Jump to content

"An eviction tsunami"


Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, bstrdsonofbtl said:

Filthy commies, eh?

Yes
 

Quote

 

On Sunday, 56 percent of voters in the German capital approved a nonbinding ballot initiative that asks the city government to expropriate the holdings of landlords who own 3,000 or more units. That would municipalize roughly 240,000 units, about 15 percent of the city's rental housing stock.

"The majority of Berliners eligible to vote opted for the socialization of the large real estate groups and thus against speculation with living space," announced the organizers of the Expropriate Deutsche Wohnen and Co., according to Deutsche Welle. (Deutsche Wohnen is a large real estate company.)

Organizers of the referendum want Berlin's government to make use of an eminent domain article in the German federal constitution to buyback the holdings of Deutsche Wohnen and other large landlords, pay "well below market value" for them, and then rent the apartments at more affordable rates to current residents.

 

We have such buybacks here as well, when the powers that be determine that some proposed use would serve a public purpose that some current owner is not fulfilling.

Makes me want to invest in German housing and roll the dice on whether my investment will be looted. How about you?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 387
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

In my case, the tenant had no negative records. She had just left her husband and had two young kids. Husband was an abuser and she had a restraining order against him. Shortly after moving in, she fo

There seems to be an assumption that all landlords are veritable young Mr. Farnsworths, the fourth generation trust fund babies. The trust fund babies own the notes on the houses, and they can’t wait

Working one's own land is a gentleman's pleasure, working someone else's land isn't even the pleasure of an ox.

Posted Images

3 hours ago, bstrdsonofbtl said:

You wanna' commodify housing in that way you deserve to lose you money.

Want to? I'm actually doing it right now. Just signed a contract on new construction of a duplex.

One reason I'm willing to do it: It's only sorta likely that my government will decide it would be better if they owned it and buyback it. I wish it were less than "sorta" likely, but alas, govt looting is one thing on which we have achieved blessed bipartisan unity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/30/2021 at 2:37 AM, Excoded Tom said:

Want to? I'm actually doing it right now. Just signed a contract on new construction of a duplex.

One reason I'm willing to do it: It's only sorta likely that my government will decide it would be better if they owned it and buyback it. I wish it were less than "sorta" likely, but alas, govt looting is one thing on which we have achieved blessed bipartisan unity.

One of the biggest crimes against social justice now is the probate system, where people are given a 15 minute cognitive test in a hospital, while under the influence of any number of pharmas, and then deemed unfit to care for themselves due to "cognitive deficiencies." A 24/7 care order is placed on the patient after this 15 minute interview, and it is legally-binding.

At that point, the old bugger has to come up with some way of providing 24/7 care for himself or herself, and if not, they are removed to a care facility, the Government takes both guardianship of the individual and conservatorship of their financial resources, then that person's resources are liquidated to the nearest cash buyer through the probate court to pay for their care costs above Medicare.

Yeah Normy, I get your concern over some government entity confiscating the duplex you built, but how often does that happen compared the wholesale "looting" of the elderly through the probate system?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, mikewof said:

Yeah Normy, I get your concern over some government entity confiscating the duplex you built, but how often does that happen compared the wholesale "looting" of the elderly through the probate system?

If I thought that at all likely, I wouldn't build, which was kinda my point about how Germans are likely to react. Whether through rent control or eminent domain buybacks, "providing" existing housing by political mandate will mean new housing stops appearing.

I agree with you about the probate thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, pusslicker said:

Does anybody know when the moratorium is going to end? I want to move to a new apartment, but it's a bitch now. I'm assuming all these assholes freeloading are causing the problem?

Landlord kicked a delinquent renter out of a house in our neighborhood last week. The renter was more than a deadbeat, he'd paid his deposit and first month with a bad check and never paid a cent, as well as being somewhat of an unpleasant neighbor.

So, depending on your state I guess, it can be done.

- DSK

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/1/2021 at 9:33 PM, pusslicker said:

I'm assuming all these assholes freeloading are causing the problem?

Among other factors.

A brief history of the eviction moratoriums so far.
 

Quote

 

...

For a couple of days, President Joe Biden and members of his administration—citing Kavanaugh's unwillingness to tolerate an executive branch–issued moratorium past July 31—claimed they had no legal authority to re-up the CDC's eviction ban. "The president has not only kicked the tires; he has double, triple, quadruple checked. He has asked the CDC to look at whether you could even do a targeted eviction moratorium—that just went to the counties that have higher rates—and they, as well, have been unable to find the legal authority," White House adviser Gene Sperling said at a press conference on August 2.

One day later, the administration went ahead and issued just such a "targeted" moratorium, covering the 90 percent of counties where the spread of COVID-19 was rated as "high" or "substantial" by the CDC.

"The bulk of the constitutional scholarship says that it's not likely to pass constitutional muster," Biden admitted at a press conference that day. But, he said, "by the time it gets litigated, it will probably give some additional time while we're getting that $45 billion out to people who are, in fact, behind in the rent and don't have the money."

It was an exercise in lawlessness, albeit a temporary one. On August 26, the Supreme Court ruled 6–3 that the CDC did not have the power to issue an eviction moratorium. Still, the persistence of these measures captures a new way of thinking among some on the left: the rise of the idea that people should never be evicted for nonpayment of rent. When someone stops paying, this thinking goes, it's a problem for public policy—i.e., regulations and subsidies—to address.

For a year, the CDC was able to lay claim to a vast amount of power—arguably enough power to impose any restriction on private parties it deemed "necessary" to prevent the spread of a communicable disease. And although the CDC order was eventually struck down, moratoriums at the state and local level will persist long after the public health threat that initially justified them has ended. Seattle's moratorium on evictions for nonpayment won't expire until March 2022 at the earliest.

Meanwhile, these moves have deprived rental housing providers of the ultimate means to safeguard their property rights and remedy contract violations. It's also made their business a lot riskier.

In response, some landlords say they're raising the credit scores they'll require of new renters and increasing their security deposits. With home prices at record highs, there's also a powerful incentive to get out of the rental market altogether by selling off properties to owner-occupiers. Neither of those outcomes is great for tenants, many of whom rent precisely because they can't afford to buy right now.

"In terms of renting it out in the future, I'm way more skeptical," says Rivera. "I tried to be a good landlord. I got [my tenant] a job. I tried to be patient. But if evictions are that difficult to do, if it's going to take a year, if I'm not going to have a sense of who's in my house, it really does worry me."

Blanket eviction moratoriums were a novel feature of the COVID crisis. They look more and more likely to be a regular feature of our future—even when there isn't a crisis.

 

The majority of those who have recently applied to rent our properties have said something like, "My landlord is selling so I have to find a new place." Dramatically increasing the risk of being a landlord (along with high real estate prices) might just lead some to leave the business.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Excoded Tom said:

Among other factors.

A brief history of the eviction moratoriums so far.
 

The majority of those who have recently applied to rent our properties have said something like, "My landlord is selling so I have to find a new place." Dramatically increasing the risk of being a landlord (along with high real estate prices) might just lead some to leave the business.

 

This makes sense. Just another thing to happen during covid that seems counterintuitive at first. I was assuming people would couple up and move back home and there would be a ton of apartments on the market. I had no idea Trump would let all these fucks live on rent free, but then I guess this is how he deals with people he owes money to.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/29/2021 at 9:28 AM, mikewof said:

They attest that due to COVID, they can't pay rent, sign the second page of a two page form, and then they cannot be evicted with the moratorium in place ... and as far as I know, it is still in place until at least October.  I was told by both a housing lawyer and a rep from my state's agency that no effort is being made to determine fraud on the side of the tenants.

Who writes these laws? Nobody, apparently ... the moratorium order didn't come from a governing body, it came from the Center for Disease Control, which is one of our public health agencies. A few judges and "fringe" politicians have protested this, but generally nobody is willing to put their political careers on the line with it.

In the case of my grandmother's house, the tenant finally attacked one of the neighbors and threatened him with a hammer. Police got involved, made an arrest, eviction proceeded, the house is now empty as I fix, paint and rehab. I rented a 32-some cubic yard dumpster and had to fill it with the stuff they left behind, I threw out a brand new 60-some inch LCD television that had a fist-sized hole in the center. A few days before the eviction when I was mowing the lawn, the tenant ran out of the house to warn me about getting any errant grass clippings on her shiny new 2021 car that was parked in front of the house.

The neighbors are much happier now, and I hope to have a paying tenant in place in about a month. I also am getting close to selling my dad's old condo to the current tenant. I don't make any money on it anyway, and she is trying to get her credit in order to buy it. So things are okay again for now in that area.

On the other hand, the probate system is still a metric shitshow, with old folks around town losing ownership of their property for being diagnosed with "symptoms consistent with dementia." They then get a 24/7 care order placed on them, and if they can't do a reverse mortgage on their property, their custody is assumed by the State, they are sent to a nursing facility, and their property is sold through the probate court (often to a well-connected cash buyer) to pay for their nursing care. They then die in an institution instead of their own home. This problem seems an epidemic for those people who have few if any living relatives and never had children.

Covid-Mikey seems to be the only landlord I know that blames a poor choice in tenants on the big bad gov't.  I'll never own a rental unit as the risk of a shitty tenant makes someone with a couple places a target. If you have 30, ok, maybe you can absorb some deadbeats or regulatory risk.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, pusslicker said:

This makes sense. Just another thing to happen during covid that seems counterintuitive at first. I was assuming people would couple up and move back home and there would be a ton of apartments on the market. I had no idea Trump would let all these fucks live on rent free, but then I guess this is how he deals with people he owes money to.

Trump started it and extended it, but Biden has extended it repeatedly since taking office, including once since saying he doesn't believe has the power to do it.

So it's not so much a Trump thing as a blessed bipartisan unity thing. Isn't it wonderful?

6 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Covid-Mikey seems to be the only landlord I know that blames a poor choice in tenants on the big bad gov't.  I'll never own a rental unit as the risk of a shitty tenant makes someone with a couple places a target. If you have 30, ok, maybe you can absorb some deadbeats or regulatory risk.

I think I'd want a lot more than 30 if I lived in California. The stories on landlording groups from out there are nutz. Takes a year or two and you get to pay the deadbeat's utilities the whole time. Can cost tens of thousands. FL is a bit different. A tenant can be gone in a month, two tops, in normal times if they don't pay the rent.

Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Excoded Tom said:

Trump started it and extended it, but Biden has extended it repeatedly since taking office, including once since saying he doesn't believe has the power to do it.

So it's not so much a Trump thing as a blessed bipartisan unity thing. Isn't it wonderful?

I think I'd want a lot more than 30 if I lived in California. The stories on landlording groups from out there are nutz. Takes a year or two and you get to pay the deadbeat's utilities the whole time. Can cost tens of thousands. FL is a bit different. A tenant can be gone in a month, two tops, in normal times if they don't pay the rent.

I’d agree, and the rate of return in Cali is pretty low.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  

1 hour ago, Olsonist said:

Power was granted, not grabbed. In fact, Biden (and your boy Shitstain) invoked the 1944 Public Health Services Act.

https://www.hhs.gov/answers/public-health-and-safety/who-has-the-authority-to-enforce-isolation-and-quarantine/index.html

Then your boy Shitstain's Supreme Court said (Aug 25), well yeah, but Congress originally intended that to apply only to pest control despite the Act literally mentioning communicable diseases (AIDS, ...) and the quarantine section literally having an escape clause

PART G—QUARANTINE AND INSPECTION

CONTROL OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

SEC. 361. ø264¿ (a) The Surgeon General, with the approval of the Secretary is authorized to make and enforce such regulations as in his judgment are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the States or possessions, or from one State or possession into any other State or possession. For purposes of carrying out and enforcing such regulations, the Surgeon General may provide for such inspection, fumigation, disinfection, sanitation, pest extermination, destruction of animals or articles found to be so infected or contaminated as to be sources of dangerous infection to human beings, and other measures, as in his judgment may be necessary.

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/COMPS-8773/pdf/COMPS-8773.pdf

What did Biden say above about the "bulk of constitutional scholarship?"

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Excoded Tom said:

Trump started it and extended it, but Biden has extended it repeatedly since taking office, including once since saying he doesn't believe has the power to do it.

So it's not so much a Trump thing as a blessed bipartisan unity thing. Isn't it wonderful?

I think I'd want a lot more than 30 if I lived in California. The stories on landlording groups from out there are nutz. Takes a year or two and you get to pay the deadbeat's utilities the whole time. Can cost tens of thousands. FL is a bit different. A tenant can be gone in a month, two tops, in normal times if they don't pay the rent.

Florida

A month is a bit aggressive 

6 weeks and a free bus ticket to California is civilized 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

  

9 hours ago, Olsonist said:
16 hours ago, Excoded Tom said:
Quote

"The bulk of the constitutional scholarship says that it's not likely to pass constitutional muster," Biden admitted at a press conference that day.

Even he knows that the power was not "granted" as you say, but he's willing to go for it mostly because people like yourself will excuse it with your usual lies.

Expand  

You quoted this and just this. However, Biden didn't just say that. He actually said:

... The bulk of the constitutional scholarship says that it’s not likely to pass constitutional muster.  Number one.  But there are several key scholars who think that it may and it’s worth the effort. ...

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/speeches-remarks/2021/08/03/remarks-by-president-biden-on-fighting-the-covid-19-pandemic/

So you left out But there are several key scholars who think that it may and it’s worth the effort in making your Even he knows that the power was not "granted" as you say conclusion. Cute.


Ah, so that's why you want to talk about this subject in a thread where the evidence is not.

What did Sperling say again?

Quote

"The president has not only kicked the tires; he has double, triple, quadruple checked. He has asked the CDC to look at whether you could even do a targeted eviction moratorium—that just went to the counties that have higher rates—and they, as well, have been unable to find the legal authority," White House adviser Gene Sperling said at a press conference on August 2.

Biden knew Trumps moratorium is unconstitutional and renewed it anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's weird that Kavanaugh (belatedly) voted against the unconstitutional Trump/Biden eviction moratorium. It's like he already forgot who gave him the job.

In the lower courts, most TeamR appointees have gone against it. 7 of 9.

So I decided to see what it looks like when a Trump appointee upholds the unconstitutional Trump/Biden eviction moratorium

Turns out it's like selling little turtles.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The tsunami turns out to be a ripple

The market reaction to the end of the moratorium...

Quote

Nevertheless, a month after the end of the federal eviction moratorium, these millions of evictions have yet to materialize. Indeed, while filings have increased, they remain well below historical averages almost everywhere in the country.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rather than deal with evictions, we are just selling a bunch of our condos.  We were in debt due to deadbeat non-paying tenants owing us 30+ grand. Our credit was destroyed.  They didn't have to pay because of Covid, and we couldn't evict, because of Covid.  After 2 years of Covid, and retirement from the daily rat race fast approaching, I reevaluated our goals and direction.  Selling a bunch to get liquid, and be well funded to travel again as soon as Covid is over, and enjoy retirement, and our kids, and soon to be grandkids.   

As I have opined in another thread, this country is so fucked up with anti-vaxers, and right wing nutjobs, I can seriously consider spending half of the year in Europe, or any other friendly, temperate place to GTFO of the US of A!!

 

Dunno why the spacing is all fucked up?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Rather than deal with evictions, we are just selling a bunch of our condos.  We were in debt due to deadbeat non-paying tenants owing us 30+ grand. Our credit was destroyed.  They didn't have to pay because of Covid, and we couldn't evict, because of Covid.  After 2 years of Covid, and retirement from the daily rat race fast approaching, I reevaluated our goals and direction.  Selling a bunch to get liquid, and be well funded to travel again as soon as Covid is over, and enjoy retirement, and our kids, and soon to be grandkids.   

As I have opined in another thread, this country is so fucked up with anti-vaxers, and right wing nutjobs, I can seriously consider spending half of the year in Europe, or any other friendly, temperate place to GTFO of the US of A!!

 

Dunno why the spacing is all fucked up?

You set this to right justified. You should be on left justified.

image.png.3d6effa4e79b08537149b11254c71ad4.png

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Excoded Tom said:

The tsunami turns out to be a ripple

The market reaction to the end of the moratorium...

 

We went to court on Tuesday and had our eviction granted.  Buh bye freeloading bitch!

Edit to add..... we started the eviction process the day after the moratorium ended.  We had to go through the whole service process, arbitration and then finally the court hearing.  It was worth it.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ishmael said:

You set this to right justified. You should be on left justified.

image.png.3d6effa4e79b08537149b11254c71ad4.png

 

 

I think this new computer has a mind of it's own; shit keeps changing without my doing anything, unless it's accidental???

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Burning Man said:

We went to court on Tuesday and had our eviction granted.  Buh bye freeloading bitch!

Edit to add..... we started the eviction process the day after the moratorium ended.  We had to go through the whole service process, arbitration and then finally the court hearing.  It was worth it.

 

I'm sure that's a relief and I hope she didn't dump a bag of concrete down a toilet on the way out.

But you seem to be more the exception than the rule among landlords. Evictions are up, obviously, but still below historic norms. There was, apparently, no emergency need for the moratorium. It was just a vote-buying power grab based on the fact that there are a lot more voters who rent than voters who are landlords.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Ishmael said:

You set this to right justified. You should be on left justified.

image.png.3d6effa4e79b08537149b11254c71ad4.png

 

 

What do you do to get that screen?  I must have accidentally changed it without realizing it?  New machine is so fast, that one fault key stroke can send it somewhere different, unintentionally....

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

What do you do to get that screen?  I must have accidentally changed it without realizing it?  New machine is so fast, that one fault key stroke can send it somewhere different, unintentionally....

It doesn't matter now, you're back to normal.

image.thumb.png.e8d9975a68c101b972f3dc5771a43d4d.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

It doesn't matter now, you're back to normal.

image.thumb.png.e8d9975a68c101b972f3dc5771a43d4d.png

 

It matters to try and understand what I accidentally did to cause it, to avoid a repeat performance! :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, billy backstay said:

 

It matters to try and understand what I accidentally did to cause it, to avoid a repeat performance! :blink:

Well, just look at the screen grab I sent, it tells you everything you need to know.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Well, just look at the screen grab I sent, it tells you everything you need to know.

 

Yes, but I was asking how do I find that screen to check if it's left or right?

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Excoded Tom said:

I'm sure that's a relief and I hope she didn't dump a bag of concrete down a toilet on the way out.

But you seem to be more the exception than the rule among landlords. Evictions are up, obviously, but still below historic norms. There was, apparently, no emergency need for the moratorium. It was just a vote-buying power grab based on the fact that there are a lot more voters who rent than voters who are landlords.

I agree with that last bit about it being political. Do you think those renters were mainly D or R voters?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Burning Man said:

I agree with that last bit about it being political. Do you think those renters were mainly D or R voters?

Judging by the actions of Trump and Biden, they both think there are sufficient numbers of renters on their Team to be worth pandering and unconstitutionally grabbing some power. Their guess is probably better than mine. My first thought on reading your question was that I have no idea about the politics of any of my tenants, some of whom have been with me 5 years now.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2021 at 4:35 AM, Excoded Tom said:

But you seem to be more the exception than the rule among landlords. Evictions are up, obviously, but still below historic norms. There was, apparently, no emergency need for the moratorium. It was just a vote-buying power grab based on the fact that there are a lot more voters who rent than voters who are landlords.

I think there's a few things to consider:

A lot of states have their own bans/limits that delay a reversion to the norm.

States are incentivized to slow roll acceptance of the forms and reporting.

So using that as a metric isn't as effective.

---------------

The fact that the ban happened at all accelerates the corporate level consolidation of the renter's market.  Most individual landlords aren't good enough to vet more than a few tenants and can't survive 'zero rent' for extended periods of time so they'll just phase out, selling to bigger fishes.  The big boys are cool - they'll let people stay forever paying nothing if they know the government will give them checks - hell, that's a GREAT situation for them.  Competitive rates set by market forces but Uncle Sam foots the bill?  What's not to love.  Just have to have enough capital to survive the 18-24 months it takes for the US government to actually start sending out money.  But once is flows...

Investment firms are sniffing the sweet sweet aroma of the residential REIT market and its exploding.  There's really not much different between a mortgage CDO and a rental CDO except the rental CDO has more upside, particularly if you've bought up several of the key transitional classes of real estate.  Those CDOs have GROWTH potential whereas the mortgage CDO was limited to preservation of capital.

You will own nothing and be happy.  Managed societies are the plan.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, BeSafe said:
On 10/9/2021 at 4:35 AM, Excoded Tom said:

Evictions are up, obviously, but still below historic norms. ...

I think there's a few things to consider:

A lot of states have their own bans/limits that delay a reversion to the norm.

Yes, but even where that's not the case,
 

Quote

 

Evictions have increased more markedly in places that were only covered by the CDC moratorium.

Connecticut, where a state moratorium expired at the end of June, saw a little over 1,000 eviction filings in September alone.

"That's the highest number of evictions filed since March 2020, when the pandemic began. It's almost double the number of evictions filed in August 2021," says Erin Kemple of the Connecticut Fair Housing Center. "While we're not meeting the numbers prior to the pandemic yet, we're getting close."

Even with that sharp increase in evictions and no local moratorium in place, however, filing rates are about 60 percent of historical averages in Connecticut. That's true for most other states and cities for which the federal moratorium was the last protection against eviction.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, bstrdsonofbtl said:

FBrCOTtWQAMsoTp.jpg

I'd like to see that compared to voting trends. Although there are some areas that are suspect regarding what the votes are versus what the votes should be. Calling Mitch McConnell to the White courtesy phone.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I'd like to see that compared to voting trends. Although there are some areas that are suspect regarding what the votes are versus what the votes should be. Calling Mitch McConnell to the White courtesy phone.

I can compare them to regulating trends. Those top states are all ones where I see landlords complaining about how it takes a year or two and tens of thousands of dollars to get rid of a deadbeat tenant. They've gotta make that up somewhere, so it comes out of the pockets of non-deadbeat tenants.

None of which has anything to do with the thread topic of the Trump and Biden administrations unconstitutionally assuming control of landlords' properties.

I guess it's sorta related: if you can get the government to just give you someone else's property, there's no need to work for a higher wage.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

In "meddlesome fucks who think they own rental properties" news,

If approved by voters, St. Paul’s rent control ordinance would be among the strictest in the world
 

Quote

 

...

St. Paul, on the other hand, has the opposite situation. Thanks to the city’s ballot initiative rules, a proposal has already been written by a coalition of advocacy groups called Housing Equity Now Saint Paul (HENS). With almost all the details laid out in writing, if it passes, the only thing left to city leaders would be the implementation of things like enforcement and variance regulation.

The short version of St. Paul’s proposed ordinance: The law would cap rent increases for all of the city’s 65,000 rented homes at 3% per year, but includes a complicated list of factors that allow landlords to apply for a variances — things like property taxes, maintenance issues, capital improvements (only if needed to bring a building to code), and a few others. The process for applying for the variances is yet to be determined. The ordinance exempts only subsidized housing from the caps.

...

“For rent stabilization, the obvious benefit is that once you move in somewhere, your rent is not going to go up too quickly,” Phillips said.  “The overlooked benefit is the stability and certainty. Homeowners don’t really appreciate… how precarious it can be to be a renter. Even if you’re doing perfectly well, you don’t know what the future holds.”

...

 

This reminded me of a recent call I received. One of my tenants saw an ad I put up for a home that's nowhere near as nice as hers and the price was more than she was paying. She recognized my phone number and called me to ask what her rent would be at the end of her lease. I told her it was going up by $50, still under the other place. We recently signed another year lease on those terms.

She's great. Takes very good care of our property, always reliable, reasonable, and accomodating. I don't wish to lose her and know she can't afford what I could really charge for that home. If she leaves, rent is going up by way more than 3% and I'm glad I don't have to explain why to any meddlesome fucks who think they own the property.

As for capital improvements that are not required by code, this reminds me of a recent replacement of an ancient air conditioner. My tenants, who are also paying less than I could get today, contacted me the next month to say that their utility bill had gone down by over $50. Well, guess what? They're not going to be the only beneficiaries of that investment when renewal time comes.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

HENS Rejoice in St. Paul

 

Quote

 

A day after St. Paul voters passed one of the most stringent rent control ordinances in the nation, many basic questions about its implementation remain unanswered, including when it takes effect.

While the city charter states that an ordinance passed by referendum becomes effective immediately, the rent stabilization language passed by St. Paul voters includes an implementation date of May 1, 2022.

That prompted some renters to contact KARE11 and the city of St. Paul to ask whether their landlords could increase rent in the next few months. City leaders were unable to offer a decisive answer on Wednesday, even taking down a website it had created to answer questions about rent stabilization just hours after launching it.

"It could be something that lawyers fight about in court," said Max Nesterak, deputy editor of the Minnesota Reformer.

...

Nesterak says there's a lot at stake because the St. Paul ordinance, as written, is among the most stringent in the country. It caps rent hikes at 3% per year and though landlords can seek exceptions, inflation isn't one of them.

"They can only seek exemptions for things like tax hikes or making renovations that bring the apartment up to code; not stainless steel appliances, not new bathrooms, just bringing the units up to code," Nesterak said. "What we see in rent control ordinances across the country is there's normally some movement. When prices go up, people allow rents to rise a little bit more. As we see more inflation happening now, because of supply chain issues, (the St. Paul ordinance) may pose a problem for landlords."

It could also pose a problem for developers because the 3% cap applies to all units, even new construction.

"The concern of not exempting new construction is that it will deter developers from building any new housing at all," Nesterak said. "I think one of the first real tests of this policy will be what happens at the St. Paul Ford Site, now called Highland Bridge. It's one of the biggest developments happening in St Paul history. It's 3,600 new units, 20% are slated to be affordable. I talked to a developer with Ryan Company and they said they're concerned that they may not be able to find investors in their project.

Proponents say, 'We're going to call the bluff on developers, we think St. Paul is a great city and they'll still want to build here.'"

...

 

Um.. yeah, a ballot initiative that clearly violates the city charter just might become part of a legal challenge.

Even assuming that's unsuccessful, "calling this bluff" is not likely to end well. I know what I'd do in response. I have to go get an easement notarized for a duplex I'm building today. I think I'd play with my golf cart and abandon the project instead if faced with meddlesome fucks who think I'm building their duplex, not mine.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/4/2021 at 12:14 PM, Raz'r said:

Covid-Mikey seems to be the only landlord I know that blames a poor choice in tenants on the big bad gov't.  I'll never own a rental unit as the risk of a shitty tenant makes someone with a couple places a target. If you have 30, ok, maybe you can absorb some deadbeats or regulatory risk.

You seem to show no real understanding here. Perhaps you should educate yourself on what the eviction process normally is, versus what it is/was under a moratorium.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/8/2021 at 6:37 PM, billy backstay said:

Rather than deal with evictions, we are just selling a bunch of our condos.  We were in debt due to deadbeat non-paying tenants owing us 30+ grand. Our credit was destroyed.  They didn't have to pay because of Covid, and we couldn't evict, because of Covid.  After 2 years of Covid, and retirement from the daily rat race fast approaching, I reevaluated our goals and direction.  Selling a bunch to get liquid, and be well funded to travel again as soon as Covid is over, and enjoy retirement, and our kids, and soon to be grandkids.   

As I have opined in another thread, this country is so fucked up with anti-vaxers, and right wing nutjobs, I can seriously consider spending half of the year in Europe, or any other friendly, temperate place to GTFO of the US of A!!

 

Dunno why the spacing is all fucked up?

When Duh-Razor read this he likely blamed you for picking bad tenants. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/15/2021 at 10:03 PM, Ishmael said:

I'd like to see that compared to voting trends. Although there are some areas that are suspect regarding what the votes are versus what the votes should be. Calling Mitch McConnell to the White courtesy phone.

Interesting, but way too broad.  If someone could even find a 2 bed home for rent where I live in Idaho, $17/hr is not even close.

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, mikewof said:

You seem to show no real understanding here. Perhaps you should educate yourself on what the eviction process normally is, versus what it is/was under a moratorium.

Like the way you educated yourself on Covid before rambling on incoherently about how it is similar to the flu?  By far the DUMBEST and most IRRESPONSIBLE comments made in the history of this site.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On 8/5/2021 at 5:13 AM, Seriatim Tom said:

Few things are as permanent as a "temporary" government power grab.
 

Quote

...

"To date, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky and her team have been unable to find legal authority for a new, targeted eviction moratorium," White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement Monday

"The President has not only kicked the tires; he has double, triple, quadruple checked.  He has asked the CDC to look at whether you could even do targeted eviction moratorium—that just went to the counties that have higher rates—and they, as well, have been unable to find the legal authority for even new, targeted eviction moratoriums," said White House advisor Gene Sperling at a press conference the same day.

...

That elusive authority was never found but oh well.

The Biden Administration Is Asking an Appeals Court to Lift the Order Blocking OSHA's Vaccine Mandate
 

Quote

 

The Biden administration today asked a federal appeals court to dissolve the stay blocking implementation of its vaccine mandate for private employers, warning that any delay in enforcing the rule "would likely cost many lives a day." In an emergency motion filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, the government's lawyers say there is no merit to the statutory or constitutional arguments against the mandate, which demands that companies with 100 or more employees require them to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or wear face masks and submit to weekly testing.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published that "emergency temporary standard" (ETS) on November 5. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit temporarily blocked it the following day, saying it raised "grave statutory and constitutional issues." The 5th Circuit extended its stay on November 12, saying the ETS is "fatally flawed" because it "grossly exceeds OSHA's statutory authority." Last week, various challenges to the mandate, including the 5th Circuit cases, were consolidated and assigned by lottery to the 6th Circuit, which the government is now asking to override the other court's order.

...

 

The 6th won the hot potato lottery and gets to decide whether the administration was right last summer or is right now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In eviction ripple news, One of the Country's Last Eviction Moratoriums Is Struck Down
 

Quote

 

Boston politicians are fighting to retain one of the country's last remaining eviction bans in the face of a waning pandemic and an adverse court ruling. Newly elected Boston Mayor Michelle Wu has vowed to contest a state judge's ruling, which found that the city's moratorium was an abuse of its emergency powers.

...

BPHC argued in response to their lawsuit that its own eviction moratorium was necessary to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and was therefore justified by state public health laws that gave it the power to craft "reasonable public health regulations" to combat communicable diseases.

In a Monday decision, Housing Court Judge Irene Bagdoian firmly rejected this argument, saying that nothing in the statutes cited by BPHC would suggest that an eviction moratorium that overrides state landlord-tenant law was "reasonable."

"This court perceives great mischief in allowing a municipality or one of its agencies to exceed its powers," wrote Bagdoian.

...

Boston's sweeping ban was one of the last of its kind.

It's also one of the few local moratoriums to be successfully challenged in court. Judges have generally given local and state governments wide latitude to impose whatever limits on evictions they see fit during the pandemic.

These moratoriums have been justified as necessary to prevent a "wave" of evictions during the pandemic. That fear was always overblown, and wave has failed to materialize almost anywhere eviction bans have been allowed to lapse.

The policies have, however, put an incredible amount of hardship on a limited number of landlords, who have effectively been forced to provide free housing for unscrupulous, and in a few cases dangerous, tenants.

...

 

Jeff and Cliff have both shared their troubles with the moratoriums.

Having to evict someone is a disaster for a landlord, not something anyone is yearning to do. It never got close for me. The worst pandemic effect that I've seen has been otherwise good tenants being a bit late, nothing that would make me want to lose them, let alone evict them. I'm sending another year renewal to one of those today. Another is month-to-month so I could get rid of her any time, but I haven't and won't.

We happen to have two of the "limited number" of landlords affected here on the forum, but the "tsunami" turning out to be a ripple really isn't a big surprise to me. Landlording discussions online focus on the problems, of course, but there's a pervasive desire to work things out to keep tenants if possible, or do a "cash for keys" arrangement or something if they really have to go.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
7 hours ago, ShortForBob said:

You (Plural) want to see homelessness quadrupling and people with kiddies out on the streets?

In winter?

God bless America.

That’s a bizarre and naïve  statement.
Many landlords are small business operators who rely on the rent of the units to pay the mortgage.

Without the rent, the building will get foreclosed and for many landlords, that means that the bank will come after their own home to pick up any shortfall in the sale of the building.

In short, the consequences of tenants not paying their rent can lead to homelessness for both landlords and tenants.

 

Landlords are not charities, they are in the business of providing a service to the population who choose to rent rather than buy for whatever reason.

Why should it be against the law to walk out of a store without paying for goods and services but ok to not pay your rent?
 
The government should address the problem of social housing and not foist their problems disproportionately onto small business owners.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sea warrior said:


 
The government should address the problem of social housing and not foist their problems disproportionately onto small business owners.

Very true.

But then from whom would the "small business owners" like Jarad Kushner wring the last drop of blood?

Sure it's a problem for small landlords, but its their own fault if they haven't secured their own home before borrowing to buy investments. People like Mike who have inherited two properties and are using the rents from those to pay their own mortgage on a McMansion should have thought it through.

Evicting good tenants for rent debt is another poor business choice. 

It's all very well to say that once the pandemic is over or risk reduced that people can get back to work and pay rent arears, but rent is not the only debt they will have and from a low income start, it could, with the best will in the world, take years to pay all their accrued debt.

Landlords should be willing to negotiate repayment their rent arrears and take a short term hit . It's better than getting no rent at all on an empty property and risk losing a good tenant in exchange for a debt you'll never get back, an empty house and possibly a bad new tenant. AND throwing another family into the inescapable poverty downward spiral.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2021 at 2:49 AM, Lochnerian Tom said:

In eviction ripple news, One of the Country's Last Eviction Moratoriums Is Struck Down
 

Jeff and Cliff have both shared their troubles with the moratoriums.

Having to evict someone is a disaster for a landlord, not something anyone is yearning to do. It never got close for me. The worst pandemic effect that I've seen has been otherwise good tenants being a bit late, nothing that would make me want to lose them, let alone evict them. I'm sending another year renewal to one of those today. Another is month-to-month so I could get rid of her any time, but I haven't and won't.

We happen to have two of the "limited number" of landlords affected here on the forum, but the "tsunami" turning out to be a ripple really isn't a big surprise to me. Landlording discussions online focus on the problems, of course, but there's a pervasive desire to work things out to keep tenants if possible, or do a "cash for keys" arrangement or something if they really have to go.

I finally got my cunt of a "tenant" out this past weekend.  She was ruled evicted by the court back in Oct, but was given a grace period where if she got out by the next Friday (1 Week), he would not file the eviction against her record.  She said fine, she would leave.  And then the very next monday appealed, which held up the entire process.   We just had the appeals hearing two weeks ago and was again told by the judge to GTFO because she didn't meet any grounds for appeal, but he again gave her the week to clear out and he would not file the eviction against her record.  We also offered her money, deposit back, etc to get her to leave the place clean and undamaged.  She agreed to meet me at the house this past Sunday at 1pm to turn over the keys.  Of course she was a no show and I had to get a locksmith to open the house and change the locks.  This is what we walked into this....... 

 

image.png.b4ce4cfc9ec23b7089d4d215f89c8a56.png

image.png.62b4c4d7fe73d316216dbdca75c422b2.png

image.png.aebc5262d762838c8172ad9107c7306b.png

image.png.e1d7c5dcd0b9e1350ceaa1a270fd65e0.pngimage.png.fdf4e98abc94d9babb85bc6ba00b6de3.pngimage.png.b55e24d64acb6717b937601a5410d8f0.png

I have never seen a more disgusting, filthy sight in my life.  The 1 year old refrigerator is going to have to be tossed as it smells like there is a dead body rotted inside.  The new GE Profile stove we put in a year ago is so disgustingly caked with burned on food that our cleaner says she'll never get it clean enough to use again.  Half eaten chicken bones from KFC in the bedroom.  Food everywhere on the floor.  And this was not an anomaly.  Everytime I went over there to do anything, the kitchen was a filthy health hazard.  She was a fat white trash girl who lived in her own filth.

We had had a few late payment issues with her in the past when she had fallen on hard times.  But after enough chasing, she usually made it back up.  As soon as covid and the moratorium hit, she immediately took advantage and just stopped paying.  Cold.  And ignored any calls to figure out how to catch her back up.  She would then tell the usual tale..... "I've lost my job, I was in a car accident, blah blah blah".  But we knew she had a good job.  In mediation, she said she would pay $500 over the current rent if she could stay, but offered no money to catch up the back rent.  We knew it was her usual stall tactic.  She was denied for the COVID rental assistance because she made too much money.  The Marshall who ran the court pulled us aside after the 2nd time in court to evict her said in any normal times, she would have been gone in weeks or LEO would have shown up at her door and dragged her out into the street and then locked her stuff in the house. He said now with the sensitivity around covid and evicting people, Judges have been bending over backwards to make it reasonable for the tenant who might be in a bad spot.  But he said he sees more like my white trash bitch just trying to capitalize on the situation and landlords like me trying to work with them, than people who are down on their lock and Landlords who are just being dicks.  

Fuck her and the box of twinkies she rode in on!!!  And @ShortForBob - I'd be tickled pink if this lying bitch were homeless during Christmas and living under an overpass in the snow.  She deserves everything she gets.  With an eviction on her record in this tight market, I'd be surprised if she could rent an abandoned crack house.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Edit to add.... meanwhile she went on an Amazon shopping spree for all kinds of stuff like Flat screen TV's and lots of other electronics.  All of the boxes were dated after she stopped paying rent.  Cunt!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for solidifying my commitment to never be a landlord. Of course, I find myself as a landlord for my father's house, but I get no rent and pay the taxes and insurance, as the tenant is my father's cousin, who he promised to care for. She's sweet. Her dogs are doing a number on the floors however. Oh well.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Thanks for solidifying my commitment to never be a landlord.

It's a different era in landlording nowadays. Ever since the economic recession the "roll of the tenant dice" has turned up a lot more snake eyes than not.

Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, ShortForBob said:

Very true.

But then from whom would the "small business owners" like Jarad Kushner wring the last drop of blood?

Sure it's a problem for small landlords, but its their own fault if they haven't secured their own home before borrowing to buy investments. People like Mike who have inherited two properties and are using the rents from those to pay their own mortgage on a McMansion should have thought it through.

Evicting good tenants for rent debt is another poor business choice. 

It's all very well to say that once the pandemic is over or risk reduced that people can get back to work and pay rent arears, but rent is not the only debt they will have and from a low income start, it could, with the best will in the world, take years to pay all their accrued debt.

Landlords should be willing to negotiate repayment their rent arrears and take a short term hit . It's better than getting no rent at all on an empty property and risk losing a good tenant in exchange for a debt you'll never get back, an empty house and possibly a bad new tenant. AND throwing another family into the inescapable poverty downward spiral.

 

Saved for posterity.

So got that, landlords?  It's your own damned fault, and evicting for not paying rent is a bad business practice.  Just renegotiate.  I'm sure that ShortForBob will be glad to help you figure it out.

 

 

A long time ago I owned two houses, and rented one out at a quite reasonable rate.  Ended up with a lousy tenant who didn't pay, and trashed the place.  Threatened to sue me when she slipped on her own garbage.  It was not a friendly, or speedy, eviction.  Never again. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Burning Man said:

Edit to add.... meanwhile she went on an Amazon shopping spree for all kinds of stuff like Flat screen TV's and lots of other electronics.  All of the boxes were dated after she stopped paying rent.  Cunt!

I've seen similar enough to understand, and hate humanity.   The smart tenant can stall out the clock and trash your property for months.  I recall having to repaint because roaches came out at night and stuck to the fresh paint.   Frozen pipes are so much fun because some deadbeat leaves overnight January.   Broken toilet because the boyfriend was too drunk to stand.  A buddy did commercial maintenance and saw ceiling lights full of water because the vanity upstairs had been leaking for months. 

I've also looked at bankruptcy claims and noticed how many had jewelry and other non essential purchases on the list of creditors.  Meanwhile, I've never seen a penny from a bankruptcy settlement.   Bring back debtor's prison, or better yet the pillory.   

No, I will never rent residential again.  Far too much headache, without bleeding heart  librarians trying to claim the landlord is cruel for expecting financial compensation for letting the tenant trash his property.

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Burning Man said:

I finally got my cunt of a "tenant" out this past weekend.    

Fuck her and the box of twinkies she rode in on!!!  And @ShortForBob - I'd be tickled pink if this lying bitch were homeless during Christmas and living under an overpass in the snow.  She deserves everything she gets.  With an eviction on her record in this tight market, I'd be surprised if she could rent an abandoned crack house.

Yeah Jeff, We've all had bad tenants.

What I learned from the landlord experience is be carefull who you let too and don't leave it in the hands of an agency that is a big renal agency.

either manage it yourself or get a good small agent to do it for you. 

My best tenant was a single Mum who though sometimes was a bit late with the rent, looked after the property as if it were her own. She lived in my house for 5 years. I didn't increase the rent for all of that time and she saved enough to buy her own. Win win.

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Burning Man said:

I finally got my cunt of a "tenant" out this past weekend.  She was ruled evicted by the court back in Oct, but was given a grace period where if she got out by the next Friday (1 Week), he would not file the eviction against her record.  She said fine, she would leave.  And then the very next monday appealed, which held up the entire process.   We just had the appeals hearing two weeks ago and was again told by the judge to GTFO because she didn't meet any grounds for appeal, but he again gave her the week to clear out and he would not file the eviction against her record.  We also offered her money, deposit back, etc to get her to leave the place clean and undamaged.  She agreed to meet me at the house this past Sunday at 1pm to turn over the keys.  Of course she was a no show and I had to get a locksmith to open the house and change the locks.  This is what we walked into this....... 

 

image.png.b4ce4cfc9ec23b7089d4d215f89c8a56.png

image.png.62b4c4d7fe73d316216dbdca75c422b2.png

image.png.aebc5262d762838c8172ad9107c7306b.png

image.png.e1d7c5dcd0b9e1350ceaa1a270fd65e0.pngimage.png.fdf4e98abc94d9babb85bc6ba00b6de3.pngimage.png.b55e24d64acb6717b937601a5410d8f0.png

I have never seen a more disgusting, filthy sight in my life.  The 1 year old refrigerator is going to have to be tossed as it smells like there is a dead body rotted inside.  The new GE Profile stove we put in a year ago is so disgustingly caked with burned on food that our cleaner says she'll never get it clean enough to use again.  Half eaten chicken bones from KFC in the bedroom.  Food everywhere on the floor.  And this was not an anomaly.  Everytime I went over there to do anything, the kitchen was a filthy health hazard.  She was a fat white trash girl who lived in her own filth.

We had had a few late payment issues with her in the past when she had fallen on hard times.  But after enough chasing, she usually made it back up.  As soon as covid and the moratorium hit, she immediately took advantage and just stopped paying.  Cold.  And ignored any calls to figure out how to catch her back up.  She would then tell the usual tale..... "I've lost my job, I was in a car accident, blah blah blah".  But we knew she had a good job.  In mediation, she said she would pay $500 over the current rent if she could stay, but offered no money to catch up the back rent.  We knew it was her usual stall tactic.  She was denied for the COVID rental assistance because she made too much money.  The Marshall who ran the court pulled us aside after the 2nd time in court to evict her said in any normal times, she would have been gone in weeks or LEO would have shown up at her door and dragged her out into the street and then locked her stuff in the house. He said now with the sensitivity around covid and evicting people, Judges have been bending over backwards to make it reasonable for the tenant who might be in a bad spot.  But he said he sees more like my white trash bitch just trying to capitalize on the situation and landlords like me trying to work with them, than people who are down on their lock and Landlords who are just being dicks.  

Fuck her and the box of twinkies she rode in on!!!  And @ShortForBob - I'd be tickled pink if this lying bitch were homeless during Christmas and living under an overpass in the snow.  She deserves everything she gets.  With an eviction on her record in this tight market, I'd be surprised if she could rent an abandoned crack house.

I feel for ya and it’s a shame that the courts not only allow but facilitate this type injustice. 
I hate to say it, but that property looks clean in comparison to the state I found one of my apartments this year.

I won’t post pictures yet because of litigation issues but I will say this, I’m a grown man who’s seen his share of shit but when I discovered how bad the situation was I actually cried for the children who were subjected to the filth and horrid conditions by their mother.

I am getting the fuck out of the rental business as soon as possible 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been a tenant. Every landlord I've ever had has found or even made an excuse to keep my security deposit.

Every home I've ever rented was left cleaner by 100% than when I moved in.

1) had a flea infestation that only became apparent after we moved in. The landlord said fix it yourself. Then my foot went through the rotting floorboards in the bathroom. Never was fixed. When we left, the landlord kept the deposit and his excuse was "damage to floor"

2) Left the apartment pristine, all woodwork skirting boards washed etc. When the landlord  met us to inspect the property on vacating, there were dead leaves scattered all over the floors, he said he'd have to get a cleaner in. He'd put them there. We said "see you at VCAT" he paid up.

3) Apartment in Salibury. UK. Absolutely filthy when we moved in. Had to pay rent on a holiday home, while it was being cleaned. (Still a but grubby)

When we left, I washed the walls, the woodwork cleaned the oven etc. Pristine. 

The landlord said he was taking the deposit for some water damage from a leaking skylight that had damaged an old cupboard and to clean the flat.

We were back in Oz and couldn't do much about it.

 

4) When we first saw the house, it was a bit grubby but had two sets of beautiful glass doors between the lounge and dining room and the lounge and hallway.

When we moved in, they'd been removed. I asked for them back. He said he's removed them so the kids wouldn't break them. (my kids were 17 and 21) it would cost me $500 to re install them. I paid it because without doors, the place was unheatable. When we left, he said he was taking $500 out of the deposit to remove them again and $200 for tidying up the garden. (the garden was weeded and mowed, but I'd left a pile of leaves in one corner to mulch)

When I visited the property 2 months later to pick up mail, the doors were still in situ.

So pardon me if I have an unsympathetic view of landlords, But my experience has been 

Tenants 50/50 good bad

Landlords universal thieves.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

You've had a couple, it seems, but I think you're overstating the matter.

Well I just gave you a few examples of thieving and greedy landlords in my excerience, just like Mike and Jeff et al have given a few examples of bad tenants

 Maybe it's the agents maybe it's the landlords. My son's agent is excellent, but then again they give a percentage of all commissions  to homeless and DV shelters and their staff camp out in the city once a year to raise funds for the same. Pretty rare.

The bottom line is that making decent people homeless, does nothing than ruin their lives in all sorts of ways (bad credit records, poor rental risk etc) for years and add to the societal burden for possibly generations.

A property owner can get back on their feet, they have assets.

An indebted tenant with kids can put 2 generations under water. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, ShortForBob said:

Well I just gave you a few examples of thieving and greedy landlords in my excerience, just like Mike and Jeff et al have given a few examples of bad tenants

Perhaps I should tell you I've been a landlord for almost 30 years, so I may be biased.

42 minutes ago, ShortForBob said:

A property owner can get back on their feet, they have assets.

That depends on their current status in the building of their business. Some landlords are building those assets from a single house while working "regular" jobs.

Early in their careers is a tentative time where if the tenant can't pay, there's a very real chance that the mortgage won't get paid.

It can be a veritable house of cards, and the banks play the same game.

It boils down to "you pay, you stay. You don't, you leave."

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, justsomeguy! said:

Perhaps I should tell you I've been a landlord for almost 30 years, so I may be biased.

That depends on their current status in the building of their business. Some landlords are building those assets from a single house while working "regular" jobs.

Early in their careers is a tentative time where if the tenant can't pay, there's a very real chance that the mortgage won't get paid.

It can be a veritable house of cards, and the banks play the same game.

It boils down to "you pay, you stay. You don't, you leave."

Sure, I've been a landlord too, paying off two houses mine and a rental. I was an easy going  Landlord simply because I've known too many of the other kind. 

When the property market is as hot as it's been in Australia, frankly you could rent your place for nothing and still make 5-10% PA on your investments. No need to squeeze tenants.

Point is one has to plan for an empty property as well as repairs etc . Don't do it if you cant take a hit or, worst case, have enough equity in the rental to sell if you must.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, ShortForBob said:

When the property market is as hot as it's been

Aye, there's the rub. 

 

9 minutes ago, ShortForBob said:

Point is one has to plan for an empty property as well as repairs etc .

That type of planning is hard to do, especially in a down economy.

In my experience, tenants don't always follow the agreed upon lease terms, from giving 30 days notice or routine maintenance, leaky toilets and faucets, gas/electric payments, even keeping a phone number up to date with the landlord.

Having their boyfriend/girlfriend/family/friends move in with them got pretty rampant during the last downturn.

Boom, there goes your water bill.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, justsomeguy! said:

Aye, there's the rub. 

 

That type of planning is hard to do, especially in a down economy.

In my experience, tenants don't always follow the agreed upon lease terms, from giving 30 days notice or routine maintenance, leaky toilets and faucets, gas/electric payments, even keeping a phone number up to date with the landlord.

Having their boyfriend/girlfriend/family/friends move in with them got pretty rampant during the last downturn.

Boom, there goes your water bill.

 

 

Hmm. tenants pay their own water bill here.

Boom, there goes your carefully manicured garden :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Burning Man said:

With an eviction on her record in this tight market, I'd be surprised if she could rent an abandoned crack house.

Sounds like she went to a lot of trouble to get that eviction on her record and does deserve what it will bring. Few things bring a hard NO from me, that would be one.

9 hours ago, ShortForBob said:

I've been a tenant. Every landlord I've ever had has found or even made an excuse to keep my security deposit.

I had that happen in college and felt it totally unjustified. We had taken darn good care of the house for a few years, especially if grading on the "rented to a bunch of college guys" curve. The landlord told us he was keeping the deposit and to sue him. Stupidly, he did this a couple of days before we were to leave. We, uh, didn't leave it cleaner than we found it.

I've refunded most deposits, including in a couple of cases refunding the "cleaning fee" that I don't have to refund because tenants left it so clean. Where I've kept some or all of a deposit, I first explained to the tenant what I was keeping and why and got their agreement.

If they don't agree, I'd better be ready to explain to a judge what I've done. What happened to us back in college could not happen to FL tenants today and the landlord would stand a good chance of some kind of punitive damages if he couldn't document his case to a judge.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, ShortForBob said:

Sure, I've been a landlord too, paying off two houses mine and a rental. I was an easy going  Landlord simply because I've known too many of the other kind. 

When the property market is as hot as it's been in Australia, frankly you could rent your place for nothing and still make 5-10% PA on your investments. No need to squeeze tenants.

Point is one has to plan for an empty property as well as repairs etc . Don't do it if you cant take a hit or, worst case, have enough equity in the rental to sell if you must.

 

What a load of crap

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Thanks for solidifying my commitment to never be a landlord. Of course, I find myself as a landlord for my father's house, but I get no rent and pay the taxes and insurance, as the tenant is my father's cousin, who he promised to care for. She's sweet. Her dogs are doing a number on the floors however. Oh well.

Yeah, if you get a good tenant, it's smooth sailing.  I have one sweet old lady that is renting a house we bought several years ago and was so happy we were not going to kick her out.  She's been great except for the odd repair call.

But we've had two tenants stop paying rent over the last 4 years.  One guy, a retired USAF Master Sergeant I'm ashamed to say, just stopped paying and eventually did a runner out of state.  Hi back rent was north of $7K.  We tried to work with him numerous times to get him back on track as an eviction was a PITA and we tried to keep him in the house.  This latest cunt is #2.  We just got renters into house #4 and so far so good..... fingers crossed.  We've filed small claims against both of the shitbag tenants, but not terribly confident we will ever see a dime.  

I am just amazed at how much drama the average person has in their lives.  There's always some excuse.  I think both of the above issues stemmed from a jackass of a property manager we had while we were overseas.  He turned out to be a lazy cunt and hid a lot of issues from us and he was the one who supposedly "vetted" those renters.  Now that we're local - we can do a much more thorough job screening applicants.  We'll see if we are any better judges of people that the fuck knuckle prop manager that was recommended to us before.  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Lark said:

I've seen similar enough to understand, and hate humanity.   The smart tenant can stall out the clock and trash your property for months.  I recall having to repaint because roaches came out at night and stuck to the fresh paint.   Frozen pipes are so much fun because some deadbeat leaves overnight January.   Broken toilet because the boyfriend was too drunk to stand.  A buddy did commercial maintenance and saw ceiling lights full of water because the vanity upstairs had been leaking for months. 

I've also looked at bankruptcy claims and noticed how many had jewelry and other non essential purchases on the list of creditors.  Meanwhile, I've never seen a penny from a bankruptcy settlement.   Bring back debtor's prison, or better yet the pillory.   

No, I will never rent residential again.  Far too much headache, without bleeding heart  librarians trying to claim the landlord is cruel for expecting financial compensation for letting the tenant trash his property.

Yup, I'm just growing more hardened to fact that too many people at the lower end of the wage scale are at the lower end of the wage scale not because of "lack of opportunity", but because they are shitbag disgusting pieces of human filth who make poor decisions constantly and then cries "Woe is me" when their life sucks.  

Seriously, fuck them!

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, ShortForBob said:

An indebted tenant with kids can put 2 generations under water. 

Then they should make better choices.  Both of my shit tenants had more than enough income to afford the rent.  We bent over backwards to give them every chances to slowly catch up on back rent.  We did this for years before ever even considering any eviction action.  And we didn't argue if the rent came in a little late.  So it wasn't like "Your rent is late 10 days - GTFO".  

But when you willfully spend all your income on crap and you ignore your responsibility to pay your debts, then any negative consequences is squarely and solely on THEM.  FUCK THEM!  I hope they fucking freeze in a ditch.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Burning Man said:

Then they should make better choices.  Both of my shit tenants had more than enough income to afford the rent.  We bent over backwards to give them every chances to slowly catch up on back rent.  We did this for years before ever even considering any eviction action.  And we didn't argue if the rent came in a little late.  So it wasn't like "Your rent is late 10 days - GTFO".  

But when you willfully spend all your income on crap and you ignore your responsibility to pay your debts, then any negative consequences is squarely and solely on THEM.  FUCK THEM!  I hope they fucking freeze in a ditch.  

try looking at the broader picture for a change. Everyone's had bad tenants. But most tenants aren't bad. 

If you're constantly getting bad tenants, maybe there's another reason why. Could be the property, could be your vetting practices. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a rental house for 18 yrs. I told the tenants that eviction papers would be filed the day after rent was due if it didn't show up or I didn't get a phone call. I said I wasn't mad at them, just had to get the clock started. I'm in SoCal, laws are heavily slanted to the tenants. Never had more than a few days late, ended up selling to the last tenant.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ShortForBob said:

try looking at the broader picture for a change. Everyone's had bad tenants. But most tenants aren't bad. 

If you're constantly getting bad tenants, maybe there's another reason why. Could be the property, could be your vetting practices. 

Victim blaming.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Burning Man said:

He turned out to be a lazy cunt and hid a lot of issues from us and he was the one who supposedly "vetted" those renters.

I've worked in sales and know it's work, so when I got into rentals I decided to let a property manager do the selling part.

Easy pick because a close friend (you've all seen his pic, partner with me in an F-27) is a realtor who has a property management service in his office.

Never again. You're picking a business partner. I don't want anyone to do it for me because I want someone with whom I can "click." How does anyone know whether one person will get along with another? They can't. I wouldn't even let my wife pick tenants. I have to deal with them, not her.

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Burning Man said:

  I have one sweet old lady that is renting a house we bought several years ago and was so happy we were not going to kick her out.  She's been great except for the odd repair call.

 

 

Wow.:rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/11/2021 at 3:29 AM, ShortForBob said:

Hmm. tenants pay their own water bill here.

Boom, there goes your carefully manicured garden :)

I don't know if it's universally true but in the two US states where I have purchased a house, the water/sewer are tied to each other and to the property itself.  In other words, if you buy a house and the previous owner didn't pay the water bill, its now YOUR water bill now.  That's part of closing - to take care of that kinda thing and any other tax/claims against the property.

You can 'charge' the water bill to the tenant - but the bill goes to the property owner.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, BeSafe said:

I don't know if it's universally true but in the two US states where I have purchased a house, the water/sewer are tied to each other and to the property itself.  In other words, if you buy a house and the previous owner didn't pay the water bill, its now YOUR water bill now.  That's part of closing - to take care of that kinda thing and any other tax/claims against the property.

You can 'charge' the water bill to the tenant - but the bill goes to the property owner.

Hmm..we just get the metre read before occupancy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/11/2021 at 3:29 AM, ShortForBob said:

Hmm. tenants pay their own water bill here.

Boom, there goes your carefully manicured garden :)

None of mine do, at least not directly. The reason is what BeSafe said: the bill is attached to the property. The other reason, on some properties, is that it has a well, not municipal service.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, BeSafe said:

I don't know if it's universally true but in the two US states where I have purchased a house, the water/sewer are tied to each other and to the property itself.  In other words, if you buy a house and the previous owner didn't pay the water bill, its now YOUR water bill now.  That's part of closing - to take care of that kinda thing and any other tax/claims against the property.

You can 'charge' the water bill to the tenant - but the bill goes to the property owner.

That's not unusual.  Where I am, If the tenant refuses to pay and does a runner, Any unpaid bills are the owners problem.  The owner would have to pay it off and then attempt to collect from the deadbeat cunt.  I think here it applies to water/sewer only whereas the electric and gas are in the name of the tenant and they have to have credit checks on them before they will get service and follows them if they leave.  That's partially why I charge at least 2 months rent as deposit so I can pay any of these bills if they screw me.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

The water bill thing is also a matter of who should assume risk. A tree broke my main water line out in a part of the property where I seldom go and by the time I found it, our water bill was $800. And that after the city reduced it to their lowest rate.

We've got some old homes with old pipes in the concrete floors. One of those could run up a big bill. OK, who should have replaced the pipe sooner, the tenant or me?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Lochnerian Tom said:

The water bill thing is also a matter of who should assume risk. A tree broke my main water line out in a part of the property where I seldom go and by the time I found it, our water bill was $800. And that after the city reduced it to their lowest rate.

We've got some old homes with old pipes in the concrete floors. One of those could run up a big bill. OK, who should have replaced the pipe sooner, the tenant or me?

Meli's half truths again Tom. The property owner is billed for usage by the provider, the usage bill is passed on to the renter. Maintenance on the property side of the meter is the property owner's gig, on the outside it's the provider's.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/10/2021 at 4:07 PM, Burning Man said:

I finally got my cunt of a "tenant" out this past weekend.  She was ruled evicted by the court back in Oct, but was given a grace period where if she got out by the next Friday (1 Week), he would not file the eviction against her record.  She said fine, she would leave.  And then the very next monday appealed, which held up the entire process.   We just had the appeals hearing two weeks ago and was again told by the judge to GTFO because she didn't meet any grounds for appeal, but he again gave her the week to clear out and he would not file the eviction against her record.  We also offered her money, deposit back, etc to get her to leave the place clean and undamaged.  She agreed to meet me at the house this past Sunday at 1pm to turn over the keys.  Of course she was a no show and I had to get a locksmith to open the house and change the locks.  This is what we walked into this....... 

 

image.png.b4ce4cfc9ec23b7089d4d215f89c8a56.png

image.png.62b4c4d7fe73d316216dbdca75c422b2.png

image.png.aebc5262d762838c8172ad9107c7306b.png

image.png.e1d7c5dcd0b9e1350ceaa1a270fd65e0.pngimage.png.fdf4e98abc94d9babb85bc6ba00b6de3.pngimage.png.b55e24d64acb6717b937601a5410d8f0.png

I have never seen a more disgusting, filthy sight in my life.  The 1 year old refrigerator is going to have to be tossed as it smells like there is a dead body rotted inside.  The new GE Profile stove we put in a year ago is so disgustingly caked with burned on food that our cleaner says she'll never get it clean enough to use again.  Half eaten chicken bones from KFC in the bedroom.  Food everywhere on the floor.  And this was not an anomaly.  Everytime I went over there to do anything, the kitchen was a filthy health hazard.  She was a fat white trash girl who lived in her own filth.

We had had a few late payment issues with her in the past when she had fallen on hard times.  But after enough chasing, she usually made it back up.  As soon as covid and the moratorium hit, she immediately took advantage and just stopped paying.  Cold.  And ignored any calls to figure out how to catch her back up.  She would then tell the usual tale..... "I've lost my job, I was in a car accident, blah blah blah".  But we knew she had a good job.  In mediation, she said she would pay $500 over the current rent if she could stay, but offered no money to catch up the back rent.  We knew it was her usual stall tactic.  She was denied for the COVID rental assistance because she made too much money.  The Marshall who ran the court pulled us aside after the 2nd time in court to evict her said in any normal times, she would have been gone in weeks or LEO would have shown up at her door and dragged her out into the street and then locked her stuff in the house. He said now with the sensitivity around covid and evicting people, Judges have been bending over backwards to make it reasonable for the tenant who might be in a bad spot.  But he said he sees more like my white trash bitch just trying to capitalize on the situation and landlords like me trying to work with them, than people who are down on their lock and Landlords who are just being dicks.  

Fuck her and the box of twinkies she rode in on!!!  And @ShortForBob - I'd be tickled pink if this lying bitch were homeless during Christmas and living under an overpass in the snow.  She deserves everything she gets.  With an eviction on her record in this tight market, I'd be surprised if she could rent an abandoned crack house.

If it makes you feel any better, that mess would be on the "relatively clean" end of the spectrum of some of the past rentals that I managed. I tend to base them on the number of roll-offs that I need to clear the place out.  My record is three. And that wasn't me hiring anyone, it was me dragging that excrement out of the house but by bit over weeks of soul-crushing labor. At the worst point, I had to trash a teenage girl's personal stuff and even her diary. Her reprobate parents couldn't manage their alcoholism well enough to even help their daughter hold onto some faint tendrils of her young life.

Link to post
Share on other sites