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7 hours ago, Zonker said:

I think it is. Just a stuck bow would not likely be enough to get it so stuck.

It's Egypt.

Egyptians built these things thing by hand ...

The-great-pyramid-of-Giza-Oldest-And-Lar

Getting that boat unstuck should be easy .... just get a shit-ton of wire rope, run it across to the opposite bank, and get a few tens of thousands of temporary Israelite slaves to pull the fucker off the ground.

Passover is this weekend, they can call it a religious observance to remember their days of slavery in Egypt.

 

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Feexed! 

I'm sure they'll have divers in the water inspecting the damage. Likely some cracks and a few compartments locally badly damaged. If a ship is damaged that way, you might do some underwater welding to

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On 3/25/2021 at 1:05 AM, MisterMoon said:

Who is to blame, the pilot or the master? 

The Master .

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head to Costco and get a few million of these to pour in the canal. Guaranteed to eliminate blockage.

Kirkland Signature LaxaClear, 100 Doses

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Some the ideas on here sound good, but won't work in practicality.  Two tugs and using the vessels propwash?  Nope.  The suction and fluid dynaimcs on the banks it would cause would actually do more harm then good.

 

Large ship with container crane?  Negative....not practical enough and would take a long long time.

 

Wire running across the canal?  Sorry Wofsey, this ship is way to big for anything shoreside to be able to do anything like that.

 

AS of right now they are tackling this slowly with the dredging suction barge and the salvage tugs to slowly work on getting her free.  You also have to take into consideration the structural stresses the hull is experiencing.  The hull is deigned to float, when you run it aground the center of buoyancy is shifted and sections of the hull designed to withstand floating free are now aground and under the pressure of that section of the hull and cargo....which it is not designed for.  An operation like this takes time if you want to get it done with no damage or environmental issues. 

 

They have already started diverting other vessels to an older canal, so cargo is being transited, just not as fast.

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fly a bunch of us fat fuckers over 1st class (always wanted to go to  Bumfuck Egypt).

we all grab a six pack and sit on the rail (on the top containers) talking shit and roll that bitch on its side so the tugs can pull it off.

We high five each other and get some more beer.

This technique works every time we fuck up and find shallow water.

 

Man am I a super genius or what???   ;<)

 

On a more serious note, it is turning into a giant parking lot south of the canal...

 

evergreen2.pdf

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38 minutes ago, Jkdubz808 said:

Some the ideas on here sound good, but won't work in practicality.  Two tugs and using the vessels propwash?  Nope.  The suction and fluid dynaimcs on the banks it would  running across the canal?  Sorry Wofsey, this ship is way to big for anything shoreside to be able to do anything like that.

 

AS of right now they are tackling this slowly with the dredging suction barge and the salvage tugs to slowly work on getting her free.  You also have to take into consideration the structural stresses the hull is experiencing.  The hull is deigned to float, when you run it aground the center of buoyancy is shifted and sections of the hull designed to withstand floating free are now aground and under the pressure of that section of the hull and cargo....which it is not designed for.  An operation like this takes time if you want to get it done with no damage or environmental issues. 

That's what I don't understand ... why is it better to pull on her from the water than from the shore?

I get the dredging barges, that's obvious enough, and the shore work they're apparently doing with the excavator and front loader in the photos; dig it out, dredge it away. But what's the advantage of using water as a reaction surface rather than the ground, which is literally, about a thousand times more viscous?

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59 minutes ago, Jkdubz808 said:

They have already started diverting other vessels to an older canal, so cargo is being transited, just not as fast.

Ummmmmm, what?

157B84DC-8B30-4DE9-97C8-B9347CA04E3F.thumb.png.7c142d946521634b8518444344c91c34.png

 

The ship is stuck about a third of the way along this stretch.  I can only hope that statement was in jest, otherwise where is this mysterious older canal of which you speak?  
 

Incidentally, if anyone needs a good laugh, the gCaptain forum has a topic on this, and now has two utter whack jobs posting on it.  One claimed that the ship never ran aground at all, and one needs to simply pull the bow free, but then went down the conspiracy rabbit hole that it was a sabotage job by the Egyptian government.  Another is hard to follow but seems to think that canal depth has been changed due to earthquakes, which were caused by aliens, maybe?  It’s a doozy, anyway.

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2 minutes ago, NaClH20 said:

Ummmmmm, what?


 

Incidentally, if anyone needs a good laugh, the gCaptain forum has a topic on this, and now has two utter whack jobs posting on it.  One claimed that the ship never ran aground at all, and one needs to simply pull the bow free, but then went down the conspiracy rabbit hole that it was a sabotage job by the Egyptian government.  Another is hard to follow but seems to think that canal depth has been changed due to earthquakes, which were caused by aliens, maybe?  It’s a doozy, anyway.

"Cocaine, its a hell of a drug"

    -  Rick James

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36 minutes ago, NaClH20 said:

Ummmmmm, what?

157B84DC-8B30-4DE9-97C8-B9347CA04E3F.thumb.png.7c142d946521634b8518444344c91c34.png

 

The ship is stuck about a third of the way along this stretch.  I can only hope that statement was in jest, otherwise where is this mysterious older canal of which you speak?  
 

Incidentally, if anyone needs a good laugh, the gCaptain forum has a topic on this, and now has two utter whack jobs posting on it.  One claimed that the ship never ran aground at all, and one needs to simply pull the bow free, but then went down the conspiracy rabbit hole that it was a sabotage job by the Egyptian government.  Another is hard to follow but seems to think that canal depth has been changed due to earthquakes, which were caused by aliens, maybe?  It’s a doozy, anyway.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2021-03/24/c_139832592.htm#:~:text=Русский-,Egypt's Suez Canal diverts ships to old channel after,container blocked new crossing%3A statement&text=Some 12 percent of the,where the ship was grounded.

 

They are diverting ships to the old channel, the Ever Given ran aground in the newly expanded channel.

 

As for the conspiracies, there are some doozies out there.  My favorite are the ones about how Hillary is involved and child trafficking comes into play somehow with all of that as well.

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41 minutes ago, NaClH20 said:

  
 

Incidentally, if anyone needs a good laugh, the gCaptain forum has a topic on this, and now has two utter whack jobs posting on it.  One claimed that the ship never ran aground at all, and one needs to simply pull the bow free, but then went down the conspiracy rabbit hole that it was a sabotage job by the Egyptian government.  Another is hard to follow but seems to think that canal depth has been changed due to earthquakes, which were caused by aliens, maybe?  It’s a doozy, anyway.

The best conspiracy memes :) Memedroid

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14 minutes ago, Jkdubz808 said:

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2021-03/24/c_139832592.htm#:~:text=Русский-,Egypt's Suez Canal diverts ships to old channel after,container blocked new crossing%3A statement&text=Some 12 percent of the,where the ship was grounded.

 

They are diverting ships to the old channel, the Ever Given ran aground in the newly expanded channel.

 

As for the conspiracies, there are some doozies out there.  My favorite are the ones about how Hillary is involved and child trafficking comes into play somehow with all of that as well.

I'm confused.  I thought the old channel expansion was located in the north. 

"On 24 February 2016, the Suez Canal Authority officially opened the new side channel. This side channel, located at the northern side of the east extension of the Suez Canal, serves the East Terminal for berthing and unberthing vessels from the terminal."

Ever Given is plugging the south part of the canal, which I do not see a route around via another canal.

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3 minutes ago, More Cowbell2 said:

I'm confused.  I thought the old channel expansion was located in the north. 

"On 24 February 2016, the Suez Canal Authority officially opened the new side channel. This side channel, located at the northern side of the east extension of the Suez Canal, serves the East Terminal for berthing and unberthing vessels from the terminal."

Ever Given is plugging the south part of the canal, which I do not see a route around via another canal.

To be honest I'm not sure, I've never been through that Canal before in my career.  I'm only going off of what I am reading in various articles.

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That is correct.  The two channel expansion was north of the lake.  Ever Given is stuck south of the lake, where there is one channel.  There is no other channel to divert around it.  There is no movement of any cargo through Suez at this time.

FD47409E-3F86-4DFA-BDD2-8D01947C5E88.thumb.png.3fc032a6b1f8133e5aec3f63b38b0e3e.pngE8979966-4D6F-4647-9545-B601F6E83AC4.jpeg.8fa4b66c80f587423d08b159240aa8f4.jpeg

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3 hours ago, mikewof said:

That's what I don't understand ... why is it better to pull on her from the water than from the shore?

I get the dredging barges, that's obvious enough, and the shore work they're apparently doing with the excavator and front loader in the photos; dig it out, dredge it away. But what's the advantage of using water as a reaction surface rather than the ground, which is literally, about a thousand times more viscous?

I think we noodled the number a few days ago. Bulldozers indeed pull hard. But the force available compared to a huge tug is tiny. 400 kN vs. 4600 kN. Another napkin calc vaguely implied dozens of super tu gs might be required to overcome the sand/hull friction. Probably mustering a thousand dozers and the gear would be difficult....time consuming. A dozer winch can likely bollard pull much harder than tracks alone...against a berm...but complicated logistics....especially in Egypt.

Dredging seems like the best option to this bathrobe wearing keyboard expert.

 

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4 hours ago, Sol Rosenberg said:

Send Turbo-Lax. 

 

 

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the JSL disabled the engine room .... Secret Space Laser Pin

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3 hours ago, El Borracho said:

I think we noodled the number a few days ago. Bulldozers indeed pull hard. But the force available compared to a huge tug is tiny. 400 kN vs. 4600 kN. Another napkin calc vaguely implied dozens of super tu gs might be required to overcome the sand/hull friction. Probably mustering a thousand dozers and the gear would be difficult....time consuming. A dozer winch can likely bollard pull much harder than tracks alone...against a berm...but complicated logistics....especially in Egypt.

Dredging seems like the best option to this bathrobe wearing keyboard expert.

 

Tugs have an insane amount of power, but their reaction surface is water, which has about 1/1000 the dynamic viscosity of a solid. Part of the reason tugs have such huge engines is because their reaction surface is so inefficient to couple against. Rule of thumb is that a gas (like air) is a thousand times less efficient to couple than a liquid (like water) and liquid is a thousand time less efficient to couple than a solid (like concrete).  The reason an airplane has such an enormous propeller compared to a boat is because the air is so much less efficient as a reaction pair.

Egypt is an industrialized country, but I believe you have a good point there ... it going to take a day or two to get the land-based infrastructure out there, but the tugs are already on site.

And it seems your bathrobe expertise is the mode of choice here ... dig away at the bulb, dredge it away, free the ship.

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Saw a video today on one the news sites, glad to see the Evergiven still operating her radar.  I know, watchkeeping and all that.  But what is that radar going to see 170 feet in the air, in a big ditch through the flat desert?

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18 minutes ago, BayRacer said:

Saw a video today on one the news sites, glad to see the Evergiven still operating her radar.  I know, watchkeeping and all that.  But what is that radar going to see 170 feet in the air, in a big ditch through the flat desert?

Probably some bureaucratic reason, like they get a fine if it's turned off during transit. 

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30 minutes ago, mikewof said:

Tugs have an insane amount of power, but their reaction surface is water, which has about 1/1000 the dynamic viscosity of a solid. ...

Yes. We had 'researched' the hugest bulldozer tractive force on wet sand vs. hugest sea tug bollard pull force. So the relative water/sand effects got eliminated.

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20 hours ago, Navig8tor said:

Except when things get sideways.

You think Covid stuck a spanner in the world wide shipping industry -watch this space

Supply and demand baby!

Lockdowns and wearing a mask suck and cause riots.

Just wait when people cant get a new iPhone, Nike, or any other shit in life!! :lol: 

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4 minutes ago, Windward said:

Probably some bureaucratic reason, like they get a fine if it's turned off during transit. 

COLREGS: "Watch by all available means at all times...". Certainly open to interpretation but simpler to leave the radar on than hire lawyers if something goes amiss...again.

Did you notice which shapes they were showing: balls, diamonds, cylinders?

Routinely ignored by cruisers, I have noticed, especially those that are especially self righteous after a few drinks and start quoting Chapman's, etc.

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19 hours ago, charisma94 said:

Those guys had a good job, eh. They do SFA... I doubt they could actually handle a line! They were good for buying Egyptian "artifacts" and really shitty hash.

Everyone, including the Pilots all had their hand out for the second local currency, cartons Marlboro Red. We'd go through 50 cartons of them, given to all & sundry for each transit... They love their smokes!

3 industrial 100 litre sacks full of cartons, 5 crew changes plus. Skipper gets 2, mate gets 1, each handler a pack.

Add lagoon wait and a re-anchor and guys at both ends.:lol:

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8 hours ago, Jkdubz808 said:

Some the ideas on here sound good, but won't work in practicality.  Two tugs and using the vessels propwash?  Nope.  The suction and fluid dynaimcs on the banks it would cause would actually do more harm then good.

 

Large ship with container crane?  Negative....not practical enough and would take a long long time.

 

Wire running across the canal?  Sorry Wofsey, this ship is way to big for anything shoreside to be able to do anything like that.

 

AS of right now they are tackling this slowly with the dredging suction barge and the salvage tugs to slowly work on getting her free.  You also have to take into consideration the structural stresses the hull is experiencing.  The hull is deigned to float, when you run it aground the center of buoyancy is shifted and sections of the hull designed to withstand floating free are now aground and under the pressure of that section of the hull and cargo....which it is not designed for.  An operation like this takes time if you want to get it done with no damage or environmental issues. 

 

They have already started diverting other vessels to an older canal, so cargo is being transited, just not as fast.

And that was a narrower canal as well, I've been through it.

I wonder how well its been maintained for big cargo?

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6 hours ago, Jkdubz808 said:

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2021-03/24/c_139832592.htm#:~:text=Русский-,Egypt's Suez Canal diverts ships to old channel after,container blocked new crossing%3A statement&text=Some 12 percent of the,where the ship was grounded.

 

They are diverting ships to the old channel, the Ever Given ran aground in the newly expanded channel.

 

As for the conspiracies, there are some doozies out there.  My favorite are the ones about how Hillary is involved and child trafficking comes into play somehow with all of that as well.

If they start delivering pizzas to the salvage crews, its true. 

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3 minutes ago, El Borracho said:

COLREGS: "Watch by all available means at all times...". Certainly open to interpretation but simpler to leave the radar on than hire lawyers if something goes amiss...again.

Did you notice which shapes they were showing: balls, diamonds, cylinders?

Routinely ignored by cruisers, I have noticed, especially those that are especially self righteous after a few drinks and start quoting Chapman's, etc.

Video was shot from road a fair bit away.  Could not make out any shapes, just the spinning antenna stood out.  I am sure it is easier to just leave it on then remember to turn it back on when freed.  But other than the tugs and dredge, there is no traffic to keep an eye out for with all vessels sent to anchor. 

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4 hours ago, El Borracho said:
7 hours ago, mikewof said:

That's what I don't understand ... why is it better to pull on her from the water than from the shore?

I get the dredging barges, that's obvious enough, and the shore work they're apparently doing with the excavator and front loader in the photos; dig it out, dredge it away. But what's the advantage of using water as a reaction surface rather than the ground, which is literally, about a thousand times more viscous?

I think we noodled the number a few days ago. Bulldozers indeed pull hard. But the force available compared to a huge tug is tiny. 400 kN vs. 4600 kN. Another napkin calc vaguely implied dozens of super tu gs might be required to overcome the sand/hull friction. Probably mustering a thousand dozers and the gear would be difficult....time consuming. A dozer winch can likely bollard pull much harder than tracks alone...against a berm...but complicated logistics....especially in Egypt.

Dredging seems like the best option to this bathrobe wearing keyboard expert.

Wofsey the deep sea container, dredging expert...:lol:

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49 minutes ago, BayRacer said:

Saw a video today on one the news sites, glad to see the Evergiven still operating her radar.  I know, watchkeeping and all that.  But what is that radar going to see 170 feet in the air, in a big ditch through the flat desert?

Camels?

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5 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

The problem with the Suez canal it is too wide. If you keep them narrow like the Corfu Canal then the ships just can't get turned sideways enough to get stuck!

The Corinth Canal: A Narrow Man-Made Shipping Canal

And if they do, a crane on the edge can lift the containers off. Assuming they can drop the hook low enough...

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39 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

The problem with the Suez canal it is too wide. If you keep them narrow like the Corfu Canal then the ships just can't get turned sideways enough to get stuck!

The Corinth Canal: A Narrow Man-Made Shipping Canal

Not Corfu Canal it’s the Corinth Canal

from Wiki:

Corinth Canal

 
 

 

The Corinth Canal (Greek: Διώρυγα της Κορίνθου, romanizedDhioryga tis Korinthou) connects the Gulf of Corinth in the Ionian Seawith the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnese from the Greekmainland, arguably making the peninsula an island. The canal was dug through the isthmus at sea level and has no locks. It is 6.4 kilometres (4 mi) in length and only 21.4 metres (70 ft) wide at its base, making it impassable for many modern ships. It has little economic importance and is mainly a tourist attraction.

Corinth Canal
Canal of Corinth.jpg
Specifications
Length 6.4 km (4.0 miles)
Maximum boat beam 17.6 m (58 ft)
Maximum boat draft 7.3 m (24 ft)
Locks 0
Status Open
History
Principal engineer István Türr and Béla Gerster
Construction began 1881
Date of first use 25 July 1893[1]

 

 

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2 hours ago, El Borracho said:

Yes. We had 'researched' the hugest bulldozer tractive force on wet sand vs. hugest sea tug bollard pull force. So the relative water/sand effects got eliminated.

A bulldozer wouldn't be a good way to do it, the traction on the sand sucks.

The way they pull up bridge constructions is to drop some pier foundations to some post-tensioned concrete pads and pull from those ... use the land as a good reactive pair. Of course, that takes time to organize, their current method of digging and dredging will probably get her free by Monday or so, right?

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sooner or later they'll figure out that they need to lighten her .....................

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17 minutes ago, Mid said:

sooner or later they'll figure out that they need to lighten her .....................

Or just start digging a diversion around it??

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9 hours ago, Mid said:

sooner or later they'll figure out that they need to lighten her .....................

A good theory, but again the only way to do that is by container offloading.  Take all the fuel and ballast off of her and she will roll over like a $2 Thai hooker......

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7 minutes ago, Olsonist said:

The bank effect and the big boat blocking the Suez

https://archive.is/pmUEm

My theory involves exactly that.  Pair bank cushion on the bow, bank suction on the stern and a large gust of wind from a dust storm and that gives you a situation which could have altered the vessels course with no time, especially for a big ULCV like that, for the master OR pilot to correct the ship before running aground.  Its a fine line between going fast enough for bank effect to do something like this and keep bare steerage from the screw over the rudder.

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Add wind to your theory.  The overall result of bank effect is to generally keep the ship in the middle of the channel.  High pressure at the bow deflect the bow away from the bank, and low pressure at back will drag the stern towards the bank, with equilibrium dead center of the channel.  It is difficult if not impossible to keep a ship that is moving to hold a course that is not in the middle.  This effect results in the game known as “Texas Chicken” in the Houston ship channel.  Galveston Bay is shallow, about 6’, and the channel is dredged to (last I knew) 45’.  The strong bank effect keeps the ships in the middle of the channel.  For an outbound and inbound ship to pass, it requires that they head directly at each other.  Then, in a coordinated action seemingly at the last minute, they put the helm to stbd, and when the bows overlap, helm to port and back to the middle.  A really big box ship in a decent breeze has other issues... Pilots I know that do cruise ships on a regular basis say they can have as much as 20 degrees of set, and have the bow at one side of the channel and the stern at the other and the entire width swept by the length of the ship (not a shallow channel, mind you... mostly it’s defined by lobster gear).  Do that to keep course, and then have the wind lull on you, and if you don’t react fast enough you’ve got problems.

 

edit to add:  Yup, you did add wind.  I’ll plead reading comprehension before coffee 

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40 minutes ago, NaClH20 said:

Add wind to your theory.  The overall result of bank effect is to generally keep the ship in the middle of the channel.  High pressure at the bow deflect the bow away from the bank, and low pressure at back will drag the stern towards the bank, with equilibrium dead center of the channel.  It is difficult if not impossible to keep a ship that is moving to hold a course that is not in the middle.  This effect results in the game known as “Texas Chicken” in the Houston ship channel.  Galveston Bay is shallow, about 6’, and the channel is dredged to (last I knew) 45’.  The strong bank effect keeps the ships in the middle of the channel.  For an outbound and inbound ship to pass, it requires that they head directly at each other.  Then, in a coordinated action seemingly at the last minute, they put the helm to stbd, and when the bows overlap, helm to port and back to the middle.  A really big box ship in a decent breeze has other issues... Pilots I know that do cruise ships on a regular basis say they can have as much as 20 degrees of set, and have the bow at one side of the channel and the stern at the other and the entire width swept by the length of the ship (not a shallow channel, mind you... mostly it’s defined by lobster gear).  Do that to keep course, and then have the wind lull on you, and if you don’t react fast enough you’ve got problems.

 

edit to add:  Yup, you did add wind.  I’ll plead reading comprehension before coffee 

I know the Texas Chicken game all too well.  I operated harbor tugs in the Galveston/Houston area for awhile.  It was taught to us immediately that if you are the assist tug being towed on the stern, STAY THE FUCK ON THE OUTBOARD SIDE OF THE WAKE!!  Its quite daunting as they pass watching the other ships bow basically pointing close to at you as they swing the vessels back.  It took more than a few times to get used to it.  The good pilots would give you a heads up before doing it.  The not so good ones would let you figure it out by watching the stern.

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Yep. We would see shallow water effect on a NIMITZ class at high speed that could completely overrule the rudder. 
 

The old Jebel Ali channel cost a few careers with current and cross winds. Narrow and steep sided, a few COs discovered the bridge could be in the center of the channel when the rudders/screws were churning sand and ending careers due to the set. 

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On 3/25/2021 at 11:53 PM, mikewof said:

It's Egypt.

Egyptians built these things thing by hand ...

The-great-pyramid-of-Giza-Oldest-And-Lar

Getting that boat unstuck should be easy .... just get a shit-ton of wire rope, run it across to the opposite bank, and get a few tens of thousands of temporary Israelite slaves to pull the fucker off the ground.

Passover is this weekend, they can call it a religious observance to remember their days of slavery in Egypt.

 

Feexed! 

309D444A-0465-4112-B5E0-85B11A3A3743.jpeg

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On 3/26/2021 at 6:17 PM, NaClH20 said:

58697C1E-E767-4666-9EAA-0E2FE7BC89A8.jpeg.9bf6306fb5e1711c5fe74bcd40782fdc.jpeg
 

Clearly what they need is:

2DB1006D-D394-4F6C-AA42-2512CFA16166.jpeg.81981c6f5347a9c4f90346f3443cb51e.jpeg

 

Problem solved!

Now it's a meme!

 

Despair.jpg

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apparently, according to digger guys twitter feed, they got the thing to move a few meters...

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On 3/26/2021 at 12:17 PM, NaClH20 said:

58697C1E-E767-4666-9EAA-0E2FE7BC89A8.jpeg.9bf6306fb5e1711c5fe74bcd40782fdc.jpeg
 

 

Hard to gauge that excavator but looks to be a 60,000 lb class machine (~30ton).  With a long stick they get maybe 14-16 foot of digging depth and maybe 2 cu yds per bucket.  Slow going.  Is 16 foot deep enough?  If the ship unballasts to float higher does it roll over on its side?

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3 minutes ago, warbird said:

If the ship unballasts to float higher does it roll over on its side?

Short answer, yes.  So it's a delicate decision on how much (and what) cargo to take off (if they go that route) or how much ballast to pump out, and where from.  Fingers crossed all round.

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It is full of containers. Not much ballast aboard right now. 

This size of ship is pretty much at the size of the biggest we can do right now. It's a flimsy shoe box without a lid. 

So... carefully unloading will happen soon. They don't want to break the back if bow and stern are both supported by the bank. 

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

It is full of containers. Not much ballast aboard right now. 

This size of ship is pretty much at the size of the biggest we can do right now. It's a flimsy shoe box without a lid. 

So... carefully unloading will happen soon. They don't want to break the back if bow and stern are both supported by the bank. 

Article I read somewhere this morning was that unloading and predicting stability are difficult because the shipping and port industry is "the most corrupt". I took that to mean ships are always overloaded, paperwork faked, and probably not ballasted properly....carrying ballast does not pay the investors.

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No, likely they meant the Suez Canal is the most corrupt. Your sailboat doesn't get through without several packs of cigarettes to your pilots (who changes along the way so you'll need lots of cigarettes). Big ships pay more in bribes to smooth the way.  To get parts through to your ship while in Egypt is a pain etc.

Ships are very seldom overloaded in most nations, and are ballasted properly. Plimsoll marks show very quickly if the ship is overloaded.

 Yeah overloading happens in more developing nations but it's not common and no way in that size/type of ship. Because the ship was loaded with containers from Asia to Europe, it probably isn't carrying much ballast to unload. Some ballast to offset fuel burned is normal, but it won't be a lot.

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Have not had time to read the whole thread, but someone mentioned tonight that there are many live animals on many of these stalled ships, that will soon run out of food.  Dunno if this is meat on the hoof, from Oz to Europe, or whatever?  It's non like they can let them off the boat, for the locals to benefit from the shippers, and vendors and buyers losses???..

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Having transited the suez multiple times on both container and RORO's I can attest that there are way more bad pilots than good. That being said all have their hand out looking for those american cigarettes. 

If any of you all are interested in actually seeing the canal in chart form see British Admiralty SC01 and SC02. As you can see on the charts, the section south of great bitter lake is just one channel. 

The canal operates in convoys of around 50 vessels they leave from the south (Port Suez) and the north (Port Said) at about the same time each day. Usually @ 0330. Ideally the Northbound convoy has made the transit through the one way section and into the two way section prior to the southbound convoy hitting the Great Bitter lake.  If that does not happen then the ships in the southbound convoy will have to moor to the bank of the canal and wait for the northbound ships to pass. In my experience this is hit or miss, sometimes it works perfectly and you make it through with no stopping, other times it turns into one big Cluster F. 

Having ships run aground in the canal is nothing new, rather the size and scale of this one is what really sets it apart. The Canal Speed Limit is right around 7.5 Knots and if he was actually making turns for 13.5 before the grounding, he was definitely having problems steering. However as noted in other posts increasing speed only helps so much before suction and cushion take over. Once you get the out of shape with regard to the pressure on each side of the bow it really doesn't  matter how big your rudder is, your screwed and you plow into the side of the canal at 10+ knots.

I think  eventually it will become a big case study on what not to do, and I for one am very curious about what is on the VDR - Voyage Data Recorder. 

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15 minutes ago, boston said:

I think  eventually it will become a big case study on what not to do, and I for one am very curious about what is on the VDR - Voyage Data Recorder. 

Hopefully it doesn't show them doing 740 knots at 30,000 feet before they ran into cloud.

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4 hours ago, Zonker said:

No, likely they meant the Suez Canal is the most corrupt. Your sailboat doesn't get through without several packs of cigarettes to your pilots (who changes along the way so you'll need lots of cigarettes). Big ships pay more in bribes to smooth the way.  To get parts through to your ship while in Egypt is a pain etc.

Ships are very seldom overloaded in most nations, and are ballasted properly. Plimsoll marks show very quickly if the ship is overloaded.

 Yeah overloading happens in more developing nations but it's not common and no way in that size/type of ship. Because the ship was loaded with containers from Asia to Europe, it probably isn't carrying much ballast to unload. Some ballast to offset fuel burned is normal, but it won't be a lot.

In all my transits (6?) as Master, I never interacted face to face with any authourities as such. The only official we saw from memory was the fire fighting equipment inspector. You have to use an agent, I used Gulf Shipping Agency (GAC), the agents were fantastic & helpful guys who'd guide us through the maze of paperwork, I'd be signing and stamping pages of forms, they'd take them ashore to all the various offices & bring them back, stamped and approved... The only money I paid to transit (by bank transfer) went directly to the GAC bank account and I guess they'd distribute the funds, the fee more or less was the published transit fee according to tonnage.

The agent would also organize parts, bunkers & provisions as required. I never found this a hassle. That's the worth of a good agency...

My transits were on 50-70m super-yachts, a ripe target for bribe requests, but never did anyone ask me for a bribe... Smokes were another matter... I was told in advance by GAC to bring at least 50 cartons of Marlboro red. We'd pick these up, enough for both ways, duty free in Gibraltar when we'd bunker there before leaving the Med. By the time you transit and get to the other side, 50 cartons were gone. (If you gave them single packets of smokes, they'd just about throw them back at you! Cartons only!)

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been through twice on yachts , cigs , soft drinks and writing implements cleaned out .....

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Per gCaptain, the Egyptian Canal Authorities report (for whatever that's worth) that they were able to shift the Ever Given 29 meters.  The prop and rudder have also been reported cleared.  Dredging operations continue in advance of the Monday Spring Tide. 

The forward crew quarters and bow thruster room were also reported flooded, indicating the hull integrity suffered from her attack on Asia.  
 

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9 hours ago, charisma94 said:

By the time you transit and get to the other side, 50 cartons were gone. (If you gave them single packets of smokes, they'd just about throw them back at you! Cartons only!)

 

WTF??  Not possible to purchase cigs in Egypt?

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Just now, billy backstay said:

 

WTF??  Not possible to purchase cigs in Egypt?

No need to, the Suez canal provides all the tobacco products needed.:lol:

3 industrial trash bags full when I went through.

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2 hours ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

Per gCaptain, the Egyptian Canal Authorities report (for whatever that's worth) that they were able to shift the Ever Given 29 meters.  The prop and rudder have also been reported cleared.  Dredging operations continue in advance of the Monday Spring Tide. 

The forward crew quarters and bow thruster room were also reported flooded, indicating the hull integrity suffered from her attack on Asia.  
 

The bow thruster room I fully expected, the crew quarters are under the bridge on that ship, and they don't go down past the main deck so I doubt they got flooded.  Noe one lives down in the belly of the ship except cadets :lol:

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50 minutes ago, Jkdubz808 said:

The bow thruster room I fully expected, the crew quarters are under the bridge on that ship, and they don't go down past the main deck so I doubt they got flooded.  Noe one lives down in the belly of the ship except cadets :lol:

Perhaps there is a crew lounge forward. Seems reasonable given the one-hour round trip to the wheelhouse for coffee or whatever herb.

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