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Anybody know a mast climber near Annapolis?


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I’m looking for someone who can go up the mast on my Quickstep 24 and replace the windex, the wind transducer and install two blocks.

Anybody know someone?  

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1 hour ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Plenty of riggers around but that’s a short, deck stepped mast (probably 28’ max as P is only 25’) on a 4,000 lb boat. Why not just drop it for an afternoon, do the work and put it back up?  

That would be ideal ‘cause it would let me do the work, but I’m not sure I could pull it off. There are several wires in the mast, requiring that it be held up just a small distance of the cabin top while they’re disconnected. 

I’ve seen masts removed with a gin pole, but I’ve never done it myself and I can picture the mast crashing on the stern. Also, I don’t have much in the way of help. 
 

 

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where's the boat?

can ya heel the boat over to get the top of the rig down to you, rather than go up to it?

I did that with my j24 and j30 both with big ass chunks of lead hanging off the bottom 

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54 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

where's the boat?

can ya heel the boat over to get the top of the rig down to you, rather than go up to it?

I did that with my j24 and j30 both with big ass chunks of lead hanging off the bottom 

Also an option. Careen it slowly in a calm, large slip if possible and use safety lines to keep it down while you work. 
 

Does your club or marina have a mast crane or small boat crane?  If not, can you get access to one?  Safe way to pull it the first time to get a look at how it’s put together.  Usually 2 people who know what they are doing can get it down and up safely. 3 is pretty easy and 1 can do it with the proper gin pole and rig set up. 

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1 hour ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Also an option. Careen it slowly in a calm, large slip if possible and use safety lines to keep it down while you work. 
 

Does your club or marina have a mast crane or small boat crane?  If not, can you get access to one?  Safe way to pull it the first time to get a look at how it’s put together.  Usually 2 people who know what they are doing can get it down and up safely. 3 is pretty easy and 1 can do it with the proper gin pole and rig set up. 

or tie up next to a buddy with a taller rig and swing over to the top of yours in a bosuns chair... 

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10 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

where's the boat?

can ya heel the boat over to get the top of the rig down to you, rather than go up to it?

I did that with my j24 and j30 both with big ass chunks of lead hanging off the bottom 

This is where those fat ass crew members earn their brewskis.  Grab a halyard and have them pull the boat over. That mast give LOTS of leverage.

Once watched a BIG guy repeatedly dunk himself ("He's a witch!") when his j-80 got sideways to the swell.  Funny as shit to us onlookers heading out to the race course..

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12 hours ago, Al Paca said:

I think you’re looking for a rigger. 

Yeah but he's in Annapolis. Riggers?

And look at that "Q". That's what this is all about.QUICKSTEP 24 drawing

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I can do the work, but I’m a little chunky to go up the mast. I tried once and the grinder wasn’t really able to pull me up and I’m really not athletic enough to add much value trying to shimmy up. 
 

 

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4 hours ago, Blue Crab said:

Yeah but he's in Annapolis. Riggers?

And look at that "Q". That's what this is all about.QUICKSTEP 24 drawing

I’ve been waiting for that! Because of my handle, most of the forums I’m on have the big “Q” as a logo. Perhaps I should work on updating my profile before I end up on a do not fly list. 

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Anywhere handy with a bridge or even a Yacht Club deck?

Heck, even rent a boom bucket truck for a couple hours.

Find some skinny teenager. (work quality may suffer)

Low tide?

Low tide at a boat ramp?

Low tide at a piling, and use the ladder?

Pay the rigger?

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20 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

I’m looking for someone who can go up the mast on my Quickstep 24 and replace the windex, the wind transducer and install two blocks.

Hmmmm.... 200 lbs 30+ feet above waterline, vs. 1900 lbs probably a foot below waterline.  Even with some form-stability, not sure I'd love that math.

I - personally - would either put the boat next to a bigger boat with a taller rig, or pull the mast.

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18 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

That would be ideal ‘cause it would let me do the work, but I’m not sure I could pull it off. There are several wires in the mast, requiring that it be held up just a small distance of the cabin top while they’re disconnected. 

I’ve seen masts removed with a gin pole, but I’ve never done it myself and I can picture the mast crashing on the stern. Also, I don’t have much in the way of help. 
 

 

Just try to go underneath the bridge by the YC that should do it.

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15 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

or tie up next to a buddy with a taller rig and swing over to the top of yours in a bosuns chair... 

Get your pal Neil to do that. LOL

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7 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

I can do the work, but I’m a little chunky to go up the mast. I tried once and the grinder wasn’t really able to pull me up and I’m really not athletic enough to add much value trying to shimmy up. 
 

 

Borrow an ATN.mast climber from someone on the dock.

https://www.sailrite.com/ATN-Mastclimber-Bosuns-Chair

 

I have lent mine out many a time.

You pull yourself up the mast and can stand above the mast head making repairs to windex, instruments a lot easier than a bosom's chair.

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My community has a launch ramp with a finger pier. I thought about tying the boat to the finger pier and parking a bucket truck on the ramp (the ramp isn’t very steep), but a friend told me that was a recipe for disaster. 
 

Spa Creek Bridge sounds interesting, but wondering how to keep the boat still. 
 

Mast climber looks cool, especially if it can get me above the mast top. Might be cheaper than paying a rigger, but I’m not sure. The boat is a bit of a lead sled and it’s 1900# keel is nearly half its displacement, so it might not tip too badly with some weight aloft. 
 

All that said, I think I’d probably be best served to hire a pro if somebody knows one. 
 

 

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6 hours ago, sledracr said:

Hmmmm.... 200 lbs 30+ feet above waterline, vs. 1900 lbs probably a foot below waterline.  Even with some form-stability, not sure I'd love that math.

I - personally - would either put the boat next to a bigger boat with a taller rig, or pull the mast.

I pull myself up on a Harbor 20. 1800 lb displacement/900 lb in the keel. I’m around a buck 45.  I’m on the left coast so.........

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28 minutes ago, Quickstep192 said:

All that said, I think I’d probably be best served to hire a pro if somebody knows one. 

This. Wake the fuck up. Annapolis is the center of EC sailing.

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I vote for either the skinny guy or working from the rig of an adjacent bigger boat, both work well.

I've pulled small racing boats over. I wouldn't do it to a cruising boat. Firstly all the shit below will end up everywhere, more importantly things on cruising boats are never as strong or well maintained. I'd be concerned about some serious damage, loads are much larger than you get in normal cruising...

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If you can't bring over the boat because it is too fragile at some point you will lose the mast or break something....

It isn't that hard to do on a smallish boat and it is the most comfortable way to work up there...

 

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Bollocks. It's not a mini, is not a race boat.

95% or more of boats are never pushed anything like a fraction of their limit so that stuff doesn't break.

That's the difference between a 4ksb and a race boat. Don't go dragging boats like that over, they don't like it.

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Trevor Harney is good.  

If you haven't googled riggers in Annapolis, others that come to mind are Jay Herman at Annapolis Rigging and the Rigging Company.  There are many others

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2 hours ago, European Bloke said:

Bollocks. It's not a mini, is not a race boat.

95% or more of boats are never pushed anything like a fraction of their limit so that stuff doesn't break.

That's the difference between a 4ksb and a race boat. Don't go dragging boats like that over, they don't like it.

Cruising boats should be overbuilt compared to race boats... Seriously I wouldn't go more than 5 miles offshore in a boat that can't structurally resist a knockdown. One bad puff, one broach and the boat is broken!

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So, I'm intrigued by the idea of pulling the mast over, but I can't figure out how you'd keep the boat away from the pier as the the mast is being pulled. 28' away in my case. 

Also, wouldn't the cockpit swamp by the time the masthead was within reaching distance from the pier? (See attached photo)

 

973799800_ScreenShot2021-03-09at10_48_20AM.thumb.png.84c619ed538c7c1ea7b017f2d96de674.png

 

 

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Pulling the masthead over to a dock is technically interesting but silly and unsafe. Either unstep it, use a crane, use a bridge, or simply climb it. The boat is not going to capsize in calm water with a person up the mast. You can brace it to docks either side if you like, too.

Don't ever imagine that tasks up at the masthead, even if unstepped and on the hard, are simple and quick in any way. "Oh, it should only take an hour."

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2 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

So, I'm intrigued by the idea of pulling the mast over, but I can't figure out how you'd keep the boat away from the pier as the the mast is being pulled. 28' away in my case. 

Also, wouldn't the cockpit swamp by the time the masthead was within reaching distance from the pier? (See attached photo)

 

973799800_ScreenShot2021-03-09at10_48_20AM.thumb.png.84c619ed538c7c1ea7b017f2d96de674.png

 

 

You start with the boat alongside the pontoon and as you heel the boat, the hull will tend go away from the pontoon as the masthead will locate itself more or less vertical from where you are pulling. Obviously, the first degrees are harder as you don't have much leverage but one or two persons standing on the rail will get you past this point. To keep the boat perpendicular to the quay/pontoon, you need a stern rope and a bow rope. Ideally you want to do it in a corner where 2 pontoons meet like in the video posted above

As for the cockpit being swamped, that will depend of the boat design/geometry if it does, you are stuck and need to climb or dismast, offshore capable boats shouldn't have this issue as in theory they can survive a knockdown.

Obviously you don't want to do this with a big boat where the forces would become unsafe but up to say 8 or 9 metres, it is definitely doable. I've never done it myself but I've seen it done.

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21 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Cruising boats should be overbuilt compared to race boats... Seriously I wouldn't go more than 5 miles offshore in a boat that can't structurally resist a knockdown. One bad puff, one broach and the boat is broken!

70s design... somehow I can easily imagine those with stretched sails and spinnaker and driven like bat out of hell. 4knsbs were the racing machines back then. Or at least so the old beards tell me.

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22 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Obviously, the first degrees are harder as you don't have much leverage

In my experience the opposite is true.  The first degrees are really only resisted by form-stability, but as the angle increases the keel becomes more and more of a player in trying to "right" the boat, until you're basically straining to pull the lever arm of a really big catapult down to horizontal

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In addition, the location of the keel and centre of bouyancy on this boat is offset significantly from the mast step.  I suspect that trying to pull her over will lead to the boat wanting to rotate around the mast.  

It looks to me like sending a small person up the rig to do the work would be a good option.  Got any kids, or nieces or nephews with a sense of adventure?  It should be easy to borrow a bosun's chair, or a mast climber.

Widget-hull.jpg

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On 3/7/2021 at 8:34 PM, Innocent Bystander said:

Also an option. Careen it slowly in a calm, large slip if possible and use safety lines to keep it down while you work. 
 

Does your club or marina have a mast crane or small boat crane?  If not, can you get access to one?  Safe way to pull it the first time to get a look at how it’s put together.  Usually 2 people who know what they are doing can get it down and up safely. 3 is pretty easy and 1 can do it with the proper gin pole and rig set up. 

Here come the stories...  Dropped the mast on the 20 mid race to retrieve the spin hally...  It can be done, it's all about technique if deck stepped.  Whaer are you??  Access to a bridge or quay that will get you up there.  Bosuns chair hooked to the launch crane??  I have done the slip method as well but that was for bottom cleaning, so not technically replacing something.  Get a local kid from the sailing school up there, it's one screw...   There is always the Rimas method, but that would require caulk...  

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23 hours ago, Panoramix said:

You start with the boat alongside the pontoon and as you heel the boat, the hull will tend go away from the pontoon as the masthead will locate itself more or less vertical from where you are pulling. Obviously, the first degrees are harder as you don't have much leverage but one or two persons standing on the rail will get you past this point. To keep the boat perpendicular to the quay/pontoon, you need a stern rope and a bow rope. Ideally you want to do it in a corner where 2 pontoons meet like in the video posted above

As for the cockpit being swamped, that will depend of the boat design/geometry if it does, you are stuck and need to climb or dismast, offshore capable boats shouldn't have this issue as in theory they can survive a knockdown.

Obviously you don't want to do this with a big boat where the forces would become unsafe but up to say 8 or 9 metres, it is definitely doable. I've never done it myself but I've seen it done.

U can save yourself some healing by getting a step ladder and only bringing it over that far.   That last 6' is the doozy.  

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2 hours ago, European Bloke said:

I saw one bunch of clowns rip the cleat that they had tied the mast down to off the dock, that was exciting.

I've only done it on OPBs I was crewing on. Max pucker factor. Wouldn't do it on my own boat.

 

I watched a guy with a Martin 242 rip the mast off the boat at the dock.  Hint: don't do this with the main halyard on a fractional rig.   OTOH I did this a lot with my Dash 34 (not with the main halyard), though never more than about 25 degrees of heel, to be able to clean the bottom completely.

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