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Between Boston and Maine, stopping spots


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11 minutes ago, Ajax said:

@accnick  I'm going outside of LIS. Technically, my longest unsupported leg will be from Cape May, NJ to Onset but like I said, if it's flat calm, I'll be able to pull into various places along that leg without concern.

I'm casting off somewhere between July 2nd and July 5th. Geeze, I hope there's still some breeze left. July and August are notoriously flat but I was warned against heading up in June.

What's wrong with June?

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Last overnight we did from Rockport to Onset, we had a nice Southerly breeze, most of the way.  I don't keep a log but the trip was mostly like this (taken at 2:45pm, we left just after sunrise):

The Kindle changed our lives, and made us much more welcome at airports, as our heaviest piece of baggage was always our son's bag of books. We were early adopters. My son had never heard of a Ki

It's a rare afternoon in the summer when you don't have a good afternoon SW seabreeze in Block Island Sound and Buzzard's Bay.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I have a large funnel as well as the rattle siphon hose that @Ishmael linked. The rattle siphon is really the way to go. 

Ok, I'll carry one or two jugs. If the weather is really flat calm, that means I'll be able to get into inlets for fuel that might normally be inaccessible due to rollers and narrow channels. That opens up more possibilities for refueling points.

I'm glad no one said that I needed 4-5 jugs lashed to the rail. I'm not really sure that I have good attachment points for a lot of jugs and I wouldn't want them to wash overboard.

Were it me, I'd find what would fit side-by-side in my cockpit footwell. 

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28 minutes ago, accnick said:

What's wrong with June?

Eh, people told me that the fog was worse, it could still be cold, that not everything would be open. I was advised that I'd have a better time in July.

Truth be told, one of the reasons for the trip is to escape Chesapeake summer heat for a little while. The real heat doesn't arrive until July/August so that was another reason for me to wait until July.

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3 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Were it me, I'd find what would fit side-by-side in my cockpit footwell. 

2 smaller cans (5 gallon total capacity) would fit under the helm seat.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Eh, people told me that the fog was worse, it could still be cold, that not everything would be open. I was advised that I'd have a better time in July.

Truth be told, one of the reasons for the trip is to escape Chesapeake summer heat for a little while. The real heat doesn't arrive until July/August so that was another reason for me to wait until July.

Makes sense. We're actually launching in mid-June, Which will be our earliest ever since we started leaving the boat in Maine. That assumes the new cabin heater installation is finished by then, of course.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

2 smaller cans (5 gallon total capacity) would fit under the helm seat.

Keep in mind that Block Island is on the rhumb line about 50nm shy of Onset (200nm from Cape May, or 36hrs at 5.5kts), has multiple fuel docks, and is not the worst place in the world to make a pit stop.  Also any afternoon trip from Block to Onset will likely be with a nice breeze aft of the beam.

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30 minutes ago, jewingiv said:

Keep in mind that Block Island is on the rhumb line about 50nm shy of Onset (200nm from Cape May, or 36hrs at 5.5kts), has multiple fuel docks, and is not the worst place in the world to make a pit stop.  Also any afternoon trip from Block to Onset will likely be with a nice breeze aft of the beam.

It's a rare afternoon in the summer when you don't have a good afternoon SW seabreeze in Block Island Sound and Buzzard's Bay.

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Ajax, we've cleared the decks for your journey. 

 

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New England is generally looking pretty good right now.

We will be driving up there very shortly. The thing controlling our schedule is the uncertainty of gasoline along the route. I go through about 4 1/2 tanks of fuel between Florida and Maine, and certain parts of the south along 95 are showing a real shortage of fuel on Gas Buddy at this time, thanks to the pipeline shut down which just ended.

Not sure how much Gas Buddy lags reality, but it will still be at least a few days before this sorts itself out completely.

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

along 95 are showing a real shortage of fuel

just btw - here in Virginia, while we do have a lot of gas stations closed - it is also perfectly easy to find an open one.  My wife has a delivery fleet under her span of management and they were originally a bit worried about meeting deliveries this week but it turned out to be no problem.

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On 5/12/2021 at 11:51 AM, jewingiv said:

Block Island 

A great stop, although the anchoring can be a bit touchy at times (both tight and not perfect bottom) - but is certainly perfectly doable.  I did love the CCA buoy's there.  And there was almost always another boat we knew also anchored there for good sunset conversations.

edit: and ice cream, can't forget the ice cream :)

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Ajax,

I highly recommend "Wentworth by the Sea Marina" as a great stopping point.  It's at the same parallel as Isle of Shoals but has facilities, hot showers, a pool, spa, restaurants and is really really nice.  We always love a relaxing stop there at the mid point of our summer adventures.  They also have a shuttle to the "Outlets", if that's something that interests the wife/gf/so.

https://wentworthmarina.com/

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7 hours ago, estarzinger said:

A great stop, although the anchoring can be a bit touchy at times (both tight and not perfect bottom) - but is certainly perfectly doable.  I did love the CCA buoy's there.  And there was almost always another boat we knew also anchored there for good sunset conversations.

edit: and ice cream, can't forget the ice cream :)

When there's a lot of boats anchored - especially mobos, there's always entertainment. 

1295622_BlockMoboaground.thumb.jpg.33e04f65787cc11b2dd594af26390e65.jpg

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If you've come into the coast at NH or southern Maine, Jewell Island is a good overnight spot.

It's one of the outer islands of Casco Bay so not too far off the coastal line. Quite a bit of room and well protected from prevailing wind. Stay in the middle, best holding (a little rocky around the edges). 

1048400799_JewelIsland.thumb.jpg.5464a38e81a95b419a70dac78132e9be.jpg

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17 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

When there's a lot of boats anchored - especially mobos, there's always entertainment. 

1295622_BlockMoboaground.thumb.jpg.33e04f65787cc11b2dd594af26390e65.jpg

Yup. That’s pretty much every weekend.  All the boats in Portsmouth have exactly one place to go…

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20 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

When there's a lot of boats anchored - especially mobos, there's always entertainment. 

1295622_BlockMoboaground.thumb.jpg.33e04f65787cc11b2dd594af26390e65.jpg

BI was bad enough when we used to go there regularly back in the 1970s. We did stop there for a night in June on the way north from Florida to Maine a few years ago.

Zero visibility, and reminded me of the days when our only nav aid was a flashing depth sounder. Find 1BI bell coming from Newport, head 209m   or follow  the 20' contour leaving the sound of breakers to port, and run along it until you hear R2 bell. 

Now, of course everybody uses R2 as a GPS waypoint, and you're in danger of being run down by people following the plotter rather than looking and listening. 

I guess this is progress...

It is a wretched anchorage--deep in the middle, foul bottom around the edges. Pick up a mooring there if it is available.

On fourth of July, you pretty much used to be able to step from boat to boat without getting your feet wet.

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

BI was bad enough when we used to go there regularly back in the 1970s. We did stop there for a night in June on the way north from Florida to Maine a few years ago.

Zero visibility, and reminded me of the days when our only nav aid was a flashing depth sounder. Find 1BI bell coming from Newport, head 209m   or follow  the 20' contour leaving the sound of breakers to port, and run along it until you hear R2 bell. 

Now, of course everybody uses R2 as a GPS waypoint, and you're in danger of being run down by people following the plotter rather than looking and listening. 

I guess this is progress...

It is a wretched anchorage--deep in the middle, foul bottom around the edges. Pick up a mooring there if it is available.

On fourth of July, you pretty much used to be able to step from boat to boat without getting your feet wet.

The Twenty-Hundred Club weekends in the '70's were fun.

You forgot to mention the rampant alcoholism which prevents many from dealing with their boat's dragging when the breeze comes up in the afternoon or if, heaven forbid, a T-storm comes through. 

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

BI was bad enough when we used to go there regularly back in the 1970s. We did stop there for a night in June on the way north from Florida to Maine a few years ago.

Zero visibility, and reminded me of the days when our only nav aid was a flashing depth sounder. Find 1BI bell coming from Newport, head 209m   or follow  the 20' contour leaving the sound of breakers to port, and run along it until you hear R2 bell. 

Now, of course everybody uses R2 as a GPS waypoint, and you're in danger of being run down by people following the plotter rather than looking and listening. 

I guess this is progress...

It is a wretched anchorage--deep in the middle, foul bottom around the edges. Pick up a mooring there if it is available.

On fourth of July, you pretty much used to be able to step from boat to boat without getting your feet wet.

Now in the GPS days, the CG has pulled a lot of those nuns on the 4 fathom contour, so the find the 20' depth and turn find the buoy no longer works as well.  It's probably best to give all those marks with the pre-plotted course on the chart booklets a wider berth.   

 

On 5/15/2021 at 11:32 AM, estarzinger said:

can't forget the ice cream 

Noooo, can't forget that. I have a mental map of some of the better ice cream shops accessible by boat along the coast of Maine and I work at growing it each year.   No matter where I've lived in the world, I've made it a point of finding whatever form of iced dessert they have. 

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49 minutes ago, Elegua said:

 

Noooo, can't forget that. I have a mental map of some of the better ice cream shops accessible by boat along the coast of Maine and I work at growing it each year.   No matter where I've lived in the world, I've made it a point of finding whatever form of iced dessert they have. 

Just so you know the best ice cream in the state is far from the coast. 
I don’t think I’ve gone on record here about it, but it’s Houlton Farms Dairy

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2 minutes ago, mgs said:

Just so you know the best ice cream in the state is far from the coast. 
I don’t think I’ve gone on record here about it, but it’s Houlton Farms Dairy

If it's better than something like Roundtop (which has declined somewhat) I'd make a trip. 

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17 minutes ago, Elegua said:

If it's better than something like Roundtop (which has declined somewhat) I'd make a trip. 

About Roundtop, a friend once asked rhetorically where the cows were. He grew up with Roundtop as a dairy and might have stronger feelings about it than I for HFD. 
 

id offer to bring some down to you, but a quart wouldn’t make it past Patten. Better make the drive and get the full experience. 

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Heading north, the Isles of Shoals is the first (almost the only) anchorage in New Hampshire, the Granite State. The Granite State clearly refers to the nature of the holding in the Isles of Shoals.

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On 3/10/2021 at 11:53 AM, kent_island_sailor said:
On 3/10/2021 at 11:47 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

Yeah, except if you take the CCC headed into Buzzards Bay with the canal flowing out against a strongish SW'er, you may find an interesting set of standing waves at the exit of the canal past Mass Maritime. 

Is this just annoying or worth waiting for the wind to shift?

Depends on your idea of fun.

I've only done it in OPBs (except for a 470 long long ago) and loved every time. We don't get shit like that around here

FB- Doug

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  • 2 weeks later...

Weird weather: Our heat pump is still cranking out heat(right now). Lows in the 40's the last week.

Then one day it got so hot we had to switch the pump to Cool as it got too hot upstairs to sleep that one night(storm windows still closed).

Spring is historically a slow season for us, but so far, spring is no-show in 2021.  

 

But the forecast a week or so out shows temperatures reaching into the mid 80's and beyond in the Concord area(the cold North Atlantic will keep us cooler on the coast). 

 

No surprise, NOAA prediction center shows a warmer than normal early summer season: 

image.png.d0a8956f162656ff3344823b30c14cf5.png

 

And then above normal heat filling in for the July, Aug, Sep. Notice there is no B (below normal), in the prediction area. 

 

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Spring has been 404 so far.  I’m hoping it’s found next week when I commission. Looks like cool and rainy until the weekend. 

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Yea, Memorial Day weekend has been a bust.  It was nice lounging around on the boat and going out to eat, but, I would rather be sailing around.  Not a fan of sailing in 40deg weather when its raining.

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We managed to sail to our destination on Friday in mostly dry and pleasant conditions. As we rounded Cove Point into the Pax River, we were smacked by a small rain squall that lasted for about 15 minutes, then back to dry. We only had a little upwind work.

Saturday and Sunday were a deluge but we were already where we intended to be, so we played Scrabble and hung out with friends.

Monday was dry and sunny. We started out against a sporty headwind but it quickly moderated and then died. We motored another 1/3 of the way home, then the breeze filled in from behind and we sailed the remainder home.

@estarzinger was right- the boat needed a thorough cleaning out. We remove 17(!) bottles of sun screen accumulated from guests who bring the shit and then forget to take it with them.

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We made the jump from Cape Lookout to Sandy Hook and just beat the nasty weather in.  Then hunkered down for two days till the NE blew through.  Tomorrow Newport then Tuesday we'll be in Portland, I hope it warms up soon.

This was the start of the nasty weather while closing with the shore. Fun at two in the morning!  

 

PXL_20210527_061508432_compress56.jpg

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One of my concerns about arriving in Maine is arriving at night.

I know the rocks don't move and that they're well charted but it's still an unfamiliar place. Arriving at 2am in a storm would really suck. If the weather is calm, I could drift or heave-to outside of whatever inlet I'm aiming for.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

One of my concerns about arriving in Maine is arriving at night.

Be careful about engaging the motor at night up there. You may think you have . . . but you have not seen fishing floats yet until you have seen Maine's.

You can always heave-to, just make some coffee and wait for dawn.  Th charts are quite good - but human's make mistakes at o dark hundred.

With time you can get 'used' to making night entries - you need to double check everything and stop immediately if anything at all seems not exactly right.  We were once making a night entry and had leading lights shown on the chart lined up in front of us but the course was a few degrees off what was marked on the chart.  We stopped/turned abound and waited.  Turned out one of the leading lights was out and one of the lights we saw was a masthead light on an anchor super yacht. We would have lost the boat if we had continued.

The Fog gets rather thick up there are times also - but at least you are in daytime alertness cycle, and you can usually see right in front of the bow.

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

One of my concerns about arriving in Maine is arriving at night.

I know the rocks don't move and that they're well charted but it's still an unfamiliar place. Arriving at 2am in a storm would really suck. If the weather is calm, I could drift or heave-to outside of whatever inlet I'm aiming for.

i don't make landfall at night in Maine. I just don't. We heave to or slow the boat. 

I also haven't snagged a lobster bouy in years.

I suppose if it's dead calm, moon so bright you can read by it, and you have someone on the bow....

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9 hours ago, Ajax said:

One of my concerns about arriving in Maine is arriving at night.

I know the rocks don't move and that they're well charted but it's still an unfamiliar place. Arriving at 2am in a storm would really suck. If the weather is calm, I could drift or heave-to outside of whatever inlet I'm aiming for.

If you're coming from the CCCanal, I can't imagine you'd arrive at night unless you tried to do it on purpose. Give yourself lots of daylight each side on your planned arrival time. 

And on a storm; two days max (actually less) is all you need to plan for weather so you should be able to assure your weather (forecast), for the crossing. Avoid the tempting big blow on your stern, unless you have plenty of crew (I've made that mistake,...). 

Boothbay is open and straight forward, even at night. 

However, I rarely power around our coast in the dark because of the lobster buoys. And my boats underbody is very slippery for buoys and warp, even under power. Don't chance wrapping your prop at night. 

 

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A number of years ago we left Camden mid-afternoon bound for Nova Scotia. By dusk Mantinicus was abaft abeam and I was still seeing lobster pot buoys slipping by the lee rail - I still have bad dreams about that night. I will never go back to Maine without a shaft cutter fitted. I am against shaft cutters on principle as I don't want to be damaging a working man's gear, but...

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On 6/3/2021 at 6:27 PM, Jim in Halifax said:

A number of years ago we left Camden mid-afternoon bound for Nova Scotia. By dusk Mantinicus was abaft abeam and I was still seeing lobster pot buoys slipping by the lee rail - I still have bad dreams about that night. I will never go back to Maine without a shaft cutter fitted. I am against shaft cutters on principle as I don't want to be damaging a working man's gear, but...

We are in Maine now. Our boat is still in the shed (Brooklin) while we are installing a new diesel heater and catching up on a lot of deferred maintenance.

Weather has been really odd. Freezing cold for a while, now very pleasant temps. Because we are surrounded by water, it is a  cooler than even a tiny bit inland.

I second not traveling in coastal Maine at night. There are simply too many lobster pot floats, and many of those now use toggles (a second float) which makes them difficult to read even when you can see them.

It just isn't worth it to me, even though we have cutters (Spurs), with the prop in an aperture  (single engine powerboat).

Not that many pots are in yet, but the season could start up at any time.

 

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I’m sitting in Muscongus Bay right now. I’d forgotten how cool early June can be.  Strange absence of lobster pots so far…. The price of picked lobster is shocking - just like everything else right now. 

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7 hours ago, Elegua said:

I’m sitting in Muscongus Bay right now. I’d forgotten how cool early June can be.  Strange absence of lobster pots so far…. The price of picked lobster is shocking - just like everything else right now. 

I’m sure you’ve realized this by now, but the water is cold. I wouldn’t sit in it too long

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10 hours ago, Elegua said:

I’m sitting in Muscongus Bay right now. I’d forgotten how cool early June can be.  Strange absence of lobster pots so far…. The price of picked lobster is shocking - just like everything else right now. 

Fekkin' different worlds.

I can see the sea from my house. No coincidence, the water and the air temperature around the Penbay NOAA buoy are both 50F (+-).

I see photos posted this am of friends on boats dressed like they're at Sugarloaf Ski area.

It's already in the low 60's here in the shade in my backyard. We're throwing open windows and opening doors. I've been asked to turn the AC on across the street,... We'll see 80 today. I'm painting my bottom today. 

You're lucky, if you were out last weekend or any other May time, you'd swear you'd lost your mind. Enjoy the first 'spring' weather.

Find an island that is big enough to warm up in the sun,  and anchor tight to it, in the lee. That's your heater. :)

 

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I heard about that honking and 40 degrees a week a go. 

Amazaballs sailing today. Normally it's all dead upwind, but the wind picked up and shifted east a little making it a nice sunny, yet cool, close reach with 20 kts true. The old tub lifted her skirts. 

 

15 hours ago, mgs said:

I’m sure you’ve realized this by now, but the water is cold. I wouldn’t sit in it too long

My swimming is usually numbered in seconds even in July/August. 

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18 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I heard about that honking and 40 degrees a week a go. 

Amazaballs sailing today. Normally it's all dead upwind, but the wind picked up and shifted east a little making it a nice sunny, yet cool, close reach with 20 kts true. The old tub lifted her skirts. 

 

My swimming is usually numbered in seconds even in July/August. 

I made the mistake of going overboard in Buck's Harbor late one August to check my prop. I thought I was going to die before I could climb back out onto our swim platform. And yes, I was wearing a wetsuit, but it was my tropical weight shorty.

I don't even think about going into the water in Maine these days.

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3 hours ago, accnick said:

I made the mistake of going overboard in Buck's Harbor late one August to check my prop. I thought I was going to die before I could climb back out onto our swim platform. And yes, I was wearing a wetsuit, but it was my tropical weight shorty.

I don't even think about going into the water in Maine these days.

{When we lived in our cardboard box on the main street}, I stupidly volunteered to swim out into local waters and damn near died before I got the wayward dinghy home. Holy fecal matter, it was cold.

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I almost never swam off the boat on the coast of Maine for nearly 2 decades. Things have changed. 70 F degrees is what we look for. That's 70F when the air temperature on the boat has reached into the 80's(also not a rare occurance mid-day). Even under an awning, it's hot! 

Usually, that 70F only happens in upper areas of bays and estuaries. And not much before August. 

But we are finding that 70F farther down the bay(s) and even in July these days. The actual rate of warming ocean temperatures seems inconsequential but coupled with tidal currents and other factors, it's a game changer. 

 I can attest because I care not one bit about swimming in cold water. However, a cool refreshing dip on a hot day is lovely.

Yep, things have changed since I first sailed the coast of Maine in the 90's. 

1730632098_SwimmingPerryCreek.thumb.jpg.7f05e868e91fbed9d7a31e2792a63aea.jpg

1326149543_SwimminginBelfasat.thumb.jpg.1a4406142f6a52f77591f518ea59a97f.jpg 

57965036_Pswimmingwithhat.thumb.jpg.9157282f2b83f7c01530bd1c8e81803a.jpg

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This literally answered my next question- if you could safely take a quick dip to get relief from the heat. 

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21 hours ago, accnick said:

I made the mistake of going overboard in Buck's Harbor late one August to check my prop. I thought I was going to die before I could climb back out onto our swim platform. And yes, I was wearing a wetsuit, but it was my tropical weight shorty.

I don't even think about going into the water in Maine these days.

I once had to cut a line off my prop (self-inflicted - dinghy painter) in my skivies and a t-shirt in June. I had my wife wait for me to come up with a towel and a pitcher of hot water. Luckily it was quick work and my prop isn’t too far down. 

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All of this is bringing back terrible memories of my dad kicking my brother and me off the boat and making us swim laps around her before he'd let us back up the swim ladder off of Isle Au Haut when I was a kid.

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On 6/6/2021 at 4:38 PM, Ajax said:

I'm beginning to think that I should have bought a thicker wet suit. 

I'm not going in with anything less than 6 mm unless I can get right out again.

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I seemed to be the designated 'anchor recovery guy' every time I sailed thru maine, because I had dive equipment.  I had both arctic temperature capable drysuit and wet suit on board, but for maine I just used a 3mm one (plus hood and boots).  The hood probably provides a disproportionate added benefit.

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Left Isle of Shoals this morning on the way to Portland. Warm, little wind or fog.  Watch for the lobster pots!

PXL_20210608_093245514_compress34.jpg

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On 6/6/2021 at 7:08 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I almost never swam off the boat on the coast of Maine for nearly 2 decades. Things have changed. 70 F degrees is what we look for. That's 70F when the air temperature on the boat has reached into the 80's(also not a rare occurance mid-day). Even under an awning, it's hot! 

Usually, that 70F only happens in upper areas of bays and estuaries. And not much before August. 

But we are finding that 70F farther down the bay(s) and even in July these days. The actual rate of warming ocean temperatures seems inconsequential but coupled with tidal currents and other factors, it's a game changer. 

 I can attest because I care not one bit about swimming in cold water. However, a cool refreshing dip on a hot day is lovely.

Yep, things have changed since I first sailed the coast of Maine in the 90's. 

1730632098_SwimmingPerryCreek.thumb.jpg.7f05e868e91fbed9d7a31e2792a63aea.jpg

1326149543_SwimminginBelfasat.thumb.jpg.1a4406142f6a52f77591f518ea59a97f.jpg 

57965036_Pswimmingwithhat.thumb.jpg.9157282f2b83f7c01530bd1c8e81803a.jpg

Having spent the past two winters in the Caribbean, where the water is 84 degrees. No, no no no, I'm not swimming in Maine.  Even when scuba diving in the islands we wore 3 mil wet suits.  Brrrrrr.

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I believe 3mm is what I bought.  Here's hoping I don't snag any logs, boulders or wrap any pots around the running gear. I'm praying the water is at least 65F when I get there.

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On 6/8/2021 at 6:28 AM, Ajax said:

I believe 3mm is what I bought.  Here's hoping I don't snag any logs, boulders or wrap any pots around the running gear. I'm praying the water is at least 65F when I get there.

We have the burner on HIGH in Maine.

 

I tried to install a couple batteries below on Tuesday afternoon. Boat on the hard edge of the harbor - all hatches open. I couldn't see for the sweat pouring on my glasses.

 

WTF? I took a look at the cabin thermo: 

821724313_100Finthecabin.thumb.jpg.521d111d0383eeea7c6ac091d4e1b6ff.jpg

Phew! The heat finally broke, this am is cool. 

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17 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Yes, we had the heat on a week ago. These spikes - up or down - are becoming more common in my experience. 

64 this am in Marblehead. 

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We're here in Portland and it's been hot.  Not fun when breaking down the boat to haul.  Today is much more pleasant, which is good since we need to brick the jib yet and haul 500#'s of sails up to storage.

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Strange weather since we arrived in Maine almost three weeks ago.

Hot even in our boatshed in Brooklin for the last few days, but comfortable today, and headed down to the 40s tonight.

Fired up the new Webasto diesel-fired central forced-air system for the first time today, and it performed as advertised. Now it will probably be the hottest summer and fall on record, but we have both the heating and air conditioning angles covered.

That was a pretty big project requiring about 16 hours from the yard and almost 40 hours from me, plus untold amounts of planning and changing plans. I will spend most of tomorrow detailing the installation, plus putting parts of the boat back together that had to be taken apart to install the system.

Retrofitting a heating system is a bitch.

Launching a week from today, assuming my prop comes back from re-pitching and re-cupping on Monday as promised.

Probably heading over to NE Harbor next Friday if everything runs OK, where we will sit on our mooring and drink ourselves into a stupor to celebrate.

For some reason, all this getting ready to launch gets harder every year, despite having done it for most of the last 50 years.

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5 hours ago, accnick said:

Strange weather since we arrived in Maine almost three weeks ago.

Hot even in our boatshed in Brooklin for the last few days, but comfortable today, and headed down to the 40s tonight.

Fired up the new Webasto diesel-fired central forced-air system for the first time today, and it performed as advertised. Now it will probably be the hottest summer and fall on record, but we have both the heating and air conditioning angles covered.

That was a pretty big project requiring about 16 hours from the yard and almost 40 hours from me, plus untold amounts of planning and changing plans. I will spend most of tomorrow detailing the installation, plus putting parts of the boat back together that had to be taken apart to install the system.

Retrofitting a heating system is a bitch.

Launching a week from today, assuming my prop comes back from re-pitching and re-cupping on Monday as promised.

Probably heading over to NE Harbor next Friday if everything runs OK, where we will sit on our mooring and drink ourselves into a stupor to celebrate.

For some reason, all this getting ready to launch gets harder every year, despite having done it for most of the last 50 years.

I blame gravity, it gets worse every year.

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Hi Ajax,

We just finished A2N so rejoining this thread.  what is your timing looking like for this trip?  We are leaving Newport around 7/12, planning to be on MDI around 7/20 heading back to the Chesapeake around 8/2.  
 

are any of you locals going to be around mid coast during that time?

I have been consumed with race prep for the last 2 months so now turning my attention back to this trip.  

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Thanks Slim,

We love Marblehead (my wife lived there for a year when we started dating)!  We might actually stop there on the way North but tbd...

What is the consensus on Monhegan Is. and Sebasco?   Sebasco has a little resort that looks like my kids may enjoy (pool!).  Monhegan looks really cool but maybe a bit exposed and potentially foggy?  

Cheers,

T

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At Monhegan I would avoid anchoring or mooring in that spot between islands they call a harbor unless you plan to sleep ashore. An ebb current can turn you sideways to the incoming ocean swells, the rolling can be horrendous if there is any swell running

It is much better off the north side of the island, but still very exposed, only suitable in fine, settled weather.

 

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We are aboard in NE Harbor after a hectic month of work prior to launch. It's quiet here now, but will start to get busier beginning this week.

Most things are open, although the library requires masks and limits number of visitors because it caters to a large number of younger children.

The wifi works ok in the harbor for  now, but a booster/amplifier is probably still a good idea if access from your boat is important. You can always go ashore into the yachtsmen's building, although it, too, is capacity limited. Washers and dryers all working.

Since I stopped working (for now) a few months ago, constant internet a cess is less important, but I still have trouble weaning myself off it.

The excellent hardware store was closed yesterday, with no sign as to why and no indication of opening hours.

I hope this is not an ominous sign.

The engine seems to like the re-pitched prop, and ran well coming over, although I was more interested in getting here than stress-testing things.

Remarkably, most things on the boat still work, but now I have to remember how to operate them.

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Further to discussions on lobster traps, we ran from Brooklin to NE Harbor on Friday, and other than the usual concentrations at hotspots like the Western Way coming into SW Harbor, not that many traps are in yet.

Talking to a lobsterman who works at our boatyard last week, he was just going to set for the first time this past weekend.

The attached photo shows our prop (just re-conditioned and re-pitched to reflect our increasing displacement) with its Spurs line cutters. We still try to avoid lobster gear, since these guys are trying to make a living, and even with cutters, there is no guarantee you will not wrap a line.

1663882676_prop1.thumb.jpg.17ec9f65a23fb207ddc18244264b6ebe.jpgprop2.thumb.jpg.2c8ec0e0c46b52dbac784f12e6f8b1ff.jpg

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@accnick Holy smokes, the last time I saw a propeller like that, was on one of my old submarines. I'll bet you have adequate backing power.

I have 2 weeks until departure and at least one week of travel time (more like 10 days). I'm sure the lobster pots will be in full deployment by the time I get up there. :(

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