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your worst distance race experience! What happened?


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Not my race, but a good friend signed on to a boat for the Hobart race at the suggestion of a fellow student.  She knew there was no hope of winning, a definite back-of-the fleet entry, but she wanted the experience.  

The owner collected cash from each of the crew for provisions and they shoved off and started the race.  Lunch was missed in all the excitement of getting going.  Came evening and no food appeared.  They went burrowing into lockers and found almost nothing.  At which point the owner confessed that, while he had bought the food, he'd left it out in unrefrigerated and it had all spoiled.  So he threw it out and was too embarrassed to tell the crew or ask for more money.  

So...as she tells it, they each had one Snickers bar and one apple per crew per day for the 3 and a half days of the race.  The owner was, apparently, not included in the Snickers distribution.

 

I have another friend on the 1998 race who was plucked out of the water after several hours of swimming alone by an S&R swimmer dropping out of the sky.  They were heading in with other rescued sailors on board and just happened to see him. 

He got back to the US and never sailed again.  Worst race?

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second worst distance race. It was going to be a short over night  double handed race race on a new boat. The owner wanted to win so he called me up . Got down to the boat  45 minutes  b4 the start and was very disappointed the boat was not ready to leave the dock. Then I found out the owner could not make it so he sent his daughter. She was pretty old as she just turned 31 and not in that great of shape at around a 120 lbs for being only 5'8 or so. Anyway had to rush around to get the boat to the start line. Had a great start as usual in medium breeze. We horizoned  the fleet then the wind shut off and it was sweltering hot in the late afternoon. She had a tiny bikini  (she needed a shave) on and for her age her 36 DD weren't sagging that bad. Then all of a sudden she popped up came over and grabbed my tiller then sh....... oh gotta go, Loren Grey is on Tik Tok 

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On the topic of "crew crawled into corners below and just "switched off.""

We were doing a Whitney Series out of Los Angeles YC. Leave Santa Barbara Island to port, return. The weather wasn't horrific but for the So. Cal. folks used to drifting around in under 6 knots of wind, the #3 and a reef were a bit much. We get to Santa Barbara Island around midnight and crack off to get to Sutil Island about 1 mile away. Tom is calling for the chute but everyone is moving in slow motion. I talk to him and explain, if we were to get it up right now, we would be late for the jibe after the island and we'd throw away 15 minutes getting that sorted. So we shook out the reef and by the time we were set up for the jibe/set we were at Sutil.

The spinnaker goes up with minimal drama but within a minute we run right into one of those kelp patches surrounding the islands. It was like a giant had grabbed the keel and used it to body-slam us onto the surface. Just WHAM! and then done. We shook it off and away we went, surfing into the night.

It was at this time, just after midnight, that all the crew crawled into corners below and just "switched off." It was just Tom and me on deck until dawn. We traded off time steering and trimming. Hey, Fuck 'em! They missed an awesome star-lit sail surfing all night long in brisk but not freezing conditions. An absolutely beautiful sail.

_____

30 years later I fucked up calling the jibe into Ensenada. Given a normal crew it would have been fine but I forgot the Sea Scout Factor which adds 20-30 minutes on to every transition as the youngsters get into position for the maneuver. It wasn't a disaster; it added only about a mile to our distance to finish and the hotter angle made up for the greater distance. Sort of. Again, somewhere around midnight. We were flying. Trouble was, we were right at the limit of our spinnaker and prudence dictated that we should throw up a smaller heavier sail. But... Sea Scouts... The owner was not feeling well (cancer survivor and not feeling tip-top) so he was below. And the rest of the crew, again... crawled into corners below and just "switched off." 

Luckily the helmsman was skilled and rested enough and understood the spinnaker situation. I trimmed, he drove, the spinnaker didn't blow up, the boat went straight and true. I think we even ended up with a trophy from that one.

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15 hours ago, P_Wop said:

OK, I've been asked for my 1979 Fastnet story, so here goes...


 

We had no idea at all where we were, as there'd been no DR plot for 18 hours.  So I brought out my trusty sextant.  I'd been given grief in Cowes from several mates in the Admiral's Cup fleet as I walked down the dock with it.  "Hey, Magellan, looking for the New World?  Haven't you heard about electronics?"  My reply was that electronics and seawater don't mix too well, which was a bit of a chilling prognostication.

Anyway I got a noon latitude, which put us half way across the Channel, so we gybed for the general direction of Plymouth.  Not the finest race conclusion for that lovely boat.

 

 

Thank you for the story P. Wop.

When we reached Plymouth (retired) I felt we were no where as decent sailors as we previously thought .... just to hear a lot of stories and tick-off a number of "bad job"  boxes.

Now, 40 + years later, you help me tick te last remaining box: "unable to keep a proper DR for very long hours" . Thanks ;)                                      PS: no engine and no electronics bar the RDF.

 

 

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5 hours ago, P_Wop said:

As a 20-year old I remember doing a hideous RORC 200-mile Channel triangle race on a 34-footer Schuylkill.  It was hard on the wind all the way round. 

As soon as we got to a corner, we got a major windshift.  There was lots of rain and a nasty confused sea caused by the wind direction changes, and 15-25 knots all the way.  

At one point, with three of us on the rail suffering repeat freezing inundations and misery, our bow man turned round and said in a pissed-off voice, "I'm glad I'm not out here."

Cracked everyone up.

Luckily our naviguesser Ben Bradley from Spencer Rigging in Cowes was a genius at making bacon toasted sandwiches.  He got them done and handed out faster than the rest of us could eat them.

Was that 1974 ?

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Geraldton to Fremantle in 2007. Started with a strong wind warning that turned into a gale warning with winds and swell hitting us at 90 degrees on the starboard side.

Peak gust of 64 knots with 6m swell and combined 10m seas and swell. Rather horrendous 20 hours with nowhere to hide. Couldn’t see the bow during the squalls. Many of the crew never sailed again. I decided that would be my last offshore race.

2002 Fremantle to Geraldton. Thunderstorms so thick you could see the flashing down below with eyes shut. Similar swell but only 25-30 knots

2008 Fremantle to Bunbury and return. Rounded the mark in Bunbury and heading back to Fremantle at 1 in the morning. Mast head assy up and full mail. Get out of the protected water and the kite explodes. Try to get it down and the halyard has skinned itself and gets jammed around 5m down....18m to go...No volunteers to go and get it so throw the harness on and up I go very quickly as the boat is rolling around in the now 25-30 knots. Must have gone up and down in less than a minute. Fired the halyard and got flung back to the deck and straight over the side to throw my guts up.

That was my last ocean race.

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7 hours ago, Left Shift said:

I have another friend on the 1998 race who was plucked out of the water after several hours of swimming alone by an S&R swimmer dropping out of the sky.  They were heading in with other rescued sailors on board and just happened to see him. 

He got back to the US and never sailed again.  Worst race?

The dangerous storm during the 1998 Sydney to Hobart yacht race

 

^ not that boat @Left Shift but regards to your mate, you may be talking about Kingurra ?

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I think what takes the prize is '79 Fastnet. There are a few pictures from rescue helicopters showing shocked, traumatized, exhausted chew sitting in the cockpit with a corpse draped randomly cross some winches. Too wiped out to even move the body a little bit. I think the photo that affected me strongly was in "Fastnet, Force 10"

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8 hours ago, moody frog said:

Was that 1974 ?

I think it was 76.  Ding Dong Bowl (De Guingand Bowl) or Cervantes Race, not sure which.  Just plain English Channel fugly.  I also did one in similar conditions in a Scampi in 74. That's how nuts I was before I attempted to grow up.

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7 hours ago, Swanno said:

No volunteers to go and get it so i throw the harness on

Volunteer positions on a sail boat? Maybe it was an 70-80s thing and we just weren't woke enough...

There wasn't a debate on who was going to the end of the pole while rolling rail to rail to set up a peel or who was going aloft in any conditions.

My job was bowman. 'Yes sir' was the only acceptable response!

 

I also sailed with owners that would put you in the life raft and sail away if you went below and shut down! 

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3 hours ago, Somebody Else said:

I think what takes the prize is '79 Fastnet. There are a few pictures from rescue helicopters showing shocked, traumatized, exhausted chew sitting in the cockpit with a corpse draped randomly cross some winches. Too wiped out to even move the body a little bit. I think the photo that affected me strongly was in "Fastnet, Force 10"

Yes, John Rousmaniere's "Fastnet, Force 10" book is well worth a read.  He did the race on a Swan 48. 

What I found unconscionable was the attitude of the gutter press.  They swarmed all over Plymouth, jamming microphones in your face, and "How frightened were you?" etc...  I wanted to clock them.

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26 minutes ago, Liquid said:

Volunteer positions on a sail boat? Maybe it was an 70-80s thing and we just weren't woke enough...

There wasn't a debate on who was going to the end of the pole while rolling rail to rail to set up a peel or who was going aloft in any conditions.

My job was bowman. 'Yes sir' was the only acceptable response!

 

I also sailed with owners that would put you in the life raft and sail away if you went below and shut down! 

If people go below and shut down, you probably don't want them on deck.   

All time worst crew shut-down excuse was when my previously reliable and very aggressive bowgirl went into a complete funk below deck on the second day of a race.  When pushed she simply said it was the first anniversary of her cat's death and she was in mourning. 

New one on me.  And I like cats.  

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2 hours ago, Liquid said:

Volunteer positions on a sail boat? Maybe it was an 70-80s thing and we just weren't woke enough...

There wasn't a debate on who was going to the end of the pole while rolling rail to rail to set up a peel or who was going aloft in any conditions.

My job was bowman. 'Yes sir' was the only acceptable response!

 

I also sailed with owners that would put you in the life raft and sail away if you went below and shut down! 

Corinthian effort with 4 bowman and whoever was up the front at the time something happened got that job, closest to the mast got mast etc. all 4 of us were competent.

Owner is my old man so I had a vested interest in unfucking things 

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25 minutes ago, Swanno said:

Corinthian effort with 4 bowman and whoever was up the front at the time something happened got that job, closest to the mast got mast etc. all 4 of us were competent.

Owner is my old man so I had a vested interest in unfucking things 

Why climb... you could of hinged the mast to deck level :lol:

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11 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Yes, John Rousmaniere's "Fastnet, Force 10" book is well worth a read.  He did the race on a Swan 48. 

What I found unconscionable was the attitude of the gutter press.  They swarmed all over Plymouth, jamming microphones in your face, and "How frightened were you?" etc...  I wanted to clock them.

Second you 100% on the press.

We came back, retired, in the middle of the night. After a few hours sleep and a quick phone call home, we regrouped on the Plymouth quay. Then comes this guy, long gray hairs and a "Colombo" like raincoat. "How did you guys on "Javlin" do ?"  he says in French. A lot of ?????? were surrounding our heads till we realise we wear early "Javlin" fleece jackets :).

After introducing himself as the reporter sent by the largest french tabloïd, he went straight to his concern, "have you lost any friends ?" telling us the Dutch warship was bringing back corpses.   We were still to get news of friends at sea on other boats and adrenaline started flowing in. There he was, his back to the water and three of us facing him. How lucky he was that the tide was low, how regretful we are that it was not high !!!!

I clearly remember his face to this day ..... but never crossed roads again :angry:

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12 hours ago, Rushman said:

Why climb... you could of hinged the mast to deck level :lol:

In one of the earlier Bunbury races, slamming along half way down we heard a twaaaannng. Didn’t notice until the morning that a few strands on the port lower had popped. Got a spare brought down, Lowered the rig on the mooring, removed the spreader, put it back together again and got line + handicap honours for the race home.

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On 2/26/2021 at 4:40 AM, Livia said:

I have been listening to LB 15 same jokes in long races since about 1978!

What do I win!

Your reward is sainthood but you have to die to claim it.

15 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Yes, John Rousmaniere's "Fastnet, Force 10" book is well worth a read.  He did the race on a Swan 48. 

What I found unconscionable was the attitude of the gutter press.  They swarmed all over Plymouth, jamming microphones in your face, and "How frightened were you?" etc...  I wanted to clock them.

I had only recently got into yacht racing at the time but for some reason that race affected me deeply, and still does. I subsequently became friendly with people who had done it.

As well as "Fastnet, Force 10", which has some of those desperately sad photos, Nick Ward wrote his account of the race, "Left For Dead". The title says it all. He was on Grimalkin.

 

download.jpg

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Very early in my racing years I went out on a Ranger 32 (Mull 3/4 ton production boat). Beating upwind, rapidly closing on the reef off Diamond head, I noticed the lee upper shroud seemed slack. I went to leeward & forward to get a look - the spreader had sheared off the mast. I started yelling "No Tack, No Tack" just as the owner started yelling "tack! Tack!" Luckily the helm listened to me & bore off rapidly

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I have zero offshore experience so I'll share an inshore "distance" race and someone else's experience:

Sailing a 24ft sportboat in Fraser Lightships regatta 2019 the fleet was hit by 30-35 out of Howe Sound after a couple hours of drifting around in the bay. Was a very quick ride down to the turning mark where our main halyard shackle broke and left us beating ~7 miles 30-35 on a sportboat under jib alone... not too bad but my worst race experience.

A GP26 that won Div3 for Van Isle 360 in 2019 lost their jib halyard in a big southerly and did a big port tack out into the pacific overnight. At 2am they went to grab warmer clothes to put under their drysuits only to find their bins had smashed to smithereens and their warm clothes were floating in 12-18" of water thanks the tackline getting wedged under the forward hatch. Raced on the boat a couple weeks after they returned from Van Isle and was told they would never do it again... they did sign up for R2AK though...

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Leading the 2016 Miami to Havana race with @mustang__1, full send downwind in 25+ on a Hobie 33 with whitewater everywhere back to the helm and the speedo constantly in the high teens (when we could see it).

Steering had been getting little loose earlier in the day so we tightened the bolt fixing the tiller to the rudder stock....all good for a bit. Little while later I'm in the companionway navigating off an ipad and looking aft at the helmsman tugging the tiller towards him to initiate surfs on every wave. Pole way back with the big kite on just hammering it to get to some rum drinks and champagne. He goes to put a big ass pump on for a large wave and nearly smacks himself in the face with the tiller suddenly. "I've got nothin." Immediate kite down, slow the boat down, figure what's up. Tiller is still attached to the rudder post but the rudder post no longer provides input to the blade which is just freewheeling under the water. We later find out the two-part rudder stock has sheared off in the watertight (read: inaccessible) bushing between the deck and the hull.

It's now midnight, we're in the middle of the gulfstream halfway between the Florida Keys and Cuba with 25 knots of wind against 4 knots of gulfstream current and we've gotta go back upwind to civilization in a glorified windsurfer because no Fucking way are we going to be stranded in a communist country without a rudder. Did a rudderless sailing drill all the way upwind back to the Keys at which point we needed to thread through the reefs without an outboard motor, which had died of saltwater poisoning earlier that day. Sunrise finds us collapsed on the dock in Marathon searching for food and sympathy. Found a trailer a few hours away from another Hobie 33 which was racing, pulled her out, got her home and drank heavily until our flights back North. 

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In the early noughties, I remember a windless Cowes - Dinard when we spent 24 hours becalmed North of Guernsey with cargo ships passing by, thank god there were all paying attention.... Nothing like the experience from the guys who've seen 1979 Fastnet like conditions but I found it worse than the few times I had to deal with strong winds!

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not sure if this is the worst or the best, but definitely the scariest, i was 16, it was the 92' LA-Cabo .. relatively slow standard Cabo race, i wanna say it was 4 days to scorpion bay slow, final evening probably 150 miles out, get off watch at 9pm, wake up around 10:30pm to massive pounding, the entire crew up on the rail tethered in, my dad driving like it was a formula one race on this big ass wheel, the wind is warm. when i went down we were DDW with the chute up at 8-10 knts, now chute is down and we're now port reaching with a reef and a #4 at 18-22 knots boat speed with waves straight behind and it's blowing 30+ in the warmest wind i had ever felt at night. i forget but i believe they had a name for this wind that came from sea of cortez over land and blew offshore at night, iirc we were 20+ miles off the coast. this boat was pretty fresh maybe 6 months old and i had never been near 20 knots of boat speed on anything, the humming was scary as shit the first few times. we covered a ton of ground, went back down at 5am, woke up around 8-9am to sails flapping and looking at the finish for 2 hours in no wind at all, we crossed the line doing 1 kt . we won PHRF-A and IMS by 10 hours and corrected out over Victoria for first overall.

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Sydney to Hobart 1998 - my second Hobart at age 19 on an alloy boat that was nearly as old as I was.

 

Everywhere a winch or deck fitting was attached pissed in water. The skipper had decided that the authorities didn’t need another 12 souls in a life raft, so aimed us north(ish). We were 80 miles into the Strait, but 100 miles offshore.
 

Waves so big they terrified me, and the scream of 80 knots of wind... I could not go on deck. Even if it was freezing down below, raining through the deck fittings and the walls ran with condensation while guys with 10,000 more sea miles than me puked their hearts out. And free floating in a bunk as the boat falls for what seems like forever off another mammoth wave, wondering (even praying) if this bang will be the last bang. Fuck going on deck.

 

The sea state was too heinous for us to enter Merimbula or Eden, so we just kept going north. We ended up in Ulladulla at 10pm and I was on a 6am bus out of there. I just... could not comprehend that in the sport I loved we’d lost boats and people I knew. It was cowardly, but fuck... when I got home I burst into tears in front of my brand new girlfriend. I still consider myself lucky as one of our other mates who was also in the race ended up taking his own life.

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Had the boat two weeks. Hadn't even had all 14 sails out for inspection. Doublehanding and come around the corner to 20+ on the nose. Swap out the #1 (hanks) for the sail in the #3 bag. They were both #1s. It was not a #1 day. 

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Then there was southern straits 2010. Look it up. Told that story too many times. When at the skippers meeting and environment canada tells you to go skiing and instead of sailing tomorrow - GO SKIING! they laughed at him and then tried to blame the race committee for having the race. Instead of blaming all our dumbselves for going out in that weather report.  Dumb dumb dumb. 

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Freezing cold Cervantes Race.  Le Havre dead to windward F6 and a lumpy seaway.  Comment from someone on the rail. 'I wouldn't care to be a nudist on a night like this'.  Shortly followed by another 'It really makes you appreciate how warm and wonderful a woman's body is.'

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On 2/26/2021 at 2:10 AM, NZK said:

Sliced a hole in my ball sack when we capsized during a distance multihull race....

Other than that I agree with Couta, plenty more shit seems to go wrong on deliveries.

 

ayup. 1994 return to CT after Newport Bermuda. that flatout sucked. Like a 3/4 scale model of Perfect Storm kinda suck... got knocked over, masthead in the water kinda knocked over, about 6 times by waves. Cambria  40. On one such knockdown, wave breaking over port side drove one of the crew into helm pedestal cracking the base, so that now I have an airplane yoke in my hands. very surprised that the steering linkage didn't fail. 3 solid days of that shit before it finally calmed down enough to put up more than a storm jib. 

6 crew. owner was off the boat, myself and a buddy were watch capt's he got sick about an hour into it. the others got sick by end of first night. 2 never set foot on a boat again. 

gackkkkkkk

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Imagine someone new to the sport, thinking they might learn something useful reading this thread, and deciding "WTF? Think I'll take up something sensible, like skydiving".

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21 hours ago, bigrpowr said:

blowing 30+ in the warmest wind i had ever felt at night. i forget but i believe they had a name for this wind that came from sea of cortez over land and blew offshore at night

vague recollection, we used to call that "el diablo", but no idea if that was a real name.

And, yeah, I was somewhere behind you on a Wylie 46 in that race.  That was an interesting night.

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13 hours ago, Jason AUS said:

The sea state was too heinous for us to enter Merimbula or Eden, so we just kept going north. 

This really brings home to me how terrifying it must have been.

A few years ago we ran up the coast in front of a forcast 50 knot SW - it was a bit bouncy and the autopilot had died just north of Gabo from a loose connection. Just the wife and I with our 2 young kids, she was a bit seasick so I ended up hand steering for most of the day. Turning into Eden was a very welcome respite.

I cannot fathom how bad it must have been that you couldn't get into twofold bay. Thats a bay where the entrance is over one NM wide and 20 m deep - I'd always considered it a true 'all weather' refuge. I actually cannot imagine how big the seas and swells would need to be for me to decide it was too risky to enter.

And I sailed with folks who said the 99 westcoaster was worse.

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1 hour ago, kinardly said:

Imagine someone new to the sport, thinking they might learn something useful reading this thread, and deciding "WTF? Think I'll take up something sensible, like skydiving".

But it's enlightening and humbling to read all these experiences. I've been sailing all my life, haven't done much offshore racing but all kinds of other sailing... rescued people and been rescued, some pretty bad storms, etc etc. Like most SouthEastern USAneans I have been thru hurricanes but never at sea (thank God).

My worst experience at sea was on a Navy destroyer off the coast of Scotland. Trying to work in a boiler room that's on it's ear 3/4 of the time is difficult but not in any way comparable. My worst experience in a distance race was a spinnaker broach at night in Chi-Mac and I was below... trying to get out of my bunk and to the companionway, somebody stomped hard on my right hand and it put me out of action until the fun was over anyway, so I just got back into the pipe berth and went to sleep. My near-death sailing experiences have all been in small boats, thunderstorms and asshole motorboats and such.

So yeah, I can see the point where this wouold not be the best thread to show a newbie you're hoping to recruit. But I love it just the same, thank you all!

FB- Doug

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22 hours ago, bigrpowr said:

... it's blowing 30+ in the warmest wind i had ever felt at night. i forget but i believe they had a name for this wind that came from sea of cortez over land and blew offshore

Chubasco

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6 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

Chubasco

Yeah.... that's (IIRC) the generic word for squall, but I have some vague recollection that there was a local name for the hot offshore breeze that pipes up at night between Turtle Bay and Mag Bay.

Or maybe not.  that was a lot of brain cells ago.

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1 minute ago, Somebody Else said:

"A chubasco is a violent squall with thunder and lightning

Yeah.  I think what Bigrpowr was talking about is more like a Santa Ana in So Cal ..... a dry offshore (easterly) breeze that comes off the land at night and peters out the next morning  Usually in a clear sky, no thunder/lightning/rain, just hot wind.

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20 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Yeah.  I think what Bigrpowr was talking about is more like a Santa Ana in So Cal ..... a dry offshore (easterly) breeze that comes off the land at night and peters out the next morning  Usually in a clear sky, no thunder/lightning/rain, just hot wind.

correct. there was no weather associated, it was some crazy warm breeze blowing east to west but with a decent 3-5 following swell, prolly bigger.

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6 hours ago, Somebody Else said:

This is a heartbreaking image!

Agree. I cannot imagine finding myself on the boat with everybody gone except my dead friend, and the two of us in the cockpit. Has to be the ultimate loneliness.

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9 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

But it's enlightening and humbling to read all these experiences. I've been sailing all my life, haven't done much offshore racing but all kinds of other sailing... rescued people and been rescued, some pretty bad storms, etc etc. Like most SouthEastern USAneans I have been thru hurricanes but never at sea (thank God).

My worst experience at sea was on a Navy destroyer off the coast of Scotland. Trying to work in a boiler room that's on it's ear 3/4 of the time is difficult but not in any way comparable. My worst experience in a distance race was a spinnaker broach at night in Chi-Mac and I was below... trying to get out of my bunk and to the companionway, somebody stomped hard on my right hand and it put me out of action until the fun was over anyway, so I just got back into the pipe berth and went to sleep. My near-death sailing experiences have all been in small boats, thunderstorms and asshole motorboats and such.

So yeah, I can see the point where this wouold not be the best thread to show a newbie you're hoping to recruit. But I love it just the same, thank you all!

FB- Doug

:rolleyes:

Although I would rank a Biscay crossing in a mine sweeper which moved in the gale, hour after hour, as an IOR boat before a death roll as one of my more frightening experiences ........

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I guess this one is a lesson is shit doesn't only go South in breeze poor prep can lead to trouble even in light air.  Did a Cabo on boat no water maker took bottled water only against my advice.  Ended up very slow and reached go /no go and had to drop out while in first as we would not have enough water to get to the end.  Two years later asked to do Cabo agin on the same boat. Promises of water maker being installed for the race.  Race arrives no wate maker don't worry we put the bladder back in have more then enough water.  I ummed and erred but had a great crew and figured it's a Cabo waht could go wrong.  Wake up first morning to all the water from the bladder in the bilge as owner had cross threaded the fitting so instant water rationing. Forecast looked slow but not too bad we continued on.  This lead to dehydration and some constipation.  Got a cut on my finger went to med kit everything wet and had ben for a while no antibiotic ointment or anything else.  Fix it up as best I can. Started feeling worse and worse until I was confined to my bunk the last 20 hours.  Ended up going off the boat on a stertcher directly to hospital.  Dehydration, impacted bowel, a bit of shock, at the time they thought swollen or burst apendix, possible blood poisoning and MERSA.  Was in hospital for two days before I could fly home and go to doctor.  Suffice to say I am now always involved in Med Kit and won't go offshore without a water maker.

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Fan, Yeah it was always Win or Bust on that boat.

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I wasn't even part of it and I still live with it to this day and that was the 2011 Annapolis to Newport Race when then Donnybrook ran around. My wife got messed up bad, spent the rest of June in the hospital and summer recovering from a rather lengthy internal surgery done to resolve damage done from the impact. 

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9 hours ago, moody frog said:

:rolleyes:

Although I would rank a Biscay crossing in a mine sweeper which moved in the gale, hour after hour, as an IOR boat before a death roll as one of my more frightening experiences ........

Steam, don't get me wrong. This is the most fascinating and engaging discussion in a looong time. Reading of these exploits makes me all too aware of my limitations. I doubt I wold have performed to this level and most likely would have chucked the whole sailing thing afterwards.

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10 hours ago, moody frog said:

:rolleyes:

Although I would rank a Biscay crossing in a mine sweeper which moved in the gale, hour after hour, as an IOR boat before a death roll as one of my more frightening experiences ........

Too right.  As was well recorded, those little ships would roll on wet grass.  HRH Prince of Wales, once in command of HMS Bronington, pennant number M-1115 (also known as "old quarter past eleven") was once asked what was the best cure for sea-sickness.  "Go and sit under a tree."

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10 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Too right.  As was well recorded, those little ships would roll on wet grass.  HRH Prince of Wales, once in command of HMS Bronington, pennant number M-1115 (also known as "old quarter past eleven") was once asked what was the best cure for sea-sickness.  "Go and sit under a tree."

;) At the time, I had been only too happy to see a brass plate with " design by Philip L. Rhodes".  How's that about misplaced trust :)

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34 minutes ago, WGWarburton said:

Am I the only one who keeps checking this thread to see if Rasputin22 has pitched in, yet?

Cheers,

               W.

No

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Here's another one, albeit an isolated incident in an otherwise very fun race...

During a Caribbean 600 I woke up in mid air after getting launched across the inside of a Gunboat when we got hit by a very strong gust rolling off the back of one of the islands. I'd been asleep on the port side of the main salon/cabin. Ended up slamming into the side of the galley island on the stbd side and landing on top of another crew member who I think had also been asleep on the floor. 

We stayed upright and carried on unharmed but that split second of waking up in mid air was a proper 'pucker the balloon knot' moment...

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Whimp perspective here.

I have sailed for many (50?) years. Mostly inshore/coastal + some offshore. Reasonably resistant to seasickness.

Maybe it's age, but I am impressed how tiring a sustained 25-30 knot wind can be offshore. Is our anemometer registering correctly?
 

Imagine anything above 35/40 will be decidedly unpleasant. Have been in several of these but short duration squalls. 

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Sorry I skimmed a bit but has someone brought up 2013 Down the bay?  Did it on the family 36.7, lost count of the wipe outs, pulled the rivers out of the vang kicker and fixed it by stuffing the biggest Allen wrench we had on board into one of the holes when they lined up and duct taping it in place.... I think a TP 52 stayed just ahead of the really nautical stuff and posted a pic of a bar tab in Hampton before dark... hobie 33 had to be hauled on arrival due to hull delam from hours above hull speed, couple boats lost their rig...

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On 3/2/2021 at 7:08 PM, kinardly said:

Imagine someone new to the sport, thinking they might learn something useful reading this thread, and deciding "WTF? Think I'll take up something sensible, like skydiving".

I have never been seasick skydiving.

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While this story has nothing to do with the actual sailing, it's a story about assholes that seem to exist on our planet. We had just finished a Cleveland Deepwater to Put-In-Bay. We're pulling into the public docks trying to find a place to raft. The inner boats are all huge power boats and none of them are letting the sail boats raft up. Nothing but a huge shouting match. It's about 2AM so we're thinking about heading out and dropping an anchor. We see an open mooring ball labeled "Police Use Only". Since we knew we were going to crash on the boat. We tied up. 

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Transpac - similar to incident mentioned above. A little over half way when spin pole mast ring breaks sending outboard end of pole crashing into the owner's forehead while the inboard end punches a hole in the main. Had two doctors onboard but one had become afraid and spent all days after the West End of Catalina below along with the owner's son (CG vet with time on a cutter in Viet Nam) who was likewise, afraid. Incident resulted in a crew of five that began as eight. Fortunately it all ended well for the owner and the shirkers just kinda faded away once we hit Waikiki.

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What did Alex Whitworth used to say when teaching Safety and survival at Sea courses: "You spend enough time at sea you see everything!"

Sinking, fire, dismasting, capsize, rudder failure, serious injury, MOB.

Sounds about right.

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42 minutes ago, Livia said:

What did Alex Whitworth used to say when teaching Safety and survival at Sea courses: "You spend enough time at sea you see everything!"

Sinking, fire, dismasting, capsize, rudder failure, serious injury, MOB.

Sounds about right.

Livia,

The boys want a commemorative shirt for our delivery a few years ago.

We all reckon yours needed a few more words.....

 

 

polo Shirt.png

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