Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ok, I've got a 1 year old bottom paint (Petit HRT Unepoxy) that I need to scuff with 80 grit before painting over with Premium HRT.

So one alternative to dry sanding with a shopvac, dustless sander, etc. I've been considering wet sanding with a drywall screen.

But my engineering mind then saw this:

https://www.amazon.com/Tool-Daily-Sandblasting-Sandblaster-Attachment/dp/B08QZH43K1/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=1KRNW70JBGIBL&dchild=1&keywords=sandblaster+pressure+washer+attachment&qid=1617896584&sprefix=sandblaster%2Caps%2C208&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&smid=A1PP23JAMET0D4&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExNUY1VTlKSU9KTjFNJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUExMDI2MzQzMTRTR1dRMDE1QkRaTCZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwNjI5MzcyMjhCWTRJNTJYUlpCOSZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

Wondering if I ran this with baking soda and a lower pressure washer (like the electric one I have that's only 1500 psi)... could I quickly and safely "scuff" without over-doing it?

There is an epoxy barrier coat under the HRT, and this is the only coat of bottom paint (the boat was new in 2019).

Crazy?

Brilliant?

I figured I'd get the unvarnished feedback here...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Scuffing with 80 grit is very easy to do. Your options are not worth the time or effort. Just do it. Dry is thought to be better because disposal of a small amount of toxic dust is easier to manage than a sea of toxic mud.

Link to post
Share on other sites

omg.  yes, the soda would dissolve.  Duh.

I was trying to think of something "softer" than sand...

ok, same question with Sand.  I guess i'd be afraid it would be too abrasive with sand and you'd blow through the paint very quickly.

Good point on the disposal too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you just want to scuff before a new coat the drywall sander with a vac attached is the best way.

IMO.

Dumbass.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have that fitting and used it to strip paint off a painted walkway. Lets just say (3) buckets worth, which is about 15 gallons only did 144 square feet. Thankfully the sand was free and I went on to reclaim, dry, sift and re-used it for the remaining 100 square feet. I have a 4k PSI pressure washer and my friend tried it on his 3.2K one and it didn't have enough pressure. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one of those and it's great. I've used it for removing the trailer rust before welding, removing galvanizing before welding, cleaning off old paint on metal parts etc. It's messy, bloody messy but as my yard is all on sand it's not really a problem. Wear eye protection and an over shield face mask and be prepared to be picking sand grains out of your hair and ears for some time. The pressure of your washer is not the limiting factor it's the water flow required. From memory you need a minimum of 6litres/min or the washer constantly cycles on and off. To lessen the amount of cut hold the nozzle further away from the job. At 6litres/min you don't get rivers of mud more like mounds of wet sand. At less than $30 it's worth a go. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Ukuri said:

At less than $30 it's worth a go.

for the intended purpose, I think Sloop has it right. I think you'd have a hard time being consistent if all you're doing is scuffing for new paint - too many chances to gouge or miss a spot. the sander with a vac will be a lot better, will conform to the bottom, and will definitely be easier to clean up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/8/2021 at 8:59 AM, Borracho said:

Scuffing with 80 grit is very easy to do. Your options are not worth the time or effort. Just do it. Dry is thought to be better because disposal of a small amount of toxic dust is easier to manage than a sea of toxic mud.

This. I don't know how big your boat is, but if the bottom is clean, scuffing is maybe a couple of hours of work, including prep time?

Your other solutions would be $$ in equipment + an hour of fiddling around to get it working right (+ masking, if you're going to blast???)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol.  Very true!

In hindsight I did it the old fashioned way, vacuum on a drywall pole sander.  If I needed to do anything more aggressive I think a powered sander with a dust extractor is the right way to go, but for scuffing the manual sanding block worked just fine...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...