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Just hooked up a Masterbilt "dual fuel" smoker. Basically 24" square, 40 " tall box, with propane heating a pan that holds wood chips, under a tray that can hold water/juice/wine with 4 shelves for payload. 

I haven't done a brisket in a smoker in > 5 years since giving up my Bradley electric "puck" model when moving from single family to condo's and now back to single family. This is a bit more labor intensive, to setup the flame and drafts to get temperature and the wood chips don't have the ability to stack different wood flavors at 20 minute intervals as you could do in the Bradley. 

Anyone care to share their recipe for brisket ? 

I'm targeting a less than "well done" so internal temperature probably 180-200F to get the tenderness

 

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I've only successfully done this once, out of about 15 tries. It seems to me, that a long (and I mean days) soak in brine, or pickling brine, and then a long slow super slow smoke is the key. I've never used a propane smoker, only straight charcoal/wood, so I can't help you on that, but I aimed to keep the smoker at 200f (+-) for about 6 hours, with lots of moisture. I used apple cider cut with water, and after 4 hours I wrapped the brisket in foil and sort of let it steam in it's own moisture after it had got it's char bark on the outside.

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I use a lot of the info from this site:

https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/beef-and-bison-recipes/smoked-brisket-texas-style

First step to good brisket is get a good cut of meat. Stay away from the flats. You want the best grade packer cut you can find. The "pros" let it age for about 30 days in the fridge before cooking. It does make a difference. I inject with beef broth the day before. Next morning, while the smoker is warming up, liberally apply a commercial rub. There are a lot of different rubs but the one I settled on has salt, cracked pepper, garlic and onion powder. We like it enough that it goes on steaks and burgers also.

I have a wood smoker and fuel it with oak/mesquite combo. Target smoker temp is 225. When the meat temp gets to 165-175, it usually stalls. I wrap it in foil (Texas crutch) and continue cooking to 203.

The hold is important. Once meat  is at temp, remove it, wrap in old towels, put it in a cooler for a couple of hours. Once I settled on this this system all my briskets turned out fantastic. No sauce needed, cut with a fork goodness.

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Salt, pepper, water pan,"pink butcher" or "peach paper" not foil for the wrap...see Aaron Franklin above ^^^^...

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I agree on the pink butcher paper, but haven't been able to find it around here, and I don't really need a 100' roll.

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

a roll is like $10...     find someone and split it...  

Is it? I'd always thought it would be expensive, seeing as no one seems to have it in stock. I'll  look it up. I can always use it for Christmas and birthday wrapping paper.

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12 hours ago, Grabbler said:

Salt, pepper, water pan,"pink butcher" or "peach paper" not foil for the wrap...see Aaron Franklin above ^^^^...

Depends on your taste. Butcher paper allows for a crisper bark. Important to some and apparently the judges at the numerous cook offs. To me a crispy, crunchy bark is "meh". I'm after moist and tender.

I'm smoking 2 briskets in couple of months for my mothers 90th birthday. I'll do one with foil, other with butcher paper. We'll  do a side by side taste test.

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16 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I've only successfully done this once, out of about 15 tries. It seems to me, that a long (and I mean days) soak in brine, or pickling brine, and then a long slow super slow smoke is the key. I've never used a propane smoker, only straight charcoal/wood, so I can't help you on that, but I aimed to keep the smoker at 200f (+-) for about 6 hours, with lots of moisture. I used apple cider cut with water, and after 4 hours I wrapped the brisket in foil and sort of let it steam in it's own moisture after it had got it's char bark on the outside.

You made pastrami.

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41 minutes ago, bmiller said:

You made pastrami.

I did do that on purpose once. I've also made corned beef the same way, except simmering in beer instead of smoking. Both of those worked very well. I have ordered pink butcher's paper, so next time, I'll use that instead of foil. The thing with the pastrami, and corned beef is they were brined in pickling spice for 2 weeks, not 2 days.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My pitmaster, seen here with saucing some ribs, is getting pretty good at the brisket.

00saucing2.jpg

A good Texan mate of mine, just back from a stint in the sandpit, reckons our brisket is the best he's ever had.

Brisket slicing.jpg

We've tried several variations - but are settled on brining, salt and cracked pepper rub and the Texas crutch.  Can't seem to find any paper here, so it's foil for us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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