Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It is the right boat for the market. A simple, modern J boat at 28 feet.  Few need more.

• Easy-access cockpit with deep, secure 8.4' cockpit seats and backrests, self-draining cockpit and step-on transom for easy swim platform boarding. 

• A deck layout optimized for simplicity and efficiency with sail controls led to the cockpit.  

• 20” lifelines and rails with starboard and transom boarding gates for secure boarding from a dock or a launch. 

• Keel-stepped, tapered aluminum mast with single spreaders.

• Jib roller furling system with single-line self-tacking option. 

• Tiller steering – more responsive and maneuverable than a wheel, and the driver can comfortably sit with feet braced across the cockpit.  At anchor, simply hinge up the tiller to expand one’s social area.  And for solo sailors a belowdecks auto-pilot is available.

• Low VCG (vertical center of gravity) 4.9’ fixed keel standard, with shoal-draft 3.9’ optional.

• Auxiliary engine options: inboard diesel, inboard electric, or transom bracket for portable electric or 4-stroke gas outboard. 

• Interior with main cabin seating, cooler, storage compartments, ventilation from two opening ports and skylight hatch, and a marine head system forward of the main bulkhead with privacy curtain and optional V-Berth package. 

• Easy to trailer behind an SUV or ship overseas on an angled cradle inside a container.

Screen Shot 2021-03-16 at 8.18.48 AM.png

Screen Shot 2021-03-16 at 8.19.06 AM.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like it but I'm a ways away from considering a day sailor. Even from an afternoon sailing or single overnight point of view I'd prefer an optional sprit to play with. Really like the electric drive option

I can see groups of people who own bigger cruisers/racers splitting something like this to have something ready to take out quickly alone after work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like a lot of it but not the center point main sheet.  If they do not want a traveler then move the center point out of the cockpit middle to the boom end and put the sheeting cleat on the boom.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rule 52 is about to disappear or become irrelevant in many mixed fleets. I beleive many of the J9 boats ordered will include powered below deck power main sheet winches as an option as well as a main power winch. This design and setup means owners will be able to sail well beyond what was formerly antisipated. The standard mainsheet otherwise works for people with deminishing upper body strength or for smaller statured members of the crew.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

J/9 PRICING & OPTIONS

BASE BOAT PACKAGE (FOB Bristol, RI USA)J/9 Standard Base Boat $ 105,900

J/9 with Inboard Electric Engine (TBD) TBD

J/9 with Yanmar Diesel Engine $ 125,850

EXTERIOR OPTIONS

Comfort Group (Main cover, tiller cover, cockpit cushions) $ 1,680

Flexiteek Synthetic Teak Cockpit Floor/Swim Platform $ 2,450

Folding/Retractable Swim Ladder $ 575

Opening Ports in Aft Face of Cabin (2) $ 785

Outboard bracket (TBD) TBD

Two-tone deck $ 1,770

INTERIOR OPTIONS

V-Berth Package $ 2,350

SPARS & RIGGING OPTIONS

Code Zero/A-Sail Deck Package $ 3,125

Self-tacking Jib System $ 1,445

COMMISSIONING OPTIONS

J/9 Sail-Away Package (main & jib, speed & depth, & sprayed anti-foul) $ 10,695

SYSTEMS OPTIONS

110V Shorepower System $ 1,795

Note: Pricing is in US$ and based on February 8, 2021 Specifications, and is subject to change. Please contact info@jboats.com.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Black Jack said:

Rule 52 is about to disappear or become irrelevant in many mixed fleets. I beleive many of the J9 boats ordered will include powered below deck power main sheet winches as an option as well as a main power winch. This design and setup means owners will be able to sail well beyond what was formerly antisipated. The standard mainsheet otherwise works for people with deminishing upper body strength or for smaller statured members of the crew.

That’s a bold statement.  Do you have any stake in rule 52 being changed?

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, sailman said:

That’s a bold statement.  Do you have any stake in rule 52 being changed?

No stake.  I am observing what is going on in fleets all over the country/world. Here in San Francisco within the YRA and SSS, these organizations are creating divisions within the fleets that are powered. Harken and Lewmar have improved thier winches and battery life has made it feasable.

In the upcoming round the rocks race for the SSS, currently there are 8 vessels reporting PW (powered winches) out of 148. It is the tip of the spear for older sailors, injured and those with disabilities. It will a matter of time before you will inquire about them or get a vessel that has them. In an era of being politically correct who will disquailfy them from sailing in a regatta.

Scott Easom in his modified J100 is leading the effort here.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, climenuts said:

I like it but I'm a ways away from considering a day sailor. Even from an afternoon sailing or single overnight point of view I'd prefer an optional sprit to play with. Really like the electric drive option

I can see groups of people who own bigger cruisers/racers splitting something like this to have something ready to take out quickly alone after work.

There is an option for a fixed sprit J/99 style...

From J/News in January:

Fun J/9 FAQs

Following are some follow-up questions that have come in since the J/9 announcement.

Can I add an auto-pilot to the J/9? 
Yes, either an above deck or below decks auto pilot can be installed aftermarket.

Why are the jib tracks on the cabin top and not the side deck? 
We learned from the J/99 that the optimal upwind jib lead sheeting angles are generally between 8 and 9 degrees depending on the wind strength and sea state. But to do that on the J/99 (and most other boats) one must rig in-haulers. The J/9 gets rid of all that clutter with jib tracks installed on an 8.5 degree sheeting angle with easy trimming right to the cabin top winches. Tacking between cabin top winches is much easier than primary winches (no scrambling across the cockpit needed). This one, small change significantly cleans up the side decks.

How does the mainsheet system work? 
This is the first J with the primary mainsheet purchase at the end of the boom and the sheet tail coming out mid-boom into the cockpit near the tiller. Instead of a bulky traveler with cars, blocks, purchase, control lines, etc. the J/9 will have a mainsheet purchase that floats on a double Dyneema strop. For 90% of one’s daysailing needs, the double strop attaches to a centerline pad-eye aft of the tiller (much like leaving a traditional traveler centered). Then for the occasional times one wants to optimize centerline boom sheeting, each strop can be quickly moved outboard to a pad-eye (P&S) to create a triangle bridle – similar to the set-up seen on the Olympic 470 and 49er. This is another solution that visually reduces clutter, simplifies sailing, and doesn’t give away performance.

What size outboard do you recommend? 
The ideal outboard for the J/9 will be a 6HP. A 5HP could be sufficient in protected waters without strong tides. The final design for the outboard bracket is in process and will include a tilt-up position so the outboard can remain on the transom while sailing.

Can you tell us more about the electric inboard option? 
We’re reviewing several electric options including a new product coming online in 2021 from our long-time diesel engine supplier Mack-Boring. We’re not able to share specifics yet, but are planning to test out a system on hull #1, before signing off on the final option.

Will there be a bow sprit option? 
The J/9 is designed for main-only or main & jib-only sailing, but we will be offering a sprit option for those wanting to fly an overlapping A-Sail. We are finalizing the design for a 2-3’ fixed carbon sprit option that matches the bow profile of the boat (similar to the J/99) and that will be packaged with all the necessary rigging and blocks. This option will be available to add aftermarket.  For more J/9 daysailer sailing information

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2021 at 7:04 PM, Crash said:

There is an option for a fixed sprit J/99 style...

From J/News in January:

Fun J/9 FAQs

Following are some follow-up questions that have come in since the J/9 announcement.

Can I add an auto-pilot to the J/9? 
Yes, either an above deck or below decks auto pilot can be installed aftermarket.

Why are the jib tracks on the cabin top and not the side deck? 
We learned from the J/99 that the optimal upwind jib lead sheeting angles are generally between 8 and 9 degrees depending on the wind strength and sea state. But to do that on the J/99 (and most other boats) one must rig in-haulers. The J/9 gets rid of all that clutter with jib tracks installed on an 8.5 degree sheeting angle with easy trimming right to the cabin top winches. Tacking between cabin top winches is much easier than primary winches (no scrambling across the cockpit needed). This one, small change significantly cleans up the side decks.

How does the mainsheet system work? 
This is the first J with the primary mainsheet purchase at the end of the boom and the sheet tail coming out mid-boom into the cockpit near the tiller. Instead of a bulky traveler with cars, blocks, purchase, control lines, etc. the J/9 will have a mainsheet purchase that floats on a double Dyneema strop. For 90% of one’s daysailing needs, the double strop attaches to a centerline pad-eye aft of the tiller (much like leaving a traditional traveler centered). Then for the occasional times one wants to optimize centerline boom sheeting, each strop can be quickly moved outboard to a pad-eye (P&S) to create a triangle bridle – similar to the set-up seen on the Olympic 470 and 49er. This is another solution that visually reduces clutter, simplifies sailing, and doesn’t give away performance.

What size outboard do you recommend? 
The ideal outboard for the J/9 will be a 6HP. A 5HP could be sufficient in protected waters without strong tides. The final design for the outboard bracket is in process and will include a tilt-up position so the outboard can remain on the transom while sailing.

Can you tell us more about the electric inboard option? 
We’re reviewing several electric options including a new product coming online in 2021 from our long-time diesel engine supplier Mack-Boring. We’re not able to share specifics yet, but are planning to test out a system on hull #1, before signing off on the final option.

Will there be a bow sprit option? 
The J/9 is designed for main-only or main & jib-only sailing, but we will be offering a sprit option for those wanting to fly an overlapping A-Sail. We are finalizing the design for a 2-3’ fixed carbon sprit option that matches the bow profile of the boat (similar to the J/99) and that will be packaged with all the necessary rigging and blocks. This option will be available to add aftermarket.  For more J/9 daysailer sailing information

Fixed sprit adds unnecessary length to slip fees.  J Boats is pretty good at building retractable sprits.  Silly it's not offered.  I would have to upgrade slips at my marina (max LOA in my slip is 28').  That would mean another 1-2 years on a wait list.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fixed sprit is simpler, lighter, no risk of leaking into forepeak (the retractable sprit on my 109 did that when new and needed some "adjustment") and cheaper.  Talking to Jeff J, and looking at the J/99 at Richmond boat show in '19, I think the fixed sprit is "relatively" easy to remove.  Yes, you'd have to unbolt and de-rig/ bolt back on and re-rig, which would be a pain, but might work for a year or two while waiting on the list?  Or at least do the first time to "qualify" then stop doing until someone complains to management?

I like a retractable sprit too, and would prefer it as well.  But there was more vertical clearance on the J/109 from vee berth to sprit than there would be on the J/9...so that might cause an issue as well.

Everything is a trade off/compromise...

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you do not like the fixed sprit and/or if the J9 with the fixed is too long to fit in your slip do not order the sprit option.

 Install one of the many after market deck mounted retractable sprits that are available instead.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, glass said:

If you do not like the fixed sprit and/or if the J9 with the fixed is too long to fit in your slip do not order the sprit option.

 Install one of the many after market deck mounted retractable sprits that are available instead.

 

 

I'm not a fan of the deck mounted options.  Ugly and take up lounging space.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Swimsailor said:

I'm not a fan of the deck mounted options.  Ugly and take up lounging space.

I suspect a lot of grandparents will buy J9s. After a few years, the kids / grandkids take possession and begin upgrades. Grandma doesn't want all the string in the cockpit, grandpa doesn't think asyms are real spinnakers. Hopefully these things will be hot-rodded like Honda Civics in the coming decades.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Swimsailor said:

I'm not a fan of the deck mounted options.  Ugly and take up lounging space.

Which particular deck mounted telescoping sprits do you dislike.

I doubt that J Boats considered providing lounging space forward of the mast.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, glass said:

Which particular deck mounted telescoping sprits do you dislike.

I doubt that J Boats considered providing lounging space forward of the mast.

I see the Selden version a lot.  It just looks clunky.  Bean bags on the foredeck make an awesome place to lounge!

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, apophenia said:

I suspect a lot of grandparents will buy J9s. After a few years, the kids / grandkids take possession and begin upgrades. Grandma doesn't want all the string in the cockpit, grandpa doesn't think asyms are real spinnakers. Hopefully these things will be hot-rodded like Honda Civics in the coming decades.

I'm not sure it needs a ton of "hot-rodding."  For example the J/9 has more upwind sail area than a J/88 (449sqft to 439sqft), yet displaces 740lbs less than the J/88.  Sure, the keel's not as deep, but I think it should go just fine.  Add and optional sprit and Asym, and you'd have a very nice beercan racer as well as a nice daysailer.  I think grandma and grandpa are going to mostly sail it under main alone....

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Crash said:

I'm not sure it needs a ton of "hot-rodding."  For example the J/9 has more upwind sail area than a J/88 (449sqft to 439sqft), yet displaces 740lbs less than the J/88.  Sure, the keel's not as deep, but I think it should go just fine.  Add and optional sprit and Asym, and you'd have a very nice beercan racer as well as a nice daysailer.  I think grandma and grandpa are going to mostly sail it under main alone....

Bravo !

Could not have stated it better myself.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, frozenhawaiian said:

and there it is. north of $100k for a day sailor, $120k if you want an inboard engine. unreal. 

 

What other good options are available to oldsters who want to extend their sailing days?

Leaving their hard earned and saved money to their ungrateful children would be silly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, frozenhawaiian said:

and there it is. north of $100k for a day sailor, $120k if you want an inboard engine. unreal. 

There's a reason no one is building smaller boats in the US these days...it's because boat building is still very labor intensive, and labor is expensive.  Throw a bunch of environment & workplace regs in on top, and it gets even more expensive.  It's much harder to "spread" those costs out on smaller boats.  But its not unreal, we've "done" it to ourselves.  For real and good reasons even...Our problem is we all can remember what boats cost 40 or 50 years ago...but that was a different time...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone shopped a new Malibu or Mastercraft ski boat recently?  Seems to be a pretty good market for $150k-$200k 24’ wakeboard boats that are definitely not being marketed to grandparents.  Or perhaps a 29’ center cockpit fishing boat w/ twin outboards?  It’ll set you back $250k easily w/ a few options.  No doubt you can buy a 28’ sailboat for pennies on the dollar but some people want new boats.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, windwagon said:

Has anyone shopped a new Malibu or Mastercraft ski boat recently?  Seems to be a pretty good market for $150k-$200k 24’ wakeboard boats that are definitely not being marketed to grandparents.  Or perhaps a 29’ center cockpit fishing boat w/ twin outboards?  It’ll set you back $250k easily w/ a few options.  No doubt you can buy a 28’ sailboat for pennies on the dollar but some people want new boats.

That's what prompted my comment: back when I lived in Washington State in a condo on a lake, most of my neighbors were grandparents with > $200k skiboats waiting for the kids and grandkids to come out and play on the weekends. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

7 hours ago, Crash said:

There's a reason no one is building smaller boats in the US these days...it's because boat building is still very labor intensive, and labor is expensive.  Throw a bunch of environment & workplace regs in on top, and it gets even more expensive.  It's much harder to "spread" those costs out on smaller boats.  But its not unreal, we've "done" it to ourselves.  For real and good reasons even...Our problem is we all can remember what boats cost 40 or 50 years ago...but that was a different time...

It isn't that much really. It is a matter of perspective. Both you and I are caught up in nation where middle and upper midle class do not really apply to most working folks. There are lots of retiring and new middle class folks (those who make the easy 225k plus yearly) buying crappy 150k campers made in the USA. The new RV van boom is off the charts and they run the same price as a new 28 to 30 foot sailboat. We do remember those boats from 40 to 50 years ago where doctors, dentists, lawyers, heavy hitting sales people and upper middle management would buy them from the yearly boat shows or order one up to be ready to race in the spring. Most regular folks at the time then had the pick in the turnover of wooded racer cruisers, homemade boats, or bought J24s and moore 24s on credit if we wanted to race on our own. The glory days of the IOR was about some rich dudes who bought a hot new sled  or semi custom race boats and went on spending spree with a crew happy to drink and eat off thier owners midlife crisis. 

You are right about one thing, we know we are lucky to have those folks who did so we have something now that is a bit faded and needs work that brings us back to that special youthful boating place we felt decades ago. 140k for a new boat is too much of a stretch for me. My boats cost me less than 5 percent of that. I won't take the gun against a new boat in any big race i'll be doing. I am content with just being out there waiting for the J9 to become a 25k boat in 15 years. If I hype it enough there might be enough of them out there when that comes around.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Black Jack said:

 

It isn't that much really. It is a matter of perspective. Both you and I are caught up in nation where middle and upper midle class do not really apply to most working folks. There are lots of retiring and new middle class folks (those who make the easy 225k plus yearly) buying crappy 150k campers made in the USA. The new RV van boom is off the charts and they run the same price as a new 28 to 30 foot sailboat. We do remember those boats from 40 to 50 years ago where doctors, dentists, lawyers, heavy hitting sales people and upper middle management would buy them from the yearly boat shows or order one up to be ready to race in the spring. Most regular folks at the time then had the pick in the turnover of wooded racer cruisers, homemade boats, or bought J24s and moore 24s on credit if we wanted to race on our own. The glory days of the IOR was about some rich dudes who bought a hot new sled  or semi custom race boats and went on spending spree with a crew happy to drink and eat off thier owners midlife crisis. 

You are right about one thing, we know we are lucky to have those folks who did so we have something now that is a bit faded and needs work that brings us back to that special youthful boating place we felt decades ago. 140k for a new boat is too much of a stretch for me. My boats cost me less than 5 percent of that. I won't take the gun against a new boat in any big race i'll be doing. I am content with just being out there waiting for the J9 to become a 25k boat in 15 years. If I hype it enough there might be enough of them out there when that comes around.

While I agree with your thoughts above Black Jack, I think the ever growing demand (based on people’s realization that is all they have time for) for purpose built daysailers like the J/9 will always surpass the supply produced and the chances of finding them at $25k 15 years from now (barring some big economic meltdown) is unlikely.  Try finding an 2000s era Alerion 28, J/100, Morris 29, Harbor 25 for 50K or less. Now drop down to the 20-22ft size and options are plentiful, Harbor 20, Capri 22, Tartan, J 70, J22. I think J boats knows their target demographic well enough now and has designed the right size boat to meet it as best possible while still keeping with the J boats ethos. Look forward to seeing the end product. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2021 at 12:58 AM, frozenhawaiian said:

and there it is. north of $100k for a day sailor, $120k if you want an inboard engine. unreal. 

What? You complainin' bout something for fun that costs a smidge more than a tricked out crew cab pickup?  I remember when Ford came out with the Maverick for just $3500 'out de door'.  Cheapest cars now are pushing$30k or more.  10x.  For new, the J9 is quite reasonable...   

...and the comments about ski boats and (around here, PNW) aluminum runabout fishing boats tells me there's lots of moolah laying around.  It's just that sailors (as a rule) are really cheap.

As a sailor, ask me how I know....

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2021 at 11:21 AM, Black Jack said:

It is the right boat for the market. A simple, modern J boat at 28 feet.  Few need more.

• Easy-access cockpit with deep, secure 8.4' cockpit seats and backrests, self-draining cockpit and step-on transom for easy swim platform boarding. 

• A deck layout optimized for simplicity and efficiency with sail controls led to the cockpit.  

• 20” lifelines and rails with starboard and transom boarding gates for secure boarding from a dock or a launch. 

• Keel-stepped, tapered aluminum mast with single spreaders.

• Jib roller furling system with single-line self-tacking option. 

• Tiller steering – more responsive and maneuverable than a wheel, and the driver can comfortably sit with feet braced across the cockpit.  At anchor, simply hinge up the tiller to expand one’s social area.  And for solo sailors a belowdecks auto-pilot is available.

• Low VCG (vertical center of gravity) 4.9’ fixed keel standard, with shoal-draft 3.9’ optional.

• Auxiliary engine options: inboard diesel, inboard electric, or transom bracket for portable electric or 4-stroke gas outboard. 

• Interior with main cabin seating, cooler, storage compartments, ventilation from two opening ports and skylight hatch, and a marine head system forward of the main bulkhead with privacy curtain and optional V-Berth package. 

• Easy to trailer behind an SUV or ship overseas on an angled cradle inside a container.

Screen Shot 2021-03-16 at 8.18.48 AM.png

Screen Shot 2021-03-16 at 8.19.06 AM.png

So they are building the j/27 again...

Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, USA 236 said:

So they are building the j/27 again...

The J27 is a great boat and a great choice. These J9s are a foot and a half longer platform, wider, without a barn door rudder and can come with an inboard electric or petrol. It does make one think though... a new inboard rudder, a solid sugar scoop/swim platform addition for waterline and keel modification would be pretty close to these j9s. I bet the whole deal could be done for less than 10k to 16k with a pod drive outsourced to a yard.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Black Jack said:

The J27 is a great boat and a great choice. These J9s are a foot and a half longer platform, wider, without a barn door rudder and can come with an inboard electric or petrol. It does make one think though... a new inboard rudder, a solid sugar scoop/swim platform addition for waterline and keel modification would be pretty close to these j9s. I bet the whole deal could be done for less than 10k to 16k with a pod drive outsourced to a yard.

 

I'm a fan of the 27, and of upgrading it as well.  I'd add a J/80 style sprit to "mine",  a small diesel saildrive and some clutches &self tailing winches.  But, and the biggest but is J-27s are getting long in the tooth, and many were raced hard/put away wet.  Finding one in really good shape is a challenge these days.  So I think you'd also have to factor in the very likely need to recore portions of the deck and transom, as well as the possibility of needing to recore sections of hull.  Plus the chainplates and main bulkhead will also likely need attention.  So I'm guessing we are well north of 10-15k, even if you do "all" the work yourself.

Still, I think the idea has merit, as long as you don't think you can sell it for anything like what you would have put into it.  So it'd have to be a "forever" boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Crash said:

I'm a fan of the 27, and of upgrading it as well.  I'd add a J/80 style sprit to "mine",  a small diesel saildrive and some clutches &self tailing winches.  But, and the biggest but is J-27s are getting long in the tooth, and many were raced hard/put away wet.  Finding one in really good shape is a challenge these days.  So I think you'd also have to factor in the very likely need to recore portions of the deck and transom, as well as the possibility of needing to recore sections of hull.  Plus the chainplates and main bulkhead will also likely need attention.  So I'm guessing we are well north of 10-15k, even if you do "all" the work yourself.

Still, I think the idea has merit, as long as you don't think you can sell it for anything like what you would have put into it.  So it'd have to be a "forever" boat.

If you need a  EXTREMELY well cared for J27 LMK. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2021 at 7:59 PM, Black Jack said:

It isn't that much really. It is a matter of perspective. Both you and I are caught up in nation where middle and upper midle class do not really apply to most working folks. There are lots of retiring and new middle class folks (those who make the easy 225k plus yearly) buying crappy 150k campers made in the USA. The new RV van boom is off the charts and they run the same price as a new 28 to 30 foot sailboat. We do remember those boats from 40 to 50 years ago where doctors, dentists, lawyers, heavy hitting sales people and upper middle management would buy them from the yearly boat shows or order one up to be ready to race in the spring. Most regular folks at the time then had the pick in the turnover of wooded racer cruisers, homemade boats, or bought J24s and moore 24s on credit if we wanted to race on our own. The glory days of the IOR was about some rich dudes who bought a hot new sled  or semi custom race boats and went on spending spree with a crew happy to drink and eat off thier owners midlife crisis. 

You are right about one thing, we know we are lucky to have those folks who did so we have something now that is a bit faded and needs work that brings us back to that special youthful boating place we felt decades ago. 140k for a new boat is too much of a stretch for me. My boats cost me less than 5 percent of that. I won't take the gun against a new boat in any big race i'll be doing. I am content with just being out there waiting for the J9 to become a 25k boat in 15 years. If I hype it enough there might be enough of them out there when that comes around.

Based on used 2000 J/105 resale value which is now still >50% of the original price you will have to wait about 80 years for J9 to sell for $25,000.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Geronimo said:

If you need a  EXTREMELY well cared for J27 LMK. 

Deal!  But I’m really ~ 5.5 to 6 years out from moving back east and executing that plan.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2021 at 11:21 AM, Black Jack said:

It is the right boat for the market. A simple, modern J boat at 28 feet.  Few need more.

• Easy-access cockpit with deep, secure 8.4' cockpit seats and backrests, self-draining cockpit and step-on transom for easy swim platform boarding. 

• A deck layout optimized for simplicity and efficiency with sail controls led to the cockpit.  

• 20” lifelines and rails with starboard and transom boarding gates for secure boarding from a dock or a launch. 

• Keel-stepped, tapered aluminum mast with single spreaders.

• Jib roller furling system with single-line self-tacking option. 

• Tiller steering – more responsive and maneuverable than a wheel, and the driver can comfortably sit with feet braced across the cockpit.  At anchor, simply hinge up the tiller to expand one’s social area.  And for solo sailors a belowdecks auto-pilot is available.

• Low VCG (vertical center of gravity) 4.9’ fixed keel standard, with shoal-draft 3.9’ optional.

• Auxiliary engine options: inboard diesel, inboard electric, or transom bracket for portable electric or 4-stroke gas outboard. 

• Interior with main cabin seating, cooler, storage compartments, ventilation from two opening ports and skylight hatch, and a marine head system forward of the main bulkhead with privacy curtain and optional V-Berth package. 

• Easy to trailer behind an SUV or ship overseas on an angled cradle inside a container.

Screen Shot 2021-03-16 at 8.18.48 AM.png

Screen Shot 2021-03-16 at 8.19.06 AM.png

Five years ago I sold my 1985 J22 and bought my 27 foot H-Boat and completed a pretty extensive, financially unsound renovation. If the J9 had been available at that time, I would have jumped on it. I think it's a wonderful idea.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, glass said:

Based on used 2000 J/105 resale value which is now still >50% of the original price you will have to wait about 80 years for J9 to sell for $25,000.

Or we can also look at the J24 which now sells for less than 2,000 often with a trailer purchased from the kids whos dad loved to race up till 1992. He has now gone into a home. Or go all out and pick up a decent j30 for less than 10.

https://www.boattrader.com/boat/1983-j-boats-j-30-7533558/

My current boat 30' built in 1972 sold new for $125,000. adjusted for inflation would be nealy $800,000 in 2021. I purchased it for 6k last spring. I race her once or twice a month and could have no problem entering/racing her in this years Paccup. But that is not the point really with boat bucks. With the increasing decline in sailing in general and with th loss of slips and local services, a $120,000 boat in 15 years could very well be adjusted for inflation could be less than 25k in todays dollars... Rather than wait, I will double down on work for a few months and see close i can come to buying a this new boat in next couple of years to come. It also might be a move required. I heard South Carolina or other points on the east coast would work well for this boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Certainly from a slips fees standpoint.  I was paying $200/mo for my then S2 9.1 in Norfolk Va.  I now pay $470mo for my First 310 in Oxnard, and in San Deigo, that would be closer to $600/mo.  That much difference is a decent chunk of a boat loan on a new J9...Or a new sail every 1.5 to 2 years...

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Five years ago I sold my 1985 J22 and bought my 27 foot H-Boat and completed a pretty extensive, financially unsound renovation. If the J9 had been available at that time, I would have jumped on it. I think it's a wonderful idea.

Why not the Alerion 28? For me, the longer LWL, bit lighter and more SA than the Alerion makes the J9 look like that boat I might own in 10, but a few years ago? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

J24: Wonderful race boat, dreadful for anything else.

Alerion 28: Definite "head turner" but the J9 looks very nice too. I'm not crazy about the A28 interior plan, and really haven't seen enough of the J9's.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I still don't have a good feel for how big the daysailer market is now. The market for sailboats overall is small, and daysailers a minor portion of that. We have a blip because of wealthy people looking for covid safe activites now, but that will be a short term phenomenon. In my area many older sailors transition to small powerboats so companies like Ranger tugs are booming. Finally, for the cost and length of a J9 you can find a few almost as easy to sail boats that have a decent interior for those who are not ready to completely give up light cruising. The J99 is good, but more expensive, example. I know the J9 has an interior, but as we get older we get less tolerant of crouching headroom and using a head out in the open.

J has been good at marketing so I am not saying it will be a bust, but I am still unsure how many they will sell.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think in the end it totally depends on where you are in your "sailing" life, and that may of us have more boat then we really need on the illusion we will cruise/overnight on it.  My last 2 boats were/are both 30 foot racer-cruisers.  Over the last 8 years, we have mostly day sailed or raced.  We've spent maybe 10 nights total sleeping on board in the marina, just to spend a night on it, and maybe 2 nights on the hook?

So if 99% of my sailing is daysailing and racing, the J/9 sure seems to hit the target of what I actually use a boat for...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Your point is well taken, but your's is a more practical assessment than most. Most mid size sailboats have more interior space and systems than most of us use. Many of the nicer cruisers near me never leave the dock. I think it is like all the 4 wheel drive SUVs being sold. Most will never be off road and the owners would be better served by a front wheel drive sedan. It is the possibility of the adventure and not the reality that sells.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This discussion I think it is about having the time. Who that is well balanced and with obligations has the time to really cruise with so much more of great life adventure choices and family demands going on? My sailing is restricted to day sailing and solo, double handed or the ever rarer fully crewed racing.  I can get the wife to sleep on the boat maybe 3 nights a year. With the lttle dog it is a pain to bring him aboard or find someone to watch him at home for a night or weekend.  For adventure we travel by plane and can be nearly anywhere in hours. We can charter a yacht or take a small luxury cruise ship to almost anywhere that is almost hidden, remote or hard to get to. 

A simple, friendly, decently appointed confortable and relitively fast 28 to 30 foot boat set up and managed for a solo or couple and having the cockpit for taking a group of four or five with space is ideal. I see the same possibilities of this J9 to have the same adventures as a doubly expensive j1XX foot race oriented family boat is the same while saving significant amounts in slip fees, haul outs and go fast sail changes.  There is a lot of life to do, make sure you budget your time and money to get it all in.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems for you, Crash, and probably Bull the J9 would be ideal, ignoring the cost. I am lucky that my wife likes the boat, it goes along with her love of camping hiking etc. We day sail twice a week during the summer, but do a multiple 2-3 day overnights a season, and a 7-10 day vacation on the boat once a summer. Soon this will be more as we enter semi-retirement. For us having an interior with a bit more function works well. I think our use is also infuenced by where we sail, there are probably 30-40 marinas or safe anchorages within one day of our home port so spending the night on the boat can be an easy last min type of decision. 

When I reach an age where sailing our light cruiser is too much I will probably not be ready to give up overnighting etc, so a small powerboat is the likely choice, perhaps with a stable sailing dingy. Horses for courses.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I had my J/109 (2003-2007) we used that boat as an overnight destination all the time, cruised and raced it with my older kids from my first marriage, etc all on the Chesapeake.  We sold it to pay for kids college expenses.  2 years later, while moving back down to Norfolk from the Annapolis/Northern VA/Solomons Island areas we had been living in, we picked up a S2 9.1, and had a new baby.  While I still raced it alot with those same older kids and friends, it changed the use case for my wife...and while the J/109 in Annapolis was an awesome waterfront weekend destination (marina had a pool and a tiki bar/downtown was less that a mile walk), we had a nicer house a block from the boat...so the spend a weekend on the boat use case went away.  Then we moved to the LA area of California...So out here the cruising destinations are fewer and farther away then they were on the Chesapeake, and your in the Ocean, so need to be a little more weather wary...

We plan to retire back to the East Coast in 5-6 years, and are debating what is the right boat once we are back there.  Plan is to retire to our Condo in the Blue Ridge Mountains, and have a boat on the bay.  So boat needs a place to sleep and a head...J/109 is a leading candidate, but depending on how much sailing/racing my wife is really going to do (its become less her thing as the years have gone by) the J/9 might provide all the accommodations I would need to stay on it after a Wed Nite Beercan, or weekend race/regatta, and save on cost of sails and slip at the same time.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Update on J9 from local dealer. 30 sold so far...

Good afternoon,   Attached is an update on the J9.   Hull #1 is scheduled to be launched in Newport towards the end of the month.   We are scheduling sea trials for early May in Newport. 

 
Around 30 hulls have been ordered to date, and that isbefore anyone has even sailed or seen one.....that's the power of the J boat brand!
 
I have ordered hull # 6, #14, and# 21.  Hull# 14 is going to Naples and Hull # 21 is going to Sarasota.  Hull # 6 is first coming to Sag Harbor and if not sold here will be going to Florida in the fall.     Hull # 6 might be the only boat available for the summer 2021.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I am observing what is going on in fleets all over the country/world. Here in San Francisco within the YRA and SSS, these organizations are creating divisions within the fleets that are powered. 

The YRA clamped down and there were NO Rule 52 exclusions for powered winches in the Doublehanded Series..   The SSS created new powered division that are NOT eligible for the overall trophies.    

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, solosailor said:

The YRA clamped down and there were NO Rule 52 exclusions for powered winches in the Doublehanded Series..   The SSS created new powered division that are NOT eligible for the overall trophies.    

 

...and ski hills used to not allow snow boarders...

YRA and SSS have to follow the "desires or needs" of the membership.  Soon enough, powered winches will be "normal" for single handed sailing....I don't necessarily agree, but there it is.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The whole thing kinda pisses me off.  Easom stirred up the issue with his automated boat (and solosailor's reaction to it with his letters, etc.) and then Easom walked away.  I have conversion kits for the mainsheet winches and am inclined to install them, then I'll just go daysailing.  I don't need all this drama.

Now we've got the "back to basics" North Bay Race with a bunch of solo skippers using rubber bands, etc. to steer instead of autopilots.  Where TF did that come from?  I hope those guys don't hit anybody while they're learning to steer with that stuff.  That should not be happening during a 60+ entry solo Bay race.  Go play with that stuff away from other boats.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Ismotorsport said:

Update on J9 from local dealer. 30 sold so far...

Good afternoon,   Attached is an update on the J9.   Hull #1 is scheduled to be launched in Newport towards the end of the month.   We are scheduling sea trials for early May in Newport. 

 
Around 30 hulls have been ordered to date, and that isbefore anyone has even sailed or seen one.....that's the power of the J boat brand!
 
I have ordered hull # 6, #14, and# 21.  Hull# 14 is going to Naples and Hull # 21 is going to Sarasota.  Hull # 6 is first coming to Sag Harbor and if not sold here will be going to Florida in the fall.     Hull # 6 might be the only boat available for the summer 2021.

What is wrong with your J/100?  Why are you not sailing it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/18/2021 at 9:22 PM, BobJ said:

The whole thing kinda pisses me off.  Easom stirred up the issue with his automated boat (and solosailor's reaction to it with his letters, etc.) and then Easom walked away.  I have conversion kits for the mainsheet winches and am inclined to install them, then I'll just go daysailing.  I don't need all this drama.

Now we've got the "back to basics" North Bay Race with a bunch of solo skippers using rubber bands, etc. to steer instead of autopilots.  Where TF did that come from?  I hope those guys don't hit anybody while they're learning to steer with that stuff.  That should not be happening during a 60+ entry solo Bay race.  Go play with that stuff away from other boats.

I get you sentiment Bob. Like many, I have mixed feelings about the growing stored energyand powered technology to sailing. Easom is in the business of selling boat goods and services. It made sense for him to make the move and show what was possible. I wish he had not baulked but became a proponent if he was so inclined. Perhaps it got out farther of hand than he thought for the time being and now is walking it back. The powered sailor genie is out of the bottle now.  As Crash says - we will adapt as it goes. 

I would like to think of this north bay race as a race being at the helm most of the time and balancing the boat to run the course. Rubber bands and sheet to tiller stuff is good practice. Holding an event to make it so could lead to better sailing for many in the days to follow. another thing about this race is the no obligation to finish except for pride. I think the message of this next weekend is have learn more about your boat, have fun and be safe. 

Two things more - Thanks so much for using your boat in the last race as the committee boat. Your support to the SSS and generosity ripples through the entire bay. Secondly, this week I will push to get a great start and work to be quite competive in my division. I will get my second Moderna shot Thursday - sure hope it doesn't take the wind out of me leaving me flat for the weekend.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, glass said:

What is wrong with your J/100?  Why are you not sailing it?

Still waiting for a Slip here in Tampa Bay Area.....  : (  

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

...and ski hills used to not allow snow boarders...

But do they allow Snowmobiles on the course?   That would be a proper comparison.

 

Quote

Soon enough, powered winches will be "normal" for single handed sailing....I don't necessarily agree, but there it is.

Let me know when the minis, Figaros, Class 40s and IMOCAs use them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Easom stirred up the issue with his automated boat (and solosailor's reaction to it with his letters, etc.) and then Easom walked away. 

I wasn't the only one concerned with powered sailing handling but I certainly helped bring the concern to light to many...... and many were shocks to find out.  Easom still raced the YRA DH race he wasn't allowed to race in, shadowing the fleet.  I'm sorry you got pissed off and think it's drama.....   same way I felt.  But I feel I wasn't the one making waves....   I was simply trying to preserve Rule 52 against the onslaught of powered sail handling boats racing level with those that pulled the string manually.

I think what the SSS did was the right move at the time.....   allowing boats with powered automation to race in their own division.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/18/2021 at 1:34 PM, apophenia said:

I suspect a lot of grandparents will buy J9s. After a few years, the kids / grandkids take possession and begin upgrades. Grandma doesn't want all the string in the cockpit, grandpa doesn't think asyms are real spinnakers. Hopefully these things will be hot-rodded like Honda Civics in the coming decades.

LOL at 125K...  Hotrod..  Right...  

Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, solosailor said:

But do they allow Snowmobiles on the course?   That would be a proper comparison.

 

Let me know when the minis, Figaros, Class 40s and IMOCAs use them.

No, but they allow shaped skis which is almost the same thing.  First time I went from my old long straight GS skis to a pair of shaped skis (sometime in my early 50s) I thought I was cheating 'cuz they turn so easily :P

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Black Jack said:

I will get my second Moderna shot Thursday - sure hope it doesn't take the wind out of me leaving me flat for the weekend.

I got my second shot (Moderna) on Saturday.  I started taking Vitamin I that evening to blunt any fever and aches.  Woke up at 2 a.m. to some uncontrollable shaking (but not bad) and felt crummy all day Sunday.  Sat around too much and now I have a stiff back, but that's as much from 13 months of desk work without a break.  (Retirement is in my sights for later this year.)

You know you're not sick - just reacting to the shot - and you bounce back quickly.  I'm guessing you'll be right for Saturday.

Thanks for your kind words.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, solosailor said:

I think what the SSS did was the right move at the time.....   allowing boats with powered automation to race in their own division.

Banning them for Saturday's race - the first fresh course we've had in years - sent a message, at least to me.

And it wasn't an "onslaught of boats challenging Rule 52" it was one or two.  Cinde mostly uses her boat to take out senior RYC members who otherwise wouldn't sail any more, and Scott did a couple boats for guys who had hung up their winch handles.  The whole thing was overblown because of Eight Ball.  Then Easom did what we all expected - as soon as crewed racing opened back up he went back to his glamor rides.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Every new piece of controversial technology needs a villain.  Simply, Scott sees the potential of the technology and acknowledges there is a market that his business could benefit from.  Shows off said technology in the best venue available to him at the time and you guys make him into the villain.  I bet you shout at the kids in the neighborhood to get off your lawn.  Eight Ball is, what it is, get over it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Except he affected some boats' ratings, including mine, prevented some of his own customers, including me, from racing in the divisions and with boats we used to race against, and he took out a full page ad in Latitude 38 to blast the PHRF committee because he didn't like how they rated his boat (so who needs to get over it?)  I've supported him in the past (big time) but when his actions hurt my own enjoyment of the sport, I'm entitled to state my opinion.

We probably know each other - come on out to E dock and we'll chat.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/18/2021 at 8:03 PM, Ismotorsport said:

Update on J9 from local dealer. 30 sold so far...

Good afternoon,   Attached is an update on the J9.   Hull #1 is scheduled to be launched in Newport towards the end of the month.   We are scheduling sea trials for early May in Newport. 

 
Around 30 hulls have been ordered to date, and that isbefore anyone has even sailed or seen one.....that's the power of the J boat brand!
 
I have ordered hull # 6, #14, and# 21.  Hull# 14 is going to Naples and Hull # 21 is going to Sarasota.  Hull # 6 is first coming to Sag Harbor and if not sold here will be going to Florida in the fall.     Hull # 6 might be the only boat available for the summer 2021.

I don't understand you post.

Is it you or some unnamed J Boat Dealer who has ordered hulls #6, #14, and #21?

Don't you have a J/100 in Tampa rotting on the hard that has not been sailed for a long time?

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, solosailor said:

But do they allow Snowmobiles on the course?   That would be a proper comparison.

Powered winches don't add to boat speed (they add weight).  Not a proper comparison.

They do allow a few of us to stay "on the hill" a little longer, doing what we enjoy.  This is where I agree with Scott's efforts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not know about the ad in Lat 38,  that is taking it a bit too far IMO given existing racing rules and he is basically a pro with not a whole lot to gain by racing in the local PHRF leagues.  I guess in for a penny, in for a pound, we all have our axes to grind, sorry you seemed to get caught up in it. I think the bay area needs an old person's (no one under 50) el toro season series, just for bragging rights you know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

RYC's is about to resume and I've been poked about joining them.  But 50 is too young - you'd need a minimum age of 65 to keep the fleet size manageable.

Maybe we'll all end up in J9s with captive winches (segue back to the thread topic...)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...