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The 2021 Aviation thread


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I don’t have a pilots license and don’t fly (back when I had the money to learn I didn’t have the time, now that I have the time I don’t have the money), and haven’t even flown commercially in over a year, but I’m still an airplane geek.  I liked the 2020 aviation thread, so I thought maybe it’s time to start one for this year.

To start things off, a contribution from another blog:

The AI colorizing was cool, but what really makes it work is the speed correction.  All the old films seem to be off speed and make the people in them seem herky-jerky and cartoonish.  When corrected it really seems to humanize them and makes the film so much more watchable.  Enjoy!

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Thanks for the video Mr. Salt Water!!  Even though it's been colorized and AI enhanced,  I am gobsmacked of video tech of the day!!  Showing a wheel as they took off, and the props spinning, etc.   Also surprised to see no rear wheel, just a small skid.  Guess why they still call them "tail draggers"!

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  • 2 weeks later...

A cool video about the development of the X-15.  I had heard that in the Right Stuff era the astronauts were pushing for the X-15 to be their ride into space rather than being passengers on a dumb capsuleI, but I didn’t know what issues were involved.  More respect now for the pilots of these things... They were pushing very far into the unknown with only a decent guess as to what might happen.

I’d have put this in the Thread for Videos thread, but there’s something in there that keeps crashing my phone.  There is a subtle segue to an ad at the end but you gotta pay for things somehow....

 

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2 hours ago, NaClH20 said:

A cool video about the development of the X-15.  I had heard that in the Right Stuff era the astronauts were pushing for the X-15 to be their ride into space rather than being passengers on a dumb capsuleI,

They were pilots so they wanted to fly into space, not be human cannonballs. (SPAM in a can). They were working on winged craft beyond the X15 but the pressure of competition with Russia, especially after Gagarin, changed the focus to quick & dirty rockets & capsules.

That era was a great time to be a small boy.

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Yeah, massive respect to the pilots.... “Here, go fly this.  Just let us know if the skin melts off or anything.  By the way, the paint might explode if you hit it wrong, so just watch out.”  With all the engineering obstacles I can see why throwing a capsule up would be a lot more expedient.  Also comparatively less (!) risky, if not as romantic.

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  • 5 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Here is my contribution.  First taxi test of Waiex s/n 191.  My kid and I built this.  He was 12 when we started and he has logged over 500 hours of construction.  Now he is 20 and working on his master's in mechanical engineering.  He is also my main sailing partner and we have rescued some old H16s together.

 

Hoping for first flight this year.  I'm really down to paperwork and inspection.  In the first 30 seconds of video you can see part of my sailboat fleet.

 

Jack Bally (who built the 1/3 scale B17) was pretty close to where I live.  My EAA chapter flew down to check it out a couple of years ago but I didn't make it.  I did see it on display at Oshkosh this year.

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12 minutes ago, chum said:

Looks like Sonex lineage?

Edit: Its a Y tailed Sonex I see. 

It's a Sonex Waiex.  Mine is the classic A model, these days they are hawking the B model.

https://www.sonexaircraft.com/waiex/

The engine is the 80hp Aerovee.  Basically a 2180cc bug motor with some parts to make it into an airplane motor.  My kid built this motor when he was 15.

http://www.aeroconversions.com/products/aerovee/index.html

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Very cool!  I've never flown a Hiller.  I learned to fly in an Enstrom F28A.  One of my former Sikorsky co-workers was retired from the Army and he had a lot of Hiller stories from his training, like having to run at full power on the ground to burn enough fuel to do a running takeoff.

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I just finished the article "Flight Plan" in the New Yorker by Ann Patchett.  Anyone with a passing interest in flying might enjoy it.  It is also a credit to a wife in a wonderful marital partnership.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Pilot here.  Actually just retired from Aviation.  Not intentionally.  The salaries keep getting worse and prices of everything keep going up, so I decided to bow out and get into something more lucrative like nonprofit work. ;)

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My wife's (Sea Nymph-06 Actual) last ride - a 1970 Cherokee 235.  Was in West Germany for the first 30-years (so no auto-pilot) before we bought her from some Detroit Police Officers.

Absolutely amazing ride.  Sipped AV gas.  Had 4 fuel tanks (we could fly longer than she could hold her bladder).  Stupidly powerful Lycoming 6-cylinder engine (perhaps not the plane to learn in... but we lived).  We both miss that plane!

 

IMG_0353.JPG

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2 hours ago, Ruminator said:

My wife's (Sea Nymph-06 Actual) last ride - a 1970 Cherokee 235.  Was in West Germany for the first 30-years (so no auto-pilot) before we bought her from some Detroit Police Officers.

Absolutely amazing ride.  Sipped AV gas.  Had 4 fuel tanks (we could fly longer than she could hold her bladder).  Stupidly powerful Lycoming 6-cylinder engine (perhaps not the plane to learn in... but we lived).  We both miss that plane!

 

IMG_0353.JPG

The Pathfinders/Dakotas are awesome planes. Stable as hell when flying "in the shit", and once you nailed the glide slope... it will slide right on down.   My only complaint, no pilot side door.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
7 minutes ago, chum said:

Wowzer!

Looks like they had it, then didn't have it, then had, then didn't have it...  then it hit the clouds.  What was the outcome besides a new pair of pants and a reupholstered pilot seat.

 

On 10/30/2021 at 5:52 PM, Charlie Foxtrot said:

Prolly an aft CG...  Easy to do if the Ramp Apes aren't careful.  

 

https://simpleflying.com/ups-747-landing-gear/

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On 10/15/2021 at 3:28 PM, Ventucky Red said:

Like becoming a CFI? :lol:

 

Cute young gal at the bank was sporting an engagement ring last year, so I asked her about her fiance.  She said he was in flight school to become a professional pilot.  So, a week or so ago, I asked her who he was flying for now?  She said he had to accumulate hundreds or thousands of expensive hours of seat time before he could get a job, so was now in training to be a cop.  I mentioned my young flight instructor who was building his hours when I was in training 20 years ago, but that apparently doesn't pay enough for them to pay their bills along with her meager salary as a bank teller.....

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3 hours ago, Ventucky Red said:

Looks like they had it, then didn't have it, then had, then didn't have it...  then it hit the clouds.  What was the outcome besides a new pair of pants and a reupholstered pilot seat.

 

https://simpleflying.com/ups-747-landing-gear/

Well, I'll be damned.  Thanks. 

I worked for years on the MD-11 program.  The rampies were continuously dropping them on their ass.  Never a problem with the gear - always with the aft CG of the cargo.  Especially with Alitalia's Combi aircraft with the aft main deck cargo hatch. 

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4 hours ago, billy backstay said:

Cute young gal at the bank was sporting an engagement ring last year, so I asked her about her fiance.  She said he was in flight school to become a professional pilot.  So, a week or so ago, I asked her who he was flying for now?  She said he had to accumulate hundreds or thousands of expensive hours of seat time before he could get a job, so was now in training to be a cop.  I mentioned my young flight instructor who was building his hours when I was in training 20 years ago, but that apparently doesn't pay enough for them to pay their bills along with her meager salary as a bank teller.....

Around here they get jobs flying float planes under mind bending "safety" practices to build hours for airline standards.

The ones that survive are deemed good enough to fly heavies.

A guy I grew up with from grade one was obsessed with flying - all he wanted to do was be a pilot. He went the local route and suffered a nervous breakdown because of the conditions the 2 bit coastal "airlines" demanded they fly in.

I hadn't seen him between high school and the 25th reunion - he was an entirely different person.

Died when he was 53.

I think joining the air force would be a better route.

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Know plenty of CFIIs that put their time in, flew the regional, and are now flying the big iron with the know names... one is flying for FedEx and loves it, another was one of the first to work for NetJets...  been making some bank for quite a few years now and one that flew for Evergreen Freight and is now with UPS.    Know another CFII that went to China to teach students to fly and help set up 141 style school...   $250K a year for three years and practically no living expenses. .  He has an opportunity to do the same thing in South America next year and is seriously considering it.

CFIs that get into a 61 operation will starve, get with the 141 schools, you won't get rich, but you'll have a clearer path to the airlines.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Around here they get jobs flying float planes under mind bending "safety" practices to build hours for airline standards.

The ones that survive are deemed good enough to fly heavies.

A guy I grew up with from grade one was obsessed with flying - all he wanted to do was be a pilot. He went the local route and suffered a nervous breakdown because of the conditions the 2 bit coastal "airlines" demanded they fly in.

I hadn't seen him between high school and the 25th reunion - he was an entirely different person.

Died when he was 53.

I think joining the air force would be a better route.

 

I can imagine that some of the float plane pilots in your neck of the woods, deal with some hairy, scary conditions!!

But, if it was as "mind bending" practices that you describe, I would expect to hear of more accident reports than we do now??

I did a little practice with soft field, short landings, but then the GBS took me out of action for 6 or 9 months, and when I recovered from that, I was too busy running a business and raising young daughters to finish my flight training.....  

Now that I am retired from the daily grind, I am tempted to pick it back up, and complete it, but the cost to benefit ratio points me towards other more important goals now......

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2 hours ago, billy backstay said:

I can imagine that some of the float plane pilots in your neck of the woods, deal with some hairy, scary conditions!!

But, if it was as "mind bending" practices that you describe, I would expect to hear of more accident reports than we do now??

I don't think we even begin to hear of all the accidents. When they are visible or spectacular - crashing when landing in the main harbours or when people other than the pilots get killed and so forth.

I know from my time in banking that there were lots of crashes of courier planes that never made the news.

The one that stuck in my mind all these years was flying up north with the outgoing morning clearing bags. It disappeared without a word.

After a search it was found way past its destination, having run out of fuel but no sign of the pilot. After the investigation it was decided the most likely scenario was that the baggage door had become unlatched, the pilot put it on auto and climbed back (small planes) to latch it and fell out. :o The plane stayed on course until the gas ran out.

The small carriers are all shoestring operations and come & go with regularity - when they start to "go" we all know what happens with the corners.

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If I ever end up in situation where I cannot dump all my money to boats, my backup plan is to get one of these - Yak-52. They tick all the boxes I like in planes:

  • Not ridiculously expensive - but you can forget glass cockpit and comfort
  • Aerobatics capable, wont shed its wings with little pull.
  • Can be registered as experimental - I can do service by myself.
  • Proper canopy & parachute ( I wont get in boat without PFD, why would I get in plane without parachute.
  • Damn cool

dd15a8957992dfa8e16c97bfc1815846.jpg

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8 hours ago, Pertsa said:

If I ever end up in situation where I cannot dump all my money to boats, my backup plan is to get one of these - Yak-52. They tick all the boxes I like in planes:

  • Not ridiculously expensive - but you can forget glass cockpit and comfort
  • Aerobatics capable, wont shed its wings with little pull.
  • Can be registered as experimental - I can do service by myself.
  • Proper canopy & parachute ( I wont get in boat without PFD, why would I get in plane without parachute.
  • Damn cool

dd15a8957992dfa8e16c97bfc1815846.jpg

There are a few of these at KCMA... along with some other "real" war-birds..

Personally I would take a Pilatus PC-7 over the Yak/Chang.

 

 

40614_1287096579.jpg

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21 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

Cute young gal at the bank was sporting an engagement ring last year, so I asked her about her fiance.  She said he was in flight school to become a professional pilot.  So, a week or so ago, I asked her who he was flying for now?  She said he had to accumulate hundreds or thousands of expensive hours of seat time before he could get a job, so was now in training to be a cop.  I mentioned my young flight instructor who was building his hours when I was in training 20 years ago, but that apparently doesn't pay enough for them to pay their bills along with her meager salary as a bank teller.....

A kinder, gentler way to get free hours is to tow for one of the glider clubs.  Little or no pay, but the hours are free and the environment is a lot more friendly.  Glider pilots typically fly on nice days.  

There are lots of days when I'm down working on the boat and a float plane lands or takes off nearby with me thinking "glad it is them and not me flying today".

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Gonna bet there were quite a few fingers poised over FIRE buttons as that chopper (twin screw?) crawled it's way up the port side of the Essex. If they turned to starboard, they'd be scrap.  

From Wiki:

Armament

To say nothing of her escorts.  "They lived by our suffrage."

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3 hours ago, Ventucky Red said:

There are a few of these at KCMA... along with some other "real" war-birds..

Personally I would take a Pilatus PC-7 over the Yak/Chang.

 

 

40614_1287096579.jpg

But I guess that is not available with these prices?

efefee.JPG.5fa177481517c01fc8cc0359e3c219ba.JPG

And these are not even the aircraft version of zombie fleet:

grdgrdgrd.JPG.9d4c429ea8ca01f1259867f34ca8b23d.JPG

 

 

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1 hour ago, Pertsa said:

But I guess that is not available with these prices?

efefee.JPG.5fa177481517c01fc8cc0359e3c219ba.JPG

And these are not even the aircraft version of zombie fleet:

grdgrdgrd.JPG.9d4c429ea8ca01f1259867f34ca8b23d.JPG

 

 

A few of them are for sale right here...  stop dreaming and start flying..  we just sold a 172 for almost double of what you can get one for, but then again....

 

https://www.trade-a-plane.com/search?s-type=aircraft&warbird=t&s-page_size=96

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2 hours ago, Rain Man said:

A kinder, gentler way to get free hours is to tow for one of the glider clubs.  Little or no pay, but the hours are free and the environment is a lot more friendly.  Glider pilots typically fly on nice days.  

I've done a lot of towing, in PA18s and PA25s.  I've got more time in a Pawnee than any other single type.  I'll never be a professional, I just did it for fun.  I miss towing and gliders both.  Towing is proficiency flying with a mission. Lots of landings.  Plus the glider punches off and it's a race to the ground to get the next one.  It's all fun.

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16 hours ago, Rain Man said:

A kinder, gentler way to get free hours is to tow for one of the glider clubs.  Little or no pay, but the hours are free and the environment is a lot more friendly.  Glider pilots typically fly on nice days.  

I've done most of the list of ways to get hours. Flight instructor, towed gliders, towed banners, "trained" flying cargo on Beech 18's (kind of an apprentice/slave labor program, but I have a couple hundred multiengine tailwheel hours as a result). Glider towing was by far the most fun.

13 hours ago, Waiex191 said:

Plus the glider punches off and it's a race to the ground to get the next one.  It's all fun.

I towed with a Cessna 150 w/STOL kit wings and a 180 hp engine. It had a "red zone" on the tach, to be avoided while descending. Something about harmonic vibrations. Below the zone, the engine might crack from shock cooling. Above the zone, it still had enough power to maintain altitude, which is inconvenient if you want to descend. The solution was a 60 degree bank spiral down with power.

From my list of things I know, but should not: don't try that hung over.

But that's not why I dropped by this thread.

The ‘Flying-V,’ a Fuel-Efficient Alternative to Jumbo Jets, Flies for the First Time

Well, a model of it did anyway, by remote control.

Lead-flyingvimageiii-276996.jpg?w=1000

 

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24 minutes ago, Seriatim Tom said:

I towed with a Cessna 150 w/STOL kit wings and a 180 hp engine. It had a "red zone" on the tach, to be avoided while descending. Something about harmonic vibrations. Below the zone, the engine might crack from shock cooling. Above the zone, it still had enough power to maintain altitude, which is inconvenient if you want to descend. The solution was a 60 degree bank spiral down with power.

We used to spiral down of course, but the ultimate descent weapon of the Pawnee was speed. Rough days, 140 MPH and it came down great. On the rare smooth days, run it up to the redline around 160 and you were going down pretty steeply.  

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10 hours ago, Seriatim Tom said:

I've done most of the list of ways to get hours. Flight instructor, towed gliders, towed banners, "trained" flying cargo on Beech 18's (kind of an apprentice/slave labor program, but I have a couple hundred multiengine tailwheel hours as a result). Glider towing was by far the most fun.

I towed with a Cessna 150 w/STOL kit wings and a 180 hp engine. It had a "red zone" on the tach, to be avoided while descending. Something about harmonic vibrations. Below the zone, the engine might crack from shock cooling. Above the zone, it still had enough power to maintain altitude, which is inconvenient if you want to descend. The solution was a 60 degree bank spiral down with power.

From my list of things I know, but should not: don't try that hung over.

But that's not why I dropped by this thread.

The ‘Flying-V,’ a Fuel-Efficient Alternative to Jumbo Jets, Flies for the First Time

Well, a model of it did anyway, by remote control.

Lead-flyingvimageiii-276996.jpg?w=1000

 

Cool concept, but it is difficult to understand how the form drag will not make the shape less fuel efficient than today's SLF shipping tubes.

We have had at least half a dozen commercial pilots go through our small glider towing operation and become successful airline pilots.  I enjoy watching them progress from shaky landings on the Pawnee and sketchy speed control and decision-making on tow to smooth, competent tow pilots.  Our last guy had an amazing sense of where to find lift even on blue days.

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11 hours ago, Seriatim Tom said:

I've done most of the list of ways to get hours. Flight instructor, towed gliders, towed banners, "trained" flying cargo on Beech 18's (kind of an apprentice/slave labor program, but I have a couple hundred multiengine tailwheel hours as a result). Glider towing was by far the most fun.

I towed with a Cessna 150 w/STOL kit wings and a 180 hp engine. It had a "red zone" on the tach, to be avoided while descending. Something about harmonic vibrations. Below the zone, the engine might crack from shock cooling. Above the zone, it still had enough power to maintain altitude, which is inconvenient if you want to descend. The solution was a 60 degree bank spiral down with power.

From my list of things I know, but should not: don't try that hung over.

But that's not why I dropped by this thread.

The ‘Flying-V,’ a Fuel-Efficient Alternative to Jumbo Jets, Flies for the First Time

Well, a model of it did anyway, by remote control.

Lead-flyingvimageiii-276996.jpg?w=1000

 

I wonder how much a window seat will cost to upgrade to?

 

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11 hours ago, Waiex191 said:

We used to spiral down of course, but the ultimate descent weapon of the Pawnee was speed. Rough days, 140 MPH and it came down great. On the rare smooth days, run it up to the redline around 160 and you were going down pretty steeply.  

At those speeds, wasn't there a danger of shock cooling the jugs?  Or would you cool down first?

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59 minutes ago, Rain Man said:

At those speeds, wasn't there a danger of shock cooling the jugs?  Or would you cool down first?

We would leave the RPM at 2400. Pretty much the only damage we ever observed, in both glider clubs I've been in, has been over heating and not shock cooling.

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On 11/14/2021 at 6:35 AM, Charlie Foxtrot said:

At 10k Gs? However, our cell phones - and Keith Richards - can survive that loading.  

Scott Manley SpinLaunch YouTube Post   Guaranteed Void Ho Free

"Yeeting satellites into orbit." 

 

10,0000 Gs? Have to pull it for several minutes too. Not a good bet a cellphone can survive that. Even money odds even for Keith Richards.  

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10 hours ago, Waiex191 said:

We would leave the RPM at 2400. Pretty much the only damage we ever observed, in both glider clubs I've been in, has been over heating and not shock cooling.

The engine on the tow plane I flew was always dangerously hot at the end of a tow. Just touching its red line on the cylinder head temp gauge.

We...um...discovered that a sip of Marvel Mystery Oil in the fuel resulted in a little gap between needle and red line. You're not supposed to feed anything to an aircraft engine that hasn't been blessed by the FAA, but we kept right on doing it once we discovered that little trick.

 

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2 hours ago, Seriatim Tom said:

The engine on the tow plane I flew was always dangerously hot at the end of a tow. Just touching its red line on the cylinder head temp gauge.

We...um...discovered that a sip of Marvel Mystery Oil in the fuel resulted in a little gap between needle and red line. You're not supposed to feed anything to an aircraft engine that hasn't been blessed by the FAA, but we kept right on doing it once we discovered that little trick.

 

Old low compression engines seem to like a shot of Marvel and a shot of TCP.

s-l300.jpg

 

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11 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Old low compression engines seem to like a shot of Marvel and a shot of TCP.

s-l300.jpg

 

Even better, they like the autogas STC to keep the lead out. All of my towing was done on autogas and our chapter C140 was much happier on autogas than 100LL.

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21 hours ago, Waiex191 said:

Even better, they like the autogas STC to keep the lead out. All of my towing was done on autogas and our chapter C140 was much happier on autogas than 100LL.

Word is Lycoming approves of the use of Tricresyl phosphate as an oil additive. 

https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/1994/november/pilot/airframe-and-powerplant-(8)
 

 I would check to see if any gas additive settles out after some time before using it...like in a glass jar. Might cause a problem. Cars get shaken up daily. Planes, not so much. 

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

That Icon looks like a restyled Lake - what's the problem?

The aircraft is fine, but the advertising isn't.  It is promoted as being completely benign and easy to fly.  Just ask Roy Halladay - oh wait, you can't, he mishandled the aircraft and killed himself. 

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21 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

That was great until ethanol came around :angry:

 

We had a Mako 231 for years with a 225 HP Yamaha V-6, 2-stroke, and never had problems with the pump gas containing ethanol.  Shop that is winterizing our just acquired 20 foot Sea Ox uses ethanol free gas in the fuel system while winterizing, but it costs well over 10 bucks a gallon, so not feasible to run the boat on......

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12 hours ago, Mark K said:

 I would check to see if any gas additive settles out after some time before using it...like in a glass jar. Might cause a problem. Cars get shaken up daily. Planes, not so much. 

I had OK skills but I think some of my landings may have jostled some fuel around. It was only once a week if that's what you meant.

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11 hours ago, Seriatim Tom said:

I had OK skills but I think some of my landings may have jostled some fuel around. It was only once a week if that's what you meant.

I meant that an fuel additive that precipitates out of solution could cause a problem.  

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23 hours ago, Rain Man said:

The aircraft is fine, but the advertising isn't.  It is promoted as being completely benign and easy to fly.  Just ask Roy Halladay - oh wait, you can't, he mishandled the aircraft and killed himself. 

Roy would have probably killed himself sooner in a Lake than the ICON. Less than 15 hours time in the ICON and doing aerobatic maneuvers at low altitude...

 

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On 11/17/2021 at 2:59 PM, billy backstay said:

 

We had a Mako 231 for years with a 225 HP Yamaha V-6, 2-stroke, and never had problems with the pump gas containing ethanol.  Shop that is winterizing our just acquired 20 foot Sea Ox uses ethanol free gas in the fuel system while winterizing, but it costs well over 10 bucks a gallon, so not feasible to run the boat on......

With ethanol polluted gas, keep an eye on your rubber fuel feed line and if you have aluminum fuel rails check them from time to time too.

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Roy would have probably killed himself sooner in a Lake than the ICON. Less than 15 hours time in the ICON and doing aerobatic maneuvers at low altitude...

 

The toxicology says he was high as a kite. 

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3 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Roy would have probably killed himself sooner in a Lake than the ICON. Less than 15 hours time in the ICON and doing aerobatic maneuvers at low altitude...

 

 

15 hours in the Icon?  Did he have flight training in anything else before that?  I had nearly 60 hours in a bulleproof Cessna 152, and prepping for my 2 stop solo, then flight check for my ticket, prior to becoming very ill and sidelined for nearly a year, and never finished getting my license because of the illness.  Even with 60 hours, I would not have attempted  those kind of maneuvers???  But, I was also never taking psychoactive meds ..........

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5 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

15 hours in the Icon?  Did he have flight training in anything else before that?  I had nearly 60 hours in a bulleproof Cessna 152, and prepping for my 2 stop solo, then flight check for my ticket, prior to becoming very ill and sidelined for nearly a year, and never finished getting my license because of the illness.  Even with 60 hours, I would not have attempted  those kind of maneuvers???  But, I was also never taking psychoactive meds ..........

Check out the low level maneuvers in the promo video - not as extreme as what Halladay attempted but one can connect the dots to figure out where he got the idea:

 

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4 hours ago, Ruminator said:

I always ask my Sea Nymph why she wants an Amphib Cert?  Seems like we could just refine our SFL???

Seriously, this clip always impresses.

unreal.gif

I'm not an aviator...

But that is a staged landing in the prop wash of a helo

Just saying!

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17 hours ago, Liquid said:

I'm not an aviator...

But that is a staged landing in the prop wash of a helo

Just saying!

Wouldn't that push the plane down rather than providing lift?

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40 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Wouldn't that push the plane down rather than providing lift?

If a helicopter is hovering low, and in no wind, the downwash hits the ground and goes outward in all directions.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Wouldn't that push the plane down rather than providing lift?

From an above helo, yes!

I think the wind is a helo on the ground and spooled up, throwing off deflected rotor wash like @Waiex191 said...

Something about those micro wind waves look super localized and curved... I could also be suffering from confirmation bias!

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