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You store wine horiztally to keep me cork moist and thus from drying out.  If you are drinking the wine in 6- 12 months  it doesn't matter.

Sparkling wine is stored vertically for carbonation.  

Temperature is more important.  Cool dark places are best for wine storage.  

 

All that said my wine is mostly stored horiztal for space and sorting reasons.  (I can more easily see what is around) but mine ist stored in my kitchen out of direct light and generally temp stable. If warmer than recommended.

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I find that wine is best stored in the stomach...

I have a wine cooler, but it rarely ever gets to where I want white wine to be. It's good for reds though.

 I should probably unplug it, now that A/C season is coming up.

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41 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

I find that wine is best stored in the stomach...

I have a wine cooler, but it rarely ever gets to where I want white wine to be. It's good for reds though.

 I should probably unplug it, now that A/C season is coming up.

Why store a consumeable?

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Most unfiltered reds won't have a screw top so sediment shouldn't be an issue.  If you have unfiltered screw top reds that you're going to lay down for multiple years put them horizontal. 

Other than longer term storage it shouldn't matter.

Temp can be important, but for the most part wine is a lot more resilient than the snobs give it credit for. 

 

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We had an actual cellar in CT, that was perfect temp/humidity. We kept hundreds of bottles in there from 5.99 to nearly a hundred. Mostly in the $20-$40 range. We gave a lot of that away. We took our favorites to the Carib, where it did very well under a somewhat leaky but not always sink.

 

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BTW Just my experience..... Lay corked bottles with punts at about a 10-15angle. Enough to keep the sludge in the punt, and enough to keep the cork weeping, but you don;t want the cork to rot by lying it flat.

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You are asking a group of people some of whom think Australians know how to make rum and others who think USAeans know how to make beer how to store wine???  

Lordy.  

There are actually places where people who actually know actual wine can give you actual advice.  

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Screw tops are vastly superior to cork closures when it comes to failures. No tainted screw caps. Some really nice wines offer both closure methods now but.......we wine geeks like opening corks. It’s part of the whole ceremony. As a result,  the screw tops have failed to really catch on. Storage? Screw tops can be stored in any position. Light, vibration and temperature are your enemies still so be mindful of that. Anything you’re going to drink in a few months or so don’t worry about those either...except temperature........that will kill any wine. Too warm is very bad.......big swings in temperature also not good. 

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3 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

BTW Just my experience..... Lay corked bottles with punts at about a 10-15angle. Enough to keep the sludge in the punt, and enough to keep the cork weeping, but you don;t want the cork to rot by lying it flat.

You won't rot a good quality cork by laying the bottle flat.  If it's a cheap cork, you aren't going to age the wine for years.

I've opened bottles over 80 years old, and many in the 20-50 year range.  Some of the corks were not very tight but complete failures were rare. 

Large format bottles require special equipment to open.

 

1928 Cheval Blanc rs.jpg

Big1.jpg

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8 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

my wife tells me wine won't last more than a day,  I'm suspicious..

she's must be hanging out with my wife....

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Most wine isn't made to be stored for a long time in a cellar. It is made to drink. Unless you are buying fine vintages from wherever then drink the stuff and forget about how it is stored.  

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On the side, put upright day of or day before drinking if you suspect sediment.  Champagne does fine on its side, too.  Keep it in a dark cool place if you can.  Not in the sunlight next to the oven. 

If your box of wine doesn't fit a wine rack, that is telling you something. It is sayng "drink me"

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54 minutes ago, NeedAClew said:

On the side, put upright day of or day before drinking if you suspect sediment.  Champagne does fine on its side, too.  Keep it in a dark cool place if you can.  Not in the sunlight next to the oven. 

If your box of wine doesn't fit a wine rack, that is telling you something. It is sayng "drink me"

Temperature variations and especially heat such as direct sunlight or near a furnace, etc., will kill a wine quicker than anything else.  As long as it's above freezing, colder temperatures are not harmful.  But big temperature swings can hurt a wine.

As Rum Runner said, the majority of wine drinkers drink wines that aren't made for long term aging.  If you are buying $10.00 wines and laying them down in your cellar, you are probably going to be disappointed 5 years from now.  

Keep your wines cool and within as narrow a temperature range as possible and everything will be fine.  

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The cellar (basement) in CT. always stayed between 50f-57f year round. Perfect for storing wine. Always slightly humid, except in the depths of a dark, and cold winter, the humidity usually stayed around 70-75%.

Growing consumables required a special foil lined enclosure that lived next to the furnace/boiler. They liked it down there too.

Beer needed to be fermented upstairs, but once bottled, it aged very nicely along side the wine.

 Ginger beer was not allowed in the house. It lived in the barn. Too many ginger bombs went off unexpectedly at various times of the day/night, and left a helluva sticky mess.

 

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2 hours ago, NeedAClew said:

If your box of wine doesn't fit a wine rack, that is telling you something. It is sayng "drink me"

you been looking in my window ?

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17 hours ago, Left Shift said:

You are asking a group of people some of whom think Australians know how to make rum and others who think USAeans know how to make beer how to store wine???  

Lordy.  

There are actually places where people who actually know actual wine can give you actual advice.  

hopefully, I missed the sarcasm font..     

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2 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

"After the first bottle, nobody can tell the difference."

I'll dispute that .

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15 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

You won't rot a good quality cork by laying the bottle flat.  If it's a cheap cork, you aren't going to age the wine for years.

I've opened bottles over 80 years old, and many in the 20-50 year range.  Some of the corks were not very tight but complete failures were rare. 

Large format bottles require special equipment to open.

 

1928 Cheval Blanc rs.jpg

Big1.jpg

Still the funniest scene in Sideways!

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On 4/14/2021 at 6:51 PM, Mid said:

Screw Caps 

Upright or horizontal ?

the screw caps themselves should pile up on the coffee table. 

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On 4/14/2021 at 4:00 PM, Sidecar said:

Agree, but if any of your wines throw any kind of sediment, you might prefer it on the bottom of the bottle rather than the side?

If you're buying wine with sediment in it you need to find a new brand.

That shit went out decades ago - there's no excuse for it anymore.

And before anyone posts the inevitable, no-one asking that question would be buying wine old enough to legitimately have sediment.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:
On 4/15/2021 at 9:00 AM, Sidecar said:

Agree, but if any of your wines throw any kind of sediment, you might prefer it on the bottom of the bottle rather than the side?

If you're buying wine with sediment in it you need to find a new brand.

That shit went out decades ago - there's no excuse for it anymore.

And before anyone posts the inevitable, no-one asking that question would be buying wine old enough to legitimately have sediment.

Depends on the sediment:

https://www.decanter.com/learn/advice/tartrate-crystals-in-wine-346248/

https://www.goldmedalwineclub.com/blog/post/the-gritty-truth-why-is-there-sediment-in-my-wine

https://www.awri.com.au/industry_support/winemaking_resources/fining-stabilities/hazes_and_deposits/crystalline_deposits/

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