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I have a lot of work ahead of me still. I am and isolation for 2 weeks still at the new facility. I have so much to say to all of you that and so much for Hope and I, My heart has been touched an

Hobot was kept on a drug that put a protective layer over the ulcer yesterday and last night. The bleeding has been stemmed. He was taken off the respirator this morning. However his blood pressure ke

It appears as if Hobot is on the road to recovery. He's propped in his hospital bed up and alert, cutting it up with his nurses. He's also being combative with one of his doctors a tall blonde Doctor

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1 hour ago, boomer said:

It appears as if Hobot is on the road to recovery. He's propped in his hospital bed up and alert, cutting it up with his nurses. He's also being combative with one of his doctors a tall blonde Doctor who Hope says looks like a Barbie Doll, walks around on air, and has total disregard for everyone beneath her including Hope, and ignoring her questions.

Sadly, my experience has been that many of the asshole docs have been the most effective.

Awesome news on his recovery!  He had me scared.  This is a great community and so happy we're looking out for our own.  Boomer, you have been great, does the name come from time on an Ohio class?  My second guess is that you fart a lot!

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Besides being born a boomer, then working in a trade where we moved around from state to state or country to country if necessary - booming - there's a lot of reasons for the handle, including working around friction rigs and Derrick Barges for 41 years, and active duty Seabees for four years, and 24 years as a Seabee Reservist - and in that trade, sometimes it means working up to our ears in mud or water and sometimes underwater.

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37 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

 My second guess is that you fart a lot!

As a diver, Mr. Boomer has to live with the consequences of any self inflicted gaseous release while wearing a dive helmet.  

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29 minutes ago, boomer said:

...including working around friction rigs

Nice work experience, it sounds exciting and challenging.  I like those red and white cranes.

But Boomer, most of us men here have extensive experience with a friction rig, except we just call it a right hand.  Just sayin'.

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2 hours ago, boomer said:

It appears as if Hobot is on the road to recovery. He's propped in his hospital bed up and alert, cutting it up with his nurses. He's also being combative with one of his doctors a tall blonde Doctor who Hope says looks like a Barbie Doll, walks around on air, and has total disregard for everyone beneath her including Hope, and ignoring her questions.

The one doctor who is down to earth, whom was Hobot's primary care doctor, whom Hobot gets along with. Whom with the nurses was responsible for saving Hobots life, along with the vascular surgeon who clamped off the veins leading to the bleeding ulcers, is forthwith with every question by Hope. He has concern for Hobot and everyone - the nurses, the other doctors, Hope. Whom is a young Russian immigrant with a broken accent, who studied here at the U of W.

Hope hasn't told Hobot about the GFM donations, and will probably break the news to him today.

It's quite nice to see the GFM donations exceed $10, 000 this morning. I thank all you sailors for coming through in a time of need. Words can not express my and Hope's gratitude.

Thank you all!

Thanks for keeping us informed, and providing a means for us/me to make a donation.

Continuing to send positive vibes.

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Nice work experience, it sounds exciting and challenging.  I like those red and white cranes.

But Boomer, most of us men here have extensive experience with a friction rig, except we just call it a right hand.  Just sayin'.

No doubt about that ED!

It's not for everyone, and takes a different breed of cat to work long hours in the winter with the rain or snow coming down sideways. Piledriving 'Fishery Window' season in the salt waterways is from Aug 15 to February 15. Hobot and I sailed together and he worked in the trade for me at Manson, too.

A friction rig or friction crane is a land based lattice boom crane crawler or water based derrick barge or a friction crane crawler on a barge, that uses clutches and foot brakes for load control instead of a hydraulic system as with modern lattice boom cranes. Your very largest derrick barges all all friction lattice boom cranes. Friction cranes are no longer manufactured; however, many are still in use on job sites. Since these cranes are still in service and their operation is completely different than their modern counterpart, it is important for the accrediting agency as well as the construction company to train with a four year union program and a couple years of yard experience before demonstrating operator skills on the crane types they are expected to operate.

https://www.mansonconstruction.com/what-we-do/fleet#Derrick Barges and Clamshell Dredges/827154

 

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1 hour ago, Windward said:

As a diver, Mr. Boomer has to live with the consequences of any self inflicted gaseous release while wearing a dive helmet.  

The one thing you cant take out of the enclosed atmosphere.  Which is why the space shuttles always smelled like boiled cabbage when they landed until they were cleaned.

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Used my limit of likes for the last 24 hours. Many thanks to all who donated.

It would be nice to see that $25K figure met. I set the end date for this GFM at 90 days .

Any amount would be appreciated as once he's healed up he's facing a staggered double hip replacement.

Mark has a tough road ahead this coming year, and a few of us including Kim would like to get him back out on the water. 

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1 hour ago, boomer said:

Used my limit of likes for the last 24 hours. Many thanks to all who donated.

It would be nice to see that $25K figure met. I set the end date for this GFM at 90 days .

Any amount would be appreciated as once he's healed up he's facing a staggered double hip replacement.

Mark has a tough road ahead this coming year, and a few of us including Kim would like to get him back out on the water. 

As the current owner of a 3 year old double hip replacement, I’d be surprised if they are willing to do it until some time after the virus. Hip infections of the prosthesis are a hell of a thing to get through. Believe me I know. A virus is less likely an infectious agent than a bacteria but a recovering or compromised immune is ripe for a secondary opportunistic bacterial infection.   .....it’s a very very bad thing. 

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10 minutes ago, Point Break said:

As the current owner of a 3 year old double hip replacement, I’d be surprised if they are willing to do it until some time after the virus. Hip infections of the prosthesis are a hell of a thing to get through. Believe me I know. A virus is less likely an infectious agent than a bacteria but a recovering or compromised immune is ripe for a secondary opportunistic bacterial infection.   .....it’s a very very bad thing. 

My wife lived without a hip joint for 5 months while they tried to cure a replacement joint gone septic.  Went from long-distance hiking and sailing to permanently needing a walker.  Her immune system had been ravaged by chemo so she was a ready and waiting target for bacteria.  

Any weakness from Covid has got to be resolved, from my purely non-professional view from standing on the (lucky, so far) medical sidelines.

 

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12 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

My wife lived without a hip joint for 5 months while they tried to cure a replacement joint gone septic.  Went from long-distance hiking and sailing to permanently needing a walker.  Her immune system had been ravaged by chemo so she was a ready and waiting target for bacteria.  

Any weakness from Covid has got to be resolved, from my purely non-professional view from standing on the (lucky, so far) medical sidelines.

 

I'm scared shitless from Covid and I'd really like to shoot the assholes not wearing a mask, but I won't.

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The University of Washington's Dr. Howard Chansky a Professor and Chair of the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, who's specialty  is hip replacements, who's also a specialist in bone and soft tissue tumors, volunteered to do both hip replacements several months ago. He won't proceed without making sure Mark is fully healed and any issues resolved.

https://orthop.washington.edu/faculty-profiles/howard-a-chansky-md.html

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3 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I'm scared shitless from Covid and I'd really like to shoot the assholes not wearing a mask, but I won't.

Butte that inclinatione ist badde as we sawe in "Do the ritte thinge" that in itselfe ist the probelme..........        :)

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9 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I'm scared shitless from Covid and I'd really like to shoot the assholes not wearing a mask, but I won't.

My wife's view is that if she gets Covid she will die.  And if I get Covid, she will get it.  From everything I read, and from what I see Hobot and others going through, she is very likely correct.  

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5 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Is he lookeng foire a bowman?

Hope set this up. Working 40+ years in healthcare, she knew exactly who she wanted to do the surgery.

During the past five years Mark has missed several windows of opportunity to get the replacement/s done.

So I got hold of Hope, and we set this up in such a way that Mark got signed up with healthcare, under the watchfull eye of Hope, with the plan, no matter what, Mark was going to get a hip replacement. Hope did the rest of the footwork, choosing the best surgeon in the area - who volunteered to do the surgery no charge - but with the cavet, it had to be in a teaching environment on the U of W.

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15 minutes ago, boomer said:

Hope set this up. Working 40+ years in healthcare, she knew exactly who she wanted to do the surgery.

During the past five years Mark has missed several windows of opportunity to get the replacement/s done.

So I got hold of Hope, and we set this up in such a way that Mark got signed up with healthcare, under the watchfull eye of Hope, with the plan, no matter what, Mark was going to get a hip replacement. Hope did the rest of the footwork, choosing the best surgeon in the area - who volunteered to do the surgery no charge - but with the cavet, it had to be in a teaching environment on the U of W.

Two takeaways from this, living in the USA:  Always go to a teaching hospital; if you work for said hospital, you will get the best doctors and care available .  I’m sure Hobot is getting the best of care, with Hope as his advocate.

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7 hours ago, Left Shift said:

My wife lived without a hip joint for 5 months while they tried to cure a replacement joint gone septic.  Went from long-distance hiking and sailing to permanently needing a walker.  Her immune system had been ravaged by chemo so she was a ready and waiting target for bacteria.  

Any weakness from Covid has got to be resolved, from my purely non-professional view from standing on the (lucky, so far) medical sidelines.

 

Yep, I’m 4 months into my infected hip prosthesis. We (my ortho Doc and I) elected a different surgery than the explant and spacer your wife had. That was discussed. If the current less difficult approach I had in December of open it up, pull it apart again, irrigate, debride, replace the “plastic” parts, close up with antibiotic beads and home with big followup antibiotics via a PICC line for 3 months (which I just finished) is not successful then I’ll be headed to your wife’s surgery next......maybe. There are a few other complications I won’t bore you with but yes an infected hip replacement is no fun.

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10 hours ago, boomer said:

No doubt about that ED!

It's not for everyone, and takes a different breed of cat to work long hours in the winter with the rain or snow coming down sideways. Piledriving 'Fishery Window' season in the salt waterways is from Aug 15 to February 15. Hobot and I sailed together and he worked in the trade for me at Manson, too.

A friction rig or friction crane is a land based lattice boom crane crawler or water based derrick barge or a friction crane crawler on a barge, that uses clutches and foot brakes for load control instead of a hydraulic system as with modern lattice boom cranes. Your very largest derrick barges all all friction lattice boom cranes. Friction cranes are no longer manufactured; however, many are still in use on job sites. Since these cranes are still in service and their operation is completely different than their modern counterpart, it is important for the accrediting agency as well as the construction company to train with a four year union program and a couple years of yard experience before demonstrating operator skills on the crane types they are expected to operate.

https://www.mansonconstruction.com/what-we-do/fleet#Derrick Barges and Clamshell Dredges/827154

 

Nice construction porn!  I've always liked that stuff since I was a kid, and I still stop at construction sights to rubberneck whenever possible.

I have a little crane collection.

 

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14 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

I'm scared shitless from Covid and I'd really like to shoot the assholes not wearing a mask, but I won't.

The biggest thing with this is you just don't know what it's going to do to you if you get it.  I caught it in mid-March after attending an open regatta.  At 54 I've been a careful "masker" through the whole thing.  I'm pretty good shape but was terrified.  My first test, a rapid test came back negative.  I found out 2 days later it was a failed test when I hauled my 6 yr old kid and myself to the Doctor for a PCR test.  Both positive.  It bothered my kid for 2 days and put me mostly out of commission for 10 days, but a full month on recovery, (assuming no unknown future issues come from this.  Again, what we DON'T know).  I got very lucky.  A younger guy in my workout group who is in much better shape than me, (like one of those MMA dudes) had it and it put him down for 3 months with the hospital stay and whole 9 yards.   My whole family is vaccinated and/or carrying some immunity right now but we still mask up when leaving the house and social distance.  This thing ain't over....

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I've seen many catch the virus and go through it without almost noticing (including my 88yo uncle) and I've seen a 49yo friend of a friend die in a month and a half.

My (uninformed) take is that is a bit of a lottery with genetics, previous health condition and amount of virus in your system being the most likely to win tickets.

Stay strong Hobbot!

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, RobbieB said:

The biggest thing with this is you just don't know what it's going to do to you if you get it.  I caught it in mid-March after attending an open regatta.  At 54 I've been a careful "masker" through the whole thing.  I'm pretty good shape but was terrified.  My first test, a rapid test came back negative.  I found out 2 days later it was a failed test when I hauled my 6 yr old kid and myself to the Doctor for a PCR test.  Both positive.  It bothered my kid for 2 days and put me mostly out of commission for 10 days, but a full month on recovery, (assuming no unknown future issues come from this.  Again, what we DON'T know).  I got very lucky.  A younger guy in my workout group who is in much better shape than me, (like one of those MMA dudes) had it and it put him down for 3 months with the hospital stay and whole 9 yards.   My whole family is vaccinated and/or carrying some immunity right now but we still mask up when leaving the house and social distance.  This thing ain't over....

Smart to keep masking up with the variants now spreading. My brother's family had it 3 months ago, well before us. They now have it again and are seriously ill. Starting to feel like this is never going to end. 

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27 minutes ago, LenP said:

Smart to keep masking up with the variants now spreading. My brother's family had it 3 months ago, well before us. They now have it again and are seriously ill. Starting to feel like this is never going to end. 

This is what scares me the most.  I have to wait about 45 more days before I can get the vaccine but you can bet your ass I'm getting it!

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2 minutes ago, RobbieB said:

This is what scares me the most.  I have to wait about 45 more days before I can get the vaccine but you can bet your ass I'm getting it!

That is interesting, the health dept here told us no need to wait for the vaccine. I am 3 weeks removed from first symptoms and scheduled for the 27th. As long as I am not still actively fighting the virus I want it as soon as possible. Did they say why they want you to wait? 

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40 minutes ago, LenP said:

That is interesting, the health dept here told us no need to wait for the vaccine. I am 3 weeks removed from first symptoms and scheduled for the 27th. As long as I am not still actively fighting the virus I want it as soon as possible. Did they say why they want you to wait? 

Same here. 10 days after no symptoms I got a shot. Michigan. 

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1 hour ago, LenP said:

That is interesting, the health dept here told us no need to wait for the vaccine. I am 3 weeks removed from first symptoms and scheduled for the 27th. As long as I am not still actively fighting the virus I want it as soon as possible. Did they say why they want you to wait? 

Actually my Dr's office said current CDC guidelines was to wait 90 days.  I'm planning to get in earlier at 45 days.  I have a friend who got her shot 30 days after having COVID and had a major set back.  So, I was thinking about splitting the difference and getting it around mid-May.

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4 hours ago, Mike in Seattle said:

Thanks, booms for that glimpse into your office, 

I spent most of one day in Bambi season (binocs across a canyon) watching a logging crew.

fascinating , yet scary to think about if things go south

Yes Mike - in my trade - Things can and do south in the blink of an eye, and I worked hard to ensure that accidents were minimized or didn't happen on jobs I supervised - and feel fortunate no one died under my watch.

I have seen men killed on other crews killed, crushed, heads taken off when a headache ball two-blocked and the cable sheered off and the ball took the guys head off right through the deck.

My #1 foreman who've I spoke of before here and I, had a new operator two-block a headache ball right above us as we rigged a heavy steel fabrication - four feet between us, both bent ove, making up the shackles for the rigging and the headache ball landed between us, less then two feet away from both our heads.

I did have a Labor Foreman who lost the toes and end of a foot in 1989 on the Hylebos Waterway Bridge demo and replacement, because he made the unsafe decision to clean the pile cap under the deck demolition of the concrete above him - he should have never been down there and knew it. It wasn't an enjoyable evening I spend in the hospital with him - after that I said never again. A Job Hazard Analysis was written up, for every step of every operation we did from start to finish including cleanup. If a worker perform any task on my jobs, they had to read and sign the JHA for that task.

EVERY morning started with a safety meeting, followed by a detailed step by step of the game plan, in order of every operation, for that day.  The do and don'ts were reviewed, and everyone always reminded to stay out of the bight - and keep digits and limps out of the bight. Daily the crew was reminded to use all their senses - sight, sound, smell and most of all gut instinct > when you know or feel something is dangerous or can go wrong > then stop, look, listen > turn around and observe what's causing your intuition alarms to be going off. When those intuition bells and alarms go off in your head, never second guess them 99.9% of the time your intuition is spot on.

I retired in the winter of 2007/2008 with my retirement papers sitting on my desk all spring at home living on my own dime. Late in the spring I awoke, and said, "I do believe it's time and will sign those papers and send them into the Trust."

Just as I was reviewing them before signing, the phone rang. It was Manson, and a deck engineer, a real go-getter, an operating engineers mechanic on my old rig had been crushed by the counterweight. A real go-getter in the yard, she had spent a year in the yard learning all the do's and don't's.

I knew exactly why it happened, when I was told what happened. She was trying to prove herself to the General Foreman, (Whom I knew, didn't like women in our trade). She put herself in a dangerous situation welding the handrail on the edge of a stairwell, that vibration had caused the welds to weaken. Wearing her hearing protection under her welding hood, she didn't pay attention to the derrick engine or note she was standing within the yellow ring and yellow lines of the stand clear zone. She didn't see the counterweight of the crane as it approached and then crushed her into the stairwell. The operator effected deeply by losing his deck hand, took a year off. The Super requested a transfer to a offshore job in Mexico.

I came back for four and a half more years till November of 2012, till just before the installation of the false work for the foundation of Seattle's Great Wheel. If your reading and feeling your intuition, you feel it right in the middle of your face under your nose. I had been feeling that for some time, because I was getting to old to be out there doing this business with my men and women.

Sure, I could have stayed in the safety of the office, doing paperwork, planning, interviews and the myriad of other duties. But I had always hired others for most the office work, other then approvals, meetings, and writing the dailies(job progress)reports. I stayed out in the field, not bird dogging my crew, but rather watching over my people, seeing to their safety and teaching them the tricks I had learned.

Eight and a half years later, I still miss it - you don't miss the work or the danger - you miss the people, working with them and seeing them go home after a properly orchestrated day.

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21 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

I give Scot shit, but he stepped up.  

he may have stepped up, but that's no reason not to give him shit :P

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6 hours ago, RobbieB said:

Actually my Dr's office said current CDC guidelines was to wait 90 days.  I'm planning to get in earlier at 45 days.  I have a friend who got her shot 30 days after having COVID and had a major set back.  So, I was thinking about splitting the difference and getting it around mid-May.

I believe the 90 days was because you are immune for 90 days as best they can tell and they wanted to get the most people vaccinated and immune as soon as possible. 

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6 hours ago, RobbieB said:

Actually my Dr's office said current CDC guidelines was to wait 90 days.  I'm planning to get in earlier at 45 days.  I have a friend who got her shot 30 days after having COVID and had a major set back.  So, I was thinking about splitting the difference and getting it around mid-May.

Your doc needs to read it again.  The document is a bit fuzzy.  I know NY, Mass and NH are saying as long as you don't have active symptoms and are "generally healthy" go get the vaccine.

 

NH explicitly told me 7 days after my wife tested positive and 3 days after I tested negative to get the vaccine if I could and breaking quartine to do so was acceptable.  I had access to a rapid test that I took 3 hours prior to leaving for the vaccine to be doubly sure.

That said I was vaccinated in the 1B group back in Feb even though I spent all of Feb in quartine as my wife and then my 6 month old son tested positive.  

I never tested positive even living at home with my wife(masked and positive) and a 6month old who was breastfeeding.

Pretty certain masks and social distancing work as we live in a 1500 sqft home.  

 

Currently both of us are done and most of our immedaite family so social gatherings are mask less if it is a small crowd.  

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5 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

he may have stepped up, but that's no reason not to give him shit :P

, won't be too much longer and we can all gather 'round, sing kumbaya,and kick Scott's ass about Hobot's  thread.

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Watching cases rise and hearing how my BIL and nephew are STILL battling it, more than 3 months out.  BIL has a brain fog that won't quit, jeopardizing his business.  Nephew had to go to a 1/2 schedule at school and was diagnosed with Post-exertional Malaise.  I'd never heard of it, but it seems like it has set up for him much like those who battle Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.  15 year old kid who can't get out of bed without becoming exhausted.

Wear the fucking mask and get the shot, when you can.

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With all this worrying about one human’s life, I’m ok with the idea of the thread being gone. There won’t be another like it if Hobot doesn’t resurrect it when he has the free time.

I’ll take the Hobot over  the thread any day!

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If he gets long haul COVID symptoms, I think doing the hips will become lower priority unless he has significant pain at rest or with minimal activity.  COVID recovery itself is very limiting on physical exertion when it hurts to breathe and your heart is doing crazy shit.  Hopefully he can avoid that, but it sounds like he's already been to hell and back.  

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13 hours ago, peragrin said:

Your doc needs to read it again.  The document is a bit fuzzy.  I know NY, Mass and NH are saying as long as you don't have active symptoms and are "generally healthy" go get the vaccine.

 

NH explicitly told me 7 days after my wife tested positive and 3 days after I tested negative to get the vaccine if I could and breaking quartine to do so was acceptable.  I had access to a rapid test that I took 3 hours prior to leaving for the vaccine to be doubly sure.

That said I was vaccinated in the 1B group back in Feb even though I spent all of Feb in quartine as my wife and then my 6 month old son tested positive.  

I never tested positive even living at home with my wife(masked and positive) and a 6month old who was breastfeeding.

Pretty certain masks and social distancing work as we live in a 1500 sqft home.  

 

Currently both of us are done and most of our immedaite family so social gatherings are mask less if it is a small crowd.  

Thanks- I'm getting signed up!

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7 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

If he gets long haul COVID symptoms, I think doing the hips will become lower priority unless he has significant pain at rest or with minimal activity.  COVID recovery itself is very limiting on physical exertion when it hurts to breathe and your heart is doing crazy shit.  Hopefully he can avoid that, but it sounds like he's already been to hell and back.  

Asked hope about that yesterday. Fortunately since beating the pneumonia and weened off the sedatives he hasn't had a problem breathing and doesn't need oxygen. However he can only speak low and quietly due to being intubated twice. The one thing he seems to be suffering from is - his short term memory isn't up to par yet. He also appears to be suffer from a malaise which is apparently common in about 30% of the COVID survivors, and manifests itself with a bit of brain fogginess. He's also been a bit cranky as he weened off the sedatives, but once again the Doc said this was common for being sedated that long. Hope told him about the GFM yesterday, but Hope said, "he didn't understand why the GFM was set up, and was surprised so many have donated." Other then that, he gets to try and eat solid foods today.

Once again, I can't thank everyone enough for their generosity for their donations. and yes the donations are much needed, no matter what or how Mark's brain fog is effecting him. Thanks again sailors, the donations are very much appreciated.

So if I don't answer right away, it's because I'll be driving. Off to my prosthetic guy to get the final fitting for my new compression shuttle lock sailing socket, because this suction socket is a PITA sailing, losing suction on every tack or piece of rough water. It will be a pleasure to go back to the compression shuttle lock socket. Also with the toe/ heel action triggering the bending or stiffening of the knee, I can also see why sailors used peg legs back in the day.

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1 minute ago, kimbottles said:

Boomer is one hell of a guy!

You and Bob speak highly of him, that's enough for me.

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A quick update for everyone, after talking with Hope this morning.

Mark is eating solid food as of yesterday. He has to really chew a lot before swallowing, because his throat is still sore from being intubated. He's getting along  well with Hope and the medical staff.

His hand restraints were removed, but only if he promised not to pull out tubes, which is why he had restraints. His feeding tube was removed this morning, because he got two meals down yesterday.

He will be moved out of ICU and up to the next floor soon - perhaps today or tomorrow. No word on how long till he's released - hopefully this week - I know I'd be wanting to get out of there, or plotting my escape.

We heard originally that he was going to another facility for physical and occupational therapy, but that changed. He will get to go home, and got to a close by physical & occupational therapist 2-3 days a week.

Hope said this morning, he talked with his daughters on the phone yesterday, and  he may call this here afternoon.

Hope also talked with his orthopedic surgeon yesterday for an approx date for his double hip replacement - probably not till July at the earliest, and only if fully recovered.

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23 minutes ago, boomer said:

A quick update for everyone, after talking with Hope this morning.

Mark is eating solid food as of yesterday. He has to really chew a lot before swallowing, because his throat is still sore from being intubated. He's getting along  well with Hope and the medical staff.

His hand restraints were removed, but only if he promised not to pull out tubes, which is why he had restraints. His feeding tube was removed this morning, because he got two meals down yesterday.

He will be moved out of ICU and up to the next floor soon - perhaps today or tomorrow. No word on how long till he's released - hopefully this week - I know I'd be wanting to get out of there, or plotting my escape.

We heard originally that he was going to another facility for physical and occupational therapy, but that changed. He will get to go home, and got to a close by physical & occupational therapist 2-3 days a week.

Hope said this morning, he talked with his daughters on the phone yesterday, and  he may call this here afternoon.

Hope also talked with his orthopedic surgeon yesterday for an approx date for his double hip replacement - probably not till July at the earliest, and only if fully recovered.

thanks

 

 

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27 minutes ago, boomer said:

A quick update for everyone, after talking with Hope this morning.

Mark is eating solid food as of yesterday. He has to really chew a lot before swallowing, because his throat is still sore from being intubated. He's getting along  well with Hope and the medical staff.

His hand restraints were removed, but only if he promised not to pull out tubes, which is why he had restraints. His feeding tube was removed this morning, because he got two meals down yesterday.

He will be moved out of ICU and up to the next floor soon - perhaps today or tomorrow. No word on how long till he's released - hopefully this week - I know I'd be wanting to get out of there, or plotting my escape.

We heard originally that he was going to another facility for physical and occupational therapy, but that changed. He will get to go home, and got to a close by physical & occupational therapist 2-3 days a week.

Hope said this morning, he talked with his daughters on the phone yesterday, and  he may call this here afternoon.

Hope also talked with his orthopedic surgeon yesterday for an approx date for his double hip replacement - probably not till July at the earliest, and only if fully recovered.

Thanks for the positive update.Maybe some light at the end of the tunnel.

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1 hour ago, boomer said:

A quick update for everyone, after talking with Hope this morning.

Mark is eating solid food as of yesterday. He has to really chew a lot before swallowing, because his throat is still sore from being intubated. He's getting along  well with Hope and the medical staff.

His hand restraints were removed, but only if he promised not to pull out tubes, which is why he had restraints. His feeding tube was removed this morning, because he got two meals down yesterday.

He will be moved out of ICU and up to the next floor soon - perhaps today or tomorrow. No word on how long till he's released - hopefully this week - I know I'd be wanting to get out of there, or plotting my escape.

We heard originally that he was going to another facility for physical and occupational therapy, but that changed. He will get to go home, and got to a close by physical & occupational therapist 2-3 days a week.

Hope said this morning, he talked with his daughters on the phone yesterday, and  he may call this here afternoon.

Hope also talked with his orthopedic surgeon yesterday for an approx date for his double hip replacement - probably not till July at the earliest, and only if fully recovered.

I may have missed it here, but think I read it elsewhere. Is the double hip due to RA? My daughter has had severe RA since childhood, is nearing the end of a pregnancy made no easier by that awful disease. 

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3 hours ago, boomer said:

A quick update for everyone, after talking with Hope this morning.

Mark is eating solid food as of yesterday. He has to really chew a lot before swallowing, because his throat is still sore from being intubated. He's getting along  well with Hope and the medical staff.

His hand restraints were removed, but only if he promised not to pull out tubes, which is why he had restraints. His feeding tube was removed this morning, because he got two meals down yesterday.

He will be moved out of ICU and up to the next floor soon - perhaps today or tomorrow. No word on how long till he's released - hopefully this week - I know I'd be wanting to get out of there, or plotting my escape.

We heard originally that he was going to another facility for physical and occupational therapy, but that changed. He will get to go home, and got to a close by physical & occupational therapist 2-3 days a week.

Hope said this morning, he talked with his daughters on the phone yesterday, and  he may call this here afternoon.

Hope also talked with his orthopedic surgeon yesterday for an approx date for his double hip replacement - probably not till July at the earliest, and only if fully recovered.

Thank you Boomer for this, and all your previous updates on the condition of Hobot.

It is hard to express the relief I feel for someone I have never ever met in my life, whose real name I had never even heard until just a few days ago. But despite that, over the last few years Hobot has provided me and many others with literally hours and hours of entertainment, education and enlightenment through his extraordinary collection of pictures that he shared with us.

When first the news came of the demise of the Random Picture thread it already felt like a heavy punch to the gut, but the subsequent news of his illness came as a straight right hook to the jaw...

Now it looks like the count hasn't quite yet reached 10, we can gather ourselves up off the floor and hopefully look forward to Hobot returning to us soon with more of his amazing pictures.

Of course Hobot means a lot more than that to Hope and all who are close to him and their relief is infinitely greater than mine, but I just wanted to express that, through his contribution to this site, he managed to impact people all across the globe, who are very happy he is on the mend!

 

 

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I may have missed it here, but think I read it elsewhere. Is the double hip due to RA? My daughter has had severe RA since childhood, is nearing the end of a pregnancy made no easier by that awful disease. 

Honestly I don't know which arthritis is the cause, osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

Cruisin - I'll make a point of asking specifically.

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4 hours ago, boomer said:

 ....

Great to hear! thanks again for all the updates!!!

 

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New leg, Boomer? Ak/bk c-flex knee?
 

Our a/k (above knee amputee) crew always lost his leg when he sweat and eventually stowed his leg below before we left the dock. A few times early on we were racing with new crew and his leg would fall off during a tack or gybe and the sheer look of horror on the newb’s face will never be forgotten!!!

Go the Hobot!!

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57 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

New leg, Boomer? Ak/bk c-flex knee?
 

Our a/k (above knee amputee) crew always lost his leg when he sweat and eventually stowed his leg below before we left the dock. A few times early on we were racing with new crew and his leg would fall off during a tack or gybe and the sheer look of horror on the newb’s face will never be forgotten!!!

Go the Hobot!!

Good!

A long time ago, in a galaxy far away...  Well it was Cowes, about 1975.  I was invited to do the bow on Prospect of Whitby, Arthur Slater's S&S 44.  Arthur had famously lost a leg when he overturned his Bentley in  a Le Mans race in the 30s. 

This race we had a crew of amputees from BLESMA, the British Limbless Ex-Servicemen's Association.  There were 12 of them, and with Arthur between them they mustered 15 legs and about as many wings.  Olympic sailor Andy Cassell was in charge.  He'd lost both legs to polio as a child, but was a top-class sailor and sailmaker.

I was the only 'whole' crewmember.  The clattering and banging through tacks was epic, as were the gales of laughter all round, and the monstrous drinking party at the RLYC afterwards.

Go Hobot!

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I think it’s fun going out with groups with “needs”. I was part of a group taking disabled people out for day trips and the sheer look of joy on the face of a blind girl as she steered into a fresh breeze feeling the wind on her face and knowing how to head up or down without being told will always stay in my memory.

Sadly, the group fell apart after the founder became completely handicapped in an auto accident and I moved away for a number of years. I’m going to have to start that up again, everyone needs to go sailing!!

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16 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

he managed to impact people all across the globe,

a friend I haven't yet met

 

Thanks, booms.

 

, by the way, getting some hardware changes,,

, so you can Bolt yer ass to the boat,,

 

_ that _  , sir is a very respectable bit of Badassery.

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Just talked with Mark for the first time. He's still in the ICU and won't get a regular room for a day or two. He's talking in a very quiet deep whisper due to being intubated. He wanted me to say thank you for him, he wanted to say more then thank you, actually. He can't wait to get back. He says he owes all of you. He has a whole folder he wants to get started with.

His fingers are still swelled and he lost much of his motor skills, which is why he's going through three weeks of physical therapy. Looks like he will be doing the best live physical therapy in the area in downtown Seattle. I know Mark hates being downtown, but knows it's the best place to go. He also lost his core strength.

Tonight is the first time he put his legs over the side of the bed, and swung them - which he felt was a major accomplishment - so that shows how far he has to go.

He's also still recovering from being in a induced coma. Having been there myself, it is a bit different then a dream, it feels real - but reading about it in hindsight, one of the effects is hallucinogenic. In Marks "dream" he was in Hawaii, and the things he saw, he feels are real. I know what he's talking about, in my "dream", I was in Japan, and it indeed seemed real, it still does at times - but I know it isn't - and that's where Mark needs to get to - accepting and knowing that endless dream wasn't real.

 

As for the query about my amputation, it's an above the knee amp, and explained in the  RIP Austin 72 1972-2020 thread.

Looking forward to going back to the compression shuttle lock socket, it had been rock solid for sailing, climbing and just being plane active.

The suction socket does have it's place for highly active amputees, designed for walking or running, but the losing suction when sitting on hard surfaces is a real big PITA. In Europe apparently suction sockets have been the big thing for above the knee amputees for several decades. It's the most cushiony suspension there is but with the drawbacks of losing suction, and a bit more requirements to walk then just stiffening one's butt cheeks. Even a vacuum assisted suction socket loses suction, sitting on hard surfaces. One must squeeze the buttt cheeks and also pull in with the thigh as well, and balance, especially with a subischial  socket that doesn't capture the ischial. The compression socket with the shuttle/pin lock is an ischial socket, which captures the ischial bone of the hip, I'm returning to is rock solid for an active and sailing amputee. I'll eventually have both, a suction socket subischial when hiking, walking or running, then remove the suction socket and don a shuttle/pin lock ischial socket for sitting, sailing and swimming.

I'll use the Endolite Linx System Knee with the shuttle/pin lock for now - till next March when I get the waterproof Ottobock Genium X3 socket, which will become a shuttle/pin lock socket for sailing and swimming. The Genium X3 was designed for Special Forces including Seal amputees whom wish to remain on active duty.

Grant a Falklands War veteran and veteran of 40 years of various prosthesis explains the Linx system.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b6OSg8MVMdM

The Genium X3

 

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Just now, boomer said:

Mark also said, "Just tell them, "I'm alive."

Best news 

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Thanks for the update Boomer, and thanks for the information on your leg prosthesis.  Very interesting.

Tell Hobot we are pulling for him and pushing and whatever else is necessary to support his recovery.  And greetings and good thoughts to Hope as well.

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The piss tube. That is the only tube in him, which should be removed in a day or two - perhaps today.

Hobot did say, he's looking forward to getting this tube removed, and taking a real piss.- just to make sure everything is working down there.

I can relate to where he's coming from on that. I had to have two stents placed from my groin, one in the main artery in my upper thigh, and the artery where it splits to a two way under my heart. What I found out after the fact, when they come in down their, moving things around, it effects the blood supply to the penis. Though I could wake with a piss hard on, maintaining the erection proved difficult. Also the ejaculation wasn't nothing to write home about initially.

It's taken two years and eight months of regular exercise, by various methods by my wife and myself to finally be blowing an almost full load. I was told I'd probably never be able to get hard or blow a full load again - so I feel fortunate in that respect - thank God - because the majority who lose that ability, never get it back. I had a telephone conference with my Doc, a few weeks ago, about getting the blue bill, to maintain longer erections like days of yore. Also eating a shredded raw beet salad with equal part of fresh pineapple and a partial root of ginger fine shredded into the mix has worked wonders for opening the blood veins just getting a woody, with the side benefit of pissing like an 18 year old again, because the beets help open the prostate.

So when they were debated clamping off veins supplying Mark's stomach ulcer, and were discussing coming in through the groin or above. I was hoping and praying they'd come in from above, which thankfully they did.

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8 hours ago, boomer said:

Mark also said, "Just tell them, "I'm alive."

That made me smile.  There is a lot of good stuff in that short statement 

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6 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Thanks for the update Boomer, and thanks for the information on your leg prosthesis.  Very interesting.

Tell Hobot we are pulling for him and pushing and whatever else is necessary to support his recovery.  And greetings and good thoughts to Hope as well.

My pleasure and quite alright.

I kept telling him more then a few times last night, how most everyone both here and abroad has come through for him. He's very grateful for the global support.

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36 minutes ago, boomer said:

The piss tube. That is the only tube in him, which should be removed in a day or two - perhaps today.

Hobot did say, he's looking forward to getting this tube removed, and taking a real piss.- just to make sure everything is working down there.

I can relate to where he's coming from on that. I had to have two stents placed from my groin, one in the main artery in my upper thigh, and the artery where it splits to a two way under my heart. What I found out after the fact, when they come in down their, moving things around, it effects the blood supply to the penis. Though I could wake with a piss hard on, maintaining the erection proved difficult. Also the ejaculation wasn't nothing to write home about initially.

It's taken two years and eight months of regular exercise, by various methods by my wife and myself to finally be blowing an almost full load. I was told I'd probably never be able to get hard or blow a full load again - so I feel fortunate in that respect - thank God - because the majority who lose that ability, never get it back. I had a telephone conference with my Doc, a few weeks ago, about getting the blue bill, to maintain longer erections like days of yore. Also eating a shredded raw beet salad with equal part of fresh pineapple and a partial root of ginger fine shredded into the mix has worked wonders for opening the blood veins just getting a woody, with the side benefit of pissing like an 18 year old again, because the beets help open the prostate.

So when they were debated clamping off veins supplying Mark's stomach ulcer, and were discussing coming in through the groin or above. I was hoping and praying they'd come in from above, which thankfully they did.

It's stories like this that make me consider looking after myself better....

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16 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

It's stories like this that make me consider looking after myself better....

More wisdom than you know. It’s a bitch when the warranty runs out. We all said “I’ll deal with it when I get old”. Then all the sudden....there you are dealing with it thinking.......”I should have been a little more attentive to taking care of myself”.

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On 4/14/2021 at 11:49 PM, Point Break said:

Yep, I’m 4 months into my infected hip prosthesis. We (my ortho Doc and I) elected a different surgery than the explant and spacer your wife had. That was discussed. If the current less difficult approach I had in December of open it up, pull it apart again, irrigate, debride, replace the “plastic” parts, close up with antibiotic beads and home with big followup antibiotics via a PICC line for 3 months (which I just finished) is not successful then I’ll be headed to your wife’s surgery next......maybe. There are a few other complications I won’t bore you with but yes an infected hip replacement is no fun.

Had 4 hips done..  well, 1 3x and the 4th they took a piece of my tibia and jammed it into my right hip for blood flow..  Anywhoo, 1st was a birmingham hip around 2000, then I was dumb and fell off boat and broke my femur(same hip as the birmingham replacement, so that was prob why everything failed in the first place) So they patched me together.  Wellmmm, that did not work(my left leg was shorter and I was in constant pain, limping etc..) so Weeeee back to full replacement once the femur healed.  It was a fun couple yrs, but I am basically back to normal..  No infections thank god..    

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Even when you do everything right - you never know the outcome. 46 years, my wife ensured, I ate over the top healthy whole foods,vegetables, fruits daily with little crap - always took home prepared foods to work - or made the menu aboard rigs the same as at home, with me often cooking for the crew, if the deck engineer wasn't a good cook - my only vice was corn chips and homemade salsa, and ice cream once every month or two. Fastfoods maybe a coupIe times a year.

I also worked out regularly with weights, jumped rope, walked or ran 7-8 miles a day, as well as rode mountain bikes. Windsurfed from my mid 30s on, 3-4 days a week for ten+ years. Usually not over two alcoholic beverages a day. Quit drinking any alcohol a month and a half after retiring eight and a half years ago, till my doctor told me to drink one alcoholic beverage a day last year, to keep my blood platelet count down. When you quit alcohol for seven and a half years, you don't have a taste for it, and have to remind yourself to drink, which my wife always does - still hard to drink alcohol, so maybe one adult beverage every two to three days and increase my water intake on those days I don't drink alcohol by drinking 36 ounces or more of water on top of the 48-60 ozs I drink a day.

 What I've done to reduce my arterial plaque and  clean the pipes is drinking 6 ozs of Pomegranate for four years, and taking Niacin with a 10mg satin for three years. A diet eliminating the full American breakfast, and replace with oatmeal, w/walnuts, cassia cinnamon, w/banana. Lentils or beans for lunch, sardine snacks, salmon three days a week, nine vegetable salads with avocado, and everything on the cholesterol reducing food list and the blood thinning foods list. Wake up with a seven minute workout, several more workouts a day, staircimbing all three floors x6, 1/2 hr high intensity workout with a heavy medicine ball, and dumbells workouts throughout the day. With several dumbells by both desks and work benchs.

 

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This thread has become super educational. While getting old sucks keeping your head in the ground isn't the best thing to do.  Thanks Boomer.

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My late dad, a great surgeon and a good sailor, once said, "By the time a man's 50, he's either his own doctor or a fool."

What he meant by this, I think, was that you should know what your body likes, and what it doesn't like.  You should know how to avoid injury or infection, and correctly diagnose it when you have one.  You should know how much sleep you need, and what sort.  You should know your alcohol tolerance, and keep below it.  You should know what foods are healthy for you, and what foods might be troublesome.  And so on...

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31 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

My late dad, a great surgeon and a good sailor, once said, "By the time a man's 50, he's either his own doctor or a fool."

What he meant by this, I think, was that you should know what your body likes, and what it doesn't like.  You should know how to avoid injury or infection, and correctly diagnose it when you have one.  You should know how much sleep you need, and what sort.  You should know your alcohol tolerance, and keep below it.  You should know what foods are healthy for you, and what foods might be troublesome.  And so on...

Then why does my wife still think all my choices are poor, my taste and opinions questionable, and any ideas I may have will be bad.   

***  Nevermind... I think I know the answer.

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4 hours ago, P_Wop said:

My late dad, a great surgeon and a good sailor, once said, "By the time a man's 50, he's either his own doctor or a fool."

What he meant by this, I think, was that you should know what your body likes, and what it doesn't like.  You should know how to avoid injury or infection, and correctly diagnose it when you have one.  You should know how much sleep you need, and what sort.  You should know your alcohol tolerance, and keep below it.  You should know what foods are healthy for you, and what foods might be troublesome.  And so on...

At the least.....which is my approach....I view myself as a partner in my health care and the MD is the expert consultant who I want to answer my questions in detail. I’m not a MD or even close, but with a rudimentary understanding of physiology and some science there is enough information available that I can ask coherent questions of my expert. Then I decide. I care enough about my health to put that much effort into it. To behave otherwise is to really short change yourself. 

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Go the Hobot. I wouldn't rush into a rehab facility with a bunch of other people. Mrs. HB's father had been in the hospital with COPD related issues, and was moved to rehab, caught COVID from a roommate and did not make it due to the complications from his underlying issues. Hopefully, Hobot has fewer :)

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Thanks for the info on the leg and I’ll check out the Austin thread for the backstory. I spent some time vacuum forming bioelastic materials for amputees with our crew. The correct interview and measurements are essential to determine what the client needs, as you well know. 
 

You rock!

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9 hours ago, P_Wop said:

My late dad, a great surgeon and a good sailor, once said, "By the time a man's 50, he's either his own doctor or a fool."

What he meant by this, I think, was that you should know what your body likes, and what it doesn't like.  You should know how to avoid injury or infection, and correctly diagnose it when you have one.  You should know how much sleep you need, and what sort.  You should know your alcohol tolerance, and keep below it.  You should know what foods are healthy for you, and what foods might be troublesome.  And so on...

What did he have to say about transferring that knowledge to action?

Because without the threat of imminent death, I seemed to talk more, move less....

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