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

We moved our 28' sailboat up and down the East coast, 4 times total. The cheapest trip - by far - was over the road from West Palm Beach to Burlington Vermont. The boat waited until the trucker needed a back-haul (meaning he wasn't booked both ways).

There was a guy at a club we used to belong to who ditched down to Florida and Bahamas twice, then had the boat shipped back to Lake Ontario afterwards.  I always loved Ernie's quote "Nothing goes to windward like a Mack truck...".

Cheers!

 

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