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The Last Song On The Album


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Back in the days of vinyl often artists would put something a little different at the end of side two or four. What are your favorites?

Train in Vain by the Clash. At the end of the best album of the decade, London Calling by the Clash, they stuck in a pop song and did not even mention it in the liner notes. 

 

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20 minutes ago, 2slow said:

Back in the days of vinyl often artists would put something a little different at the end of side two or four. What are your favorites?

Train in Vain by the Clash. At the end of the best album of the decade, London Calling by the Clash, they stuck in a pop song and did not even mention it in the liner notes. 

 

Mick Jones looseng hisse minde overt ex-girlfrende Vivve Albertine.............                     :)                       (happendes moire we licke to admitte.......)

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12 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

You haive a nice nitte..........               :)

You too, if I hear that song in my dreams you will be a dead Snaggie.  :rolleyes:

 

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Just now, Cal20sailor said:
14 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

You haive a nice nitte..........               :)

You too, if I hear that song in my dreams you will be a dead Snaggie.  

You wille love it.........               :)

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How about it doesn't have to be the last song, but one that is out of character with the group?  This was written by Dave Davies, not Ray.  

 

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Side 2 tracks 4 and 5, "Try and Love Again" then "The Last Resort".  Great way to end the great Hotel California.

The last song anyone needs in a relationship:  "You're breakin' my heart" by Harry Nilsson.  NSFW without headphones.

 

 

 

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And of course, the last song of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club:

 

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29 minutes ago, #13 said:

Side 2 tracks 4 and 5, "Try and Love Again" then "The Last Resort".  Great way to end the great Hotel California.

What did the Dude ever do to you?  Walter might be coming to see you!  

If you don't know the reference, you need to get out more my friend.  

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A group none of my American friends have heard of.  WABX in Detroit used to do a Sunday Over Easy and this would make it many weeks.  I like this song, it reminds me of being young.  

 

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"When the Levee Breaks", Led Zepplelin IV.

Although as some wag said:  "A minute and a half of the meanest and angriest introduction you could ever hear and then what do you get?  A weather report!"

"If it keeps on rainin', levee's goin' to break ...

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youtube.com/watch?v=k0_E7dYV-7k

Great ending to a great album. Telling you to put another record on. Percussion throughout referencing the sound that running off the last track makes. 

Lots of tongue in cheek humour, and a pretty good track in it's own right.

(I'm failing at embedding video... sorry)

 

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Sensational Alex Harvey Band       

 

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On the second Blood Sweat and Tears now iconic album which featured the debut of the new lead singer David Clayton-Thomas, the last song is Variations on a Theme by Erik Satie (1st Movement, Adapted from "Trois Gymnopedies).  At the end of the hauntingly beautiful instrumental piece, after a brief pause, you hear footsteps and then a door opening and closing as somebody exits the room.  Satie was a French composer that was born born in 1866 and died in 1925.

I think I wore out the grooves on my copy of that album which was released in 1969.  In my opinion there isn't a bad song on it.  BS&Ts jazz-rock style, a brass section, and Clayton-Thomas' powerful and unique voice was an exciting new sound in an era of incredible and varied rock music.

 

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28 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

On the second Blood Sweat and Tears now iconic album which featured the debut of the new lead singer David Clayton-Thomas, the last song is Variations on a Theme by Erik Satie (1st Movement, Adapted from "Trois Gymnopedies).  At the end of the hauntingly beautiful instrumental piece, after a brief pause, you hear footsteps and then a door opening and closing as somebody exits the room.  Satie was a French composer that was born born in 1866 and died in 1925.

I think I wore out the grooves on my copy of that album which was released in 1969.  In my opinion there isn't a bad song on it.  BS&Ts jazz-rock style, a brass section, and Clayton-Thomas' powerful and unique voice was an exciting new sound in an era of incredible and varied rock music.

 

Much as I enjoyed that album I can't listen to it and not remember how the band members basically kicked Al Kooper , who started and led the band and wrote, arranged and/or sang most of the material on the first equally great album, out of the band, then went on to major commercial success. He's still bitter about it.

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Neko Case likes to end her records with something noisier than the nasty little vignettes, murder ballads, and off-kilter waltzes that fill most of the album. The Needle has Landed is one, Ragtime another. But my favorite has to be Red Tide:

Tom Waits (who was born 70 years old) amusingly ends Orphans: Bawlers with a song Sinatra made famous, and which must be tongue in cheek:

This song needs to pair with the Mike Mills video (ft Alicia Vikander) to get the full effect -- and if you aren't crying by the end, you may be dead inside. The National, I Am Easy to Find (2019), last song:

In fact, listen to the whole album. :) The National are special.

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6 hours ago, Willin' said:

Much as I enjoyed that album I can't listen to it and not remember how the band members basically kicked Al Kooper , who started and led the band and wrote, arranged and/or sang most of the material on the first equally great album, out of the band, then went on to major commercial success. He's still bitter about it.

Yeah, I can understand that.  Not the only time that's happened in the rock music business.

I saw Fleetwood Mac in Berlin a couple of years ago.  Before they started the tour, Lindsey Buckingham asked if they could postpone the start a couple of months so he could finish his solo tour.  The band agreed but Stevie put her foot down and not only said no, but threw Lindsey out of the band.  They are all old, Stevie was 70 at the time, the same age as Mick Fleetwood and Christine McVie is the oldest member.  The concert was quite good for a bunch of septuagenarian rockers but I was really pissed.  I love Buckingham's guitar sound and I wanted to see him play.  Stevie promised a long time ago that they 'Wouldn't break the chain."  They all had some tumultuous relationships in that band over their many years together.

This video is already 20 years after the song was originally released but it's the only decent video of it on YouTube because video sucked back in the '70s, and they still look and sound pretty good..  

 

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1 hour ago, Al Paca said:

What up Eddie. Nothing about Bruce Bedspring ? 

I'm waiting until you're not looking!  Then I'll sneak something in.  :lol:

And don't think for a minute that I've forgotten that whole Fish Food fiasco.  If it weren't for you, I coulda made him a contender you greasy bastard! What did you do?  Where is he?  If you tell me you don't know, I won't believe you for a minute.   And what did you do to Ms. Clew, haven't seen her around either.  You've got blood on your hand Alphonse, I know you do.  

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2 hours ago, d'ranger said:

 

Okay, I apologize for this egregious thread drift up front but anyone who is following this thread may and probably will appreciate the singularity I'm about to reveal, and that is...

THE SINGLE WORST MUSICAL NOTE EVER RECORDED!!!!

To preface, imagine two young guys, well stoned, laying on the living room floor and each wearing high quality headphones back about 1973 with nothing better to do than listen to music playing on the turntable.

It's the last song on the second side of Traffic's The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys LP and we're both expecting, as with most of the other songs on the album, an easy fade of jazzy bop hoo haws into nothingness when it happens.

We both bolted upright and looked at each other..."Did you hear that?" How did that make it past the producer, mixer, engineer and masterer?

Listen for yourself at 6:11...

Am I right or what?

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@Grande Mastere Dreade  The Righteous Brothers rendition of Unchained Melody is in my opinion is one of the greatest, and most beautiful love songs ever recorded.  The climax of the song is virtually a musical orgasm. I never get tired of listening to it and it melts the lady's hearts.  Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield's voices are incredible.  Some of the best voices of that era.

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On 3/6/2021 at 6:37 PM, Mrleft8 said:

 

Good album.  Haven’t listened to it in over a decade. But I will this weekend. Thanks. 

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