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Time to replace cordless tool


Which Cordless tools to get?  

38 members have voted

  1. 1. Which Cordless tools to get?

    • Bosch
      3
    • Mikita
      9
    • DeWalt
      7
    • Ryobi
      4
    • Milwaukee
      14
    • Porter Cable
      1
    • Ridgid
      0
    • Skil
      0


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I need to get a new cordless drill/driver. I also want a cordless jigsaw.
With all the expandable lines of tools, what would you DIYers get. This is for personal use and not any professional shit.

Currently I have an older DeWalt 14.4V Drill/driver and while it works great the battery is hard to find and costs $60 bucks.

I've checked a few sites, Mikita and Bosch are up there but damn they are expensive. 

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I bought a "last year" 18v bosch package at lowes sometime, Drill/Driver and Impact Driver for $100 with 1 battery and a charger. This years model is something like 2x that. 

Since then I've bought another battery and the mini-vac which works great on the boat. That impact driver was amazing on getting hundreds of old fittings off the boat with few breaking and being a total pain in the arse.

Surf the discount sites.

But, it you just need a light duty one, my old makita 12v has lasted for household chores for years. 

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I own both the Bosch (2) and the Makita (1). The Bosch keyless chuck crapped out on one of them and both Bosch drills have more runout than I'd like. The Makita has been great and Makita has the broadest range of 18V tools (including lawn and garden) that you'll find. I have their lawnmower, string trimmer, blower, and grinder as well. With that, I have enough batteries that I can buy their bare tools , which are generally pretty affordable. 

All the brands have lower tier models that you want to avoid so whatever brand you pick, buy their top shelf stuff.

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I went with Porter Cable 20v and have been happy with it. I have 2 drills, 1/2" impact, 1/4" impact, angle grinder. The angle grinder is the handiest tool I have ever owned. You can put on a steel grinding wheel, cut off wheel, or Roloc 4" grinding disc. After market batteries are available for less money.

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16 minutes ago, El Borracho said:

Do never buy any Ryobi product that has moving parts. 

ahh, the throwaways. I actually have one ryobi tool. The angle grinder. I think it's like 30 bucks. I buy one every season, put the cutting blade on it, and set it with the "oh shit mast-down" tools. Just swap out the battery before each offshore. Remember kids, nitronic is a bitch to cut, but your turnbuckles are likely bronze.

 

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I have over 40 Makita 18v LXT cordless tools and as many batteries, some over 8 years old.  They are used every day in a hostile factory environment by numerous people building boats, up to now not one battery has failed, one grinder died, so I have moved to brushless grinders. I wouldn’t buy any other cordless tool.

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1 hour ago, Meat Wad said:

Currently I have an older DeWalt 14.4V Drill/driver and while it works great the battery is hard to find and costs $60 bucks.

DeWalt 18V, hade same issues with batterey, whe n I wente to replaice it the guye solde me an adaptere with to 20V batteriese.  Workes greate!          :)

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I like my Ryobis - but I admittedly use them relatively sparingly. Except for a hammer drill I beat the crap out of during two hurricanes and a sawzall that I'm using to wack pepper trees on my property.  Both are doing very well. 

Buuuuuuutt, any recommendations for an electric chain saw?  Need to take down some bigger trees.

 

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1 hour ago, El Borracho said:

Do never buy any Ryobi product that has moving parts. 

I had a Ryobi offset printing press, it was one of the most reliable presses I've ever used. And I have a 2-stroke Ryobi chainsaw, the old gal is reliable, starts on the second pull, really even torque.

But I also had a Ryobi two-stroke weed trimmer, that one was a POS.

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14 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

I like my Ryobis - but I admittedly use them relatively sparingly. Except for a hammer drill I beat the crap out of during two hurricanes and a sawzall that I'm using to wack pepper trees on my property.  Both are doing very well. 

Buuuuuuutt, any recommendations for an electric chain saw?  Need to take down some bigger trees.

 

Why electric? Those things unnerve me, the second I hit the trigger, it was full torque, instead of the gentle torque-up of the two-strokes. The one I tried didn't seem too safe to me compared to the old-fashioned two=strokes. Point Break, any opinion on electric chainsaws?

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I was gonna vote for a Makita, but couldn't so I picked Mikita instead..

I've found the Chineese knock off batteries to be just as good as the branded ones but at 1/5th the cost. Plus I like the battery capacity options and depending on the use I'll either use the lightest 2 Ah for doing overhead work screwing in drywall and such to the 6 Ah for the circular saw building a shed.  

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15 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

I like my Ryobis - but I admittedly use them relatively sparingly. Except for a hammer drill I beat the crap out of during two hurricanes and a sawzall that I'm using to wack pepper trees on my property.  Both are doing very well. 

Buuuuuuutt, any recommendations for an electric chain saw?  Need to take down some bigger trees.

 

I wouldn't go with a battery on an electric chainsaw. Corded or 2-stroke is the choice. I've got a Poulan corded that's been dead nuts reliable. Just keep the chain sharp and they'll handle anything their bar length allows, though slower than a comparable gas model. The chains cost about $10 each, so you can just replace rather than resharpen if your time is worth more than that.

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re the original Q, not sure why the Ryobi hate. At the bottom of the pacific in NZ we don't have the choice elsewhere, but I bought a Ryobi 18V drill and driver 2 pack about 7 years ago, following a recomend from a builder, built a pretty substantial 30sqm deck with them from new, and have been used and abused fairly hard DIY since. Had to replace the charging unit ( no moving parts there!), but otherwise still going strong, fingers crossed. And now I'm hooked into their batteries the skins ( tool only, no battery) are so cheap I've got a weedeater ( thats a bit shit), angle drill, and fein copy renno vibro saw thingy, am pretty happy with them all. Their 240V tools are cheap and cheerful, not been as impressed with them. 

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Have many Ryobi 18v tools. Have had first set for 7 years. Drill is stating to show wear. so replaced with the brushless Hammer drill. Works great. 

Also have the 12v Milwaukee driver  because its so small, easy to get into tight spots and fits well into the toolbox.  Battery lasts for ever. 

I have about 14 different Ryobi tools 4 batts. All have lasted and run great, but I also like the Milwaukee stuff as well, but its much more pricey.

So for Ryobi 

Drill ++

Brushless Hammer Drill +++ (unstoppable) 

Sawzall + (A bit weak)

Circular Saw ++

Multi tool ++

Caulk gun ++

Drain cleaner ++

Angle drill + (speed control difficult)

Impact ++

Rotozip ++

Flashlight - (Came with the set)

Angled Finish nailer +++

 

 

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12 minutes ago, mikewof said:

I had a Ryobi offset printing press, it was one of the most reliable presses I've ever used. And I have a 2-stroke Ryobi chainsaw, the old gal is reliable, starts on the second pull, really even torque.

But I also had a Ryobi two-stroke weed trimmer, that one was a POS.

My Ryobi chainsaw lasted one day. I’d ignored a warning from a friend. How bad can it be? I do serious hard work. Wore the drive cog shit out in one day. Mad, I tossed it running into the burning slash pile. It burned okay. Bought a Stihl that has not paused in 3 years. That is how bad Ryobi is. 

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For the price, Ryobi is really hard to beat. 

For quality: Milwaukee. 

I have quite a few of the 18v Ryobi tools. They're not bad. Only fried one in the course of 10years or so. Oscillating tool, burned it up after hours of non-stop use, only burned it up after burning up my Makita corded oscillating tool. (Which was a terrible tool. ) Killed a few batteries. I use most of them often and hard. The modern Ryobi stuff is better than my old (NiCad days) Dewalt and Makita cordless stuff that's long been resigned to the trash. I still have the blue angle grinder, use it weekly. Used it today to cut some unistrut. 

I have quite a few 12v Milwaukee tools. The driver is superb because as mentioned upthread, it's quite small but plenty of power. Drill matches that, and the mini-sawsall while not very powerful is super handy because it's small. That said, I burnt up 4 (countem, 4) 12v Milwaukee rotary tools (dremel) in one day. Decided they were a POS the first time, but kept returning burnt out ones to HD until they ran out. So even a well-regarded line can have a POS design in it. 

If I had endless funds, 18v Milwaukee would replace the Ryobi stuff. But it all works, does what it's supposed to do, so it's not worth it to me to change. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Meat Wad said:

I need to get a new cordless drill/driver. I also want a cordless jigsaw.
With all the expandable lines of tools, what would you DIYers get. This is for personal use and not any professional shit.

Currently I have an older DeWalt 14.4V Drill/driver and while it works great the battery is hard to find and costs $60 bucks.

I've checked a few sites, Mikita and Bosch are up there but damn they are expensive. 

have fun

https://www.cpooutlets.com/combo-kits

 

i have a    Milwaukee 2494-22 M12 Brushed Lithium-Ion 3/8 in. Cordless Drill Driver/ 1/4 in. Impact Driver Combo Kit (1.5 Ah)

works great,  no issues,   use them a lot..  12v so weight is lower, don't feel a need for 18v

this looks like a good deal

https://www.cpooutlets.com/bosch-clpk22-120-12v-lithium-ion-3-8-in.-drill-driver-and-impact-driver-combo-kit/bshnclpk22-120.html

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Like you, I have DeWalts.  I have two drills, a corded jigsaw...etc.  The two drills are about...18yo and they still work great.  I even smoked them a couple of times and they keep on ticking.  Now they're my go to alpine ski mounting drills, one to drill the holes and the other drives the screws.  No problems.  Hard to not want more DeWalts.  Oh...and I have two or three random orbitals for sanding boats.

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I like the 12v and 18v Milwaukee tools. They seem to hold up well. The batteries are expensive so shop around. My favorite is their hammer drill which combined with a 22” carbide bit we use for placing rebar stakes in rocky and sometimes frozen ground. The impacts have been reliable and the 1/2” is a beast. The 12v cordless multi tool has been extremely handy as well as the 18v circular saw.

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2 hours ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

I like my Ryobis - but I admittedly use them relatively sparingly. Except for a hammer drill I beat the crap out of during two hurricanes and a sawzall that I'm using to wack pepper trees on my property.  Both are doing very well. 

Buuuuuuutt, any recommendations for an electric chain saw?  Need to take down some bigger trees.

 

I purchased a 110v corded big box store cheapie. Except leaking bar oil it has served admirably taking down some trees and carving split rail fences to size.

 

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For most of my stuff Roybi is great as the 18 volts battery’s our made in 2 to 9 Amps at reasonable prices and they last long term

For more demanding work I have Dewalt Flexvolt 60 right angle drill that is the class leader by far 

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3 hours ago, Meat Wad said:

I need to get a new cordless drill/driver. I also want a cordless jigsaw.
With all the expandable lines of tools, what would you DIYers get. This is for personal use and not any professional shit.

Currently I have an older DeWalt 14.4V Drill/driver and while it works great the battery is hard to find and costs $60 bucks.

I've checked a few sites, Mikita and Bosch are up there but damn they are expensive. 

So, When I went to my MIL quickly last year in april I forgot my drills so now I have 3 12 v Mkitas w 3 batteries..  Cool HU??  Ahyhoo,,,  the older 2 1 impact and one normal built 2 decks over 2 years so I would trust those, especially the impact driver with my life.  Reg Mkitas are wonderful as well.  Bit the bullet on the 18 or whatever big battery grinder and skillsaw for xmas.  As said above..  Once you get the 18v batteries, the tools are damn cheap.  Grinder has already saved time and $$ on a few projects that would have required the big extendo cord.  18v sawsall would replace my chainsaw and 2x corded sawsalls etc etc etc...

In escense

Bite the bullet.....   Everything from mowers to skillsaws are going to be some combo of 18V batteries.......  Just look at the stuff they are using on Building Alaska and that shit.  18V mkita mostly across multiple shows...

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2 hours ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

I like my Ryobis - but I admittedly use them relatively sparingly. Except for a hammer drill I beat the crap out of during two hurricanes and a sawzall that I'm using to wack pepper trees on my property.  Both are doing very well. 

Buuuuuuutt, any recommendations for an electric chain saw?  Need to take down some bigger trees.

 

Got the cheapie electric Milwaukee from lowes a couple weeks ago after a storm..  60 bucks I think.  took down 2 largish aspens and parts of a splitrail swimmingly.  If you are going to be within extendo cord range you should be fine.  As said above, just buy a new chain if it is dull.....There aint much to break.....   

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3 hours ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

I like my Ryobis - but I admittedly use them relatively sparingly. Except for a hammer drill I beat the crap out of during two hurricanes and a sawzall that I'm using to wack pepper trees on my property.  Both are doing very well. 

Buuuuuuutt, any recommendations for an electric chain saw?  Need to take down some bigger trees.

 

Electric chainsaw for bigger trees?

 You have a death wish, or want an insurance claim? Electric chain saws are for doing little limbs, or bucking up brush before adding to the burn pile..... (The brush, not the chain saw.)

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Dunno which brand is best, plenty of comparison reviews on the web.  We have a leaf blower that uses same battery as hedge clipper.  

I think it best to have multiple tools that use same battery, so you always have a fully charged back-up, when it dies mid-task...

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15 minutes ago, shaggy said:

Got the cheapie electric Milwaukee from lowes a couple weeks ago after a storm..  60 bucks I think.  took down 2 largish aspens and parts of a splitrail swimmingly.  If you are going to be within extendo cord range you should be fine.  As said above, just buy a new chain if it is dull.....There aint much to break.....   

Do these saws have special chains that can't be sharpened, or do you guys not know how to sharpen one?

Buy a new chain if it's dull, indeed!

FWIW I've a shit-ton of 18V Makita battery tools and they've been trouble free.

FKT

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2 hours ago, gptyk said:

For the price, Ryobi is really hard to beat. 

For quality: Milwaukee. 

I have quite a few of the 18v Ryobi tools. They're not bad. Only fried one in the course of 10years or so. Oscillating tool, burned it up after hours of non-stop use, only burned it up after burning up my Makita corded oscillating tool. (Which was a terrible tool. ) Killed a few batteries. I use most of them often and hard. The modern Ryobi stuff is better than my old (NiCad days) Dewalt and Makita cordless stuff that's long been resigned to the trash. I still have the blue angle grinder, use it weekly. Used it today to cut some unistrut. 

I have quite a few 12v Milwaukee tools. The driver is superb because as mentioned upthread, it's quite small but plenty of power. Drill matches that, and the mini-sawsall while not very powerful is super handy because it's small. That said, I burnt up 4 (countem, 4) 12v Milwaukee rotary tools (dremel) in one day. Decided they were a POS the first time, but kept returning burnt out ones to HD until they ran out. So even a well-regarded line can have a POS design in it. 

If I had endless funds, 18v Milwaukee would replace the Ryobi stuff. But it all works, does what it's supposed to do, so it's not worth it to me to change. 

 

 

Tried really hard to burn up my Ryobi oscillating tool cutting a hole in my 50yo doug fir siding last year. Went through 4 blades and it overheated and shut down 3 times but got through and still works just fine.  (Plus drained 2 large batteries) 

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34 minutes ago, Rum Runner said:

I have a DeWalt 20v cordless driver that came with 2 batteries. After about 2 years one battery died. Not too pleased here.

Check and see if you just need to reset the battery. We had a Ryobi battery shit the bed, required breaking the "don't break this" seal, and hot wiring it to a car battery charger for some amount of seconds. Turns out if the battery is totally flat, it can't charge, as it has to have enough juice to tell the charger that "I'm here, send power"

The jump-start gives it that juice.

 

Watch youtube for your brand.

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50 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Do these saws have special chains that can't be sharpened, or do you guys not know how to sharpen one?

Buy a new chain if it's dull, indeed!

FWIW I've a shit-ton of 18V Makita battery tools and they've been trouble free.

FKT

I don't do a replace rather than repair very often but if the chain is worn anyway and $10 will get you a perfectly sharp replacement with no wear, it sometimes makes sense.

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1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

Electric chainsaw for bigger trees?

 You have a death wish, or want an insurance claim? Electric chain saws are for doing little limbs, or bucking up brush before adding to the burn pile..... (The brush, not the chain saw.)

They seem to have enough torque, but I noticed that when you hit the trigger, the torque is right on top of you, not much time to correct for less-than-optimal footing. I can't imagine it would be all that safe if you hit something hard in the tree, either. At least with the gas, the engine's torque is variable with the load. The electric seems not to care, it's full-blast regardless.

Electric chain saws scare me, but I'm a total pussy with the chainsaw. I wear chaps, screen mask, good gloves, even if I'm just pulling down some limbs. So it might just be me.

Anyway ... I baby my little 18-inch Ryobi. I sharpen her chain by hand, clean her and oil her after each use, run the engine dry to protect from the ethanol. I got it after a snowmobile friend in Japan had the same one and used it to build a little cabin. That little Ryobi 2-stroke was near his only tool. He cut the logs, tapered them, notched them. Mine runs like a sewing machine, it's so smooth, Japanese design I guess. I got the 18-inch bar because I feel a little safer with a bit shorter bar when it kicks back.

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I still have an original 7.2 v Makita right angle drill. All the 7 v batts died long ago, I now run the 9.6v batts in it. It's the smallest right angle unit ever built, perfect for grinding/sanding tight spaces. I've made a lot of fiberglass dust with it, still going strong.  The next gen Makita's I had were still running fine when I upgraded to 18v lithium brushless units. The old one's went to charity. So if pressed for a quality judgement I'd say Makita is overbuilt for the DIY/occasional user. But I love 'em.  And with batt sizing from 2 to 5 A/Hrs you can control tool weight to the job

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4 hours ago, warbird said:

I purchased a 110v corded big box store cheapie. Except leaking bar oil it has served admirably taking down some trees and carving split rail fences to size.

 

I posted  this only because this is an ocassional use tool.

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2 hours ago, tommays said:

 

Project Farm Does great reviews 

I have to say, I'm a bit impressed with the DeWAlt, and the Makita, but I still wouldn't trust them on a felling job. Cutting through 9 shitty pieces of spruce/Hemlock/Fir shouldn't take near as long as it did with any of those saws (I'd guess 10 seconds max if you have a sharp saw, and know how to use it). The "Honey locust" was a joke.

 In any case, I don't want to go find a battery charger when I have a widow maker hanging in the air when I can just fill the tank up with mix again, and continue on. I've been cutting trees/wood for nearly 50 years, and yes I used an electric for bucking, and mill ends about 20 years ago. (Makita) But those were hard wired, not battery.

Aside from the pain in the ass of pull starting, and getting bar oil all over yourself because you didn't tighten the screw cap on correctly,(Which can happen w/ electric too) I'll take a small gas powered saw over electric any day.

 Put any of those saws up against a Stihl 072, or 098, and a 3' dia. Maple tree, and we'll talk. (Even a 038 with a 22" bar would do).

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9 hours ago, Meat Wad said:

I need to get a new cordless drill/driver. I also want a cordless jigsaw.
With all the expandable lines of tools, what would you DIYers get. This is for personal use and not any professional shit.

Currently I have an older DeWalt 14.4V Drill/driver and while it works great the battery is hard to find and costs $60 bucks.

I've checked a few sites, Mikita and Bosch are up there but damn they are expensive. 

FESTOOL 

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Pro-Milwaukee DeWalt or Mikita. Bosch makes a good laser level. Home or incidental-cheap Ryobi drill for non everyday will do most small jobs. They’ve got a half decent hammer drill.

Chainsaw or landscaping I notice pros seem to predominantly use Stihl or Husqvarna.

Another company for gardening stuff is E Go. I grabbed an E Go 56V weed trimmer as a slightly cheaper alternative to the Milwaukee version. Seems pretty good for light duty around the house. I think 1 battery lasts 50 minutes. It’s light as the shafts are carbon fibre. 

 

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11 hours ago, Meat Wad said:

I need to get a new cordless drill/driver. I also want a cordless jigsaw.
With all the expandable lines of tools, what would you DIYers get. This is for personal use and not any professional shit.

Currently I have an older DeWalt 14.4V Drill/driver and while it works great the battery is hard to find and costs $60 bucks.

I've checked a few sites, Mikita and Bosch are up there but damn they are expensive. 

Makita...

https://www.makitatools.com/

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I use Makita 18v. There are other good tools mentioned (DeWalt, Milwaukee, Festool). What I like about Makita is their 18v batteries 2 to 6 ah choice and when a tool needs more power doubling to two batteries for 36v. I have not had to chase new tool / battery increased voltage ranges in order to add tools to my selection.  They were solid tools forty years ago when others were not.

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I don't understand the popularity of cordless tools.

My friend has a cordless electric impact wrench, it's heavy, he has to set up the charger, the balance of the tool just sucks. My pneumatic impact wrench is lightweight, dead nuts money reliable, air hose is barely noticeable, I don't need to worry about using it in wet areas, or getting electrocuted, the balance is awesome and maintenance is a breeze. I have air tools that are thirty years old that still work the way they did on the first day that I bought them.

If I work close to the shop, air is the best, if I work far from the shop, gasoline is the best. This intermediate thing with these electric cordless tools seems like a compromise across categories.

I do have a corded electric angle grinder that works well, and I don't need to worry about running down my air compressor. But most tools don't need that level of extended run time like an angle grinder or a random orbital sander.

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Hahaha!...good luck with those electric chainsaws when the power's out for a week after the hurricane...for work I use a mixture of tools...recently purchased the Makita worm drive, uses two 18v batteries at a time, but couldn't pass it up at $250 when they threw in a 2nd pack of two batteries, absolutely fantastic saw, no problems cutting 5/18' 2x treated stair stringers the other day on one set of batteries...for impacts/drills/sawzall/grinder/multi-tool and other constant use tools I have the 20v Porter Cables which are fine, but honestly don't really think there is much difference between them and other comparable brands...for light duty/occasional use tools I have a set of 18v Ryobis 'cause the naked tools are so cheap, got a 1/2" impact for tire changes, redheads, J-bolts etc.which is great, also a small leaf blower for job cleanup, drywall zip tool, and their battery operated caulk gun which is the bomb when using NP-1, and the Bluetooth radio...couple years back when we moved outta the woods I got the 40v Ryobi yard tools because I was just sick and tired of the whole ethanol in fuel bullshit...backpack blower, and string trimmer/hedge trimmer/polesaw switch out combo on one powerhead...really happy with how they are holding up 2 years in...I did however keep my old Stihl Farmboss 290 for storm work/firewood...love that thing...

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I have Ryobi...i'm a "home handyman"  not a pro, hell i'm not even a "talented amateur" and in that context I have no real comlaints.  They make alot of tools to fit on their batteries.  I bought a drill, small circ saw, light, detail sander, vacuum kit when they were blue and 12v.  I still have and use the drill and swaw, the vac was always meh and the incandecent light bulb went.  the worst about the 12v was the batteries, the packs wore out quite quickly.  made the transfer to their 18v batts and they work great.  I now have a small flashlight and a "hybrid" work light, recirocating saw, jig saw, angle grinder (corded maybe).  The old blue detail sander may be giving up the ghost BUT that's probably because in the last few weeks  i set it  on a bench, running, and it fell 3 feet on to the concrete!

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12 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I have to say, I'm a bit impressed with the DeWAlt, and the Makita, but I still wouldn't trust them on a felling job. Cutting through 9 shitty pieces of spruce/Hemlock/Fir shouldn't take near as long as it did with any of those saws (I'd guess 10 seconds max if you have a sharp saw, and know how to use it). The "Honey locust" was a joke.

 In any case, I don't want to go find a battery charger when I have a widow maker hanging in the air when I can just fill the tank up with mix again, and continue on. I've been cutting trees/wood for nearly 50 years, and yes I used an electric for bucking, and mill ends about 20 years ago. (Makita) But those were hard wired, not battery.

Aside from the pain in the ass of pull starting, and getting bar oil all over yourself because you didn't tighten the screw cap on correctly,(Which can happen w/ electric too) I'll take a small gas powered saw over electric any day.

 Put any of those saws up against a Stihl 072, or 098, and a 3' dia. Maple tree, and we'll talk. (Even a 038 with a 22" bar would do).

Agree 100%, but for occasional use, where a sawsall can handle most jobs, the 18v stuff is awesome.  Especially if you can pair the batteries with numerous other lawn implements.   It's a no brainer.  I have a cheepo gas chainsaw.  Not worth the pita of storing gas, storing implement for a long time and well, maintenance for occasional use.  Would buy a stihl in a hartbeat if I had widomakers on a regular basis.  The average joe can get away with a corded $65 chainsaw and a 18 v sawsall.   Splurge for the 18v chainsaw if ya want.  

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1 hour ago, Grabbler said:

Hahaha!...good luck with those electric chainsaws when the power's out for a week after the hurricane...for work I use a mixture of tools...recently purchased the Makita worm drive, uses two 18v batteries at a time, but couldn't pass it up at $250 when they threw in a 2nd pack of two batteries, absolutely fantastic saw, no problems cutting 5/18' 2x treated stair stringers the other day on one set of batteries...for impacts/drills/sawzall/grinder/multi-tool and other constant use tools I have the 20v Porter Cables which are fine, but honestly don't really think there is much difference between them and other comparable brands...for light duty/occasional use tools I have a set of 18v Ryobis 'cause the naked tools are so cheap, got a 1/2" impact for tire changes, redheads, J-bolts etc.which is great, also a small leaf blower for job cleanup, drywall zip tool, and their battery operated caulk gun which is the bomb when using NP-1, and the Bluetooth radio...couple years back when we moved outta the woods I got the 40v Ryobi yard tools because I was just sick and tired of the whole ethanol in fuel bullshit...backpack blower, and string trimmer/hedge trimmer/polesaw switch out combo on one powerhead...really happy with how they are holding up 2 years in...I did however keep my old Stihl Farmboss 290 for storm work/firewood...love that thing...

That's what the Honda eu2000 suitcase generator is for. 

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7 hours ago, mikewof said:

I don't understand the popularity of cordless tools.

My friend has a cordless electric impact wrench, it's heavy, he has to set up the charger, the balance of the tool just sucks. My pneumatic impact wrench is lightweight, dead nuts money reliable, air hose is barely noticeable, I don't need to worry about using it in wet areas, or getting electrocuted, the balance is awesome and maintenance is a breeze. I have air tools that are thirty years old that still work the way they did on the first day that I bought them.

If I work close to the shop, air is the best, if I work far from the shop, gasoline is the best. This intermediate thing with these electric cordless tools seems like a compromise across categories.

I do have a corded electric angle grinder that works well, and I don't need to worry about running down my air compressor. But most tools don't need that level of extended run time like an angle grinder or a random orbital sander.

The setup/maintenance and just the sheer stupidity of a home diy guy going pneumatic is well a woofsie..  basically you..  For you to recommend a Pneumatic setup for a guy that is just looking for a replacement of his 12 v drill shows how out of touch with reality you actually are.  Pneumatic is great if you have a shop, hoses, generator/tank the actual tools and then you are limited to the hose length or you are dragging a fucking genset around in the pickumup truck you have to buy to get your shit to the place you need to work.  You are really really not getting the original post.......  

 

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6 hours ago, Orion Jim said:

Festool is the bestool.....pricey but worth every penny.....

Yeah Festool is great but for the casual user unless you have money to burn and/or want to impress people its's not a good use of your money.   I like DeWalt.

And this guy is the place to go for tool reviews. 

BOLTR= Boring Old Lame Tool Review 

 

 

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8 hours ago, mikewof said:

I don't understand the popularity of cordless tools.

My friend has a cordless electric impact wrench, it's heavy, he has to set up the charger, the balance of the tool just sucks. My pneumatic impact wrench is lightweight, dead nuts money reliable, air hose is barely noticeable, I don't need to worry about using it in wet areas, or getting electrocuted, the balance is awesome and maintenance is a breeze. I have air tools that are thirty years old that still work the way they did on the first day that I bought them.

If I work close to the shop, air is the best, if I work far from the shop, gasoline is the best. This intermediate thing with these electric cordless tools seems like a compromise across categories.

I do have a corded electric angle grinder that works well, and I don't need to worry about running down my air compressor. But most tools don't need that level of extended run time like an angle grinder or a random orbital sander.

You obviously haven't tried the latest generation of brushless tools, 18V/5Ah lithium batteries, and fast chargers. A hand drill, twist or impact, will go an hour at least. My string trimmer will go an hour. My angle grinder will go 30 minutes. A sawzall will go 30 minutes. Same with a circ saw. My lawnmower will go 30 minutes in heavy grass on a single charge with two batteries installed, an hour with all four that it came with. My Makita fast charger will charge two batteries from flat to full in 45 minutes so there's no downtime at all. No cords or air lines to fuck around with and no fumes, no old gas, and no annual maintenance to deal with.

Is it perfect for everything? Not yet. Rule of thumb, the more sawdust or chips it makes, the less suited it is. Router? No problem. Bladed saw? No problem. Chainsaw? Not there yet. 

Still, it's past the tipping point. If you go to most jobsites these days and even inside mechanical shops with available air and AC, it's battery tools as far as the eye can see. 

 

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12 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Yeah Festool is great but for the casual user unless you have money to burn and/or want to impress people its's not a good use of your money.   I like DeWalt.

And this guy is the place to go for tool reviews. 

BOLTR= Boring Old Lame Tool Review 

 

 

This is exactly what I'm talking about with staying away from the lower lines intended for casual home use, regardless of brand. Buy the stuff meant for tradespeople and you'll be okay. 

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13 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

FESTOOL 

In my search's before posting this thread, I saw several tool brands I had not seen, Festool, Avid, Kimo.  Hitachi which I know as a brand but had not seen their tools.

I should have mentioned I would like to have something that is not too heavy. Which kind of narrows it down.

All good comments here, Thanks

 

11 hours ago, VWAP said:

Capture.0.jpeg

What a great Idea. quick hot drinks on an overnight race without firing up the camp stove. This would have been great on the SC27 or O30.

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9 minutes ago, IStream said:

500ml * 80C rise = 40,000 calories = 167 Watt-seconds = 46.5 Wh

18V * 6Ah = 108Ah

2 cups of coffee = 1 full battery

Not very efficient. But a great idea

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43 minutes ago, IStream said:

500ml * 80C rise = 40,000 calories = 167 Watt-seconds = 46.5 Wh

18V * 6Ah = 108Ah

2 cups of coffee = 1 full battery

They will make as many things they can that use the tool batteries to get more of your money!  DeWalt dildoes are probably next, until Festool comes out with a superior one in the classic green and cream Festool colors for about 30 times the price of the DeWalt one!

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2 hours ago, IStream said:

 

Still, it's past the tipping point. If you go to most jobsites these days and even inside mechanical shops with available air and AC, it's battery tools as far as the eye can see. 

 

Also, a basic pro crew set up   will have several double battery chargers constantly on the go. Swapping a battery takes 15 seconds so no real downtime. Any homeowner should at least have an extra battery or more if embarking on a larger project...

I’m interested to watch the transition of landscape stuff from gas to electric for pros. I noticed the landscape crew at my club, though predominantly gas are slowly adopting some EGo stuff. I asked one kid how he liked it and he said it was great...ask a kid in 10 years and he might not even know  gas powered trimmer/mowers/clippers ever even existed...who knows... 

For my own home needs, 56v battery powered landscape stuff seems like a no brainer at this point(even though I still have a couple of electric chord powered hedge clippers that just keep on keepin on!!)

 

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1 hour ago, fufkin said:

Also, a basic pro crew set up   will have several double battery chargers constantly on the go. Swapping a battery takes 15 seconds so no real downtime. Any homeowner should at least have an extra battery or more if embarking on a larger project...

I’m interested to watch the transition of landscape stuff from gas to electric for pros. I noticed the landscape crew at my club, though predominantly gas are slowly adopting some EGo stuff. I asked one kid how he liked it and he said it was great...ask a kid in 10 years and he might not even know  gas powered trimmer/mowers/clippers ever even existed...who knows... 

For my own home needs, 56v battery powered landscape stuff seems like a no brainer at this point(even though I still have a couple of electric chord powered hedge clippers that just keep on keepin on!!)

 

I'm old.  I just can't wrap my head around a battery powered tool being as powerful as one with a cord.  I used to do rough carpentry work years ago for a living and toward the end the battery tools were coming out, 9. 2hqatever volts.  I've owned Makita and in recent tears DeWalt and I'm a believer in the batteries, and I never liked tripping on cords, but I still can't shake the old prejudice.   56V lithium batteries in a power tool!   Yikes.

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4 hours ago, shaggy said:

The setup/maintenance and just the sheer stupidity of a home diy guy going pneumatic is well a woofsie..  basically you..  For you to recommend a Pneumatic setup for a guy that is just looking for a replacement of his 12 v drill shows how out of touch with reality you actually are.  Pneumatic is great if you have a shop, hoses, generator/tank the actual tools and then you are limited to the hose length or you are dragging a fucking genset around in the pickumup truck you have to buy to get your shit to the place you need to work.  You are really really not getting the original post....... 

 

You just nailed it in your post without even realizing it. When a "home diy guy" buys tools, he or she might as well get the cheapest tools they can find. However if they aspire to keep a tool for a decade or three because they don't want to waste their money, then they buy pro-grade tools like Stihl, Festool, Snap-on, Unitec, etc., as Lioness, Orion and iStream mention. Professional-grade tools ARE for the "home diy guy" who does work somewhat better than the average Sunday tinkerer.

Not ALL tools, but the ones that the "diy guy" expects to use to show pride of workmanship.

So to your post ... people who spend an inordinate amount of time behind computers and televisions see batteries and cordless as the main options. But they are often the wrong options. It depends on the job!

When I'm in the shop doing riveting there is no way in hell that I'm going to use a cordless rivet gun, or even a corded rivet gun, when my pneumatic rivet gun is light, and powerful enough to pull stainless steel rivets in one or two pulls. If I'm cutting through 1/2-inch plate tool steel, there is no way that I'm going to use a cordless grinder, it wouldn't have the power or longevity to do much work, a pneumatic or corded grinder is the right tool for the job. When I'm running nails, why would I use a cordless driver when a powder-actuated driver is far more reliable and powerful? When I clear brush and trees out in Clear Creek, why would I go out there with a a genset, an extension cord and an electric chainsaw, if my trusty little 2-stroke is ready and eager to do the work?

A big part of life is choosing the right tool for the job. Cordless is often terrific. I have a few cordless drills, and a cordless angle grinder for small stuff. But cordless is often the wrong tool for the job, it's often a compromise. In your case, I assume that most of your home DIY work is wandering around your house hanging up mirrors, in which case, a little cordless driver is the right tool for the job.

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My Flexvolt is such a beast and blows away the old stuff especially with the two speed gearbox and it keeps you safe with the electronic clutch 

I gotten hurt so many times with old tools like the Milwaukee wrist breaker drills with no saftey in the design if it’s even possible no one seems to put them in 

A6C25359-CDB9-4587-90EC-80078AFFF91B.jpeg

94564D79-FA36-45A2-877A-086C67AE2AAD.jpeg

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49 minutes ago, tommays said:

My Flexvolt is such a beast and blows away the old stuff especially with the two speed gearbox and it keeps you safe with the electronic clutch 

I gotten hurt so many times with old tools like the Milwaukee wrist breaker drills with no saftey in the design if it’s even possible no one seems to put them in 

A6C25359-CDB9-4587-90EC-80078AFFF91B.jpeg

94564D79-FA36-45A2-877A-086C67AE2AAD.jpeg

Damn!

I've got a nice corded 1/2" chuck Hitachi but holy crap.

And yes, the wife couldn't find the little 12v Makita one day, so grabbed the hitachi, and proceeded to tweak her wrist. I caught hell for that. I put a warning label on it now.

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Damn!

I've got a nice corded 1/2" chuck Hitachi but holy crap.

And yes, the wife couldn't find the little 12v Makita one day, so grabbed the hitachi, and proceeded to tweak her wrist. I caught hell for that. I put a warning label on it now

If you look carefully you will see the winch adapter in the Dewalt and as it was for the Sailboat it was easy to fit in the budget 

And compared to a winchmate it’s was a great price but possibly not as much Torque

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Damn!  I've got a nice corded 1/2" chuck Hitachi but holy crap.

And yes, the wife couldn't find the little 12v Makita one day, so grabbed the hitachi, and proceeded to tweak her wrist. I caught hell for that. I put a warning label on it now.

If she wanttes to sue, I wille respersentte herre.........             :)

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buy 1 tool and a second battery and search eBay for bare tools without batteries to fill out your needs

 

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Does it make any real difference? Aren’t they all made in the same 3 or 4 factories in China?

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5 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

I'm old.  I just can't wrap my head around a battery powered tool being as powerful as one with a cord.  I used to do rough carpentry work years ago for a living and toward the end the battery tools were coming out, 9. 2hqatever volts.  I've owned Makita and in recent tears DeWalt and I'm a believer in the batteries, and I never liked tripping on cords, but I still can't shake the old prejudice.   56V lithium batteries in a power tool!   Yikes.

I know...56v is hard to believe but that’s what it says... and it’s a pretty big honkin battery compared to the 18v batteries.

I think once it becomes a table saw or something  it’s time to plug in. For any drills or even a sawzall it’s battery...for a nail gun it’s pneumatic. Chainsaw...gas. A boatright friend of mine has everything pneumatic but then again he easily  has over 100k or more in tools.

But back to the Op s question. For a basic drill these days the better brands make some smaller ones that are a bit lighter. I’ve used  smaller more manoeuvrable models  in both Dewalt and Milwaukee brands that were great and others have mentioned the Makita that can interchange a lighter battery.

As an aside, no matter how they’re powered, in my opinion, leaf blowers louder than a certain decibel level should be outlawed. 

 

 

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8 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

I'm old.  I just can't wrap my head around a battery powered tool being as powerful as one with a cord.  I used to do rough carpentry work years ago for a living and toward the end the battery tools were coming out, 9. 2hqatever volts.  I've owned Makita and in recent tears DeWalt and I'm a believer in the batteries, and I never liked tripping on cords, but I still can't shake the old prejudice.   56V lithium batteries in a power tool!   Yikes.

The Makita ones aren't IME and I've got a lot.

160mm circular saw, a 25 year old 240V one will eat the 18V brushless one for lunch. Ditto angle grinders and die grinders. Makita in both 240V and 18V.

The convenience of not having to plug in is fantastic but for serious sustained work I still use the corded tools.

FKT

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On 3/25/2021 at 9:54 AM, Meat Wad said:

I need to get a new cordless drill/driver. I also want a cordless jigsaw.
With all the expandable lines of tools, what would you DIYers get. This is for personal use and not any professional shit.

Currently I have an older DeWalt 14.4V Drill/driver and while it works great the battery is hard to find and costs $60 bucks.

I've checked a few sites, Mikita and Bosch are up there but damn they are expensive. 

I am heavily invested in the Makita battery infrastructure and have a stupid inventory of their tools (what's the joke?  When I die, I hope my wife doesn't sell my tools for what I told her I paid for them?!?).  I have absolutely no complaints about any of the tools, but if I were doing it over, I'd go Milwaukee and have toolboxes full of red.  My subjective opinion is that the red tools are just a bit better quality than the sets I have.  Most of my corded stationary machines are yellow, and I'm really happy with them.  I've not been as happy with Bosch power tools as I hoped to be (I've owned both corded and cordless Bosch), and the consumer class stuff hasn't made my short list.  I'm not a professional, but do want a tool to exceed my unreasonably optimistic expectations of service life and capabilities!

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On 3/26/2021 at 4:02 AM, Orion Jim said:

Festool is the bestool.....pricey but worth every penny.....

I've got all their sanders, a CT26 and Domino 500.  Yep, awesome tools but sometimes the prices they charge can't be justified against other brands. 

A few years ago I bought their 55 track saw but ended up returning it.  In its place, I bought a Dewalt track saw for half the money.  Very little difference in performance.  Dewalt's tracks have two usable sides, Festool - one.  They are just aluminum extrusions yet Festool tracks are almost twice the price.  Stuff like this has kept me away from buying more Festools.  But I love their sanders.  I'm just getting to know the Domino but so far it beats the shit out of my Dewalt biscuit jointer.

On the cordless tools, Festool is still operating on the 18v level.  All my cordless tools but one are Dewalt and they don't quit.  Dewalt operates on 20v and 60v now.  2 volts may not seem like much but I can feel the difference between the Dewalt 18v and 20v drills I own.  Festool needs to up their game on their cordless tools.

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 I do this stuff for  a living. Get this question regularly. For almost any DIYer a battery drill and driver makes sense. But if you use the other tools less than five days a week, corded tools are the way to go. When you've gone through many generations of these battery setups you realize the batteries have a limited life span that is much shorter than the tool itself and it costs as much as the bare tool. Using them shortens their life but not much more than not using them. In other words, they are going to become obsolete, worn out or die from lack of use just about as fast. If your are going to use them multiple times a month but not every day, don't buy cheap ones but don't buy top. Milwaukee, DeWalt or Makita would be my choice. 

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12 minutes ago, The Big D said:

 Milwaukee, DeWalt or Makita would be my choice. 

 

That's what most of the mechanics buy at the jet engine plant, where I manage the MRO machine parts....

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11 hours ago, Que said:

I am heavily invested in the Makita battery infrastructure and have a stupid inventory of their tools (what's the joke?  When I die, I hope my wife doesn't sell my tools for what I told her I paid for them?!?).  I have absolutely no complaints about any of the tools, but if I were doing it over, I'd go Milwaukee and have toolboxes full of red.  My subjective opinion is that the red tools are just a bit better quality than the sets I have.  Most of my corded stationary machines are yellow, and I'm really happy with them.  I've not been as happy with Bosch power tools as I hoped to be (I've owned both corded and cordless Bosch), and the consumer class stuff hasn't made my short list.  I'm not a professional, but do want a tool to exceed my unreasonably optimistic expectations of service life and capabilities!

I agree with all of this, except that Makita has a great lineup of 18V garden tools that Milwaukee doesn't have. That's what tipped me over to Makita. 

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14 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

That's what most of the mechanics buy at the jet engine plant, where I manage the MRO machine parts....

When I put together commuter train cars at the local GE plant in the mid 1970s we had Milwaukee power tools.  They were well built.  

I was having a bad night and out of frustration I threw a Milwaukee hand drill as hard as I could onto the floor of the car which was 3/4" ply with a metal facing.  I cracked the chuck clean off of the drill, I think the shaft was 1/2" high quality American tool steel.  I took the 2 pieces with the broken bit still in the chuck to the tool crib and slammed on the counter.  The tool crib guy kind of gave me a funny look when he saw the drill and chuck and then he must have seen my eyes.  He took the broken drill and came back with a new one without a word.  The impact left a pretty good gouge in the metal facing of the car floor, and into the wood below.    

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On 3/25/2021 at 2:19 PM, Mrleft8 said:

Electric chainsaw for bigger trees?

Electric chain saws are a thing? Says the Canadian from land of big trees...

 

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12 hours ago, IStream said:

I agree with all of this, except that Makita has a great lineup of 18V garden tools that Milwaukee doesn't have. That's what tipped me over to Makita. 

Garden tools should make 2-stroke smoke!  I have quite a collection of garden tools.

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8 hours ago, IStream said:

Very occasionally and even then, he's not as funny as he thinks he is.

I'm a big fan of the "healing bench" and "Focus you fuck".  

I often find him funny and he knows a lot of shit, even if he stumbles now and then.

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9 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

I'm a big fan of the "healing bench" and "Focus you fuck".  

I often find him funny and he knows a lot of shit, even if he stumbles now and then.

Don't get me wrong, I do like his "BOLTR" videos but they're getting rarer and I find that he often lets his pro-German bias cloud his reviews of German brands. 

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