Jump to content

Recommended Posts

What does the smart money do to add indicators to their jib tracks. Deck is being redone so options are wide open. Put down a contrasting color, lay down temporary stick-on numbers, paint with the final color, peel away the numbers? Stencil on numbers? Simple vinyl numbering? Clearcoat to follow? Any and all suggestions appreciated.

Gear Anarchy too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mid said:

Sharpie Black Chisel Marker

^^^^ this.. after measuring back from the headstay fitting on each side... marking rough gouge settings for different wind ranges with different colored sharpies or grease pencils... 

but it would presumptuous to call myself the "smart money"

edit:

and I'll add this: even though I might get pretty close to symmetrical with my measurements, having a microadjustable lead is worth a whole lot more than a buncha numbers on my deck. rarely are jib or genoa settings the same from side to side, even in the same breeze. Hence the rough gouge settings.. Get it close and then fine tune with small for and aft adjustments or in/out haulers... 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

^^^^ this.. after measuring back from the headstay fitting on each side... marking rough gouge settings for different wind ranges with different colored sharpies or grease pencils... 

but it would presumptuous to call myself the "smart money"

edit:

and I'll add this: even though I might get pretty close to symmetrical with my measurements, having a microadjustable lead is worth a whole lot more than a buncha numbers on my deck. rarely are jib or genoa settings the same from side to side, even in the same breeze. Hence the rough gouge settings.. Get it close and then fine tune with small for and aft adjustments or in/out haulers... 

It helps to be somewhat systematic. Something like for stronger winds all number on all gauges are higher, possibly ratioed to apparent wind e.g. at a leeward mark tighten all halyards, outhauls etc to #2 position in 10 kts, #3 in 20 etc

If you have multiple headsail choices, writing the mid range of each as #1, #3, etc works too, so that crew can "move to 1 hole aft of #1"

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, jnye said:

What does the smart money do to add indicators to their jib tracks. Deck is being redone so options are wide open. Put down a contrasting color, lay down temporary stick-on numbers, paint with the final color, peel away the numbers? Stencil on numbers? Simple vinyl numbering? Clearcoat to follow? Any and all suggestions appreciated.

Gear Anarchy too.

Stencils from your local vinyl guy, paint, then top coat with clear nonskid. Or no topcoat, they will stick fine if it's prepped properly.

 

As Bump said make sure you measure a few doze time for symmetry (helpful to measure from centreline as well, as most jib tracks aren't symmetrical side-side). We've used a shorter line every second mark to make it easier to reference. These can be supplemented with sharpie for different modes/conditions/sails, but it will fade thorugh the season.

 

HW

 

Edit: Also worth putting a vinyl strip/arrow on the car so there's never any question where the reference is.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Haligonian Winterr said:

 

 

Edit: Also worth putting a vinyl strip/arrow on the car so there's never any question where the reference is.

el cheapo fingernail polish worked well for for that on my beat up ol lewmar cars... 

would last a couple seasons and offer endless decorating possibilities!!!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

^^^^ this.. after measuring back from the headstay fitting on each side... marking rough gouge settings for different wind ranges with different colored sharpies or grease pencils... 

but it would presumptuous to call myself the "smart money"

edit:

and I'll add this: even though I might get pretty close to symmetrical with my measurements, having a microadjustable lead is worth a whole lot more than a buncha numbers on my deck. rarely are jib or genoa settings the same from side to side, even in the same breeze. Hence the rough gouge settings.. Get it close and then fine tune with small for and aft adjustments or in/out haulers... 

I don't understand why you would measure these marks.

Take the boat out and get the sail trim correct - then mark the position.

Rinse, repeat for each sail & track.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I don't understand why you would measure these marks.

Take the boat out and get the sail trim correct - then mark the position.

Rinse, repeat for each sail & track.

no, apparently you dont understand

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sharpie, ruler placed (symmetrically) at the back of the cabin top.  Draw a line fore/aft.  Draw cross marks every inch, draw smaller marks every half inch.  Draw numbers on the deck.  Remember to use them.  Very handy.  The numbers wash off in about a season and a half.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I don't understand why you would measure these marks.

Take the boat out and get the sail trim correct - then mark the position.

Rinse, repeat for each sail & track.

I have yet to own a boat, and I've owned several, where the jib car tracks were eggzackley symmetrical to the rig. The initial measurement from the headstay, and  as someone else pointed out, from centerline, creates an initial index point.  I agree with you that the rest of the indices are created empirically  

 

and for what it's worth, those initial indices can also be useful for a quick reference, using a halyard to see if your rig is close to being in column with the boat. At least that's what I use them for, your mileage may vary. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, jnye said:

What does the smart money do to add indicators to their jib tracks. Deck is being redone so options are wide open. Put down a contrasting color, lay down temporary stick-on numbers, paint with the final color, peel away the numbers? Stencil on numbers? Simple vinyl numbering? Clearcoat to follow? Any and all suggestions appreciated.

Gear Anarchy too.

I like to use a Brother P-Touch to label everything on the boat.

For the jib tracks I like to attach numbered labels adjacent to all the car positions I use.

They hold up well when stuck directly to the track, but probably won't stick too well to the deck.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Get some metal punches and stamp numbers in the heads of the bolts, permanent and simple. (If you don’t need to see from far away!)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sharpie wipes away on most hard surfaces with alcohol or most non-water solvents. Wax before if you want to be absolutely certain it will come clean.

Once you are certain of placement, you can choose a more permanent solution (nail polish, paint marker, stamp/emboss, etc.).

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, jackolantern said:

Measure them realtive to your beam of destiny

Great idea! Not sure it’s be worth the rating hit. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's un-needed to make very many metering marks.  There is really one 'main' location for your blocks for each sail upwind.  Mark those spots - usually just 3 or 4 points.  Then just use that as the reference side to side.  If the blocks are pin-located, just count pins.  If they're adjustable, just get it in the neighborhood and adjust as needed.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Grrr... said:

It's un-needed to make very many metering marks.  There is really one 'main' location for your blocks for each sail upwind.  Mark those spots - usually just 3 or 4 points.  Then just use that as the reference side to side.  If the blocks are pin-located, just count pins.  If they're adjustable, just get it in the neighborhood and adjust as needed.

Yeah, I just quoted myself.

We don't even bother to make marks.  Everyone is told the block positions (default) line up with the window edge.  We check that it's right before we start the race, when we shoot the middle of the line to find the favored end and set the GPS.  The rare occasion when we do move them, we're moving them back to depower the top of the sail.  Good sails nowadays don't stretch much, and don't require much block movement from low to mid wind ranges.  It's much more important to me to mark things like the outhaul, backstay and the halyards that are truly variable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...