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Need grilled leg of lamb recipe


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If it isn't butterflied, butterfly it (Or have the butcher do it.) Marinate  it over night in Olive oil good dry red wine with copious amounts of rosemary, fresh black pepper, and thyme (In the refrigerator). Just before you put it on a blazing hot charcoal grill sprinkle a little sea salt on it.Put the lid on the grill. depending on how thick it is cook for about 5 minutes. Then return it to the marinade while the charcoal gets back up to blazing hot. Then do the same thing for the second side, but only for about 3-4 minutes. Remove the top, and dump the remaining marinade on the lamb. let it flare up a bit. test the lamb with your finger. It should have about the same amount of firmness as your palm under your little finger. Remove the lamb and let it rest for about 5 minutes before carving. It should be crispy and charred on the outside, and juicy and medium rare/rare on the inside. serve with oven roasted new potatoes in salt, and steamed asparagus.

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10 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

If it isn't butterflied, butterfly it (Or have the butcher do it.) Marinate  it over night in Olive oil good dry red wine with copious amounts of rosemary, fresh black pepper, and thyme (In the refrigerator). Just before you put it on a blazing hot charcoal grill sprinkle a little sea salt on it.Put the lid on the grill. depending on how thick it is cook for about 5 minutes. Then return it to the marinade while the charcoal gets back up to blazing hot. Then do the same thing for the second side, but only for about 3-4 minutes. Remove the top, and dump the remaining marinade on the lamb. let it flare up a bit. test the lamb with your finger. It should have about the same amount of firmness as your palm under your little finger. Remove the lamb and let it rest for about 5 minutes before carving. It should be crispy and charred on the outside, and juicy and medium rare/rare on the inside. serve with oven roasted new potatoes in salt, and steamed asparagus.

Damn.  Gong to my parents this weekend but I’m nervous about pulling that off first try.  Will stick to the  basic garlic/rosemary/Dijon/evo marinated rack of lamb

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4 hours ago, Fakenews said:

Damn.  Gong to my parents this weekend but I’m nervous about pulling that off first try.  Will stick to the  basic garlic/rosemary/Dijon/evo marinated rack of lamb

Don't use garlic (maybe just a tiny bit minced really fine) No Mustard. These flavors over power lamb. My mother used to just use red wine, lots of finely chopped mint, and rosemary, and Evoo. It was very good, but I found the mint to be a bit much. Thinking back to childhood trips to the Pindus Mountains in Greece, I remembered the red wine, Olive oil, Thyme and Rosemary flavor of the roadside souvlaki stands. In the USA the souvlaki is usually much more heavily flavored, using garlic powder, and cumin, as well as sugar. But the subtle flavor of basic red wine, olive oil, black pepper, rosemary and thyme is just exquisite.

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Take leg of lamb.

Grill it.

Seriously, there's no need to gild the lilly. Trim excess fat, salt and pepper heavily, cook low and slow over indirect heat until 145F or higher, depending on your taste.

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5 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Don't use garlic (maybe just a tiny bit minced really fine) No Mustard. These flavors over power lamb. My mother used to just use red wine, lots of finely chopped mint, and rosemary, and Evoo. It was very good, but I found the mint to be a bit much. Thinking back to childhood trips to the Pindus Mountains in Greece, I remembered the red wine, Olive oil, Thyme and Rosemary flavor of the roadside souvlaki stands. In the USA the souvlaki is usually much more heavily flavored, using garlic powder, and cumin, as well as sugar. But the subtle flavor of basic red wine, olive oil, black pepper, rosemary and thyme is just exquisite.

I’d agree with you on a lamb shoulder or leg but the garlic and mustard work well with the fat IMO.  I’m just not a great griller.  I will try your marinade suggestion and do t in the oven but I won’t get that char...

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1 minute ago, Fakenews said:

I’d agree with you on a lamb shoulder or leg but the garlic and mustard work well with the fat IMO.  I’m just not a great griller.  I will try your marinade suggestion and do t in the oven but I won’t get that char...

Use the broiler. You'll get the char, but not the charcoal flavor, which is fine.

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9 minutes ago, IStream said:

Take leg of lamb.

Grill it.

Seriously, there's no need to gild the lilly. Trim excess fat, salt and pepper heavily, cook low and slow over indirect heat until 145F or higher, depending on your taste.

Low and slow is great for pork, and beef, but it'll turn lamb into shoe leather. There's generally not enough fat in lamb to render in to the muscle tissue unless you're rotissering a whole lamb, and even then, parts will be scorched dry, and parts flabby with jelly fat.

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6 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Low and slow is great for pork, and beef, but it'll turn lamb into shoe leather. There's generally not enough fat in lamb to render in to the muscle tissue unless you're rotissering a whole lamb, and even then, parts will be scorched dry, and parts flabby with jelly fat.

It's been working for my Argentine father in law for 30+ years. 

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5 minutes ago, IStream said:

It's been working for my Argentine father in law for 30+ years. 

Oh, well Argentine lamb is different than American lamb. Much fattier, and let's face it, they move slower, so the meat is more tender anyway.....

But like I said, a whole lamb cooked over the fire is different, whether it's Roti, or  Asador.

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15 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Oh, well Argentine lamb is different than American lamb. Much fattier, and let's face it, they move slower, so the meat is more tender anyway.....

But like I said, a whole lamb cooked over the fire is different, whether it's Roti, or  Asador.

Look at the label next time...most of the lamb you buy in U.S.  grocery stores comes from Australia/New Zealand...

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If you are gripped about doing this the first time, by far the most critical thing is oven temp and internal meat temp. I love medium rare but some are squeamish about lamb. Use an oven thermometer and a meat thermometer to keep track of internal meat temp. The external thermometer with a wire to probe works fantastic for $20

Also I agree with having it butterflied. The bone really complicates it.

https://www.amazon.com/ThermoPro-TP-16-Thermometer-Stainless-Standard/dp/B017613C3C/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&gclid=CjwKCAjw3pWDBhB3EiwAV1c5rOfA4rtFZISYWrD2Nj0u_vKuPPtA9H2LYEq1N7IDJpwB0sheJqIAzhoCHzwQAvD_BwE&hvadid=409926289126&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9004662&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=b&hvrand=4358433879345927146&hvtargid=kwd-775417158390&hydadcr=28545_12005666&keywords=food%2Fmeat+thermometer&qid=1617305462&refinements=p_89%3AThermoPro&rnid=2528832011&s=home-garden&sr=1-3

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One trick I use is to cut some slits into the meat with a paring knife and insert some slivers of garlic into the leg. This spreads the garlic flavor throughout the whole piece of meat.

While some think it is easier to use boneless legs, I prefer having the bone in for roasting. I think it adds better flavor.

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So I have some ideas. I e usually done my lamb med style. Lemon evoo mint rosemary garlic s&p marinate for a day and grill.  But want to try different. Had the leg deboned today and it’s good lamb from a farm near me.. it doesn’t have too much fat so not really a low and slow cut of meat but still needs to stay tender so basting is necessary. 
 

perhaps keeping it simple with salt pepper and lemon/oil baste is the way to go...I have another day t think about it. 

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9 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

If it isn't butterflied, butterfly it (Or have the butcher do it.) Marinate  it over night in Olive oil good dry red wine with copious amounts of rosemary, fresh black pepper, and thyme (In the refrigerator). Just before you put it on a blazing hot charcoal grill sprinkle a little sea salt on it.Put the lid on the grill. depending on how thick it is cook for about 5 minutes. Then return it to the marinade while the charcoal gets back up to blazing hot. Then do the same thing for the second side, but only for about 3-4 minutes. Remove the top, and dump the remaining marinade on the lamb. let it flare up a bit. test the lamb with your finger. It should have about the same amount of firmness as your palm under your little finger. Remove the lamb and let it rest for about 5 minutes before carving. It should be crispy and charred on the outside, and juicy and medium rare/rare on the inside. serve with oven roasted new potatoes in salt, and steamed asparagus.

this is what I do but I also add fresh mint to the marinade

you need to cook it enough, I have found if its too rare its tougher than if its medium rare

I go the raita, homemade pita bread, fresh tomatos and cucumber, tahini, and chile paste route and then serve with tabouleh salad

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6 hours ago, Grabbler said:

Look at the label next time...most of the lamb you buy in U.S.  grocery stores comes from Australia/New Zealand...

Not the lamb I buy. Only US lamb. I used to get lamb from my neighbor, but here it generally comes from Colorado. Oz/Enzed lamb is reliably tough.

 Of course there's the difference between cuts. Shoulder, shank, etc. does benefit from low slow stewing Like a tazshine, flavored with cumin, cardamom, coriander, ginger, and sumac, or za-atar. served with couscous, and cucumber with a yogurt sauce with paprika and a little red pepper. But grilled chops, or butterflied leg, it needs to be cooked hot and fast. (Just my humble opinion.)

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Some good stuff here. I am going to do an old stand-by with a boneless leg. Trim excess fat from lamb - helps get rid of strong flavor. Marinate overnight in:

Soy sauce, Red wine, smashed garlic cloves, bruised rosemary, chopped fresh mint, fresh ground pepper

Grill, basing and turning once or twice until done to taste. We like medium rare.

Happy Easter!

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16 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Some good stuff here. I am going to do an old stand-by with a boneless leg. Trim excess fat from lamb - helps get rid of strong flavor. Marinate overnight in:

Soy sauce, Red wine, smashed garlic cloves, bruised rosemary, chopped fresh mint, fresh ground pepper

Grill, basing and turning once or twice until done to taste. We like medium rare.

Happy Easter!

Go easy on the soy sauce. That's a strong, salty marinade for lamb. I know some people like garlic on lamb. I'm not a fan of that. Had seared "rib" (really they were loin) chops tonight. A little sea salt, some freshly ground black pepper, herbs de Provence, and olive oil. Served with steamed asparagus, and white rice with lime zest and butter.

All good. Except now I need to get more asparagus.

 One of the great culinary experiences of my life occurred in Germany. It was early mid May, and we'd flown over to visit friends that we'd met on Tobago.  My wife worked for an airline, so that was no problem, but I think I had $200 in my checking acct. and no jobs in the offing. Well..... No work, why not travel?

 When we got to Dusseldorf, we were picked up by our friends, and whisked off to the far countryside, maybe 4 hours north/north east.

 After a day of jet lag, and basically catching up, we went to the family "estate" of one of our friends. It was an asparagus farm. Maybe 300 years old or more. They don't eat green asparagus there (Green is for cows to eat!). Only white. The only white asparagus I'd ever seen, not in a can, cost more than my electric bill per pound fresh in the up scale markets back home. But they decided we needed 7 Lbs. of asparagus, and some veal for dinner. I figured 7 Lbs. of asparagus would last a week or so. Some of the asparaguses at the farm were as big around as my fore arm. "This is for soup, the roots, maybe 50 years old or more." A woman running the pre WW1 conveyor belt that sorted and washed the stalks  told me in stuttered english.

 Nope they cooked it all up that night, and served it like pasta.

 My god! They were sublimely delicious! Served with wiener schnitzel, and a good California red (German red wine sux! they said)...

 

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On 4/2/2021 at 5:23 AM, IStream said:

Take leg of lamb.

Grill it.

Seriously, there's no need to gild the lilly. Trim excess fat, salt and pepper heavily, cook low and slow over indirect heat until 145F or higher, depending on your taste.

forget the grill. in fact forget the leg and use shoulder.  salt olive oil Lemon rind, garlic, red wine thyme bung it in a 

Image 1 - Clay Oven Roaster Schlemmertopf 832 Scheurich West Germany Lidded Tray Dish GUC

slow for about 3 hours.

do not trim fat.

A genuine Lamb (still has milk teeth) or Hogget (under 24 months) should not have strong tasting fat. and it should all have cooked out in three hours and sit on the top,  leaving you with melt in the mouth superbly tender and moist lamb.

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Try a butterflied leg with a long curry-based marinade plus some ketchup, balsamic and strained or Med yoghurt. Mine's been in the sauce since Thursday, cut into 4 roughly equally thick strips to control grill cook times and intensity. This will be done in a higher-and-faster mode, not lower-and-slower on Sunday ( :) ). Low and slow is for an intact leg roast in the oven.

It's been several years since I've done this version but last time it rocked. If it sucks on Sunday I'll confess back here.

Happy dining!

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19 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

and a good California red (German red wine sux! they said)...

Bordeaux .... teach em to lose :P

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2 hours ago, Mid said:

Bordeaux .... teach em to lose :P

I believe it was DeLoach Estate Zinfandel.... Late 80s vintage... They had several cases.

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A friend called me about2PM to ask my advice.... He'd already smothered it in garlic, rosemary, Mint, and cider vinegar before trussing it up in to a roll.

 I suggested that he slather the inside with large amounts of yoguht, or at least sour cream, cardamon, and coriander and maybe even a little honey to counter the effects of the cider vinegar... Then tie it back up and hope for the best....

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