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I like how they keep a metal pontoon patch on the bow so the paint doesn't get scratched.

And the crewmember on the bow with the fender; WTF did he plan on doing with it? 

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1 minute ago, Black Sox said:

I like how they keep a metal pontoon patch on the bow so the paint doesn't get scratched.

And the crewmember on the bow with the fender; WTF did he plan on doing with it? 

2:00  that was concrete  that's not getting buffed out.

 

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That poor bow guy was just running around with his fender  - fuck over here, no shit over there, damn if the paint gets scratched I lose my job, fuck, fuck, fuuuuck!

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3 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:
8 minutes ago, Black Sox said:

I like how they keep a metal pontoon patch on the bow so the paint doesn't get scratched.

And the crewmember on the bow with the fender; WTF did he plan on doing with it? 

2:00  that was concrete  that's not getting buffed out.

You are quite correct but then they weren't using the pontoon patch in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, "...to be used for breaking cardboard, (or cardboard derivative), pontoons only, No concrete, (or concrete derivative), pontoons..."

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What was he trying to do, the bridge did not appear to be open? Maybe he was trying to get into the super yacht dock just across from the yacht club. Tied the dink there lots of times when we were going for happy hour and use of inter webs.

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That looks like 'fly by crossed wires' control system to me...

    Besides they have a lot of experience in St Martin with this sort of boating activity. This is just a drip in the pond compared to this clip,

 

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Harbor pilot I know saw this video and said that early on in his apprenticeship he learned the adage that one shall never run aground with both anchors in the hawser.  Dude in the bow could have at least dropped a hook or two rather than uselessly running around with a fender.  Even if you wind up aground with a pile of chain under the forefoot at least there’s evidence you tried.

 I hear rumor that Go’s troubles started when they had issues with the bridge wing controls but had function inside the wheelhouse.  If true (and why not just go ahead and believe a wildly speculative rumor?), then their biggest failure was attempting to dock with known control system issues.

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1 hour ago, NaClH20 said:

Harbor pilot I know saw this video and said that early on in his apprenticeship he learned the adage that one shall never run aground with both anchors in the hawser.  Dude in the bow could have at least dropped a hook or two rather than uselessly running around with a fender.  Even if you wind up aground with a pile of chain under the forefoot at least there’s evidence you tried.

 I hear rumor that Go’s troubles started when they had issues with the bridge wing controls but had function inside the wheelhouse.  If true (and why not just go ahead and believe a wildly speculative rumor?), then their biggest failure was attempting to dock with known control system issues.

My understanding is they were attempting to make the outbound bridge. The day before they were attempting to leave and sucked a sail into the bow thruster that was a leftover from Irma. They got the boat back to Isle De Sol and divers got that mess cleaned up. 

Thruster failure, windage, cross currents all add up to a career change opportunity for the skipper... 

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as I understand the owner has been fighting with the builder (turquoise yachts) to honor warranty obligations regarding ongoing issues with the fly by wire engine control system. at this point I think it's safe to assume that dispute has become a very expensive lawsuit. 

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1 hour ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

Did you know that most mega and super yachts today are driven by touch screen? No wheel, no joystick.

Maybe it was a mistake to allow integration with Pokemon Go?  

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13 hours ago, NaClH20 said:

 Dude in the bow could have at least dropped a hook or two rather than uselessly running around with a fender

That's not such a quick operation on something that size, gotta at least get the engineer on the blower to power up the windlasses and I imagine he had a bit else on at that moment.....

That decky has probably only recently graduated to 'fender management and logistics' having spent the past few months as 'moisture control technician' (aka shammy grunt)

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21 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

gotta be a fly by wire/computer glitch

 

 

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/06/internet-of-ships-tells-tale-of-uss-fitzgerald-tragedy-or-half-of-it/

Reminded me of a fantastic investigative article by The Intercept about the collision of the US Fitzgerald and a container ship in Japan a few years ago.  It had incredible descriptions of how automated touch-screen controls work on those huge ships, super complex systems...with lots of chances for things to go awry...

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4 minutes ago, 10thTonner said:

I admire the two girls who just stay seated. Didn’t even move their wine glasses. Classy! 

Did you notice the bridge tender leaving the control shack 3 seconds before its demolished?

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36 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

"I swear guys I meant to do that!" 

 

 

All joking aside if that's how it went down he probably chose the best of the bad options. Better than taking out a bridge or possibly breaching the hull on the rocks trying to get out. 

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They need a transom hung emergency tiller.

Sarcasm aside what sort of rub rail does the bridge have that permits a passage with only 50 cm (1.5') clearance 

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Big yachts/small bridge is a long time problem there. It is my understanding that a number of years ago the owner of Victoria's Secret paid to have the bridge slightly widened so his super yacht would fit through. GO is even bigger. They probably should have built a new bridge that was much larger if they want the SY business - which they certainly do. The problem is that this bridge is in a constructed location and various businesses, including the yacht club might have to be moved. The other bridge into the lagoon, generally known as 'the French Bridge' is much smaller and depths in that part of the lagoon are quite shallow.

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4 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Audi 5000 engineering team?

 

(and to head off the Audi fanbois - that was a JOKE)

Joke my ass. I admit to occasional gross lapses of judgement in the past but one of the worst was buying an Audi 100 for a business car in the 70s. After repeated trips to the shop for warranty repairs the lousy 20,000 mile warranty ran out and the dealer had the gall to tell me I should get rid of it and buy one of the new 5000s. I may be stupid but I'm thankfully not that stupid.

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Damn computers.  I wasn't there but 15 or so years ago we got a new fire engine with a lot of fly by wire on it.  It was first in at an apartment fire.  Experienced driver who had trained on the new engine could not get it engaged into pump this time.  He tried everything in his bag of tricks.  Fortunately a second engine was close and the fire was put out. 

Techies at the manufacturer said; "oh! did you shut everything down for 60 seconds, (might have been 30 seconds, I forget which) and turn it back on?"  Well a quick (one or two second) shut down and start over is one of the sop's on previous "analog" rigs, and it was done this time.  However waiting 30 or 60 seconds was not in anyone's manual.  No matter, just sitting there, waiting 30 or 60 seconds while mothers are screaming "save my children" and your officer is screaming "where's my water" might was well be forever on a fireground.  Sitting there doing nothing, waiting 30 or 60 seconds for a computer to reboot is not in a fireman's dna.  I'm sure the manufucturer fixed the problem post haste.  There were other serious repercussions of this incident but fortunately that fire engine issue did not affect the critical outcome.

Probably many/most of us have made split second decisions on what is he best course of action to minimize problems.  It is a defining moment.  I salute the captain for doing the same in this case.

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The problem with computerized control systems is they are designed by electrical engineers who only THINK they understand how the process they are controlling works. There have been a few horrific aircraft disasters over the past 20 years or so that illustrate this point.

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47 minutes ago, kinardly said:

Joke my ass. I admit to occasional gross lapses of judgement in the past but one of the worst was buying an Audi 100 for a business car in the 70s. After repeated trips to the shop for warranty repairs the lousy 20,000 mile warranty ran out and the dealer had the gall to tell me I should get rid of it and buy one of the new 5000s. I may be stupid but I'm thankfully not that stupid.

He was talking about the "unintended acceleration" scandal with Audi 5000's in the 80's spurred on by a 60 minutes episode.  Turns out it was operator error after all, but ruined Audi in this country for a few years. 

The Audi's of the 70's and Audi's of today aren't even remotely the same vehicles. Agree that the 70's models were absolute junk. Today not so much. 

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On 2/26/2021 at 2:52 AM, Glenn McCarthy said:

Saw it all over the Monaco Yacht Show 4 years ago. You need to catch up with the times.

I've been working in the yachting industry for the last 12 years. but yeah fuck it, what do I know. 

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10 minutes ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

The birds at the bar make the clip.

The boat chews through 30 feet of concrete and the shooter keep his focus on the drunks just sitting there comatose. Well done.

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On 2/25/2021 at 8:11 PM, valcour said:

That guy must really hate optis. 
 

 

but then again.... did you see how strong an optimist is? a couple of those little bastards just stopped that big ugly thing!

 

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29 minutes ago, daan62 said:

but then again.... did you see how strong an optimist is? a couple of those little bastards just stopped that big ugly thing!

 

Proof, if it was needed, that power gives way to sail.

Isn’t that the rule?

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15 hours ago, frozenhawaiian said:

I've been working in the yachting industry for the last 12 years. but yeah fuck it, what do I know. 

It’s fun to argue with idiots, isn’t it?

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12 hours ago, Monkey said:

It’s fun to argue with idiots, isn’t it?

I assure you, whether or not Glenn got it right looking at the latest/greatest at a boat show, he is nobody's idiot.  For all you know, frozenhawaiian's experience might have been as a stewardess.  And before you jump on me, my experience stops at 54', above that, all I know is I want to fuck the female crew.  

So frozen, educate me.  Are controls hydraulic-driven?  What level of redundancy?  We've had entertaining wrecks through the ages, other than taking humans out of the loop, how do we stop boats hitting stuff?  Bridges closing on an approaching yacht?  

I'm not at war.  Glenn and I don't really know each other although we raced against each other for years, I chastised him once for him calling his dad an asshole while docking after a race, but knowing his dad, that assessment was spot on.  

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4 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

I assure you, whether or not Glenn got it right looking at the latest/greatest at a boat show, he is nobody's idiot.  For all you know, frozenhawaiian's experience might have been as a stewardess.  And before you jump on me, my experience stops at 54', above that, all I know is I want to fuck the female crew.  

So frozen, educate me.  Are controls hydraulic-driven?  What level of redundancy?  We've had entertaining wrecks through the ages, other than taking humans out of the loop, how do we stop boats hitting stuff?  Bridges closing on an approaching yacht?  

I'm not at war.  Glenn and I don't really know each other although we raced against each other for years, I chastised him once for him calling his dad an asshole while docking after a race, but knowing his dad, that assessment was spot on.  

Don’t know that boat or it’s system 

it common on big boats to use  electric servo motor actuators in place of cables ,air or hydraulic actuators 

actuator positions are limited by proximity sensors 

these proximity sensors can  fail or mis align 

Some  of those jumbos also have two speed gearbox’s to reduce prop revs when maneuvering 

some of the jumbos have complex systems that allow them to stay stationary in the water by using thrusters and props ,  with out anchoring 

I don’t know if backup systems allow you to bypass the complex electronic systems 

On  the simple servo motor, proximity sensor  systems that I have used,  you shut it down,  then send an engineer into the engine room to  manually control throttle ,  gearbox or function 

this would be very challenging in close quarters 

 

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7 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

Thanks.  You ever seen the YP's in Annapolis?  Our Ensigns are equally challenged.

Sure , I grew up in Annapolis 

my father worked at north Severn 

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9 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

I assure you, whether or not Glenn got it right looking at the latest/greatest at a boat show, he is nobody's idiot.  For all you know, frozenhawaiian's experience might have been as a stewardess.  And before you jump on me, my experience stops at 54', above that, all I know is I want to fuck the female crew.  

So frozen, educate me.  Are controls hydraulic-driven?  What level of redundancy?  We've had entertaining wrecks through the ages, other than taking humans out of the loop, how do we stop boats hitting stuff?  Bridges closing on an approaching yacht?  

I'm not at war.  Glenn and I don't really know each other although we raced against each other for years, I chastised him once for him calling his dad an asshole while docking after a race, but knowing his dad, that assessment was spot on.  

 

what type of controls is highly dependent upon the boat and the size and the age.  nothing this size uses cables, the run is so long and with so many bends you'd never be able to actually move the clutches or throttles. some older, (like early 90s and older) boats will still have hydraulic or air throttles. big problem with those, especially air throttles is that there's a few seconds of delay between when you make an input and when the engine actually responds. electronic throttles solved that issue and the electronic throttle controls send an impulse to a servo on the engine which controls the throttle and the transmission.  as for the system(s) in question you're not talking about a direct link to the engine from throttles. your input goes from the throttle levers into a a computer, that computer is then sending the throttle command to the servos that control the transmission and throttle. also bear in mind that ever increasing numbers of yachts are being built with diesel electric powerplants. whereby the only actual engines on the boat are turning generators but propulsion is coming from a pirmary electric motor attached to each shaft, or depending on the boat the azipods. to throw another layer into it ever more motoryachts now are being equipped with what called dynamic positioning. this is a computer system that takes full control of the throttles/rudder (or azipods) and bow thrusters and uses GPS to automatically keep the vessel on station. 

and just point of order: your primary engine controls, be it in the wheel bridge or at the wind stations aren't a touch screen because when you're maneuvering you need to be looking out from the vessel, not down at a touch screen to make sure you're hitting the right "button" 

I'm not at war with glenn either, but he doesn't know what he's talking about here and it shows. I realize my response was snarky but having yacht fanboys argue with you about your business gets old. 

edit: just double checked the photo of GO's bridge. those are azipod controls, so no rudders. 

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