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Shameless plug time. My wife has been interviewing owners and designers for this site (along with interviews by owners of the site)

https://www.catamaransite.com/tag/interviews/

Richard Woods, Dudley Dix, Schionning Design, Seawind, Celtic, Broadblue etc. etc.

Lots of interviews with owners (Gemini/Heavenly Twins/Lagoon/Broadblue/Catana/Admiral/Catalac/Prout/Leopard)

And honest too - from a Lagoon 380 owner we know

"So she did spectacularly poorly in in light winds and just kind of sat there in the water. It was not unusual for us to throw the children on a line off the back of the boat. That’s how slow she was."

These are pretty short (~10 minutes) and give some very good real world experience with various cats as well as Richard Woods really good thoughts on various aspects of catamaran design.

The company sells ads for owners wishing to sell their boats themselves. So their motivation is to get people interested in the site, but also gather a bunch of real world experience so prospective buyers can research boats.

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I will see the interviews - but just on how slow the Lagoon 380 is - ask Lars Oudrup - the designer of the Havkatt boats of Denmark he retired in one and sailed the world and ARC and did pretty well there some years ago - so if the boat get a good set of sail and dedicated skipper some can get surprised. 

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Like most multihulls it sure depends on payload. I discount ARC results because engine running is not heavily penalized especially in light airs. It pays to strategically motor. Lots of skippers seem to under-declare their motoring hours too. "if boat speed drops below 5 knots the engine goes on"

We were friends with the folks on Don Quixote (Lagoon 380 interview owner).

On a ~35 mile daysail they left an anchorage 2 hours before us in light airs, we passed them (both boats flying spinnakers and mainsail), and arrived about 1-1/2 hours ahead of them. They had 3 kids + parents and we had 1 kid + parents. I'm sure they carried more pairs of shoes and clothing and food. We carried more tools and less water. Our boat was much faster in light airs, at least 2 knots.

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7 hours ago, Zonker said:

Shameless plug time. My wife has been interviewing owners and designers for this site (along with interviews by owners of the site)

https://www.catamaransite.com/tag/interviews/

Richard Woods, Dudley Dix, Schionning Design, Seawind, Celtic, Broadblue etc. etc.

Lots of interviews with owners (Gemini/Heavenly Twins/Lagoon/Broadblue/Catana/Admiral/Catalac/Prout/Leopard)

And honest too - from a Lagoon 380 owner we know

"So she did spectacularly poorly in in light winds and just kind of sat there in the water. It was not unusual for us to throw the children on a line off the back of the boat. That’s how slow she was."

These are pretty short (~10 minutes) and give some very good real world experience with various cats as well as Richard Woods really good thoughts on various aspects of catamaran design.

The company sells ads for owners wishing to sell their boats themselves. So their motivation is to get people interested in the site, but also gather a bunch of real world experience so prospective buyers can research boats.

Is this your wife's site? Pretty cool! didn't know that Dudley Dix was designing catamarans. I need to check it out.

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11 hours ago, Zonker said:

Like most multihulls it sure depends on payload. I discount ARC results because engine running is not heavily penalized especially in light airs. It pays to strategically motor. Lots of skippers seem to under-declare their motoring hours too. "if boat speed drops below 5 knots the engine goes on"

We were friends with the folks on Don Quixote (Lagoon 380 interview owner).

On a ~35 mile daysail they left an anchorage 2 hours before us in light airs, we passed them (both boats flying spinnakers and mainsail), and arrived about 1-1/2 hours ahead of them. They had 3 kids + parents and we had 1 kid + parents. I'm sure they carried more pairs of shoes and clothing and food. We carried more tools and less water. Our boat was much faster in light airs, at least 2 knots.

Mr. Oudrup is a serious sailor - he didnt cheat with motor thats for sure. He has also sailed regatta in heavy winds in Denmark where he beat a 40+ X-boat on a upwind leg. Often you see these type of boats with sail that is totally useless - but they have strong rigs that can handle better and bigger sails. And if you are abit concerned about weight and keep the boat klean with saildrives - they can be made sailing if you want too.  

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16 hours ago, Zonker said:

Shameless plug time. My wife has been interviewing owners and designers for this site (along with interviews by owners of the site)

https://www.catamaransite.com/tag/interviews/

Richard Woods, Dudley Dix, Schionning Design, Seawind, Celtic, Broadblue etc. etc.

Lots of interviews with owners (Gemini/Heavenly Twins/Lagoon/Broadblue/Catana/Admiral/Catalac/Prout/Leopard)

And honest too - from a Lagoon 380 owner we know

"So she did spectacularly poorly in in light winds and just kind of sat there in the water. It was not unusual for us to throw the children on a line off the back of the boat. That’s how slow she was."

These are pretty short (~10 minutes) and give some very good real world experience with various cats as well as Richard Woods really good thoughts on various aspects of catamaran design.

The company sells ads for owners wishing to sell their boats themselves. So their motivation is to get people interested in the site, but also gather a bunch of real world experience so prospective buyers can research boats.

Nice site.  Thanks for posting.  Can easily spend a longggg time in there sniffing around.  Lots of good info on the few links I checked out.

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Not my wife's site - they hired her to interview folks. But I thought it was a pretty unique resource.  She's a professional writer - this is her work site:  www.dianeselkirk.com

This WAS our boat:   https://ceilydh.wixsite.com/cat4sale  We sold it in Mexico a few years ago. This helped with a downpayment for an apartment in Vancouver.

 

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I built my first dinghy from a set of Richard Woods's plans, very clear and easy to follow, I've had a ton of fun in the boat too :) he was easy to get in touch with via e-mail and very helpful

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They look really sane and reasonable to me. Like, why isn't there more choice in decent looking cruising multi designs between the Wharram boats and the half million dollar composite wonders? I'm not slagging on an expensive boat if someone can afford it, that's great, and if you love your Wharram that's great too, but Woods boats seem like a very sane, cheaper, somewhat lower tech answer without devolving all the way back to v-hulls and gaff sails.

I watched a great hour long video years ago about them taking three of their 28 foot cats on a cruise from the UK to the Baltic. Three people, three boats, like upscale dinghy cruising. Great footage, looked like nice boats even if they did have the smaller Club rig or whatever they called it.

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