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5 hours ago, accnick said:

What are the options?

A Dyer Dhow 9ft hard dinghy that rows like a dream and a rigid transom inflatable that stows much more easily but rows like crap. 

 

I will not take a petrol outboard but I will take a 35lb thrust trolling motor with a lithium battery. 

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6 hours ago, Ajax said:

All of my cruising guides are loaded onto the boat. I have installed the Mastervolt charger for the AGM batteries. I have shuffled all of my infrequently used spares and extra safety equipment into the aft most locker in the quarter berth.

This has freed up a large locker on the port side for canned and dry goods storage. As a paranoid submariner, I just couldn't bring myself to bury my tools in that aft locker. I want immediate access to the tools so they still live in the smaller locker above the new canned goods locker.

I have new jacklines and I have an excellent jackline layout that I tested last year. What I don't have, are D-rings in the cockpit sole to clip onto. I think I need to buy two Wichard D-rings; one up near the companionway and one at the helm.  I loathe drilling holes in the boat but I'll do it right. I'll overdrill, fill with epoxy, re-drill and bed with butyl.

Lastly, I finally received a call from The Anchorage. My Dyer dingy wood rail kit will ship in a week or two. Hopefully I can overhaul the Dyer in time for the trip. I'm still vacillating on which dinghy I want to bring.

Dyer fits under the boom? Foredeck? 

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43 minutes ago, Ajax said:

A Dyer Dhow 9ft hard dinghy that rows like a dream and a rigid transom inflatable that stows much more easily but rows like crap. 

 

I will not take a petrol outboard but I will take a 35lb thrust trolling motor with a lithium battery. 

The 9' Dyer is a decent all-around dinghy for Maine. You can also tow it anywhere you want once you get there. Its biggest weakness is a lack of initial stability when you step down into it, but the 9' is infinitely  better than the smaller one in that regard.

A roll-up with the small motor is reasonably flexible, but you  don't want to beach it on Maine's typical rocky beaches very much. You also can't tow it very well, as it lacks directional stability. And, as you say, they row like crap if you have to row them. It is not something you would do as a matter of course.

I have a small (9') aluminum-bottom RIB with a good outboard, capable of planing pretty easily with two people. It stows in davits over the transom. But that is on a powerboat.

You will see all kinds of dinghies in Maine. With your choices, I might go for the Dyer, unless your roll-up is really good and stows easily.

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@accnick my boat is just shy of 34' so a RIB is just too big,  even with davits. 

I love the Dyer as my Chesapeake dinghy,  no problems with stability. 

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17 minutes ago, Ajax said:

@accnick my boat is just shy of 34' so a RIB is just too big,  even with davits. 

I love the Dyer as my Chesapeake dinghy,  no problems with stability. 

Well, Maine does seem like the forgotten land of hard dinghies. You'll see a parade most days even though RIBS are still probably the majority.   More often than you'd might think, you see someone towing something big like a peapod, dory or whitehall that's half the length of the towing boat.

If you can get it up there on your foredeck comfortably, why not? 

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12 hours ago, Elegua said:

If you can get it up there on your foredeck comfortably, why not? 

I think the Dyer will enhance your Maine cruising. Exploring under oar maybe some of your memorable hours. Plus you want to land on islands without concern. If you let your dinghy determine where you can go, you'll miss alot.

 

For the few hours it will go on the foredeck, I'd do it. I bet you'll find you won't need to haul it on deck many times. In the end, I bet it will be less hassle all around. 

This boat would get 3 more knots towing your Dyer. 

 

1742928426_Racerdinghytow.jpg.db5b95f846d8be34faa432e2a9e5c751.jpg

 

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On Covid: 74% of 65+ are fully vaccinated in my county (and along the Me. coast) and we're at 30% fully vaccinated and increasing rapidly. 

July 4th, 2019. We're planning a return of our local Harborque in 2021, on the 4th. 

1940238228_4thofJulyHarborque2019lobsters.thumb.jpg.204e24fbdad4735999a54054e40fac09.jpg

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39 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

On Covid: 74% of 65+ are fully vaccinated in my county (and along the Me. coast) and we're at 30% fully vaccinated and increasing rapidly. 

July 4th, 2019. We're planning a return of our local Harborque in 2021, on the 4th. 

1940238228_4thofJulyHarborque2019lobsters.thumb.jpg.204e24fbdad4735999a54054e40fac09.jpg

Yeah, I'm looking forward to a bit of that this summer. Last summer was a strange time, even in Maine.

It feels good to be vaccinated, even though we know it isn't a free pass to irresponsible behavior.

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I'm glad to add back a bit of the social aspect, but in terms of cruising, last year was very unique. Many of the most special locations were empty. 

I wonder if this year will be a zoo? Every time I talk to the yard they are going crazy. Everyone and their brother are splashing. 

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9 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I'm glad to add back a bit of the social aspect, but in terms of cruising, last year was very unique. Many of the most special locations were empty. 

I wonder if this year will be a zoo? Every time I talk to the yard they are going crazy. Everyone and their brother are splashing. 

"Zoo" is probably a relative term for Maine. Our yard in Brooklin had maybe 10% of the boats not launching last year.

I expect things to be more crowded than last year, but they never seem to be crowded compared to southern New England. That's one reason we go there.

All of my hard-core friends were in the water last year, although some launched later than normal. The 14-day quarantine on arrival in Maine from out of state put a damper on things for a lot of people, but we just self-isolated in the boatyard, completing our quarantine about the time we launched.

A nephew of mine has rented a house on the water in downeast Maine for August, and he locked that in some months ago  because demand was ramping up. I expect Acadia National Park to be packed this summer, so we may have to limit our hiking a bit to avoid crowds, even though we are vaccinated.

One question is whether the US/Canada border will be open to cruising boats this summer. The closure last year put a bit of a damper on the desire the go east of Schoodic, although one friend of mine went to Eastport. Needless to say, there weren't many cruisers that far east last year.

We'll see.

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

The 14-day quarantine on arrival in Maine from out of state put a damper on things for a lot of people,

That doesn't apply to you if you are fully vaccinated. I am actually arriving on my first "legal" day to be in Maine.

Re Eastport - They have a big floating dock marina, but outside of that we saw few recreational boats around that area. It really is way the heck Down East!

If Campobello Islanders weren't allowed in and out of Maine that had to REALLY piss them off! The other way off the island was a ferry that wasn't running.

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

"Zoo" is probably a relative term for Maine. Our yard in Brooklin had maybe 10% of the boats not launching last year.

I expect things to be more crowded than last year, but they never seem to be crowded compared to southern New England. That's one reason we go there.

All of my hard-core friends were in the water last year, although some launched later than normal. The 14-day quarantine on arrival in Maine from out of state put a damper on things for a lot of people, but we just self-isolated in the boatyard, completing our quarantine about the time we launched.

A nephew of mine has rented a house on the water in downeast Maine for August, and he locked that in some months ago  because demand was ramping up. I expect Acadia National Park to be packed this summer, so we may have to limit our hiking a bit to avoid crowds, even though we are vaccinated.

One question is whether the US/Canada border will be open to cruising boats this summer. The closure last year put a bit of a damper on the desire the go east of Schoodic, although one friend of mine went to Eastport. Needless to say, there weren't many cruisers that far east last year.

We'll see.

Last year a lot of people at our yard vacillated between launching and not, so it gave the yard conniptions. Same with the moorings at the yacht club where I squatted for a season, ( I lent my boat to my parents since they were between boats).  We self-isolated on the boat.  This year everyone will be vaccinated, so as long as a nasty variant doesn't show up, we should be OK. But as you say, not a license to go crazy. Maybe this is a year to go East. Last year we went West. We splash as usual in mid-May. 

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I think you'll see more activity in the harbors. I have good clients who just bought a house on the harbor with a dock. Now it's time to get their first boat, I'm looking for a mobo 20-26' or so. No specific type, we're open. Reliable, no junk. Price isn't an issue. I can't find one! A broker friend hasn't gotten back to me. 

 

On the shore, it is different. We're busier than I can remember right now. Houses selling quickly, some contracts right over smart phone. Signing up skilled labor is like winning the lottery, and I'm in the business. 

 

I met a young couple renting an AirBB across the street. They were asking if I knew of anything for sale. There's stuff but not too many simple houses under 500k in town. They're from Brooklyn, working remotely, happily living this life. They're living, working and looking here. 

 

My son just got his dream job with a firm out of Boston and globally. All his interviews (several) were via zoom; them from god only knows where, he from a small apartment in Camden.

 

The firm won't even discuss a return to the office before September, but it will be 'hybrid' (def; new normal to come that is unknown). His plan is to be the super valuable remote worker, a being that is evolving right before our eyes. 

 

He, my daughter his best friend Harry are getting NAMO, the $1 boat ready to launch.

 

Harry just landed a remote gig with a Boston based Solar firm. My daughter, working as a project manager right in town, is about to move into a new position. They have the new tools. 

 

My whole life living in rural New England, the age old mantra has always been, "How do we bring good jobs here?" 

Answer: We never could bring high paying jobs - not in any number - because,.... we ARE 'remote'. Kids largely move away. 

 

Our son, 29,  is back from Boston and living in Maine. He's making Boston $$ while enjoying Maines lower cost of living.

 

He ties flies, sails, canoes, bikes, snowboards and enjoys the quality of life Maine affords while making 'city' wages. 

 

First trout of 2021 caught on a fly he tied. Try doing that in the River Charles. The beauty was carefully released. 

1747990546_TTfirsttrout2021.thumb.jpeg.6710a3e2d0451515e91f1a6608b1e3d8.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

I think you'll see more activity in the harbors. I have good clients who just bought a house on the harbor with a dock. Now it's time to get their first boat, I'm looking for a mobo 20-26' or so. No specific type, we're open. Reliable, no junk. Price isn't an issue. I can't find one! A broker friend hasn't gotten back to me. 

 

On the shore, it is different. We're busier than I can remember right now. Houses selling quickly, some contracts right over smart phone. Signing up skilled labor is like winning the lottery, and I'm in the business. 

 

I met a young couple renting an AirBB across the street. They were asking if I knew of anything for sale. There's stuff but not too many simple houses under 500k in town. They're from Brooklyn, working remotely, happily living this life. They're living, working and looking here. 

 

My son just got his dream job with a firm out of Boston and globally. All his interviews (several) were via zoom; them from god only knows where, he from a small apartment in Camden.

 

The firm won't even discuss a return to the office before September, but it will be 'hybrid' (def; new normal to come that is unknown). His plan is to be the super valuable remote worker, a being that is evolving right before our eyes. 

 

He, my daughter his best friend Harry are getting NAMO, the $1 boat ready to launch.

 

Harry just landed a remote gig with a Boston based Solar firm. My daughter, working as a project manager right in town, is about to move into a new position. They have the new tools. 

 

My whole life living in rural New England, the age old mantra has always been, "How do we bring good jobs here?" 

Answer: We never could bring high paying jobs - not in any number - because,.... we ARE 'remote'. Kids largely move away. 

 

Our son, 29,  is back from Boston and living in Maine. He's making Boston $$ while enjoying Maines lower cost of living.

 

He ties flies, sails, canoes, bikes, snowboards and enjoys the quality of life Maine affords while making 'city' wages. 

 

First trout of 2021 caught on a fly he tied. Try doing that in the River Charles. The beauty was carefully released. 

1747990546_TTfirsttrout2021.thumb.jpeg.6710a3e2d0451515e91f1a6608b1e3d8.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maine is a terrible place to live. Don't even think of going there. (Leave it for the rest of us.)

Seriously, if we were younger, we'd probably move back there full-time, rather then just summers.

But after living in New England for 30+ years, we don't do winter anymore.

Nice Brookie. Are those flies his own patterns, or is using the classics?

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@Kris Cringle "Few hours?"  The dinghy will ride on the foredeck from Annapolis to the northern end of the CCC or possibly until Rockland, ME. Once I've arrived, of course it will be towed behind.

I will try to bring the Dyer but I think I will abstain from bringing the sailing rig for it. I'll have enough crap on board. I will bring the oars and the trolling motor.  The limiting factor for bringing the Dyer is whether or not the gunwale rail kit arrives in time and whether or not I am competent enough to install it before the trip.

I've been hoarding vacation like a mo-fo. I have over 2 months on the books so if I need to take a couple of days off to install the rail over a long weekend, I can do that without impacting my trip.

The Dyer 9' isn't exactly light but I will craft a hoisting bridle for it. I have a 2-speed winch on the mast but I can also run the tail of the spinnaker halyard to one of the 2-speed primaries. So far, I have only hoisted it by the bull nose on the bow. You can imagine what a shit-show this is.

If I'm forced to bring the inflatable, I will simply wear my tall boots and jump out before the bottom contacts the dinghy.

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16 hours ago, Elegua said:

I'm glad to add back a bit of the social aspect, but in terms of cruising, last year was very unique. Many of the most special locations were empty. 

I wonder if this year will be a zoo? Every time I talk to the yard they are going crazy. Everyone and their brother are splashing. 

First couple of deliveries/small cruises downeast last season were amazing.  On one trip we were the only boat out there...almost no lobster pots either.  Really incredible.  Of course things ramped up quite a bit as people got stir crazy, but having a place like Seal Bay all to yourself was really cool.  

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8 minutes ago, eliboat said:

First couple of deliveries/small cruises downeast last season were amazing.  On one trip we were the only boat out there...almost no lobster pots either.  Really incredible.  Of course things ramped up quite a bit as people got stir crazy, but having a place like Seal Bay all to yourself was really cool.  

Lobster season started a bit late last year, so a lot of traps weren't in where we are until mid/late July.

Which Seal Bay are you talking about? If it's Vinalhaven, we go in behind Hay Island. Good holding, good protection. Always seems to be plenty of room.

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It's not easy to change lifestyles. When I look at all these people moving to Maine or moving to Florida, I think give them a couple of Winters or give them a nice Hurricane evacuation and a hot Summer or two and then you are going to hear, "I miss going all the restaurants and the "culture".  Some will stay, but I think that the weaklings will be culled after a season or two.  

If you want to bring jobs to NE, sign up for the infrastructure bill - fast and reliable networks. 

20 minutes ago, eliboat said:

First couple of deliveries/small cruises downeast last season were amazing.  On one trip we were the only boat out there...almost no lobster pots either.  Really incredible.  Of course things ramped up quite a bit as people got stir crazy, but having a place like Seal Bay all to yourself was really cool.

Right - like when does that happen? I was by myself in the Basin. 

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23 minutes ago, Ajax said:

@Kris Cringle "Few hours?"  The dinghy will ride on the foredeck from Annapolis to the northern end of the CCC or possibly until Rockland, ME. Once I've arrived, of course it will be towed behind.

I will try to bring the Dyer but I think I will abstain from bringing the sailing rig for it. I'll have enough crap on board. I will bring the oars and the trolling motor.  The limiting factor for bringing the Dyer is whether or not the gunwale rail kit arrives in time and whether or not I am competent enough to install it before the trip.

I've been hoarding vacation like a mo-fo. I have over 2 months on the books so if I need to take a couple of days off to install the rail over a long weekend, I can do that without impacting my trip.

The Dyer 9' isn't exactly light but I will craft a hoisting bridle for it. I have a 2-speed winch on the mast but I can also run the tail of the spinnaker halyard to one of the 2-speed primaries. So far, I have only hoisted it by the bull nose on the bow. You can imagine what a shit-show this is.

If I'm forced to bring the inflatable, I will simply wear my tall boots and jump out before the bottom contacts the dinghy.

I wouldn't want to burden you with more crap, and you might only use it a couple times, but the sailing rig would be a great toy to have.  I don't have a trolling motor. If I need to go far, I sail and row. Sailing with two people, a load of clean laundry, groceries and water jugs into chop a long distance is a challenge, but doable. 

Farting around. 

ACtC-3d1KT9XDESY2Ppijd4dn47t7GMzujcj-E4T

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30 minutes ago, Elegua said:

It's not easy to change lifestyles. When I look at all these people moving to Maine or moving to Florida, I think give them a couple of Winters or give them a nice Hurricane evacuation and a hot Summer or two and then you are going to hear, "I miss going all the restaurants and the "culture".  Some will stay, but I think that the weaklings will be culled after a season or two.  

If you want to bring jobs to NE, sign up for the infrastructure bill - fast and reliable networks. 

Right - like when does that happen? I was by myself in the Basin. 

That's another thing going for this town, we installed our own fiber optics line several years ago. I have 1 gig speed at my house. But the rest of the state, dismal. 

 

We have a pretty large turn-around rate for incomers. But one of the biggest reasons was that many newbs couldn't get well enough employed. You used to have to bring your job with you. But weather always culls out a few. 

 

We could look back in a year and say nothing much changed. I can't see though. 

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26 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

That's another thing going for this town, we installed our own fiber optics line several years ago. I have 1 gig speed at my house. But the rest of the state, dismal. 

 

We have a pretty large turn-around rate for incomers. But one of the biggest reasons was that many newbs couldn't get well enough employed. You used to have to bring your job with you. But weather always culls out a few. 

 

We could look back in a year and say nothing much changed. I can't see though. 

Oh, I agree that COVID is one of those events where a decade of change happened in ten months. But I also believe that people's habits are hard to change.  COVID will have made it easier for people to stay, but not eliminated the fact that changes in lifestyle are not easy.  Perhaps my view is colored by the fact I've moved on average every 24 months for the past 20+ years, the longest stay being four years. If it's a Summer house for the wealthy, that's one thing.  Plenty of Maine license plates and Maine boats in Palm Beach right now. But for someone moving permanently from Brooklyn, the Maine lifestyle will be a big cultural adjustment, especially in Winter, and especially if they are not moving to a place like Portland. That said, if it is what you want, you'll do fine. 

Towns are funny. One of the best experiences for my daughter was attending the Edgecomb Eddy school. It was the only time my relative to stopped complaining about the property taxes for the school. 

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2 hours ago, accnick said:

Lobster season started a bit late last year, so a lot of traps weren't in where we are until mid/late July.

Which Seal Bay are you talking about? If it's Vinalhaven, we go in behind Hay Island. Good holding, good protection. Always seems to be plenty of room.

Yes Vinhaven.  Anchored plenty behind Hay island.  Sometimes I like to tuck in right at the entrance between Hen Island and Bluff head.  Good clamming in both spots

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This last summer, when everywhere was so very, very quiet, the night we tried to stay in Seal Bay it was absolutely packed with boats — a yacht club cruise. Nothing against them, been there, done that. We went back out, turned left and went into Winter Harbour. Anchored beneath the cliffs and spent two nights, with a side trip on our cruising partners’ Downeast powerboat to Duck Harbour on Isle au Haut for hiking. I think that yacht club cruise did us a favour.

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12 hours ago, Sweare Deep said:

This last summer, when everywhere was so very, very quiet, the night we tried to stay in Seal Bay it was absolutely packed with boats — a yacht club cruise. Nothing against them, been there, done that. We went back out, turned left and went into Winter Harbour. Anchored beneath the cliffs and spent two nights, with a side trip on our cruising partners’ Downeast powerboat to Duck Harbour on Isle au Haut for hiking. I think that yacht club cruise did us a favour.

That might have been a mob from my club. They had an informal rendezvous there in late July.

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On 4/13/2021 at 7:31 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I think you'll see more activity in the harbors. I have good clients who just bought a house on the harbor with a dock. Now it's time to get their first boat, I'm looking for a mobo 20-26' or so. No specific type, we're open. Reliable, no junk. Price isn't an issue. I can't find one! A broker friend hasn't gotten back to me. 

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Have you check to see what Edgecomb Boatworks has? They typically have a few motor boats for sale

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47 minutes ago, mgs said:

Have you check to see what Edgecomb Boatworks has? They typically have a few motor boats for sale

They are a Lyman specialist? They always seem to have nice stuff around. 

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45 minutes ago, Elegua said:

They are a Lyman specialist? They always seem to have nice stuff around. 

Yeah, not many sailboats though. I was there looking at a nice little Herreschoff 14.

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9 hours ago, ChrisJD said:

If I were old and rich and wore cable-knit sweaters and had a house in Maine with a dock, I would park a Dyer 29 at that dock.  But of the four on Yachtworld, three are Sale Pending.  That only leaves...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1986/dyer-extended-hardtop-3678244/

 

I've seen that listing. Ill take another look. Thanks for any leads. I'm thinking something pretty new - less than 26', more than 22', can handle 6 adults, safe(?),  inside 100k. It has to be turn key, needs no work. 

 

This house was for sale for years and they'd throw in their pristine Neilsen 40'er and (or) a Hinckley picnic boat for reasonable $$.

As I recall, they couldn't sell the house or Nielsen (on the dock background),  for a long time. The picnic boat was likely a cinch to sell. 

2053037534_27Mechanicdocks2009.thumb.jpg.59ba215412d0e9449c950ce85fdeae03.jpg

It's a different world today. 

 

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Back to Seal Bay on Vinalhaven Island for Ajax and other visitors: A few years ago I watched this little schooner sail off it's anchor and out through the channel. 

1515447943_SchooneranchoredinSealBay.thumb.jpg.9ce60dba170821b274cff219e7962bb6.jpg

They did start the engine but only to run the windlass, and then shut it off to raise the sails. 

948297166_SchoonerSealBay-undersail(1of1).thumb.jpg.d5cb5ee3b55503039adbec699a654ab8.jpg

They fell off onto starboard to get settled in on the tack. Happy with the speed the bow sprit was swung through the wind onto port. 

1227236589_SchoonerSealBayapproaching(1of1).thumb.jpg.e877f193bce1161d5585f4cbc4369ebb.jpg

It was a beautiful morning. I had been watching an Osprey picking out his breakfast in the water nearby. The schooner was making much less noise than the Osprey. 

893604908_SchoonerSealBayapproaching2(1of1).thumb.jpg.19c10c75ce50087fb94af52be9be1439.jpg

A handy sailer, surprisingly. 

1959743000_Schoonerhelmsmen(1of1).thumb.jpg.50ee4c94a7967859579101178bf08341.jpg

She coasted by our cockpit. 

1112667541_SchoonerSealBaypassing(1of1).thumb.jpg.0e772a77d3aee6ab3cbf8b5bad7ee014.jpg

Took a few tacks, and disappeared out the narrow cut. 

504501739_SchoonerSealBayexit(1of1).thumb.jpg.feb07d4302bb1258a561c1ce7644fcca.jpg

I don't know if she sailed all the way out, but I wouldn't be surprised. This is the track she would have followed. 

239390869_SailingoutofSealBayisaformidabletask..thumb.jpg.e47c7ab453dd52d492c80cab37b9ae9d.jpg

 

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6 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Back to Seal Bay on Vinalhaven Island for Ajax and other visitors: A few years ago I watched this little schooner sail off it's anchor and out through the channel. 

1515447943_SchooneranchoredinSealBay.thumb.jpg.9ce60dba170821b274cff219e7962bb6.jpg

They did start the engine but only to run the windlass, and then shut it off to raise the sails. 

948297166_SchoonerSealBay-undersail(1of1).thumb.jpg.d5cb5ee3b55503039adbec699a654ab8.jpg

They fell off onto starboard to get settled in on the tack. Happy with the speed the bow sprit was swung through the wind onto port. 

1227236589_SchoonerSealBayapproaching(1of1).thumb.jpg.e877f193bce1161d5585f4cbc4369ebb.jpg

It was a beautiful morning. I had been watching an Osprey picking out his breakfast in the water nearby. The schooner was making much less noise than the Osprey. 

893604908_SchoonerSealBayapproaching2(1of1).thumb.jpg.19c10c75ce50087fb94af52be9be1439.jpg

A handy sailer, surprisingly. 

1959743000_Schoonerhelmsmen(1of1).thumb.jpg.50ee4c94a7967859579101178bf08341.jpg

She coasted by our cockpit. 

1112667541_SchoonerSealBaypassing(1of1).thumb.jpg.0e772a77d3aee6ab3cbf8b5bad7ee014.jpg

Took a few tacks, and disappeared out the narrow cut. 

504501739_SchoonerSealBayexit(1of1).thumb.jpg.feb07d4302bb1258a561c1ce7644fcca.jpg

I don't know if she sailed all the way out, but I wouldn't be surprised. This is the track she would have followed. 

239390869_SailingoutofSealBayisaformidabletask..thumb.jpg.e47c7ab453dd52d492c80cab37b9ae9d.jpg

 

I’ve anchored right next to them in Seal

Bay too.. or rather they anchored next to me, but what a fabulous boat. 

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

The boat was not quite as nice as I thought, so back to the drawing board :(

Ugh, sorry to hear that.

When I was looking at Sabres a few years ago, I narrowly avoided a trip to Nova Scotia because my buyer's agent happened to know a guy in the area, who was able to tell him that the pristine example shown in the listing was actually a shoddy-looking thing suffering from extreme gelcoat crazing and with a hastily repaired keel from a bad grounding on rock.  It's a real PITA how brokers are willing to waste people's time and money advertising a boat that they can't even deliver in the first place.

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

The boat was not quite as nice as I thought, so back to the drawing board :(

(if I want to restore an old boat, I already have one  I don't have to go fetch from Maine :rolleyes:)

 

Sorry to hear that. I had a foreboding feeling, from my own experiences and others. 

 

It's like Match.com Yeah, yeah, you are this, you are that, (says the photos),  but until I see you, all bets are off. 

 

 

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3 issues came up:

Deck crazing was nuts. Diesel smell that had plenty of time to permeate all soft goods. Fairing around the keel was a mess. The owner swore the boat never was grounded, but I could feel an indent in the leading edge of the keel. Maybe it happened without his knowledge, but it was 3 strikes and you're out.

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13 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

3 issues came up:

Deck crazing was nuts. Diesel smell that had plenty of time to permeate all soft goods. Fairing around the keel was a mess. The owner swore the boat never was grounded, but I could feel an indent in the leading edge of the keel. Maybe it happened without his knowledge, but it was 3 strikes and you're out.

That’s a total bummer. Did you ever say what boat it was, or what yard it was at?

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On 4/18/2021 at 10:18 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

3 issues came up:

Deck crazing was nuts. Diesel smell that had plenty of time to permeate all soft goods. Fairing around the keel was a mess. The owner swore the boat never was grounded, but I could feel an indent in the leading edge of the keel. Maybe it happened without his knowledge, but it was 3 strikes and you're out.

On the Hylas 54 I had under contract but rejected before we bought the HR53 there was one of those "and she's never been aground" moments.

Except at the survey when the boat was hauled there was a divot the size of a baseball showing exposed, clean, new lead...like the T-1000 after you pump a round in it.

Terminator Canon Catch-Up: What You Need to Know before ...

Among other issues.

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On 4/18/2021 at 7:41 AM, mgs said:

That’s a total bummer. Did you ever say what boat it was, or what yard it was at?

The boat was a C&C 40. The interior is probably the nicest of any C&C 40 today and the hull looks great above the waterline.

*If* the internal stringers and such are not damaged and you don't mind repainting the deck and getting new soft goods, she might be a really nice boat for someone. Too far from home for me to deal with all that.

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4 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

On the Hylas 54 I had under contract but rejected before we bought the HR53 there was one of those "and she's never been aground" moments.

Except at the survey when the boat was hauled there was a divot the size of a baseball showing exposed, clean, new lead...like the T-1000 after you pump a round in it.

Terminator Canon Catch-Up: What You Need to Know before ...

Among other issues.

My boat has been aground 3 or 4 times just THIS YEAR, the marina is shoaling up, but Maryland "aground" is hitting something with the consistency of peanut butter and Maine aground is granite :o

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16 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

My boat has been aground 3 or 4 times just THIS YEAR, the marina is shoaling up, but Maryland "aground" is hitting something with the consistency of peanut butter and Maine aground is granite :o

Aground in Maine depends. If you are on the bottom when the 10' tide goes out, it is likely to be mud. If you hit something sticking up from the mud, it is likely to be granite. You can usually tell the difference.

As we used to say when we were cruising with our sailboats with 7' draft, if you haven't been aground, you haven't been anywhere.

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36 minutes ago, accnick said:

Aground in Maine depends. If you are on the bottom when the 10' tide goes out, it is likely to be mud. If you hit something sticking up from the mud, it is likely to be granite. You can usually tell the difference.

As we used to say when we were cruising with our sailboats with 7' draft, if you haven't been aground, you haven't been anywhere.

This is true. Also at the top of most rivers you get mud.

You can get a CB which will help with the draft, but sometimes like off-roading,  that just leads you to getting stuck where it's harder to get out.  I've had some lucky moments, but so far we've only lightly touched bottom at the top of the St George.  Having now said that out loud, I will probably hit something hard, soon. 

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51 minutes ago, accnick said:

Aground in Maine depends. If you are on the bottom when the 10' tide goes out, it is likely to be mud. If you hit something sticking up from the mud, it is likely to be granite. You can usually tell the difference.

As we used to say when we were cruising with our sailboats with 7' draft, if you haven't been aground, you haven't been anywhere.

Or there are those that have been aground and those that are lying. 

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1 hour ago, eliboat said:

Or there are those that have been aground and those that are lying. 

That, too. 

That feeling you get when you are bumping over something is pretty unforgettable. Much different from the sliding-to-a-stop feeling, or the plowing-through-the mud feeling. The hard-stop feeling is the worst.

I think I've experienced most (but thank Dog not all) of the "going aground" feelings.

The worst was parking the boat on a reef in the Red Sea off Eritrea, trying to get into a tiny anchorage with failing light after a week-long passage. A boat we were traveling with had made it in 15 minutes before us on the last of the good light. We had good visibility on the approach--water was crystal clear-- but when the sun dropped below the horizon, the water went from transparent to opaque in an instant at a critical time for eyeball navigation through a break in the reef.

I took the engine out of gear, so we didn't hit hard, but we stuck.  When the moon came up a few minutes later, the water turned transparent again, and all I could see was coral under the boat. Sounded for the deep water from the dinghy, and found it 10' off the port beam. Carried the big anchor and 75' of chain in the dinghy and dropped it abaft the beam in deep water in the channel

A combination of full astern, and the big windlass trying to pivot the bow finally worked, and the boat swung clear. Fortunately, it was flat calm. The windlass breaker tripped about a half-dozen times, but I was grateful for ground tackle and deck gear sized for a 50-footer on my little 40-footer.

It was probably less than a half hour from start to finish, but it seemed like a lifetime.

When we hauled the boat a few months later, there were only a few scratches on the keel casting.

The line between success and failure while cruising, or any form of sailing, can be pretty narrow. Errors in judgment are not always forgiven, and I've made my share.

 

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

That, too. 

That feeling you get when you are bumping over something is pretty unforgettable. Much different from the sliding-to-a-stop feeling, or the plowing-through-the mud feeling. The hard-stop feeling is the worst.

I think I've experienced most (but thank Dog not all) of the "going aground" feelings.

The worst was parking the boat on a reef in the Red Sea off Eritrea, trying to get into a tiny anchorage with failing light after a week-long passage. A boat we were traveling with had made it in 15 minutes before us on the last of the good light. We had good visibility on the approach--water was crystal clear-- but when the sun dropped below the horizon, the water went from transparent to opaque in an instant at a critical time for eyeball navigation through a break in the reef.

I took the engine out of gear, so we didn't hit hard, but we stuck.  When the moon came up a few minutes later, the water turned transparent again, and all I could see was coral under the boat. Sounded for the deep water from the dinghy, and found it 10' off the port beam. Carried the big anchor and 75' of chain in the dinghy and dropped it abaft the beam in deep water in the channel

A combination of full astern, and the big windlass trying to pivot the bow finally worked, and the boat swung clear. Fortunately, it was flat calm. The windlass breaker tripped about a half-dozen times, but I was grateful for ground tackle and deck gear sized for a 50-footer on my little 40-footer.

It was probably less than a half hour from start to finish, but it seemed like a lifetime.

When we hauled the boat a few months later, there were only a few scratches on the keel casting.

The line between success and failure while cruising, or any form of sailing, can be pretty narrow. Errors in judgment are not always forgiven, and I've made my share.

 

I apologize for going way off-topic in that post. Could not edit or delete.

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I'm finally day sailing on a regular basis. I post this here, because these are the shake downs before I head north in July.

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22 hours ago, accnick said:

I apologize for going way off-topic in that post. Could not edit or delete.

This is CA, where thread drift is a virtue.  And your well-told story is fine drift.

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Between Boston and Maine, we're likely going to see more transiting boats this season than usual. 

There may be a new 'group' out there in 2021, the remote worker.

There are a lot of 'remote' jobs between Boston and Maine, and a lot of boats.

A few remote workers could make it work (my son used his $1 boat a few times to work for his Boston firm), either close to home or even cruising Maine (if they can make the tech work for them). 

1516889499_HinckleyB40sunrise.jpg.878a6125ff07e7659a7604c1c5b3a9ce.jpg

Do we need a new signal flag to hoist? 'Working Remotely', to keep gabby cruisers at bay? 

How about a shabby basement office background fold out for zoom meetings to keep your boat office secret? 

1785957273_Dinnerguests2.jpg.8446b50a36b56cb6d441f1578129e409.jpg

 

Know any remote workers that will be afloat at times this season? 

 

 

 

 

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42 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Between Boston and Maine, we're likely going to see more transiting boats this season than usual. 

There may be a new 'group' out there in 2021, the remote worker.

There are a lot of 'remote' jobs between Boston and Maine, and a lot of boats.

A few remote workers could make it work (my son used his $1 boat a few times to work for his Boston firm), either close to home or even cruising Maine (if they can make the tech work for them). 

1516889499_HinckleyB40sunrise.jpg.878a6125ff07e7659a7604c1c5b3a9ce.jpg

Do we need a new signal flag to hoist? 'Working Remotely', to keep gabby cruisers at bay? 

How about a shabby basement office background fold out for zoom meetings to keep your boat office secret? 

1785957273_Dinnerguests2.jpg.8446b50a36b56cb6d441f1578129e409.jpg

 

Know any remote workers that will be afloat at times this season? 

 

 

 

 

I've been doing that for the last seven summers, along with a few other folks I know. Just need a usable cell or wifi signal.

Maine has gotten a lot better in that regard in the last two years. I usually carry two phones with different carriers, since no single carrier does the job across coastal Maine.

Just use the inside of the boat as a backdrop. It certainly  gets the attention of the folks on your video conference. You don't get a lot of sympathy, so don't expect it. Sometimes they ask me to take the computer up onto the flying bridge to pan around.

They're all sailors, but Maine is literally a foreign country to them.

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Cell service has improved tremendously over the past 10 years.  I remember having to row the dinghy in small circles in the half of the harbor that got good reception.  Now I can get decent service most places. 

Still not as good as the "shithole" countries I used to live, where I could get solid reception at the top of a 4k meter mountain and other out of the way places.  My personal "best" (worst?) is holding the HR review for my department with the head of HR in Australia while having my wife quietly gybing the assy on an SB3 as we went up the Johore river.  

I'm not ready for video, but I am debating installing a cell booster... 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

Cell service has improved tremendously over the past 10 years.  I remember having to row the dinghy in small circles in the half of the harbor that got good reception.  Now I can get decent service most places. 

Still not as good as the "shithole" countries I used to live, where I could get solid reception at the top of a 4k meter mountain and other out of the way places.  My personal "best" (worst?) is holding the HR review for my department with the head of HR in Australia while having my wife quietly gybing the assy on an SB3 as we went up the Johore river.  

I'm not ready for video, but I am debating installing a cell booster... 

Wifi booster is handy in harbors with access to public wifi, which means many towns in coastal Maine.

Several friends who also work while aboard have compiled lists of harbors and locations with usable cell signals, but that list is outdated every year as more towers go up, sometimes in unexpected places.

If you are a Comcast/Xfinity internet subscriber, most of their internet customers serve as wifi hotspots, whether they realize it or not. Comcast says they have millions of them. You aren't skimming their bandwidth, but Xfinity tags a wifi hotspot onto their modems. You log in with your account info to access it.

I've found them in really unexpected places.

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My work has busted several people for "working" from cruise ships :lol: We are supposed to be in one designated home office, not any random place. Lucky for me my marina and the bar at the marina both use the same cable company as I have at home ;)

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On 4/19/2021 at 10:47 AM, accnick said:

I apologize for going way off-topic in that post. Could not edit or delete.

That's true, but you can hide it.

Not that we care, as Bob Perry said, "Life is thread drift".

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12 hours ago, Elegua said:

Cell service has improved tremendously over the past 10 years.  I remember having to row the dinghy in small circles in the half of the harbor that got good reception.  Now I can get decent service most places. 

Still not as good as the "shithole" countries I used to live, where I could get solid reception at the top of a 4k meter mountain and other out of the way places.  My personal "best" (worst?) is holding the HR review for my department with the head of HR in Australia while having my wife quietly gybing the assy on an SB3 as we went up the Johore river.  

I'm not ready for video, but I am debating installing a cell booster... 

For sure.  I used to have a dedicated cell booster antenna on my radar pole in order to get reception.   I also remember having to drive to the top of Cadillac mountain to get reliable service to call my girlfriend at the time, that would have been in 2000.  Today it’s a different world, although I agree with Accnick that two carriers is the way to go for more or less full coverage along the coast from Boothbay to Bar Harbor.  Verizon is great in most of Penobscot bay. Further east ATT works better.  There are definitely anchorages that I go to sometimes because they are both secluded and beautiful, but I can also watch a movie on Netflix if I want to. 
 

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53 minutes ago, eliboat said:

For sure.  I used to have a dedicated cell booster antenna on my radar pole in order to get reception.   I also remember having to drive to the top of Cadillac mountain to get reliable service to call my girlfriend at the time, that would have been in 2000.  Today it’s a different world, although I agree with Accnick that two carriers is the way to go for more or less full coverage along the coast from Boothbay to Bar Harbor.  Verizon is great in most of Penobscot bay. Further east ATT works better.  There are definitely anchorages that I go to sometimes because they are both secluded and beautiful, but I can also watch a movie on Netflix if I want to. 
 

We use US Cellular way downeast. Got that tip from the lobstermen. ATT good in some areas E of Penobscot Bay. Penobscot Bay and west/south is Verizon country. 

Last year there was a new tower hidden on a hill above NE Harbor, and Verizon is on it. Changed everything at our homebase to have that. Saw the signal after picking up the mooring, but had to scan the hillside with binos to locate the tower.

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When I lived in Maine I had AT&T. Now I have Verizon. I haven’t tried Netflix, but gribs, email and teleconferences. I figured video was pushing it too much for both bandwidth and my colleagues’ good will. 

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7 hours ago, eliboat said:

For sure.  I used to have a dedicated cell booster antenna on my radar pole in order to get reception.   I also remember having to drive to the top of Cadillac mountain to get reliable service to call my girlfriend at the time, that would have been in 2000.  Today it’s a different world, although I agree with Accnick that two carriers is the way to go for more or less full coverage along the coast from Boothbay to Bar Harbor.  Verizon is great in most of Penobscot bay. Further east ATT works better.  There are definitely anchorages that I go to sometimes because they are both secluded and beautiful, but I can also watch a movie on Netflix if I want to. 
 

In 2000 when we moved to Camden, the locals referred to it as 'Radio Free Camden', the cellular signal was so spotty. We use Verizon now and it improves all the time. 

 

Good info in these answers. I didn't know some were carrying two providers for better coverage. 

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6 hours ago, accnick said:

We use US Cellular way downeast. Got that tip from the lobstermen. ATT good in some areas E of Penobscot Bay. Penobscot Bay and west/south is Verizon country. 

Last year there was a new tower hidden on a hill above NE Harbor, and Verizon is on it. Changed everything at our homebase to have that. Saw the signal after picking up the mooring, but had to scan the hillside with binos to locate the tower.

When you said you were working remotely in NEH, I thought of the dismal internet the harbor gets. So do you do most of your work off cellular? I think I can see your boat in my mind. I remember the dark blue trawler. 

Nice place to spend some remote working time. 

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20 hours ago, Elegua said:

Cell service has improved tremendously over the past 10 years.  I remember having to row the dinghy in small circles in the half of the harbor that got good reception.  Now I can get decent service most places. 

Still not as good as the "shithole" countries I used to live, where I could get solid reception at the top of a 4k meter mountain and other out of the way places.  My personal "best" (worst?) is holding the HR review for my department with the head of HR in Australia while having my wife quietly gybing the assy on an SB3 as we went up the Johore river.  

I'm not ready for video, but I am debating installing a cell booster... 

Cell booster, is that the go-to for remote workers afloat? What is it? :)

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2 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Cell booster, is that the go-to for remote workers afloat? What is it? :)

Yeah. That and updating the weather over cellular. 

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29 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Yeah. That and updating the weather over cellular. 

I just read some reviews on this cell booster: 

image.png.ae250e55fa461f0deb6adb4a065b1b55.png

The only measure was a report that it 'boosted signal by two bars'.

So this wouldn't necessarily get a remote worker a signal that he could hot spot to and work online (not a lot of data back and forth, of course), but it could if they were on the fringe of a good signal. 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

When you said you were working remotely in NEH, I thought of the dismal internet the harbor gets. So do you do most of your work off cellular? I think I can see your boat in my mind. I remember the dark blue trawler. 

Nice place to spend some remote working time. 

I have worked primarily remotely for the last 30 years, in that I have not had a permanent office outside my house or boat except for stretches working in fixed locations around the world for anything from a week to six months at a time, depending on the job.

It's a lot easier now than it used to be. When we were off cruising in our sailboat 20 years ago, I had a Nera mini-M satellite terminal, which was compact, but painfully slow and ridiculously expensive. I used to spend most of my monthly retainer on one job just checking and answering email on that thing.

We haunted internet cafes in various locations around the world in those days.

Fast-forward to today, and on the boat I use multiple cell phones to locate a signal good enough to establish a hotspot, if there is no usable local wifi. If I rent a float or a mooring in a larger harbor (think Camden or Belfast), you usually get a wifi password to use. 

I have a wifi booster that looks like a VHF antenna, with a modem down below. That is usually (but not always) usable even with NE Harbor's lousy public wifi.

As mentioned before, if you are a Comcast/Xfinity customer, you often have access to their local networks, including in odd places like Roque Island. Someone there or nearby is obviously an Xfinity customer

Every Maine public library has free high-speed wifi, even the tiny ones. In pre-covid days, we would just go into one of those if there was no alternative source accessible on the boat.

Is it always convenient? No.

Does it beat going into an office every day? Yes.

This is our current boat, Calypso. Same name as our last sailboat. Not exactly a trawler, but close enough from the perspective of a lot of sailors. I call it a sailor's powerboat.1962952466_Calypso34.thumb.JPG.c8142e7ad65893ad26227035bd3f4162.JPG

Stop by and say hello if you see us.

 

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7 minutes ago, accnick said:

I have worked primarily remotely for the last 30 years, in that I have not had a permanent office outside my house or boat except for stretches working in fixed locations around the world for anything from a week to six months at a time, depending on the job.

It's a lot easier now than it used to be. When we were off cruising in our sailboat 20 years ago, I had a Nera mini-M satellite terminal, which was compact, but painfully slow and ridiculously expensive. I used to spend most of my monthly retainer on one job just checking and answering email on that thing.

We haunted internet cafes in various locations around the world in those days.

Fast-forward to today, and on the boat I use multiple cell phones to locate a signal good enough to establish a hotspot, if there is no usable local wifi. If I rent a float or a mooring in a larger harbor (think Camden or Belfast), you usually get a wifi password to use. 

I have a wifi booster that looks like a VHF antenna, with a modem down below. That is usually (but not always) usable even with NE Harbor's lousy public wifi.

As mentioned before, if you are a Comcast/Xfinity customer, you often have access to their local networks, including in odd places like Roque Island. Someone there or nearby is obviously an Xfinity customer

Every Maine public library has free high-speed wifi, even the tiny ones. In pre-covid days, we would just go into one of those if there was no alternative source accessible on the boat.

Is it always convenient? No.

Does it beat going into an office every day? Yes.

This is our current boat, Calypso. Same name as our last sailboat. Not exactly a trawler, but close enough from the perspective of a lot of sailors. 1962952466_Calypso34.thumb.JPG.c8142e7ad65893ad26227035bd3f4162.JPG

Stop by and say hello if you see us.

 

 

I recognize your boat, now. I'm sure I've seen it NEH. Pretty 'office'.

I have to keep up some work correspondence and have been able to hot spot the phone to a laptop, when I need to. It's just going to be more of a thing this season, much more I bet.  

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43 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

I just read some reviews on this cell booster: 

image.png.ae250e55fa461f0deb6adb4a065b1b55.png

The only measure was a report that it 'boosted signal by two bars'.

So this wouldn't necessarily get a remote worker a signal that he could hot spot to and work online (not a lot of data back and forth, of course), but it could if they were on the fringe of a good signal. 

@accnick Nice boat! What is she? 

Until recently, half of my goal of cruising in Maine was to shake the electronic dog-leash - 12 time-zones and poor connectivity - but more recently I've learned how to manage it better so I am able to check-in enough to keep the juggled balls from dropping and enjoy myself.  When i was younger I would get too wound up and if you gave me something like this, I would have ruined the vacation.  I think I can handle it now :P.  Worth a try.  Most times these days I'm just hot-spotting my cell phone for data or make a calls. 

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14 minutes ago, Elegua said:

@accnick Nice boat! What is she? 

Until recently, half of my goal of cruising in Maine was to shake the electronic dog-leash - 12 time-zones and poor connectivity - but more recently I've learned how to manage it better so I am able to check-in enough to keep the juggled balls from dropping and enjoy myself.  When i was younger I would get too wound up and if you gave me something like this, I would have ruined the vacation.  I think I can handle it now :P.  Worth a try.  Most times these days I'm just hot-spotting my cell phone for data or make a calls. 

My office:413003890_theoffice.thumb.jpg.872312f2988141c425f3c2a6f56eec22.jpg

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On 4/21/2021 at 4:58 PM, Kris Cringle said:

Between Boston and Maine, we're likely going to see more transiting boats this season than usual. 

There may be a new 'group' out there in 2021, the remote worker.

There are a lot of 'remote' jobs between Boston and Maine, and a lot of boats.

A few remote workers could make it work (my son used his $1 boat a few times to work for his Boston firm), either close to home or even cruising Maine (if they can make the tech work for them). 

1516889499_HinckleyB40sunrise.jpg.878a6125ff07e7659a7604c1c5b3a9ce.jpg

Do we need a new signal flag to hoist? 'Working Remotely', to keep gabby cruisers at bay? 

How about a shabby basement office background fold out for zoom meetings to keep your boat office secret? 

1785957273_Dinnerguests2.jpg.8446b50a36b56cb6d441f1578129e409.jpg

 

Know any remote workers that will be afloat at times this season? 

 

 

 

 

Interesting.  Perhaps my trip north might not be so isolated.

My spousal unit will probably do a little remote work from the boat. My work is classified so, never. 

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No surprise, quite a few people have been working remotely along the coast, already. Some interesting bits from Maine Sailing and Cruising: 

 

This guy is a professor and was teaching remotely last season: 

I have had a blackboard wall behind my desk for several years. I plan on painting one on the boat this June in hopes that those people I need to have zoom meetings with never notice the change in office location.

*

My better half, a musician, sometimes does live concerts from Stinkpot using a HomeBase that works surprisingly well with 10 down and 2 up almost everywhere on the Great Loop! Almost.https://www.att.com/.../3000.../3030/ATT-Home-Base-Z700a.pdf

*

When working remotely we are unlikely to go anywhere on work days. The 11 year old can do sailing camp at the Apprentice shop. Anywhere else it all breaks down

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I work aboard the summer season from my phone’s hot spot. Haven’t gone too far afield, so I haven’t had any service issues. In a couple years I plan on cruising full time and working like that...

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I’ve been living and working on my schooner since i sailed up last spring

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Yes, will be working remotely from the boat starting in Maine and then down the ICW. Use cell phone for WiFi hotspot with Shakespeare cell booster. I have AT&T and hubby has Straight Talk so one of us has service just about everywhere. We save the really remote/non-cell locations for the weekends.

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We're Mainers currently cruising and working remotely from the boat. We're in RI making our way south.  We have unlimited wifi through the Calyx Institute (anywhere Sprint and T Mobile work). I don't hide it, but Zoom lets you do a virtual background if you wanted to hide where you are. Maybe put a sock on the ladder when you're on a call?

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Definitely the plan for at least part of the summer but for the most part from our mooring in South Portland rather than cruusing. I know I have a good cell signal from there. The real problem for me is trying to stay comfortable sitting on the boat for a extended time. I'm fine at an ergonomic desk chair but on the boat I need to move much more often, so we will see how it goes.

 

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I’m there this summer - remote teaching 3 classes while heading up and back from Down East.

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This may be of interest to live-aboards or those who wish to be very connected but Elon Musk confirmed via Twitter that Starlink will be available to moving vehicles as the sats populate the sky. One caveat is that I think in their current form the dishes consume a lot of electricity. Still, if you want 100+ megabit connection at sea..

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I’m impatiently waiting for a marine Starlink kit. The extra speed would help me finish my work earlier and get me out enjoying nature that much sooner each day. Plus not needing to worry about being in 4G range would be a game changer for us

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38 minutes ago, Sailing My Cubicle said:

We saw record number of megayachts last summer.  Curious to see if that trend continues.

We saw many fewer megayachts, presumably because the border was closed and they stayed south.

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On 4/24/2021 at 8:42 AM, Elegua said:

'Gonna be a crowded Summer

The only places we saw crowded last summer were places with moorings. The anchor-only places were "same as it ever was". 

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There were more megayachts last season but that translates into one outside each of a half dozen or so large harbors. No people effect on shore. This season I think they will have more choices around the globe(?).

 

It's a race here; we have a high positivity rate, 4%, so risk is still high but so is vaccinated rate. 

 

It's hard to say. Maine is lifting outdoor masking right now. Our county on the coast is 51% vaccinated (over 18) and rising quickly. My family all fully vacced, even the kids at 29 and 30. 

 

Things will be open along the coast. Outdoor venues will rule. If you're cruising, take what you want, or stay remote. Easy to do without going very far. 

 

We've always been a dichotomy of cultures on this coast, ever since we started fleecing the 'rusticators' (after we chased the natives off). 

477468088_Mainecoast.thumb.jpg.dca622e670c6b42da817a00a6136360f.jpg

 

 

  

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My only interaction with Mainers ashore will be for provisions and fuel.

If I have to wear a mask for the 10 minutes that I'm inside a General Store or marina office, so be it.  Didn't you say that the watermen will sell me lobster right from their boats if I have cash?

We do want a couple of bugs while we're visiting.

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7 minutes ago, Ajax said:

My only interaction with Mainers ashore will be for provisions and fuel.

If I have to wear a mask for the 10 minutes that I'm inside a General Store or marina office, so be it.  Didn't you say that the watermen will sell me lobster right from their boats if I have cash?

We do want a couple of bugs while we're visiting.

Yeah, you'll find them everywhere. This is Randy and his Corgy, ZIP. He has a floating dock in Pulpit Harbor with his cell phone #. 591903050_Randy.jpg.b070f6469119aace5734e0c5f85271b3.jpg

 

We usually pick them up while getting provisions. Some places like the Fishermens Co-op on Little Cranberry Island will steam them for you to take back to your boat. You can always try a fisherman on a boat but that can be a mixed bag. 

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