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Does he get back pay?


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Something doesn't smell right here.....

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9 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Wherre cane I sende my monney to helpe hime?

There's a Prince in Nigeria who can help you help him.... But He'll need your bank acct. routing number so he can wire you the cash.

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This does happen sadly. Never heard of 4 years but 1 or 2 years, yes. Owner goes bust, no money for wages or for crew to fly home. Their only chance of recovery is the ship

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49 minutes ago, Zonker said:

This does happen sadly. Never heard of 4 years but 1 or 2 years, yes. Owner goes bust, no money for wages or for crew to fly home. Their only chance of recovery is the ship

If the guy has $ to get food and water and charge up his phone every 2 days, he can find a place to stay other than the ship. He doesn't look skeletal, so clearly he's eating fairly well.

Dec. 2020 is not 4 years, even in Trumplandia.

Swimming to town and back with food, water and his cell phone? That ship looks like it's a half mile off shore. That's one hell of a stout zip-lok bag he's got this stuff in.

Something does not smell right.

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Back in the very early 70's I was working for a shipping firm in Cape Town. A Taiwanese fishing mothership was "arrested" for non-payment, engineer and cook were left stranded on board for about three years. 

Being enterprising and sociable fellows, they got credit from a local ship's chandler and turned it into the best (illegal) Chinese restaurant in town. I had some magnificent meals and piss-ups on the Golden Dragon No. 1.  They eventually saved enough money for airfares, made the right connections to get their papers sorted out, and went home. 

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

you'd think in four years he'd get enough money to get a little boat to go back and forth, even if you have to paddle..

And where's the money for food and water coming from?

 Something doesn't smell right.

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5 hours ago, Zonker said:

This does happen sadly. Never heard of 4 years but 1 or 2 years, yes. Owner goes bust, no money for wages or for crew to fly home. Their only chance of recovery is the ship

We had one in Baltimore harbor for 5 years, due to happenings in Bosnia.

Durmitor

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8 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

you'd think in four years he'd get enough money to get a little boat to go back and forth, even if you have to paddle..

It’s the Suez, just hire a pilot and park the ship ON the bank. Solves the swimming problem.

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14 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

If the guy has $ to get food and water and charge up his phone every 2 days, he can find a place to stay other than the ship. He doesn't look skeletal, so clearly he's eating fairly well.

Dec. 2020 is not 4 years, even in Trumplandia.

Swimming to town and back with food, water and his cell phone? That ship looks like it's a half mile off shore. That's one hell of a stout zip-lok bag he's got this stuff in.

Something does not smell right.

The ship's was detained in July, 2017. It ran aground in 2020. But you are right, it won't be four years until another four months have passed.

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Beirut held a shipload of fertilizer in a warehouse for years waiting for the value to somehow magically cover assessed bills.   We know that judge was a short sighted fool.  It doesn’t seem such a stretch for some Egyptian judge to do the same as certificates expire, maintenance ceases and a ship rusts away.    I’d like to know what ongoing assistance Egypt gave / gives the man.   The video says that ceased in December.   The article references a doctor’s report of malnutrition, is he living on fish and remaining canned food?    When a government seizes your passport I think travel would become nearly impossible, unless your government’s embassy was willing to help you.   I guess he could try to smuggle himself to Europe in a lifeboat, just another Syrian refugee.    Successfully leaving Egyptian water without detection would be hard.

edit.   I guess Egypt arrested the ship for fault safety equipment.    If he had a working lifeboat he presumably wouldn’t be swimming to shore.

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13 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

you'd think in four years he'd get enough money to get a little boat to go back and forth, even if you have to paddle..

IIRC, Moses built a small reed vessel for his voyage.

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  • 2 weeks later...
8 minutes ago, Olsonist said:

Stranded sailor allowed to leave abandoned ship after four years

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-56842506

It sounds like the Ever Given crew could be in the same boat:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/apr/19/ever-given-crew-fear-joining-ranks-of-seafarers-stranded-on-ships-for-years

 

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Stranded crew after owner goes bust is unfortunately the way it sometimes happens. 

Local and international (such as ITF or a local port chaplain or mullah) entities are supposed to help.  What's typically supposed to happen legally, is that the crew have a maritime lien against the ship for their back pay and provisions.  A local maritime lawyer brings the case "in rem" against the vessel and against the abandoning owners for back wages.  the latter has zilch (or so claims).  The local court determines that such a lien exists and the ship, after due notice to all, is put up for auction, assuming there is any value left in her.  If there are shipbreakers nearby, then the ship has scrap value, and the price of steel should cover the lone Chief Mate's wage claim (and the lawyer's fee).   If this hasn't happened it must be because ship has no value even if towed to the scrap yard.  Which seems strange, they almost always have a good bit of scrap value even in the worst of times.

Note the word "should".  That's the way it would play out in the States, and in most maritime nations.  Egypt is a maritime nation, and not inexpeienced in such claims, one would think.  So I don't know what's missing in this saga. Sailors' wage claims and liens, rank high up in the pecking order of who gets paid after the ship is sold, or sold for scrap.

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   I heard a nightmare story from a professional skipper who ran the lovely PALAWAN that was owned my IBM founder Thomas Watson. I think the boat had gotten sold after Watsons death and ended up in St John with a resident owner who was really more of a powerboat guy. The boat was plagued with corrosion around the ports, hawsepipes and scuppers from the wrong welding rod for the aluminum alloy used. The mismatch made the nice deep blue Awlgrip blister up and it was a never ending battle to keep it at bay. The new owner didn't really understand why it was happening and sort of blamed the skipper for not maintaining the boat properly. The boat got put into term charter which really wasn't what the private yacht skipper had signed up for.

   The last straw was when a certain big name (at that time) network news anchorman came down for a charter. I won't give the name but just think BIG MUSTACHE and I don't mean Paul Cayard... The big shot reporter wanted to sail from USVI waters to BVI and Bitter End in particular since that is where the 'cool kids' hang out. He had a fit when the skipper pulled into Cruz Bay Customs to clear out for British Waters but the skipper was a real professional. Big Stache just didn't understand the Customs and Immigration Policies and had an even bigger fit when the boat went into West End Tortola only about 10 miles later to clear in to the BVI. Skipper explained that they could keep sailing on towards Virgin Gorda but would then be to late to clear customs in Spanish Town customs. Stache just wanted him to sail right to Bitter End and said that his fame would exempt him and his guests from such plebian formalities. Skip tried to tell him the BVI Customs could care less about his celebrity status and his career and license and livelihood meant that they would be clearing in and out properly. West End is usually a quick stop and down came the yellow quarentine  flag and Mr Big calmed down a bit when they stopped for the night at Chubb Cay opposite Roadtown. An early start the next morning and they made Bitter End before Happy Hour and the skipper and crew were relieved that Mr Big dined at the Bitter End Yacht Club ashore that night. 

   The were treated to a big fresh caught lobster Brunch the next morning and as the table was cleared the Skip suggested a couple of dinghy excursions to chose from for the afternoons activity. Mr. Big looked at the skipper and then his watch and told him straight faced that they needed to weigh anchor and sail back 20+ miles back down wind to St Thomas as he had more guest flying in that afternoon! First time this had been mentioned and the skipper said there was no way that they could arrive back in Charlotte Amalie in that short period since it would involve clearing back in to US waters in St John. He suggested that the new guest take the puddle jumper to the Gorda airstrip and he could pick them up in the dinghy or they could take a taxi to Bitter End after doing Immigration at the airport. That is when the shit hit the fan and Stache and Skip went at it all afternoon. Not sure how the guest arrived but at the end of the week there was not a cent for tip and Big Stache told the owner of PALAWAN should fire the skipper for insubordination!  The owner said that the term charter work was not really what the skipper and lovely chef wife were all about and that they had a Stirling reputation as a team running private yachts. Then added that the boat was for sail and they would probably be moving on soon anyway. Mr. Big's eyes lit up when he heard that the boat was for sale and asked how much and made an offer on the spot and eventually bought the boat!  The he was entitled to fire the crew but it was already beyond that and into a 'you can't fire me because I don't work for you' and progressed into a 'you can't fire me because I QUIT!' scenario. 

    I didn't mean for this to turn into such a running tale but what I was originally going to share was an incident a couple of years later when Mr. Big Stache, now the owner of the yacht, put into some hellhole on the Red Sea for mechanical woes and then hired a plane and flew out without proper immigration respects and the crew were pretty much held for ransom for some time. I'll try and recall or look up those exploits later to share here but I have a pair of sash weights for anyone who can guess the identity of the ASSHOLE behind the STACHE...

  

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

I'll try and recall or look up those exploits later to share here but I have a pair of sash weights for anyone who can guess the identity of the ASSHOLE behind the STACHE...

Nice. 

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Here for general reference (not legal advice here, consult your own attorney, yada yada) from Wiki, is a blurb which lists the priority of maritime liens against a ship.

Note that wages of captain and crew are ranked first. 

Also, Evergreen are not a single-ship-give-up-and-run away and hide type of operation. They're huge. They will work out a way to pay off the existing crew and repatriate them.  Then they can tackle the other liens that may be claimed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritime_lien

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Geraldo Rivera. He renamed the boat Voyager.

But you can keep the sash weights.

No, seriously you can keep them.

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One of my family's treasured memories and one of my proudest achievements is sailing Voyager around the world. That's why I bought the old ketch in 1995; to fulfill that ultimate dream of anyone who has ever sailed beyond the breakwater into the open sea.

We departed Marion, the charming Massachusetts seafaring town on Buzzard's Bay in the summer of 1997; crossing the Atlantic, and through the Straits of Gibraltar. By the time we crossed the long Mediterranean and passed through the legendary Suez Canal, it was 1998. The first high drama came a week after the canal in the Gulf of Aqaba when we were run down by an Egyptian gunboat after making an unauthorized stop at one of their islands off the Sinai Peninsula near the Egyptian/Israeli border.

Commuting back and forth to work in New York, I left the boat in Eilat Israel after talking our way out of that jam with Egyptians; leaving the crew to make the hair-raising run down the Red Sea, around the treacherous Horn of Africa and Somalia without me; but with an armed and dangerous Israeli commando on board.

The plan was for me to meet them with the family in the Seychelles Islands 600 miles east of Kenya.

But off Somalia the crew radioed me urgently in New York to report they were being followed by suspected pirates. I immediately called the duty officer at the Pentagon, who referred me to our naval attaché in far off South Africa, who informed me we had no capable force in the Somalia region to help Voyager out.

I later discovered our forces were previously committed: they were bombing Baghdad at the time in retaliation for a Saddam Hussein plot to kill ex- President George H. W. Bush.

To make a 30,000 mile story short, after some more heart-stopping adventures, the pirates went off after another target, Voyager made it unscathed to the Seychelles; I rejoined them there; we crossed the Indian Ocean, the limitless Pacific, (after celebrating the Millennium on the International Dateline in Tonga); passed through the Panama Canal, up the East Coast, arriving in New York harbor in the summer of 2000.

Making that same circumnavigation these days, passing through Suez and the Red Sea would be wildly foolhardy. Absent a heavily armed convoy it would be an impossible peril, given the grave risk presented by the current epidemic of pirates in the region around the Horn of Africa. There are far more of the brigands than there were in 1998; they are more violent, resourceful and desperate.

The sailboat seizure and subsequent massacre of the four American evangelists last week, and this week's seizure of the Danish sailboat and crew, including three children, are stark examples of the proliferation and enormous range of these modern-day cut-throats infecting the vital sea routes within 1000 miles of their bases in chaotic Somalia.

Among the unforgivable crimes of these kidnappers and murderers is that they have punctured the age-old dream of countless sailors. They have broken the sea bridge of the world.

 

What a Spin Doctor!

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