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I'm Looking for ideas for interior carpet replacement on my Quickstep. 

I just finished removing the old carpet on the interior hull sides. It was such a bear to get the old stuff out, I'm hoping to find a better way. I was thinking about getting some kind of decent quality carpet, having the edges bound and putting snaps at 2' intervals so it can be removed for cleaning or replacement. Anybody ever seen this? Good idea or bad?
 

There are 4 panels that are about 2' high and 8' long. 

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I'm going to go with the stuff you line car speakers or trunks with. Kind of a synthetic felt. 

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5 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

I'm Looking for ideas for interior carpet replacement on my Quickstep. 

I just finished removing the old carpet on the interior hull sides. It was such a bear to get the old stuff out, I'm hoping to find a better way. I was thinking about getting some kind of decent quality carpet, having the edges bound and putting snaps at 2' intervals so it can be removed for cleaning or replacement. Anybody ever seen this? Good idea or bad?
 

There are 4 panels that are about 2' high and 8' long. 

Paint?

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Just looked up a Quickstep 24 - nice looking boat.

Sailrite has hull blanket headliner material in a few different colors.  And some decent installation videos.  

 

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carpet has little to no place on a boat.

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2 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

carpet has little to no place on a boat.

That’s what I was thinking and I’m desperate for a viable alternative. 
 

Paint would be my first choice, but the surface is too lumpy and bumpy. Between the fiberglass roving and the residual glue, I need something that can “hide a multitude of sins” 

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34 minutes ago, Quickstep192 said:

That’s what I was thinking and I’m desperate for a viable alternative. 
 

Paint would be my first choice, but the surface is too lumpy and bumpy. Between the fiberglass roving and the residual glue, I need something that can “hide a multitude of sins” 

so smear a little fairing compound or high build primer on it, sand it down a bit and paint it...I wouldn't go nuts on sanding it either.. a little texture never hurt anybody

that's what I did where I pulled the rugs outa my 35. it finished off pretty well. 

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8 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

so smear a little fairing compound or high build primer on it, sand it down a bit and paint it...I wouldn't go nuts on sanding it either.. a little texture never hurt anybody

that's what I did where I pulled the rugs outa my 35. it finished off pretty well. 

Do you think the fairing compound will get a good enough grip onto the residual carpet adhesive? (Assuming I remove all the loose stuff)

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Automotive headliner. You can get foam backed stuff. But usually it's applied with spray adhesive. Not removable. To clean, use a hot water/steam carpet cleaning machine.

For flat surfaces or gentle curvature, use foamed PVC sheets. Cheap, can take a screw, nice white easy to clean surface.

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6 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

residual carpet adhesive?

Any reason why you can't remove it? I used paint thinner which only worked so well. (wore a full face mask with filters for biological fumes and an absolute pain of two hours for a V berth)

Result was still pretty passable surface. Though I am not sure how your laminate surface is like. For me a coat of paint would take care of the worst but sanding high spots like drips can significantly improve the results with relatively low effort.

I went without a lot of previous installed liner in favor of white composite. Where I had to glue in liner(sides) just applied adhesive to the edges and some spots in the middle for some curves. Absolute minium means I'll have to clean so much less surface if I ever need to touch it again.
No idea if there could be issues with that though. Nothing noticable in the last decade.

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It looks like the old adhesive was mastic applied with a notched trowel. Lots of it too. The mastic is 32 years old and very brittle at this point making it virtually impossible to scrape, but still too soft to sand. I was able to knock off the peaks by sanding it with 36 grit paper on a random orbit sander, but the discs clog quickly. 
 

I was thinking about fairing it with thickened epoxy, but wonder if it will adhere well enough to the old mastic and I don’t need a bigger mess.  
 

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11 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

Do you think the fairing compound will get a good enough grip onto the residual carpet adhesive? (Assuming I remove all the loose stuff)

One of these in an angle grinder will do the job on "residual adhesive".

Knot-Twisted Wire Cup Brush - 3" x M14x2.0 | Construction Fasteners and  Tools

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  • 3 weeks later...

I would opt for no liner and paint.

My H-Boat (27') had hull and head liners when I bought it. The hull liner was a non-woven petrochemical fabric, and the head liner was a rubbery material with little perforations. All of it has been applied with an adhesive. Each had it own removal process:

The non-woven hull liner had to be torn from the hull, and the residue was kind of hard and flaky. I used an angle grinder and a brush like Sloop shows to "grind" it off. Dirty, shitty job. For the head liner, I pulled off the rubbery stuff in pieces - a lot of it was coming off already - and the residue was soft and sticky. I used a 3M solvent and rags to remove it. Another dirty, shitty job. See "H-Boat Renovation" thread: 

 

I was left with a fairly nice fiberglass surface. I had already decided that I did not want a liner, so I primed the surface with a primer, Zinnser BIN, and then a couple of coats of latex paint. I have been very happy with the result.

I love @Orion Jim's suggestion of a wood batten ceiling.

P.S. When you remove stuff, make sure you have a respirator, eye & ear protection, Ebola suit, good ventilation, etc.

P.S.S. I am sure the gang would like pics of your boat.

 

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A mulit tool with a wide fine tooth blade makes pretty quick work of leveling all sorts of stuff, goop solids etc.  You have alot of control and it doesn't make a horrible mess.  Once flushed then you can hit with a random orbital and vac.

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22 hours ago, Caecilian said:

Its an ugly job but you just have to start and see what works best. Fill and fair is very time consuming 

...and maybe unnecessary.

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On 3/12/2021 at 1:50 PM, Zonker said:

For flat surfaces or gentle curvature, use foamed PVC sheets. Cheap, can take a screw, nice white easy to clean surface.

I was going to suggest this but for the area he wants to do it seemed like this would end up dented badly and quickly.

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  • 1 month later...
On 5/4/2021 at 7:25 AM, WoobaGooba said:

I removed my stanky old carpet and adhesive, knocked down the fiberglass sharp edges, and gelcoat-ed. 

 

IMG_3791.jpeg

I did this part but with 2 part polyurethane over epoxy primer. 

In cold weather it does get very wet through condensation when we're staying onboard so at some point I may add some insulation. 

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