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I crossed Cape Caution yesterday, 66 nautical miles, in 35 knots, solo, all hand steered, and I got to Port Hardy last night after one of the most incredible day's sailing I've ever had. The waves wer

I've spent the last 3 weeks in Prince Rupert, waiting to finally get my vaccine (done yesterday!) and see if the US border was going to open. Apparently it's August 15th, which is too late in the summ

Please learn about sail shape. Both sails in your pic a sorely lacking in luff tension.

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6 hours ago, Rain Man said:

I should have been clued in at all the kids from the bible camp running to watch us go through.  

It's what they were praying for.

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Alright, Mainsail has battens and sets very nicely, sail track is in, reef point just needs a way to bring the grommets at the tack down to the little hook. What do you usually do?

 

Been working on the Atomic 4, fixing a few things that a marina friend suggested. New belt on the alternator (old one was worn almost out) and loosening the mounts for the water pump, that belt was far too tight. But the big project is working on unwrapping the insulation around the mixing elbow: there's an exhaust leak somewhere in there, not big, but enough to cause my CO alarm to go off and reach 600+ ppm inside the boat when it's running, which seems a little sketchy to me. I've been clued in to the fact that  it could be a really rusted out elbow, so I'm going to try and get it off and take a peek. Hoping this won't delay my plans too long! Luckily, while I've sold my car (after first provisioning up for close to a month's worth of Food and Water), there's marine dealers and mechanics close by. Here's hoping. 

 

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Not sure what the problem is with your reefing hook situation. From the photos you posted before, it doesn't look like you even have a hook. In that case, you can bolt a pair of these to the gooseneck, one on each side for convenience. Pick your flavor:

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19 minutes ago, IStream said:

Not sure what the problem is with your reefing hook situation. From the photos you posted before, it doesn't look like you even have a hook. In that case, you can bolt a pair of these to the gooseneck, one on each side for convenience. Pick your flavor:

 

 

I gave up on hooks because the main kept falling off them, plus I wanted to run the reef lines to the cockpit. So I ran a line from a hard point on the mast just below the gooseneck, up and through the reef cringle, through a fairlead on the other side of the mast, and down to a turning block. If you wanted to keep it at the mast, just mount a cleat opposite the first hard point. As a bonus, you also get 2:1 purchase, minus friction.

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20 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I gave up on hooks because the main kept falling off them, plus I wanted to run the reef lines to the cockpit. So I ran a line from a hard point on the mast just below the gooseneck, up and through the reef cringle, through a fairlead on the other side of the mast, and down to a turning block. If you wanted to keep it at the mast, just mount a cleat opposite the first hard point. As a bonus, you also get 2:1 purchase, minus friction.

I prefer reefing from the cockpit too and have an Isomat system in my boom to balance the tension between the tack and clew. I'm pretty happy with it but it only works for the first reef. Too much crap moving around in the boom to allow for more than that. What do you do for the clew on the first reef and the other reef points?

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25 minutes ago, IStream said:

I prefer reefing from the cockpit too and have an Isomat system in my boom to balance the tension between the tack and clew. I'm pretty happy with it but it only works for the first reef. Too much crap moving around in the boom to allow for more than that. What do you do for the clew on the first reef and the other reef points?

I have separate lines going to the two reef clews and the first reef tack. Second reef tack can be set up using the cunningham - which also goes back to the cabintop - once the first reef is tied in. 

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On 3/26/2021 at 7:31 AM, Ishmael said:

Not yet. Maybe never.

476905910_Screenshot_2021-03-26NakwaktoRapids-TidesCurrentsandWaterLevels.thumb.png.1c4604229ebafa5f316521dfc41ed701.png

I wonder if there is a point in between this max currents when there is a slack period? Hmmmmmm.

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1 hour ago, Baldur said:

I wonder if there is a point in between this max currents when there is a slack period? Hmmmmmm.

You mean the second column? Depends on how long the slack lasts. Hole in the Wall has about 5 minutes of "slack" water and it's still swirly as hell.

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Yeah, the turns column just indicates when the net flow turns. Depending on the geography you can have 2-3kts going either direction.

There's a saltwater lagoon in Von Donop inlet that has a near instant turn at its narrow entrance. It ebbs and floods much slower than the rest of the inlet so it turns during the peak flow of the inlet.

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22 hours ago, Vaeredil said:

But the big project is working on unwrapping the insulation around the mixing elbow: there's an exhaust leak somewhere in there, not big, but enough to cause my CO alarm to go off and reach 600+ ppm inside the boat when it's running, which seems a little sketchy to me. I've been clued in to the fact that  it could be a really rusted out elbow, so I'm going to try and get it off and take a peek. Hoping this won't delay my plans too long! Luckily, while I've sold my car (after first provisioning up for close to a month's worth of Food and Water), there's marine dealers and mechanics close by. Here's hoping. 

 

BTDT... sometimes the rust is all that was holding it together.  

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16170515957637237797820852327602.thumb.jpg.1589cca14687b6e7528254971ce0351e.jpg

 

Problem ended up being a shitty gasket, so this was checked too. Nice and solid, re-install this afternoon! 

 

And I'll take a rain check on those rapids for now lmao

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Well FUCK. 

 

The reason they wrapped exhaust tape and tried to spray foam around the exhaust flange out of the manifold wasn't because they didn't want to change the gasket, it's because the bottom exhaust flange bolt hole into the manifold is stripped. 

Goddamnit. Any suggestions? It still runs, I'd just have to stay out of the cabin to avoid gassing myself

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As a former owner of a boat with an Atomic 4, check out Moyer Marine.  Even PM me as I think I have a copy of their service manual I am happy to send you, just pay postage (I'm in Canada).

Do a service on the ignition system - rotor, plugs, wires, coil, etc.  

On the manifold - talk to a mechanic.  Can you drill/tap larger threads?  Drill it out and use nut/bolt?  Find used manifold to replace?  You need this to be safe.

Love getting these old boats back in shape and out there sailing!

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Vaeredil said:

Well FUCK. 

 

The reason they wrapped exhaust tape and tried to spray foam around the exhaust flange out of the manifold wasn't because they didn't want to change the gasket, it's because the bottom exhaust flange bolt hole into the manifold is stripped. 

Goddamnit. Any suggestions? It still runs, I'd just have to stay out of the cabin to avoid gassing myself

Overdrill the hole and put in a helicoil.

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On 3/29/2021 at 7:45 AM, Ishmael said:

You mean the second column? Depends on how long the slack lasts. Hole in the Wall has about 5 minutes of "slack" water and it's still swirly as hell.

Ah ha. I got distracted by the max and didn't see the "turns" which I guess would be at least close to slack. or is it just a different term for slack?

hole in the wall is an incredible place, that whole area really. Haven't been there for a long time. We took an 82' power boat thru there years ago. 

I dont remember what I had to predict the slack. I remember standing by and waiting at least 45 minutes because what we had was obviously not that accurate. It was august, so not big spring tides or anything. 

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36 minutes ago, Baldur said:

Ah ha. I got distracted by the max and didn't see the "turns" which I guess would be at least close to slack. or is it just a different term for slack?

hole in the wall is an incredible place, that whole area really. Haven't been there for a long time. We took an 82' power boat thru there years ago. 

I dont remember what I had to predict the slack. I remember standing by and waiting at least 45 minutes because what we had was obviously not that accurate. It was august, so not big spring tides or anything. 

 

Hole in the Wall is tricky timing. We normally get there early so we can see what is going on. Sometimes you get surprised. Since you can only get there by going through at least one set of rapids, there isn't a constant stream of boats, just what comes through during slack. So we spent 3 blissful days peacefully alone in the Octopus Islands and on our way back through Hole came across this lot waiting to go through.

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They were part of a rally for the Blue Water Cruising Club, the famous Bagheera among them. We were quite pleased to be leaving just then.

For people who don't know the area, this is what it looks like, with currents running up to 15 knots at full chat. Because of the almost sheer sides of the cliffs either side, in the right weather you can get williwaws running down the mountain and blasting passing boats. Our inflatable Zodiac was spinning in midair behind us during one of those events.

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I recall rowing out in the dinghy from Octopus Islands during full flood and seeing water spitting up 30' in the air out of the whirlpools.  Not a place to get it wrong with the timing.  Same with Surge Narrows to the south of here. 

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I've been having a pretty shit day and could really use some advice. 

Finally attempted helicoil installation to replace that stripped hole, and on the advice on someone here replaced both the still working bolt and the stripped ones with studs. Red high heat locktited them in and then this morning when I went to install the gasket and the mixing elbow again.... discovered that I managed to get the helicoil-replaced stud off true to the point where I can't reinstall the exhaust flange. Must have not kept it perfectly level with my head in the cockpit locker upside down. 

 

Really really done with this motor at this point. Not sure what my next move is, buy a new manifold? What's the next unexpected issue going to be? 

 

 

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Can you drill a bigger hole in the exhaust flange? Bend the stud a bit with some vice grips?

Hang in there - you'll get out there eventually and make us all jealous.

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Just now, andykane said:

Can you drill a bigger hole in the exhaust flange? Bend the stud a bit with some vice grips?

Hang in there - you'll get out there eventually and make us all jealous.

You should be able to extract the wayward stud with enough heat and force. Failing that, ^^^^^^^

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If not to far out of alignment, make the holes in the exhaust elbow bigger to allow install. There is no 'precision' fit, you can achieve that once parts are snug. Bolts just need to apply clamping force to the elbow.

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1 hour ago, longy said:

If not to far out of alignment, make the holes in the exhaust elbow bigger to allow install. There is no 'precision' fit, you can achieve that once parts are snug. Bolts just need to apply clamping force to the elbow.

 

1 hour ago, andykane said:

Can you drill a bigger hole in the exhaust flange? Bend the stud a bit with some vice grips?

Hang in there - you'll get out there eventually and make us all jealous.

I'll see what I can do for both bending the stud and overwriting the holes. Thanks for all the support, just having a hard time keeping up my stores of gumption 

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7 hours ago, Rain Man said:

I recall rowing out in the dinghy from Octopus Islands during full flood and seeing water spitting up 30' in the air out of the whirlpools.  Not a place to get it wrong with the timing.  Same with Surge Narrows to the south of here. 

I just make sure it's flowing in my direction and "go with the flow".

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12 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

I just make sure it's flowing in my direction and "go with the flow".

Works for some passes like Dodd, Gabriola and Porlier, but I wouldn't try it with Hole in the Wall, Surge and the others.

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32 minutes ago, Rain Man said:

Works for some passes like Dodd, Gabriola and Porlier, but I wouldn't try it with Hole in the Wall, Surge and the others.

We went through Surge with about +4 in the middle and it was...interesting. Russel's 32 would probably handle it better, without something sticking down 6 1/2 feet trying to do something totally different from what the top half of the boat has in mind. Kayakers get through no problem running the surface flow, just like Russel.

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

We went through Surge with about +4 in the middle and it was...interesting. Russel's 32 would probably handle it better, without something sticking down 6 1/2 feet trying to do something totally different from what the top half of the boat has in mind. Kayakers get through no problem running the surface flow, just like Russel.

Ah, multihull, makes sense. 

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On 3/24/2021 at 9:35 AM, SloopJonB said:

Don't forget to detour through Skookumchuck  on your way by. :ph34r:

I've done the hike in to Skookumchuckto the trail end (yes, it's 3 hour tour - trust me.) And SJB says the current can rip in there and like comedy: Timing is everything! There is  a  very small window to get through our your end up Egmont for the night. It is worth it to go out there when the current is at full runt. I have pic I took somewhere with the kayaks doing the current in standing waves there. It is quite remarkable for a sailor to understand what's going on.

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On 3/25/2021 at 10:44 PM, Rain Man said:

Went through Malibu Rapids at Princess Louisa at full flood by accident once.  Very scary experience.  We poked our nose in to have a look, and discovered we couldn't turn around to get back out.  So in we went.  The choice became the log-filled backeddy or the rock wall at 12 knots SOG.  We went for the backeddy, bumped a few logs, but we came out unscathed.  Could have been much worse.  

I should have clued in at all the kids from the bible camp running to watch us go through.  

 

On 3/25/2021 at 10:44 PM, Rain Man said:

Went through Malibu Rapids at Princess Louisa at full flood by accident once.  Very scary experience.  We poked our nose in to have a look, and discovered we couldn't turn around to get back out.  So in we went.  The choice became the log-filled backeddy or the rock wall at 12 knots SOG.  We went for the backeddy, bumped a few logs, but we came out unscathed.  Could have been much worse.  

I should have clued in at all the kids from the bible camp running to watch us go through.  

Ya, on the flood you find out too late that your in it. Princess Louisa inlet is  magical place but I've only up there twice. One time in bright sunshine and fantastic. Low cloud in a high gorge it could be anywhere up the coast, Even when it was so nice but after two days it was: "well- what you want to do now?". I never went back but do recommend it as your "bucket list". It's not bad to run up in a powerboat but I think all the reaches just going up there takes 30 or 35 miles to make that happen. No real stop offs except Vancouver Bay but it can be winds during in the day.

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On 3/25/2021 at 10:44 PM, Rain Man said:

Went through Malibu Rapids at Princess Louisa at full flood by accident once.  Very scary experience.  We poked our nose in to have a look, and discovered we couldn't turn around to get back out.  So in we went.  The choice became the log-filled backeddy or the rock wall at 12 knots SOG.  We went for the backeddy, bumped a few logs, but we came out unscathed.  Could have been much worse.  

I should have clued in at all the kids from the bible camp running to watch us go through.  

I did a similar thing with the Nitanaht bar on my proa with a boatload of friends. We were so chilled out and it looked like slack tide, but we couldn't see the rapids until it was too late because they were below line of sight. We weren't so chilled out a few seconds later, but "went with the flow" even though I was trying other options. We finally eddied out behind a point and my knees were shaking. Got to daysail and swim on Nitanaht lake while the tide was rising. Still an awesome day!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Managed to get the flange on after a lot of overdrilling the existing holes, bending the stud, losing my cool and whaling on the stud with a hammer, finding a die to fix the stud threads, and finally getting it on. Ran the engine for a while, no exhaust in cabin, torqued the nuts on the studs a little more..... and next time i ran it, exhaust again. Can't figure out where it's coming from now. Oh well, may just sail as is and not be able to go into the cabin when i've run the engine. 

 

Bit of a distraction for the last month, had a visit from my girlfriend! Back to our regularly sceduleded programming soon though. 

 

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On 4/8/2021 at 8:24 PM, Russell Brown said:

I did a similar thing with the Nitanaht bar on my proa with a boatload of friends. We were so chilled out and it looked like slack tide, but we couldn't see the rapids until it was too late because they were below line of sight. We weren't so chilled out a few seconds later, but "went with the flow" even though I was trying other options. We finally eddied out behind a point and my knees were shaking. Got to daysail and swim on Nitanaht lake while the tide was rising. Still an awesome day!

Holy snit!  Nitinat Bar.  I bet very few people make it up there to the lake!  Can see how a very shallow draft proa (or whatever) would give you access.  But how do you deal all the big offshore swell going in? I’d imagine it would be pretty big swell since it’s open to the ocean?

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43 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Some days the ocean be flat like pancake with very little swell.

That was my experience in 2019. Here's the most bracing conditions we saw, rounding Brooks Peninsula. Needless to say, results will vary.

IMG_20190630_112549.jpg

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1 hour ago, andykane said:

That was my experience in 2019. Here's the most bracing conditions we saw, rounding Brooks Peninsula. Needless to say, results will vary.

IMG_20190630_112549.jpg

They certainly will.

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1 hour ago, andykane said:

That was my experience in 2019. Here's the most bracing conditions we saw, rounding Brooks Peninsula. Needless to say, results will vary.

IMG_20190630_112549.jpg

Oh for sure it can be totally flat out there or big breaking seas - have seen both (we motored all the way to Tofino last year from down south...days of no wind)- but I was talking specifically about the entrance to Nitinat.  The Coast Pilot/Sailing Directions official description isn’t promising about it, as I recall.  As usual, though, it just takes a good sailor (in a small boat) to prove them “wrong” :-)

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22 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Oh for sure it can be totally flat out there or big breaking seas - have seen both (we motored all the way to Tofino last year from down south...days of no wind)- but I was talking specifically about the entrance to Nitinat.  The Coast Pilot/Sailing Directions official description isn’t promising about it, as I recall.  As usual, though, it just takes a good sailor (in a small boat) to prove them “wrong” :-)

Nitinat was flat when we went past in 2013 and 2019, both ways in the second trip. Rounding Cape Beale heading north, not so much.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Cape Caution crossing the day after tomorrow if the weather cooperates. Waiting out 30knot gale here in Port Hardy, then farther north I go, hopefully this afternoon!

 

 

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Setting out from Vancouver this Friday with a July 7th return date. So excited to get the hell out of dodge and see sunsets like ^^these for a while.

Does anybody know if places like Lund, Squirrel Cove, etc. are welcoming visitors right now? Both of us are vaxxed but we can make it the whole trip without stopping with some menu sacrifices.

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2 hours ago, climenuts said:

Setting out from Vancouver this Friday with a July 7th return date. So excited to get the hell out of dodge and see sunsets like ^^these for a while.

Does anybody know if places like Lund, Squirrel Cove, etc. are welcoming visitors right now? Both of us are vaxxed but we can make it the whole trip without stopping with some menu sacrifices.

We rarely stop in Lund any more, it's such a hassle. Westview is far superior if you can get in.

Edit: good marine store there, too. Marine Traders. When we had windlass problems in Buccaneer Bay, we called them and picked up a new one (at an excellent price) three days later when we got there, over a weekend.

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Now that BC travel restrictions are lifted I suspect tourist dependant towns will be more welcoming - just wear your mask indoors and don't breathe on them too heavily.

 

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@Ishmael We're just stopping for fuel on our way into the sound, if needed.

Looking like we'll either have minimal wind or 15+ on the nose so we might be going to the gulf islands for a while to wait for fair winds if we can't sneak up the coast when it's calm.

@zenmasterfred If you spent some time in Prideaux you probably know some friends of mine on Whistler 1 and/or Pyrat.

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  • 1 month later...

I've spent the last 3 weeks in Prince Rupert, waiting to finally get my vaccine (done yesterday!) and see if the US border was going to open. Apparently it's August 15th, which is too late in the summer for me I think, so I'm headed back south! Ended up taking the outside inside passage on the way north, just east inside Aristazabal and Banks island. Trying to decide which way to go this time, over to Haida which is now open, or perhaps the inside passage this time to see some hot springs and Ocean Falls? Aggravating the question is a week or more of south wind, so I'll be tacking upwind yet again. 

 

Had an absolutely amazing trip heading north, especially loved Campania Island and my anchorages on Princess Royal Island. Will do a more detailed post when I'm home safe but here's a few pictures from the trip for now!

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I crossed Cape Caution yesterday, 66 nautical miles, in 35 knots, solo, all hand steered, and I got to Port Hardy last night after one of the most incredible day's sailing I've ever had. The waves were fuckin HUGE, the wind was crazy, and I hit a top speed of 12.2 knots surfing down the waves. 

I'm proud as shit! 

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Did no-one explain the meaning of the name to you? ;)

Would have been no stress at all if I had accounted for the outgoing ebb near Pine Island..... but somehow I missed that lmao. That certainly heaped up the previously reasonable waves to 15-20 foot, steep waves, and it seemed like there was some swell reflecting off Nigei Island to the west, so I'd get one wave from the north and get up to speed, and then one of the reflected ones from the NW would pick the boat up and surf. 12.2 knots! Still riding on that high, if not that wave. The north side of Pine Island had spray flying to the base of the trees, must be a 100 foot cliff? Absolutely incredible power, I've never seen anything like that before. 

Heading southeast along Goletas Channel, after the sun had set and just after the thin sliver of crescent moon had also disappeard, I picked up a pod of 6 dolphins who played alongside for close to 15 minutes, while I still hit 7 knots in the more protected waters; near the end of the day's sail, now in full dark, you could see thousands of stars and the milky way clear overhead, and the breaking crests of all the bigs waves were leaving bubbling pools of foam that glittered with phosphorescense, and I could see a glowing trail 15 feet long behind the boat, stirred up by the turbulance from keel and rudder. 

It was literally the best day's sailing i've had in my life, caution be dammned. I'd do it again today! 

To be fair, I did have a couple bigger waves than the rest, I'm assuming freak ones. One slewed my boat sideways as it broke just behind me and threw the mast to probably 20 degrees from the water. Might be not even close to a roll, but it sure freaked me out at the time. The other one broke just before it got to me and smashed against the starboard side cabin windows, but luckily it was whitewater and not green, so no issues there. Didn't even leak! Managed to avoid everything else. 

 

I'll admit, I was skeptical at the start of the trip but the Ranger 29 has proved to be a really dependable boat and performed quite well, handled the waves as well as can be expected, given my decent but not fantastic helming ability. 

 

 

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Will have more pictures coming, and hopefully a snatch of video from near Cape Caution, but here's a few from the trip south for now. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Safe and second dose Vaxxed (finally!) In Campbell River. Lost the dinghy in Johnstone Strait when the forecasted 25-30 knots pumped up to 35 and gusting higher just north of Kelsey Bay, against an ebb tide. Those waves blew the ones at Cape Caution out of the water, not for size but just sheer confusion and steepness. Dinghy got swamped as I was scrabbling around like a crab with palsy on the foredeck, pulling in my too-large headsail. Tragic, but I suppose that's what happens. Headed south to Nanimo to visit my grandmother once I have full vaccine effectiveness! After that, I need a new dinghy and I'm seriously thinking about looking for a slightly larger boat to liveaboard and continue sailing on. 

 

I know this forum loves to hate on them but I'm thinking a westsail 32 or similar, after what I've seen for the last 4 months of sailing

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Glad you've had a good summer. A Westsail 32 is not exactly a light air rocketship. In BC waters it might make a good marina live-aboard but their sailing qualities in our light airs are rather ugly.

For the BC coast I think insulation and a heater are more important than the choice of boat. It's not that hard a coast (except a few bits).

Yes, marine place names that indicate possible issues should be taken seriously:

- Punta Mala, Panama (huge tides, nasty seas)
- Cabo Gracias de Dios ("Thanks to God"), Honduras Lots of reefs and strong trade winds as you beat northwards. After rounding the cape you can ease sheets and head more close reaching toward the Bay Islands
- Cape of Storms, S.Africa (re-named to Cape of Good Hope by some real estate developers who didn't like the old name :)

 


 

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Cape Disappointment at the mouth of the Columbia is pretty appropriate too, if a bit understated..

Wild Northwest Beauty Photography | Wild Waves at Cape Disappointment |  Wild Waves at Cape Disappointment 16

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4 hours ago, Zonker said:

Glad you've had a good summer. A Westsail 32 is not exactly a light air rocketship. In BC waters it might make a good marina live-aboard but their sailing qualities in our light airs are rather ugly.

For the BC coast I think insulation and a heater are more important than the choice of boat. It's not that hard a coast (except a few bits).

Long term, my goal is to liveaboard, hopefully financially sustainably, as well as explore as much of the world as I can. Might just be the west coast of North America or it might go a lot further! 

But after all my other sailing adventures and the last 4 months aboard Easy Rider, I have a bunch of things to check off the wishlist for the next boat. 

-Full keel. I'm sure I'll get a lot of people telling me that yacht design has advanced far beyond that, but after a summer of picking kelp out of the joint between my 3/4 skeg and my rudder, from my prop, etc, that's a consideration. I can't safely take my current boat up on a tidal grid to scrape the bottom. And finally while I avoided hitting anything this summer I REALLY want the extra protection, it'll happen eventually. Came awfully lose with an uncharted one in the entrance to Rudolph Bay on Price Island. 

-Standing headroom (I'm 6'2" ) and bunks actually large enough to stretch out in. The ones on the ranger are 6'1" and my feet always stick off the end.

-Nice big galley with a propane stove and especially an oven. I miss baking bread, not to mention everything else I cant cook without an oven. 

-reasonably easy to handle rig. Really had no problems at all with the Ranger, even solo with no autopilot in some atrocious conditions, so that's not too big of an issue. Just can't get too crazy. 

-A boat sized so that I'm not going to become broke or have to work constantly because of it's size. 

-room for a hard dinghy and a sailing rig for it aboard the boat. This one is huge, almost non negotiable!

There's a lot more but it's more boring and changeable. I can add insulation and a heater (wood stove was fantastic!) To almost any boat. 

I'm absolutely looking at anything that fits those criteria, but the market even going into fall doesn't seem fantastic. The Westsail 32 ticks all the major boxes. 

Budget for this is max range of 30-35k Canadian. I'm really looking for a forever boat, honestly. 

Might seem a little paranoid but I think with some practical skills under my belt, living on a boat is going to put me in a good position with the climate change and other issues we're facing now and the worse ones to come. 

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5 hours ago, Vaeredil said:

-Full keel. I'm sure I'll get a lot of people telling me that yacht design has advanced far beyond that, but after a summer of picking kelp out of the joint between my 3/4 skeg and my rudder, from my prop, etc, that's a consideration. I can't safely take my current boat up on a tidal grid to scrape the bottom. And finally while I avoided hitting anything this summer I REALLY want the extra protection, it'll happen eventually. Came awfully lose with an uncharted one in the entrance to Rudolph Bay on Price Island.

Just a FYI - you can easily dry out on a tidal grid with a fin keel. I, and many others, have done it lots.

You just lean the boat against the uprights (slightly) and tie a few ropes to them (if on one side only). If uprights on both sides, you tie to both sides and keep the boat as upright as possible. Done it lots on many fin keel boats. Even a San Juan 24 which has very silly sweep to the keel. Many places won't let you clean your bottom this way. BC is fairly unique in that you can still do it in more rural areas. Most other places in the world do not have tidal grids AND do not have enough tidal range.

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Re kelp - not a lots places in the world with lots of kelp. Kelp likes rocky bottoms about 30-40' deep maximum and cold water. If you are regularly catching kelp you might be skirting too close to the rocks!  Catching it on the rudder is an inconvenience and if you close the gap with a little s.s. or bronze rod that is glassed into the skeg you might have less trouble. Keeping a better lookout and just driving around the free floating bits of kelp is fairly easy except at night. Kelp on the prop usually doesn't stop you motoring but does make lots of noise and vibration. 

Hitting the bottom - most decent older boats can easily hit the bottom without significant damage. 

The rest of your criteria make a lot of sense to me for a liveaboard but I would not rule out fin keel boats as they are 95% of the market these days!

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@Zonker Wow, I'd be terrified of the weight on that SJ24 just flattening the keel against the hull! I suppose my Ranger here would be easy as pie, compared to that. 

It wasn't the still alive patches of kelp that seemed to be the issue, it was the floating bits that seemed to trip me up. I'd usually spot the large tangled up masses no problem but the pieces by themselves I'd often miss until it was too late to steer around them, particularly on the outer passage sections when there was large (well, large to me) swell coming in. I agree about the bit of rod covering the gap though, that's a sensible solution. 

 

Any opinions on a Ted Brewer designed Jason 35? Found one for sale, well equipped with a few relatively minor issues to work on for a decent price. Has the moved forward mast to deal with the weather helm issue that they had, and otherwise is super well equipped (and the German fellow who owns it did it the way I like! Simple, sturdy systems, nothing fancy!). I'm VERY tempted, and just waiting on one other person who was also interested. Pictures to come! 

 

 

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Yeah the Jason 35 I think was a well built boat. About the same beam as a Westsail 32, just spread over 35' :)

If it comes with only a yankee foresail, consider a bigger roller genoa to keep it moving in light winds. Or a drifter but that won't point as high when winds are >10 knots when you can't use it.

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I haven't gotten them unrolled yet, but it has both the yankee and the big genoa for the jib furler, and the staysail is on roller furling too. Could actually end up being an easier to singlehand boat than my current Ranger! Got a chance to check out the main and while it's not new it's certainly got over half it's life left. Again, much better than what I have now. The fellow also has an Areis Windvane somewhere for an extra grand, which I would jump all over for sure. 

 

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1 hour ago, Vaeredil said:

I've purchased the Jason 35! 

She looks great.  I hope she takes you on many great adventures, and I am sure she will bring you home safely.

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Thank you. I'm thrilled, honestly, this was exactly what I was looking for and the price was more than right. Just need to sell the Ranger 29 now, and wait for the borders to reopen before I can start ranging (heh) further afield. 

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23 minutes ago, Vaeredil said:

Thank you. I'm thrilled, honestly, this was exactly what I was looking for and the price was more than right. Just need to sell the Ranger 29 now, and wait for the borders to reopen before I can start ranging (heh) further afield. 

In this market, I am sure you will have little trouble selling the old boat.   And you will want some time to learn the new boat and tweak her a bit to your tastes, so the borders should be open when you are ready to venture further.

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