Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 966
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Just to be clear. In January, Texas Republicans introduced a bill to secede from the United States. Yesterday, the Texas governor and both senators (including Ted Cruz) asked Biden f

A Houston furniture store opened its doors as a refuge. Thousands came for help. Feb. 18, 2021, 10:33 a.m. ETFeb. 18, 2021 Feb. 18, 2021 By Christine Hauser  

At least AOC is doing something for people in need. Good for her! You are a person that is throwing rocks at someone that is helping. Really? Have you thought that through? Here in NY we have had a ho

Posted Images

The most conservative states pull in the most in Federal support dollars. There's a correlation with extractive economies, high federal payouts, low taxes, low incomes and low number of millionaires per capita.

" That year(2016), the states where federal aid comprised the largest share of general revenue were Mississippi (43.4 percent), Louisiana (42.7 percent), New Mexico (41.2 percent), Arizona (41.2 percent), and Kentucky (40.9 percent). "

https://taxfoundation.org/federal-aid-reliance-rankings/

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, learningJ24 said:

The most conservative states pull in the most in Federal support dollars. There's a correlation with extractive economies, high federal payouts, low taxes, low incomes and low number of millionaires per capita.

" That year(2016), the states where federal aid comprised the largest share of general revenue were Mississippi (43.4 percent), Louisiana (42.7 percent), New Mexico (41.2 percent), Arizona (41.2 percent), and Kentucky (40.9 percent). "

https://taxfoundation.org/federal-aid-reliance-rankings/

This should come with a hat tip for those at the other end...

Go Utah, N Dakota, Kansas, Hawaii, and Virginia!

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, dacapo said:

Texas is now unable to perform even basic functions of civilization, like having reliable electricity.

Unbelievable.

Texas mayor tells residents to fend for themselves during power outage: ‘Only the strong will survive’

Residents turned to a community Facebook group to ask whether the small town planned to open warming shelters, while others wondered if firefighters could do their job without water. But when Colorado City’s mayor chimed in, it was to deliver a less-than-comforting message: The local government had no responsibility to help out its citizens, and only the tough would survive.

“No one owes you [or] your family anything,” Tim Boyd wrote on Tuesday in a now-deleted Facebook post, according to KTXS and KTAB/KRBC. “I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn handout!”

Boyd’s tirade, which also demanded that “lazy” residents find their own ways of procuring water and electricity, immediately drew backlash. Later on Tuesday, Boyd announced his resignation and admitted that he could have “used better wording.”

The failure to deliver basic services has angered countless Texans, including top-ranking elected officials. But in Colorado City, Boyd rejected the notion that municipal governments or utility companies had any obligation to provide paying customers with necessities like heat and running water during a catastrophic winter storm.

“The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING!” he wrote on Facebook on Tuesday.

Boyd suggested that residents without electricity should simply “step up and come up with a game plan.” Those without running water could either deal with it, or “think outside of the box to survive and supply water to your family.” He did not offer any further guidance, such as where safe drinking water or reliable electricity could be found.

“Only the strong will survive and the weak will [perish],” he wrote.

Although authorities across Texas encouraged residents to hunker down until power could be restored and avoid driving on dangerously icy roads, Boyd categorized those who were camped out in frigid homes and waiting for assistance as “lazy.”

“Folks God has given us the tools to support ourselves in times like this,” he wrote, claiming that those who expected the city to come to their aid were “sadly a product of a socialist government.”

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, hobie1616 said:

Unbelievable.

Texas mayor tells residents to fend for themselves during power outage: ‘Only the strong will survive’

Residents turned to a community Facebook group to ask whether the small town planned to open warming shelters, while others wondered if firefighters could do their job without water. But when Colorado City’s mayor chimed in, it was to deliver a less-than-comforting message: The local government had no responsibility to help out its citizens, and only the tough would survive.

“No one owes you [or] your family anything,” Tim Boyd wrote on Tuesday in a now-deleted Facebook post, according to KTXS and KTAB/KRBC. “I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn handout!”

Boyd’s tirade, which also demanded that “lazy” residents find their own ways of procuring water and electricity, immediately drew backlash. Later on Tuesday, Boyd announced his resignation and admitted that he could have “used better wording.”

The failure to deliver basic services has angered countless Texans, including top-ranking elected officials. But in Colorado City, Boyd rejected the notion that municipal governments or utility companies had any obligation to provide paying customers with necessities like heat and running water during a catastrophic winter storm.

“The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING!” he wrote on Facebook on Tuesday.

Boyd suggested that residents without electricity should simply “step up and come up with a game plan.” Those without running water could either deal with it, or “think outside of the box to survive and supply water to your family.” He did not offer any further guidance, such as where safe drinking water or reliable electricity could be found.

“Only the strong will survive and the weak will [perish],” he wrote.

Although authorities across Texas encouraged residents to hunker down until power could be restored and avoid driving on dangerously icy roads, Boyd categorized those who were camped out in frigid homes and waiting for assistance as “lazy.”

“Folks God has given us the tools to support ourselves in times like this,” he wrote, claiming that those who expected the city to come to their aid were “sadly a product of a socialist government.”

 

So, his 'wording' was problematic but apparently his thinking was just fine. Actually this guy is at least honest in his thinking, that people need to be independent and that government is not responsible for stuff. Some people on PA have expressed similar thoughts although their wording can be an issue.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, hobie1616 said:

Unbelievable.

Texas mayor tells residents to fend for themselves during power outage: ‘Only the strong will survive’

Residents turned to a community Facebook group to ask whether the small town planned to open warming shelters, while others wondered if firefighters could do their job without water. But when Colorado City’s mayor chimed in, it was to deliver a less-than-comforting message: The local government had no responsibility to help out its citizens, and only the tough would survive.

“No one owes you [or] your family anything,” Tim Boyd wrote on Tuesday in a now-deleted Facebook post, according to KTXS and KTAB/KRBC. “I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn handout!”

Boyd’s tirade, which also demanded that “lazy” residents find their own ways of procuring water and electricity, immediately drew backlash. Later on Tuesday, Boyd announced his resignation and admitted that he could have “used better wording.”

The failure to deliver basic services has angered countless Texans, including top-ranking elected officials. But in Colorado City, Boyd rejected the notion that municipal governments or utility companies had any obligation to provide paying customers with necessities like heat and running water during a catastrophic winter storm.

“The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING!” he wrote on Facebook on Tuesday.

Boyd suggested that residents without electricity should simply “step up and come up with a game plan.” Those without running water could either deal with it, or “think outside of the box to survive and supply water to your family.” He did not offer any further guidance, such as where safe drinking water or reliable electricity could be found.

“Only the strong will survive and the weak will [perish],” he wrote.

Although authorities across Texas encouraged residents to hunker down until power could be restored and avoid driving on dangerously icy roads, Boyd categorized those who were camped out in frigid homes and waiting for assistance as “lazy.”

“Folks God has given us the tools to support ourselves in times like this,” he wrote, claiming that those who expected the city to come to their aid were “sadly a product of a socialist government.”

 

God bless texas 

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

So, his 'wording' was problematic but apparently his thinking was just fine. Actually this guy is at least honest in his thinking, that people need to be independent and that government is not responsible for stuff. Some people on PA have expressed similar thoughts although their wording can be an issue.

he must be one of the liberterdians 

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

So, his 'wording' was problematic but apparently his thinking was just fine. Actually this guy is at least honest in his thinking, that people need to be independent and that government is not responsible for stuff. Some people on PA have expressed similar thoughts although their wording can be an issue.

I suppose you wish to explain away incompetence in the name of higher profits for power companies and utility providers. By choosing to separate themselves from the nation's power grid in order to avoid meeting regulatory burdens, Texas GOP politicians have exposed their citizens to needless risk of losing power, fuel and water in the midst of a winter storm.

Wind generators operate in cold weather up to the arctic circle, but require different blades and heaters... but they only provide <10% of Texas power. It was the failure to prepare for cold weather at the natural gas power plants and reluctance to have >15% overcapacity mandated by national power grid standards that will cause Texans to be at risk. And it is poor communities and proportionately more minorities who will suffer the most.

Once again, the GOP has shown heartless callousness when dealing with their citizens, and deaths among the poor and minority are cast aside as they are the weak and don't deserve government help because their Republican representatives have chosen millionaires as the at-risk population that needs support.

Drain the swamp. Texas was growing bluer every election cycle, and this will only encourage that trend.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Amid severe weather and power crisis, Texas legislators stop talking about secession

It wasn’t that long ago — just a few days and weeks, in fact — that some Texas political leaders were talking about the virtues of seceding from the United States.  At the end of January, a state legislator filed a bill aimed at creating a legislative committee by referendum “to develop a plan for achieving Texas independence.”  The measure quickly won the endorsement of state GOP Chairman Allen West, who said the measure aimed to give Texans “a right to voice their opinions on a critical issue.”

You may not hear much of this rhetoric at the moment. That’s because Texas’ need for assistance from outside its borders has reached a high level of urgency.  As many as 4 million residents, or about 15% of the state, spent much of the last weekend without electricity because the state’s power grid buckled under an onslaught of ice, snow and subfreezing temperatures. The agency overseeing the state’s power grid said Tuesday that it can’t predict when electrical service will be restored to all residents.

On Saturday, Gov. Greg Abbott appealed to President Biden for an emergency federal disaster declaration. Biden promptly delivered, freeing federal assistance to flow into the state by the billions of dollars (and without first insisting on an expression of personal fealty to the White House, unlike a former president I could name).

We should all be grateful that the government is still equipped to render succor to Texans to deal with the hazards and vicissitudes of natural disasters, and we should join together in wishing the best for Texans — and residents of the many other states where the outbreak of severe weather over the last week or so has placed life and limb at risk.

However....

Texas political leaders haven’t been above mocking other states, such as California, in their times of need. Here’s Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) chortling over Gov. Gavin Newsom’s emergency appeal to Californians to conserve energy during a heat wave last August: 

“California is now unable to perform even basic functions of civilization, like having reliable electricity,” Cruz tweeted on Aug. 19. “Biden/Harris/AOC want to make CA’s failed energy policy the standard nationwide. Hope you don’t like air conditioning!”

Of course no one can be surprised at Cruz exploiting the pain and suffering of others for shabby partisan gain. Nor should we expect his own constituents’ suffering to wipe the smirk off his face.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, phillysailor said:

I suppose you wish to explain away incompetence in the name of higher profits for power companies and utility providers. By choosing to separate themselves from the nation's power grid in order to avoid meeting regulatory burdens, Texas GOP politicians have exposed their citizens to needless risk of losing power, fuel and water in the midst of a winter storm.

Wind generators operate in cold weather up to the arctic circle, but require different blades and heaters... but they only provide <10% of Texas power. It was the failure to prepare for cold weather at the natural gas power plants and reluctance to have >15% overcapacity mandated by national power grid standards that will cause Texans to be at risk. And it is poor communities and proportionately more minorities who will suffer the most.

Once again, the GOP has shown heartless callousness when dealing with their citizens, and deaths among the poor and minority are cast aside as they are the weak and don't deserve government help because their Republican representatives have chosen millionaires as the at-risk population that needs support.

Drain the swamp. Texas was growing bluer every election cycle, and this will only encourage that trend.

It wasn't just regulatory burdens, it was also the remnants of 1970s plans to run nuclear powered desalinated water up to Central Texas and make those areas bloom, Israel style. But the elevation rise was a killer, and they just wanted to grow the same crops they did before, not switch to salt-tolerant crops, let alone develop the market for those crops. Today, they inland desalination plants run all over Texas, just working to pull brackish water back down to drinkable 500 ppm standards as the edges of the Ogalala are depleted faster than it can refill.

Texas made a choice with their grid to lock it off from the rest of the country, and this problem could be solved with interconnects to the rest of the country, they could get power from Alabama, Tennessee, even from Canada via the DC lines.

The astonishing part is how this is blamed on wind and solar. Under Rick Perry, Texas was aggressive about installing wind, he apparently saw the writing on the wall with their "fortress grid" and the coming era of very expensive nuclear and the death of coal. Natural gas would be both a resource and an export. So Perry actually made lemonade out of the lemons that Texas was given, grid-wise and his wind and solar policies are the cause of running out of power?

Energy is not politics, or shouldn't be. We can take measurements, we know the costs of these forms of power, we know what works best and when it works. But like everything else it seems, when people don't understand what makes the light bulb light, they ascribe the light to the horde of fickle gods, rather than the switch on the wall. And it's not just right, it's left too. It's much easier to get political about things than learn what causes what. In this case, Texas's refusal to connect their grid to the rest of the country. Just a year ago, their grid independence was heralded as genius, when Texans got free power at night, because they had too much baseload. So they dial back capacity, and suddenly get hit with a cold snap ... chickens come home to roost.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, mikewof said:

The astonishing part is how this is blamed on wind and solar. Under Rick Perry, Texas was aggressive about installing wind, he apparently saw the writing on the wall with their "fortress grid" and the coming era of very expensive nuclear and the death of coal. Natural gas would be both a resource and an export. So Perry actually made lemonade out of the lemons that Texas was given, grid-wise and his wind and solar policies are the cause of running out of power?

Energy is not politics, or shouldn't be.

Wow. "Rick Perry" and "energy is not politics" in the same sentence and paired with "the astonishing part is how this is blamed on wind and solar." This snippet shows the GOP's hidden platform that underlaid their support of Trump for four long years.

The GOP's consistent policy is to be reliably political about energy. It is the secret way to cash in on every transaction in America. We do have a VAT in the US, its just soaked up by fossil fuel industries leaching our land, our water and our $$ every time we can't choose public transportation as the better option, more efficient cars and trucks aren't incentivized and every time new ideas are labeled socialist.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

See? Now the trouble is all those solar panels. When the clouds with the snow came in, the power went out just like at night. Trump said it was so, and the Texans made it so. And look at all the dead birds from hitting wind mills.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, hobie1616 said:

“No one owes you [or] your family anything,” Tim Boyd wrote on Tuesday in a now-deleted Facebook post, according to KTXS and KTAB/KRBC. “I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn handout!”

Boyd’s tirade, which also demanded that “lazy” residents find their own ways of procuring water and electricity, immediately drew backlash. Later on Tuesday, Boyd announced his resignation and admitted that he could have “used better wording.”

 

Full text of Mayor Tim Boyd's Facebook posts complete with spelling errors and strange grammar:

Let me hurt some feelings while I have a minute!! No one owes you are your family anything; nor is it the local government’s responsibility to support you during trying times like this! Sink or swim it’s your choice! The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING! I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn handout! If you don’t have electricity you step up and come up with a game plan to keep your family warm and safe. If you have no water you deal without and think outside of the box to survive and supply water to your family.

If you are sitting at home in the cold because you have no power and are sitting there waiting for someone to come rescue you because your lazy is direct result of your raising! Only the strong will survive and the weak will perish. Folks God has given us the tools to support ourselves in times like this. This is sadly a product of a socialist government where they feed people to believe that the FEW will work and others will become dependent for handouts. Am I sorry that you have been dealing without electricity and water; yes! But I’ll be damned if I’m going to provide for anyone that is capable of doing it themselves! We have lost sight of those in need and those that take advantage of the system and meshed them in to one group!! Bottom line quit crying and looking for a handout! Get off your ass and take care of your own family! Bottom line-DONT A PART OF PROBLEM, BE A PART OF THE SOLUTION!!

Boyd eventually deleted his post and created a second even longer post where he wrote that some of the things he said were “taken out of context.” He also complained that his wife was being harassed and had lost her job for defending her husband’s statements. It’s not immediately clear where Boyd’s wife worked or how she actually lost her job.

The second Facebook post:

All, I have set back and watched all this escalating and have tried to keep my mouth shut! I won’t deny for one minute what I said in my post this morning. Believe me when I say that many of the things I said were taken out of context and some of which were said without putting much thought in to it. I would never want to hurt the elderly or anyone that is in true need of help to be left to fend for themselves. I was only making the statement that those folks that are too lazy to get up and fend for themselves but are capable should not be dealt a handout. I apologize for the wording and some of the phrases that were used! I had already turned in my resignation and had not signed up to run for mayor again on the deadline that was February 12th! I spoke some of this out of the anger that the city and county was catching for situations which were out of their control. Please understand if I had it to do over again I would have just kept my words to myself and if I did say them I would have used better wording and been more descriptive.

The anger and harassment you have caused my wife and family is so undeserved….my wife was laid off of her job based off the association people gave to her and the business she worked for. She’s a very good person and was only defending me! But her to have to get fired from her job over things I said out of context is so horrible. I admit, there are things that are said all the time that I don’t agree with; but I would never harass you or your family to the point that they would lose there livelihood such as a form of income.

I ask that you each understand I never meant to speak for the city of Colorado City or Mitchell county! I was speaking as a citizen as I am NOT THE MAYOR anymore. I apologize for the wording and ask that you please not harass myself or my family anymore!

Threatening our lives with comments and messages is a horrible thing to have to wonder about. I won’t share any of those messages from those names as I feel they know who they are and hope after they see this they will retract the hateful things they have said!

Thank you

Tim Boyd(citizen)

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, mikewof said:

It wasn't just regulatory burdens, it was also the remnants of 1970s plans to run nuclear powered desalinated water up to Central Texas and make those areas bloom, Israel style. But the elevation rise was a killer, and they just wanted to grow the same crops they did before, not switch to salt-tolerant crops, let alone develop the market for those crops. Today, they inland desalination plants run all over Texas, just working to pull brackish water back down to drinkable 500 ppm standards as the edges of the Ogalala are depleted faster than it can refill.

Texas made a choice with their grid to lock it off from the rest of the country, and this problem could be solved with interconnects to the rest of the country, they could get power from Alabama, Tennessee, even from Canada via the DC lines.

The astonishing part is how this is blamed on wind and solar. Under Rick Perry, Texas was aggressive about installing wind, he apparently saw the writing on the wall with their "fortress grid" and the coming era of very expensive nuclear and the death of coal. Natural gas would be both a resource and an export. So Perry actually made lemonade out of the lemons that Texas was given, grid-wise and his wind and solar policies are the cause of running out of power?

Energy is not politics, or shouldn't be. We can take measurements, we know the costs of these forms of power, we know what works best and when it works. But like everything else it seems, when people don't understand what makes the light bulb light, they ascribe the light to the horde of fickle gods, rather than the switch on the wall. And it's not just right, it's left too. It's much easier to get political about things than learn what causes what. In this case, Texas's refusal to connect their grid to the rest of the country. Just a year ago, their grid independence was heralded as genius, when Texans got free power at night, because they had too much baseload. So they dial back capacity, and suddenly get hit with a cold snap ... chickens come home to roost.

I know where the brown stuff goes.  Do you?

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, phillysailor said:

Wow. "Rick Perry" and "energy is not politics" in the same sentence and paired with "the astonishing part is how this is blamed on wind and solar." This snippet shows the GOP's hidden platform that underlaid their support of Trump for four long years.

The GOP's consistent policy is to be reliably political about energy. It is the secret way to cash in on every transaction in America. We do have a VAT in the US, its just soaked up by fossil fuel industries leaching our land, our water and our $$ every time we can't choose public transportation as the better option, more efficient cars and trucks aren't incentivized and every time new ideas are labeled socialist.

I agree with you about the righties in general to get political about energy, but it's a sin of the left too, what we don't understand, we apply politics.

Rick Perry was surprisingly progressive with his energy policy. I contracted with the DOE during his tenure there, he pushed wind and solar hard. We were ready to EERE get hit hard, but he actually got more funding for renewable energy and efficiency. He did that with politics, but the beneficiary was disruptive research. He used data-driven research to guide policy.

Before you throw Perry into the pot of idiots, perhaps read what others actually said about his energy policy. Yes, he had to back "clean (dirty) coal" and nuclear to keep Trump happy, but he seemed to sabotage those out of the gate, and he put data-driven experts where the DOE needed data=driven expertise: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/10/rick-perry-s-most-surprising-legacy-energy-secretary-could-be-bigger-science-budget

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, hasher said:

I know where the brown stuff goes.  Do you?

Do you? Have you spent a few days or weeks at a sewage processing plant? It's complicated work.

I was amazed at one, they had 55 gallon barrels of granular activated carbon and some upstream sensors that detected anything in the water that could potentially harm the microorganisms in their digester beds. When the alarm went off, they had a few minutes to throw the GAC into the stream to adsorb things like nickel and pesticides to protect their single-cell employees.

Sewage processing is probably the single biggest reason for me not to complain about taxes. What's your take on it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, mikewof said:

Do you? Have you spent a few days or weeks at a sewage processing plant? It's complicated work.

I was amazed at one, they had 55 gallon barrels of granular activated carbon and some upstream sensors that detected anything in the water that could potentially harm the microorganisms in their digester beds. When the alarm went off, they had a few minutes to throw the GAC into the stream to adsorb things like nickel and pesticides to protect their single-cell employees.

Sewage processing is probably the single biggest reason for me not to complain about taxes. What's your take on it?

I flush it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, dylan winter said:

takes ten flushes for a mighty trump dump.... apparently

You need to enjoy the swirl as it goes around and around.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So living in a metro area with millions of people a bunch of whom have no power or water? Civilization can break down.  And when the power goes out so does the internet including on cell service. Before the storm hit the county judge Lina Hidalgo warned of what was coming comparing it to a cat 5 hurricane and the yeehaws were chortling. Not so much now, of course it's all the fault of AOC and her GND.

This is much different than a hurricane - instead of heat it's just f'ning cold and the roads are just f'ed up.  And instead of roofers and tree guys its the plumbers who will be working for weeks to repair all the busted pipes.  Too late now but investing in Generac would have been good, have several friends with them and they are islands of refuge in the storm. 

Our power is back on, pipes unfrozen and for the moment am feeling very special, and not the short bus kind.

edit: the word is don't get comfortable because there isn't enough to go around so power can go away again,  so sez Mz Lick Triciety

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, d'ranger said:

So living in a metro area with millions of people a bunch of whom have no power or water? Civilization can break down.  And when the power goes out so does the internet including on cell service. Before the storm hit the county judge Lina Hidalgo warned of what was coming comparing it to a cat 5 hurricane and the yeehaws were chortling. Not so much now, of course it's all the fault of AOC and her GND.

This is much different than a hurricane - instead of heat it's just f'ning cold and the roads are just f'ed up.  And instead of roofers and tree guys its the plumbers who will be working for weeks to repair all the busted pipes.  Too late now but investing in Generac would have been good, have several friends with them and they are islands of refuge in the storm. 

Our power is back on, pipes unfrozen and for the moment am feeling very special, and not the short bus kind.

 

Personal problems are so yesterday.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

So living in a metro area with millions of people a bunch of whom have no power or water? Civilization can break down.  And when the power goes out so does the internet including on cell service. Before the storm hit the county judge Lina Hidalgo warned of what was coming comparing it to a cat 5 hurricane and the yeehaws were chortling. Not so much now, of course it's all the fault of AOC and her GND.

This is much different than a hurricane - instead of heat it's just f'ning cold and the roads are just f'ed up.  And instead of roofers and tree guys its the plumbers who will be working for weeks to repair all the busted pipes.  Too late now but investing in Generac would have been good, have several friends with them and they are islands of refuge in the storm. 

Our power is back on, pipes unfrozen and for the moment am feeling very special, and not the short bus kind.

edit: the word is don't get comfortable because there isn't enough to go around so power can go away again,  so sez Mz Lick Triciety

 

Good friend of mine lives in Plano.  His power has been spotty. Friends of theirs are on the same grid as a hospital so their power has been uninterrupted. Generators I imagine. His wife and daughters are hanging with those friends. He and the dog are watching the house.  He says his pool is frozen over. I asked if he remembered how to ice skate from his time in Chicago.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, hasher said:

Personal problems are so yesterday.

Yep, so sez Rick Perry https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Perry-says-Texans-wiling-to-suffer-blackouts-to-15956705.php

 

edit: bonus points! Most areas here are under boiled water notices. Which is awesome if you don't have power to boil water - so just drink bottled water. If you don't have bottled water then go get some. Except stores don't have power and/or sold out of bottled water.  I could go on, we are better prepared than most and fortunate.  It's pull yourself up by your bootstrap time (which is totally impossible to do)  - if you don't believe me then put yer boots on and start pulling those straps and see how high you get.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

Yep, so sez Rick Perry https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Perry-says-Texans-wiling-to-suffer-blackouts-to-15956705.php

Nothing better than a guy who hasn't sat in the cold and dark for a few days to tell us what we really think.  I so look forward to the day all the clowns get relegated to the dustbins of history.

Finally time for the national grid? https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/8/3/17638246/national-energy-grid-renewables-transmission

Link to post
Share on other sites

GIVE IT BACK If the X guy wasn't so busy building a wall they could head south to warm Mexico LOL

Good to see the elected officials care about it's citizens/taxpayers , Always easy to blame or point fingers at others then do you job 

Oh they were too busy reelecting  It, I wonder how many of these Texas asshole were at Washington on 1/6. 

Maybe God will save them, ?   Just ask X mayor Tim Boyd  , doing a great job Ted , how's Cuba these days 

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, hasher said:

I flush it.

So, politics. Lack of understanding does tend toward politics.

But at some point, perhaps do yourself a favor and educate yourself to the jobs of all the people who have made a career in managing your waste. If they didn't do their job so well, apparently the job for which you have no respect, you would wake up each morning surrounded by a moat of your own shit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, learningJ24 said:

The most conservative states pull in the most in Federal support dollars. There's a correlation with extractive economies, high federal payouts, low taxes, low incomes and low number of millionaires per capita.

" That year(2016), the states where federal aid comprised the largest share of general revenue were Mississippi (43.4 percent), Louisiana (42.7 percent), New Mexico (41.2 percent), Arizona (41.2 percent), and Kentucky (40.9 percent). "

https://taxfoundation.org/federal-aid-reliance-rankings/

Closely linked to "you can't fix stupid"

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, dacapo said:
3 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

So, his 'wording' was problematic but apparently his thinking was just fine. Actually this guy is at least honest in his thinking, that people need to be independent and that government is not responsible for stuff. Some people on PA have expressed similar thoughts although their wording can be an issue.

he must be one of the liberterdians 

If they freeze to death it's God's will.

Government apparently only exists to enrich the insiders, not to provide services to those lazy voters.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

So, his 'wording' was problematic but apparently his thinking was just fine. Actually this guy is at least honest in his thinking, that people need to be independent and that government is not responsible for stuff. Some people on PA have expressed similar thoughts although their wording can be an issue.

Part of being data-driven about energy, rather than politically-driven is taking the good with the bad. In this case, Taxas's grid and energy policy failed dramatically.

But part of the reason it failed was because they had the flexibility to do what the rest of the country couldn't, due to the small grid. They led the USA in grid security, in wireless load management, in peak load distribution, in renewable energy integration, in smart meters. In some ways, Texas's grid is one of the most advanced in the world. Centerpoint and Oncor invested in grid storage and DC transmission in a way that has by far led the country per user.

The system couldn't handle this cold snap, and there will be other cold snaps, hopefully next time they'll avoid these problems and so will the rest of us. But discrediting the work of some really top-shelf energy work in Texas due to this incident isn't too productive. What we've learned from Texas has been gradually integrated around the USA.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, mikewof said:

So, politics. Lack of understanding does tend toward politics.

But at some point, perhaps do yourself a favor and educate yourself to the jobs of all the people who have made a career in managing your waste. If they didn't do their job so well, apparently the job for which you have no respect, you would wake up each morning surrounded by a moat of your own shit.

People down stream of Hotlanta can suck our waste.  We are spending billions to clean up our mess.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, mikewof said:

 

Ahh shit, here we go.

"In some ways, Texas's grid is one of the most advanced in the world."

They just can't rely on it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Socialist!

These SOB's who care about neighbors?  I am just angry about the very thought.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Our Unaposter Mikey should stick to waste treatment since he is always full of shit.

The Texas grid came about to allow capitalism to fuck over the good folk of Texas who bend over and say, thank you sir, may I have another?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, mikewof said:

Part of being data-driven about energy, rather than politically-driven is taking the good with the bad. In this case, Taxas's grid and energy policy failed dramatically.

But part of the reason it failed was because they had the flexibility to do what the rest of the country couldn't, due to the small grid. They led the USA in grid security, in wireless load management, in peak load distribution, in renewable energy integration, in smart meters. In some ways, Texas's grid is one of the most advanced in the world. Centerpoint and Oncor invested in grid storage and DC transmission in a way that has by far led the country per user.

The system couldn't handle this cold snap, and there will be other cold snaps, hopefully next time they'll avoid these problems and so will the rest of us. But discrediting the work of some really top-shelf energy work in Texas due to this incident isn't too productive. What we've learned from Texas has been gradually integrated around the USA.

As an electrical engineer: so, you’re telling me Texas’ grid had the most advanced features, yet it failed miserably for a banal, statistically predictable occurrence against which less developed countries have long ago designed a remedy, called interconnection. Emblematic

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Xlot said:

As an electrical engineer: so, you’re telling me Texas’ grid had the most advanced features, yet it failed miserably for a banal, statistically predictable occurrence against which less developed countries have long ago designed a remedy, called interconnection. Emblematic

And ignored a warning after the last big freeze which was, wait for it - 10 years ago. Because Freedumb.  It will be a cold day in hell before I ever vote for any of these clowns again. Free markets, cold people.

edit: rant continued - now that NG and electricity are having to be purchased on the spot market the costs will of course be passed on  to consumers. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Xlot said:

As an electrical engineer: so, you’re telling me Texas’ grid had the most advanced features, yet it failed miserably for a banal, statistically predictable occurrence against which less developed countries have long ago designed a remedy, called interconnection. Emblematic

You forget that Mikey is an "Everything Engineer" so he knows "Everything", when he's not being a "Physic-cyst" or a "Bio-loggist" or a "Navel Architect".  

Texas is obviously stellar.  Interconnection???  Dude..It's the "alone star" state.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

And ignored a warning after the last big freeze which was, wait for it - 10 years ago. Because Freedumb.  It will be a cold day in hell before I ever vote for any of these clowns again. Free markets, cold people.

Just remembered: in 1965, my senior year in college, they took us students on a field trip to the mountains separating Northern from Center Italy. One feature was how during the winter they could locally inject a higher current in the main dorsal power line over the pass, so conductors would heat up and icing would be prevented. So, this was Italy in the sixties, and the importance of interconnection was a foregone requisite

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I give it 50/50 that when the dust settles we're going to find that this was a failure of a financial market, not the power grid.  My guess is that there a few retailers out there sitting on what was effectively a naked short position that headed for the hills.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Thistle3868 said:

I give it 50/50 that when the dust settles we're going to find that this was a failure of a financial market, not the power grid.  My guess is that there a few retailers out there sitting on what was effectively a naked short position that headed for the hills.

I think that's pointed out up above. A little Enron for the folks that created Enron?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

You forget that Mikey is an "Everything Engineer" so he knows "Everything", when he's not being a "Physic-cyst" or a "Bio-loggist" or a "Navel Architect".  

Texas is obviously stellar.  Interconnection???  Dude..It's the "alone star" state.

Isn't he the guy who was carrying on about quantum radar and making planes invisible to photons or some weird Star-Trekish gibberish?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

If they freeze to death it's God's will.

Government apparently only exists to enrich the insiders, not to provide services to those lazy voters.

If I lived in Mayor Dipshit's town I would organize a referendum to eliminate the local government and save some tax money, since they don't seem to want to DO anything anyway so why pay them :rolleyes:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Xlot said:

As an electrical engineer: so, you’re telling me Texas’ grid had the most advanced features, yet it failed miserably for a banal, statistically predictable occurrence against which less developed countries have long ago designed a remedy, called interconnection. Emblematic

As far as I know, the grid performed well during this outage, other than downed lines from icing, but that's something that happens everywhere.

The problem wasn't the grid, it was the lack of generation and lack of redundancy in the baseload. Also, since Texas is usually fairly warm, a lot of people apparently didn't have gas heat, but rather electrical heat pumps and electric baseboard heating. Air-sourced heat pumps work well enough when the temperature is around freezing, but they're lousy when it gets too much colder than that. And electric baseboard heating is the same as all electrical heating, it's exactly 100% efficient, which sounds good, but it takes a lot of juice to heat a house compared to burning gas.

The Texas grid has features that the rest of the country doesn't have yet in storage, redundancy, communications and security. But blaming the grid for the lack of power is kind of lick blaming the highway for a ten car pileup due to people looking at their phones while driving.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Isn't he the guy who was carrying on about quantum radar and making planes invisible to photons or some weird Star-Trekish gibberish?

Your memory has failed you. Perhaps a senior moment?

The conversation to which you're referring is with Happy Jack about the F-35 and the impossibility of making planes invisible to light when the spread of wavelengths is sufficiently wide. In fact, it seems that your failure of memory in this case is that I was arguing the point of ration with someone who was convinced of the reality of "Star-Trekish gibberish."

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Xlot said:

Prefer Unaposter, though

You wrote something nonsensical about the grid. And now you're blaming me for correcting you.

I would assume that an electrical engineer would know the difference between a wire and a battery. They are not the same thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, mikewof said:

As far as I know, the grid performed well during this outage, other than downed lines from icing, but that's something that happens everywhere.

The problem wasn't the grid, it was the lack of generation and lack of redundancy in the baseload. Also, since Texas is usually fairly warm, a lot of people apparently didn't have gas heat, but rather electrical heat pumps and electric baseboard heating. Air-sourced heat pumps work well enough when the temperature is around freezing, but they're lousy when it gets too much colder than that. And electric baseboard heating is the same as all electrical heating, it's exactly 100% efficient, which sounds good, but it takes a lot of juice to heat a house compared to burning gas.

It's my understanding that 27 gigawatts of coal, nuclear and natural gas went unavailable due to the redirection of natural gas demand for residential heat.   There are a shitload of issues at hand here, and I doubt the combination of them is easily surmountable. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

You forget that Mikey is an "Everything Engineer" so he knows "Everything", when he's not being a "Physic-cyst" or a "Bio-loggist" or a "Navel Architect".  

Texas is obviously stellar.  Interconnection???  Dude..It's the "alone star" state.

 

So now you know that Texas isn't connected to the rest of the grids and doesn't have an interconnect ... something the rest of us were discussing much earlier.

When people discuss these very basic issues, it's not that they are smart, it's that you're more than likely an utter dumbshit for not knowing about them earlier. I have to tell you "Left Shift" that there are other places for you to educate yourself other than Sailing Anarchy. Perhaps you didn't know, there are "libraries."

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, benwynn said:

It's my understanding that 27 gigawatts of coal, nuclear and natural gas went unavailable due to the redirection of natural gas demand for residential heat.   There are a shitload of issues at hand here, and I doubt the combination of them is easily surmountable. 

Unavailable ... 27 gigawatts of power that was spun up and in the feed lines, or 27 gigawatts of capacity that was unused? Big difference.

As for the balance between gas for generation vs. residential heat, that isn't a problem that's easy to solve. I supported the U.S. Department of Energy as a physicist for about 6 years and people a lot smarter than me had to hold global colloquia for the complexity of these problems. But without a doubt, right now, if Texas was connected to either the Eastern or Western grid, they would be able to draw power and handle this problem.

What you have written in bold up there is correct, simply getting power and gas to our homes is a wildly complicated process, and the occasional failures of those processes don't necessarily correspond to a political failure. When I was a kid, my old man deliberately bought a house without a fireplace or chimney, one of the few on our block not to have one. As an engineer, he wanted a visual embrace in his confidence of this new era of the reliability of natural gas. But most people at the time couldn't imagine a house without a fireplace; electricity failed regularly, and gas wasn't to be fully trusted.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, d'ranger said:

Our Unaposter Mikey should stick to waste treatment since he is always full of shit.

The Texas grid came about to allow capitalism to fuck over the good folk of Texas who bend over and say, thank you sir, may I have another?

The history of Texas's grid is documented, regardless your desire to rewrite things. There are advantages and disadvantages. You're currently seeing one of the disadvantages.  But over the summer, when you had free power at night and some of the lowest power pricing in the country, what did you have to say about your grid then?

Given your love of foil-hatted conspiracy theories, how does this event feed into the planned Tres Amigas superconducting link?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, hasher said:

People down stream of Hotlanta can suck our waste.  We are spending billions to clean up our mess.

It's tough because the South is new to the era of water wars. Now Georgia, Alabama and Florida are in a battle that nobody taught them how to fight and the Army Corps of Engineers can't be the magical amulet that they would like.

Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/texas-frozen-wind-turbines-john-cornyn-b1803193.html?fbclid=IwAR2LmLth2_g4uiktHVU2fGAs84I-dKjGqUeis1-6ki8cicFOWZiFNKBJq0g

"Texas Republican Senator John Cornyn retweeted the picture on Monday. By Tuesday, Montana Republican Senator Steve Daines and conspiracy-minded Congresswoman Lauren Boebert were out with their own posts promoting the story. What do these politicians have in common? Boebert and Daines have both received extensive fossil fuel contributions, while Cornyn was the top recipient of oil and gas money in Congress over the last two years"

"In reality, the “frozen wind turbine” was a complete fabrication. The photo wasn’t actually taken in Texas, but in the Uljabuouda mountains in Arjeplog, Sweden in 2013. As Brian Kahn explained in a piece for Earther, the picture has for years been a favorite meme for far-right climate deniers to spread anytime there’s a cold snap. (None of the politicians who shared the image have yet to issue a correction)."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a litany on the Lowest Cost Producer.  Times catch up with it at some point and it fails just like your local furniture store.  The state of Louisiana is a good example and now we can use the Texas Power Grid as another.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, dfw_sailor said:

The ice is finally melting.  1/2 inch from 1f on Monday night Tuesday, last night it rose to 22f.

Captains cove marina, lake ray hubbard DFW. 

20210216_140408.thumb.jpg.1caf146a4688795ada0e1d61d0dd8e52.jpg

20210216_141522.thumb.jpg.18811f546d96e0c5a4c8d4ef3ea659a9.jpg

today

 

20210217_113345.jpg

Gonna be 29C, warm & sunny here today. I might have to turn on the air conditioning.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, mikewof said:

 

Consumers aren't businesses with the ability to analyze risk and hedge. Black swan events happen, for you to then smack the consumers up side the head as dumbasses and not having a backup plan? Fuck, that's what I pay the utility for.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, d'ranger said:

So living in a metro area with millions of people a bunch of whom have no power or water? Civilization can break down.  And when the power goes out so does the internet including on cell service. Before the storm hit the county judge Lina Hidalgo warned of what was coming comparing it to a cat 5 hurricane and the yeehaws were chortling. Not so much now, of course it's all the fault of AOC and her GND.

This is much different than a hurricane - instead of heat it's just f'ning cold and the roads are just f'ed up.  And instead of roofers and tree guys its the plumbers who will be working for weeks to repair all the busted pipes.  Too late now but investing in Generac would have been good, have several friends with them and they are islands of refuge in the storm. 

Our power is back on, pipes unfrozen and for the moment am feeling very special, and not the short bus kind.

edit: the word is don't get comfortable because there isn't enough to go around so power can go away again,  so sez Mz Lick Triciety

 

Glad you're doing all right. Out here on the west side, we lost power at 1:00 AM on Monday. Fired up my 5.5k genset which I'm sure pissed of the neighbors... Anyway, it will run a couple of space heaters, couple of lamps the fridge, laptop and TV. We're watching DVDs as there is no cable and Internet is spotty. If we unplug the fridge, we can run the microwave and the toaster. We can cook on the grill and have bottled water left over from Harvey  and a rapidly diminishing supply of firewood.

We are much better off than most.

No pipes burst yet, but there is so little water pressure we had to shut off the main and drain the house. The power is back on at the moment, but the rumor going around that it will only last about 4 hours. We have enough supplies for another 4-5 days, enough gas to run the generator another 30 or so hours and enough firewood for tonight and tomorrow night. I sure hope Friday is warmer and the power stays on and the water comes back. I would really like to take a hot shower...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, dfw_sailor said:

The ice is finally melting.  1/2 inch from 1f on Monday night Tuesday, last night it rose to 22f.

Captains cove marina, lake ray hubbard DFW. 

20210216_140408.thumb.jpg.1caf146a4688795ada0e1d61d0dd8e52.jpg

 

Not thick enough to damage the hull though?

For a while, I had my Lancer in the water in New Jersey, year round as a sometimes live-aboard. When the ice got thick it was all I could do to smash it up with a 4x4 cedar post from the toe-rail of the boat. Smash it up before bed, wake up, smash it up in the morning, go to work, come back, smash some more. The stinkpotters had the bubblers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Gonna be 29C, warm & sunny here today. I might have to turn on the air conditioning.

FKT

On the positive side it has helped me concentrate on a rapid port from Android/ ioio java for our control system to rpi 3b+ python / pysimplegui with touchscreen, 30 x ss relays, 16 x 5v relays,  16 analog inputs, 8 digital inputs, 2 x pwm outputs, rtc, 110v current detection, 24vac voltage detection, about 30 neopixels 

Link to post
Share on other sites

For you Texans, is it common to have natural gas heating your homes? Are you getting enough gas with the diversion to power generation?

I remember in Alabama, the newer homes tended to have electric heat pumps that were good until it got very cold, and then they had an electric resistive heater in the heat pumps for when it was too cold for the heat pumps to keep up. At that point, with a 220 volt electric heater running outside the house, the total power bill tended to quadruple, but there was no way to heat the house with gas in some homes and some homes were even 100% electric. The older homes more typically had a dual-phase unit, with conventional gas heating, we had one of those, plus a gas brick heater inside.

Here in Colorado, where we are in an unincorporated area, our power goes out on occasion, a couple years ago it was out for about three days, but the gas-log fireplace had a battery-driven igniter, and that was able to keep the house warm. As long as your home is warm, a lack of power isn't a big deal, though our AO Smith gas water heater wouldn't fire up without the electric carbon monoxide fan. New homes here almost never have wood-burning fireplaces, unless it's custom.

There should be some more redundancy in the building codes ... a second method of heating the house in case the first one shits the bed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, mikewof said:

Not thick enough to damage the hull though?

For a while, I had my Lancer in the water in New Jersey, year round as a sometimes live-aboard. When the ice got thick it was all I could do to smash it up with a 4x4 cedar post from the toe-rail of the boat. Smash it up before bed, wake up, smash it up in the morning, go to work, come back, smash some more. The stinkpotters had the bubblers.

We were fortunate we didn't get the second night of 1f and strong side wind of the first night.   If that happened a decent chance of losing the rudder. No signs of compression,  but protected from waves. Some evidence of wind created water level change, but the dock dolphins are still riding ok.

My gut hunch is to avoid breaking it just yet,  I tried it a bit earlier today but it just refroze but with jagged pointy bits.

A small amount of internal boat heat is starting to melt the ice where it contacts the boat.  But depends on power availability,  was back on at 4am but don't know how long. 

It should melt away by tomorrow,  except for the water shore edge.

It's never happened at ray huubard since it was built 1970s from memory. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Most homes in Houston are built with the option of gas or electric. Ours and most of our neighbors have gas fired furnaces. Of course the controls and blowers are electric, so that doesn't help when the power is out...

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jerseyguy said:

Good friend of mine lives in Plano.  His power has been spotty. Friends of theirs are on the same grid as a hospital so their power has been uninterrupted. Generators I imagine. His wife and daughters are hanging with those friends. He and the dog are watching the house.  He says his pool is frozen over. I asked if he remembered how to ice skate from his time in Chicago.

Just got a text from my friend in Plano.  Pipe burst on the 2nd floor of his house.  Major first floor damage.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, dfw_sailor said:

On the positive side it has helped me concentrate on a rapid port from Android/ ioio java for our control system to rpi 3b+ python / pysimplegui with touchscreen, 30 x ss relays, 16 x 5v relays,  16 analog inputs, 8 digital inputs, 2 x pwm outputs, rtc, 110v current detection, 24vac voltage detection, about 30 neopixels 

Nice. Sounds like a good project.

I've been bashing my head over arduino stuff lately. If you assemble a uno ethernet shield onto a uno processor, it all works fine. If you have the effrontery to insert a screw terminal breakout/breadboard shield in between the 2, the uno refuses to admit that there's an ethernet shield connected.

Not happy. Next step, see if the same problem happens with arduino nano's.

Java on the Pi 4 works pretty well, I've never warmed to Python and I like Netbeans as my programming environment. We all have our preferences.

Time to go get some outside work done before it gets too hot and I retreat to the air conditioning.....

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Junkyard Dog said:

Most homes in Houston are built with the option of gas or electric. Ours and most of our neighbors have gas fired furnaces. Of course the controls and blowers are electric, so that doesn't help when the power is out...

That's the part that bugs me, these things should have a bit of redundancy. There is enough heat in a gas furnace or a gas water heater to run a thermoelectric vent fan and a few D-cells should be a functional back up to the 24-volt control circuit.

I was surprised when I got this house that Heatilator gas log fireplace finally had the AA-battery backup igniter. None of my previous Heatilators had that, and they were all as useless as tits on a tortoise when the power went out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bunch of whining wusses.

Real Texans would be self-sufficient, adopting traditional Texan ways.

They'd go down to where the colored folk live in their cheap wooden shacks, drive 'em off at gunpoint, and take that wood home for heating. Water? Real Texans drink whiskey or tequila. If food supplies run low, shoot the neighbour's dog and have a BBQ.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Nice. Sounds like a good project.

I've been bashing my head over arduino stuff lately. If you assemble a uno ethernet shield onto a uno processor, it all works fine. If you have the effrontery to insert a screw terminal breakout/breadboard shield in between the 2, the uno refuses to admit that there's an ethernet shield connected.

Not happy. Next step, see if the same problem happens with arduino nano's.

Java on the Pi 4 works pretty well, I've never warmed to Python and I like Netbeans as my programming environment. We all have our preferences.

Time to go get some outside work done before it gets too hot and I retreat to the air conditioning.....

FKT

Yup horses for courses.  We are mainly 24x7 sensor based logic and time control,  reporting data to our server etc with a simplistic but pro gui.  For us python dev is at least 10 times faster than Java.

3b+ is better for us than 4, not just because of the price differential. 

If we find we take much of a performance hit with sensor polling and statistics massaging then we port that to C. It's already a separate program that manages ota /version control / main program crash / restart etc as well..

Wish my eagle skills were better though.  Quite a board to layout with so many outs and ins. 

Re prototyping...... I jump to solder asap. But then the prototype board starts looking like spaghetti. This one has taken 16 hours so far of testing all functions each time as more complexity added.

Couple of caps might help on the breadboard as a quick solution? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Junkyard Dog said:

Glad you're doing all right. Out here on the west side, we lost power at 1:00 AM on Monday. Fired up my 5.5k genset which I'm sure pissed of the neighbors... Anyway, it will run a couple of space heaters, couple of lamps the fridge, laptop and TV. We're watching DVDs as there is no cable and Internet is spotty. If we unplug the fridge, we can run the microwave and the toaster. We can cook on the grill and have bottled water left over from Harvey  and a rapidly diminishing supply of firewood.

We are much better off than most.

No pipes burst yet, but there is so little water pressure we had to shut off the main and drain the house. The power is back on at the moment, but the rumor going around that it will only last about 4 hours. We have enough supplies for another 4-5 days, enough gas to run the generator another 30 or so hours and enough firewood for tonight and tomorrow night. I sure hope Friday is warmer and the power stays on and the water comes back. I would really like to take a hot shower...

Long ago when I was a teenager and our winters were a lot colder, we had a week where the HIGH for the whole week might have been in the 20s and the power was out for 4 days. My parents took off to a hotel and left me in charge. I had a big-ass pile of firewood and kept a roaring fire going 24-7. It was in the mid 30s in the house when not near the fireplace, so I slept on the couch next to the fire. It sucked balls for 4 days, we had well water and I used up the accumulator probably on day 1, but I did keep the place barely above freezing. Note - when you have a well and no power, letting the faucets drip won't work. On the good side food wasn't an issue, the kitchen was cold enough to keep food and frozen stuff went out to the garage.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For those with intermittent power and generators - gas/diesel pumps need electricity. So if you don't have a big supply, go and get some while pumps are operating.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dfw_sailor said:

Yup horses for courses.  We are mainly 24x7 sensor based logic and time control,  reporting data to our server etc with a simplistic but pro gui.  For us python dev is at least 10 times faster than Java.

3b+ is better for us than 4, not just because of the price differential. 

If we find we take much of a performance hit with sensor polling and statistics massaging then we port that to C. It's already a separate program that manages ota /version control / main program crash / restart etc as well..

Wish my eagle skills were better though.  Quite a board to layout with so many outs and ins. 

Re prototyping...... I jump to solder asap. But then the prototype board starts looking like spaghetti. This one has taken 16 hours so far of testing all functions each time as more complexity added.

Couple of caps might help on the breadboard as a quick solution? 

I tend to work from the other end - database design then data acquisition over tcp or udp. Java GUI. USed to do 24/7 stuff a lot, now it's just lab information management systems. When it gets to hardware I'm out of my depth/competence and call on one of my electronics engineer buddies. Fortunately I've quite a few so don't have to bug the same one with baby level stupid questions, I can spread that over all of them. Turn about if they ever need something machined, welded or just bashed with the proverbial FBH - I'm set up for that.

Good luck with the blackouts/icing - been there myself, 5 days without mains power last time. I have a standby generator and the boat is in the bay out front anyway.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites

The lack of power to about a quarter of the state has created a widespread emergency, with families huddling in homes or cars without heat, burst water pipes, failing water systems and gasoline shortages

Republican Rick Perry, a former Texas governor and energy secretary, suggested in a recent blog post on House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s website that Texans should be more than willing to endure blackouts to keep the federal government from regulating the state’s power grid. 

I wonder if he has heat?

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Not for nothing said:

The lack of power to about a quarter of the state has created a widespread emergency, with families huddling in homes or cars without heat, burst water pipes, failing water systems and gasoline shortages

Republican Rick Perry, a former Texas governor and energy secretary, suggested in a recent blog post on House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s website that Texans should be more than willing to endure blackouts to keep the federal government from regulating the state’s power grid. 

I wonder if he has heat?

Probably not even in the state, but he certainly has "Freedumb".

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Not for nothing said:

Republican Rick Perry, a former Texas governor and energy secretary, suggested in a recent blog post on House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s website that Texans should be more than willing to endure blackouts to keep the federal government from regulating the state’s power grid.

Perfect Republican political theory

Be willing to freeze to keep the government from ensuring you don't freeze.

And millions of suckers will freeze and agree.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Perfect Republican political theory

Be willing to freeze to keep the government from ensuring you don't freeze.

And millions of suckers will freeze and agree.

What the fuck is in the water down there?

Link to post
Share on other sites