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Hey so I have a spare jib for my boat that is is all torn up along the foot of the sail. The rest of the sail is actually pretty nice material. Wondering if it's worth fixing and if I can do it myself.

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47 minutes ago, retroSail said:

Hey so I have a spare jib for my boat that is is all torn up along the foot of the sail. The rest of the sail is actually pretty nice material. Wondering if it's worth fixing and if I can do it myself.

I see you are from my neck of the woods so we can skip the usual SA introductions. 

Posting a picture of this sail would very much help us know if there is anything worth salvaging

 

 

 

 

 

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Nice!  Hope she never falls on a steep slope with that suit... 

Without being able to see the rest of the sail and assess if the cloth is still good or not, it looks like the following:

1) The foot has already had a wear patch sewn on it, and the wear patch has disintegrated.   The wear patch can be replaced easily if the underlying cloth is still intact, quite a bit harder if it isn't.  $200-$300-ish as a guess at a sailmaker.

2) The tear at the luff can be repaired but the material looks pretty tired there.  Still, it might be worth repairing it.  I would guess this part of the repair might be another $100 or so at a sailmaker. 

Can you repair it yourself?  If your sewing skills are good enough and you have a machine that can sew sailcloth, and you have access to sailcloth and sailmaker's thread, then I would say yes, and it would probably make sense to do it yourself since money spent on a sailmaker repair on an old sail like this is probably better put toward a new sail. 

I am not a sailmaker, and YMMV.

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Yeah, that foot needs to have the underlying material replaced in a few places.  That makes it harder, but still do-able.  If the material is good right at the tack and clew so you don't have to replace any of the layers there it wouldn't be too hard - you could just patch the bad areas of the underlying material then sew a new wear strip over top.  Your new wear strip should be at least double the size of the old one. 

If the tack and clew need work, it will be beyond anything other than a professional sailmaker's sewing machine.

On the luff you will have to pull the stitching out, patch the tear, then sew the luff back on.  A pro will be able to do that without the sail having a distortion there.  You will probably have a bit of distortion at that point when using the sail, but you will have the satisfaction of having fixed it yourself.  You can spend the $$$ you saved on beer for the crew.

I wouldn't put this sail up in over 15 kts of breeze and expect it to survive.

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Any repair will be a concrete patch in a dirt road, temporary at best IMO

Time to count the coins in the back of the couch and buy a new sail

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This cloth is so fatigued that any repair would just cause a hard hinge point around the repair, as the repair cloth will be SIGNIFICANTLY stiffer than the old cloth. In a short while you'll be right back where you started or worse. For what it would cost to repair this, I'd rather see you look on the web for a used sail. Depending on size and condition you may be able to find a sail that fits your boat for a couple hundred dollars.

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nice tarp. looks like a lot of just plain rot in the cloth.

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1 hour ago, SailRacer said:

DUCT TAPE. 

White Gorilla tape. Used it on a white vinyl tarp this winter instead of sewing. Will last till you find a replacement any more spent on that sail is wasted. 

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A good sailmaker will be willing to take the money if you really want it repaired, but will also tell you that you'd be better off without a spare for now, and putting the money in your sail replacement cookie jar.   

Based on the size of that, for a bit more than the repair would cost, you can probably get a decent used replacement from Bacons.  

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in a (hopefully) more helpful vein:

The foot (and likely the leech as well) have been thrashed by UV exposure. You can see the remains of the sacrificial suncover where it wasn't exposed when the sail was furled. It is very likely that the cloth exposed under where the UV cover rotted away has the structural integrity of tissue paper.

The most practical fix would be to move the clew location further into the sail (out of the rotten area) then re-fairing the leech and foot in such a way to remove the rotten material. Depending on the extent of the sun rot and the size of the clew patch, you may need to rebuild/enlarge the clew patch (possibly the head and tack patch as well). 

All of this entails skills/tools you may not have: sewing new tapes on, pressing rings ect. I'd guess $300ish at your local loft.

The tear on the luff is slightly more worrisome. That is a strange location for a tear and suggests to me that whole sail may be rotten. I'd try further tearing the cloth at the location of that tear to see how much strength is left in the cloth. If it tears easily, put the whole thing in a dumpster.

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Proably a new sail in your future. If you're not ready for that then I'd say trim off the really bad stuff and have a smaller sail that may last a bit more. 

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Yea I like the duct tape Idea. I know this is not a nice sail but I though it would be good to at least try. Maybe I'll use the material for another project once I get another spare. Cheers

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Luckily the boat came with a 1 year old 150 genoa that sails great and is still crisp. My last boat had shitty cloth sails that were smooth and old.  

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Pick a spot well in the middle of the sail away from the rotted damage.  Poke a sail makers needle in the fabric. Try to move the needle in the direction of the weave and at 90 degrees to it. If it tears easily the sail is toast.

Personally I think the sail is so toasted it would not make a good lawnmower cover.

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This thread is a classic example of if one guy says you look like a horse, ignore it, if another guy says you look like a horse also ignore it, but if a third guy also says you look like a horse then probably its time to buy a saddle.

Now if you haven't got a lawnmower, it might be time to buy one and place it under that sail

 

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6 hours ago, retroSail said:

Yea I like the duct tape Idea. I know this is not a nice sail but I though it would be good to at least try. Maybe I'll use the material for another project once I get another spare. Cheers

Nobody has complimented you on your choice of screen names. ;)

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Tyvek tape over duck tape. Tyvek tape: aggressive adhesive, thinner and lighter, more pliable. hard to work with because of strong adhesive. adhesive seems to attract dirt around the edges after use, which is unsightly, but does not affect performance. 150 feet for 30 dollars at Homey D.

 

Screen Shot 2021-04-16 at 4.24.34 PM.png

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I seriously wouldn't waste any sail tape on it. it looks almost like it's been nibbled on by mice.  but what the hey... if you can get a couple afternoons out of it with some hardware store tape, you wont be out much. 

 

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2 hours ago, Black Jack said:

Tyvek tape over duck tape. Tyvek tape: aggressive adhesive, thinner and lighter, more pliable. hard to work with because of strong adhesive. adhesive seems to attract dirt around the edges after use, which is unsightly, but does not affect performance. 150 feet for 30 dollars at Homey D.

 

Screen Shot 2021-04-16 at 4.24.34 PM.png

I was joking.

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21 hours ago, retroSail said:

Hey so I have a spare jib for my boat that is is all torn up along the foot of the sail. The rest of the sail is actually pretty nice material. Wondering if it's worth fixing and if I can do it myself.

holy crap, based upon the pictures I'd hate to see what you consider bad material....

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I was joking.

i figured you were messing around. I kinda like the reuse and patch up crap we can do to just go out.  Tyvek tape is awesome though and could be used to patch that rat nest sail. just the attempt to use the sail with tape would be a hoot.

i am a little worried when i begin posting my self designed build using old contruction ply pulled from the dumpster, found drift wood from winter storms, cement ballast, old canvas, cotton balls & lint. one time use Tyvek race sails and black sharpie designs may make all the difference to an otherwise odd duck, single use 20 foot ditch runner destined for Stockton if i can get a PHRF.

 

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1 hour ago, zenmasterfred said:

Motha Fucka Dead!

Yeah but you built sails so you're extra fussy.

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theres companies around that buy used sails and turn them into crew bags and the such. you should send photos to them and see what they would give you for this sail. im sure they would get a laugh out of it.

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11 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Yeah but you built sails so you're extra fussy.

Yes, that is an expert opinion!  Putting new leach and foot cover on my genoa this year and there is actually good sail cloth under it.  Not so much w/ OP's sail, that dog will not hunt.

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This is an easy fix.   Just cut off the bad patch, fold up the foot two times, and sew it closed.  Then put in new clew and tack rings a little higher up than the existing ones, but still within the reinforced corners of the jib.  These will need to be sewn in by hand with a heavy thread.  Invest in an awl for the best performance.    Sure it will shorten your sail by a few inches but won't make any difference to your sailing and you'll be good to go for another year or two.  For the luff, just find a piece of sail cloth from another old sail and sew it over top.   In reading SA over many years I've discovered that most of these guys won't accept anything less than the latest, greatest, newest and most expensive sails and equipment.  But for the rest of us, a sewing machine an an hour or two of work does us just fine.

A shredded spinnaker becomes a chicken chute with just a sewing machine and no worries about image.

 

39 Ripped Spinnaker.jpg

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Yea thanks, a lot of guys on here seem to have a problem with money burning a hole in their pockets. I know it's not gonna win any beauty contests or races but I think it has some value still. We will see. Worst case I make a hammock out of the sail. 

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On 4/16/2021 at 4:25 PM, Black Jack said:

Tyvek tape over duck tape. Tyvek tape: aggressive adhesive, thinner and lighter, more pliable. hard to work with because of strong adhesive. adhesive seems to attract dirt around the edges after use, which is unsightly, but does not affect performance. 150 feet for 30 dollars at Homey D.

 

Screen Shot 2021-04-16 at 4.24.34 PM.png

Not sold at Home Despot Canada Inc.

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4 hours ago, retroSail said:

Yea thanks, a lot of guys on here seem to have a problem with money burning a hole in their pockets. I know it's not gonna win any beauty contests or races but I think it has some value still. We will see. Worst case I make a hammock out of the sail. 

Don't hang it too high off the ground, you could do yourself an injury falling through it.

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6 hours ago, retroSail said:

Yea thanks, a lot of guys on here seem to have a problem with money burning a hole in their pockets. I know it's not gonna win any beauty contests or races but I think it has some value still. We will see. Worst case I make a hammock out of the sail. 

Dood... Money or not, it looks softer than some tp i have used. I think what we, the people you came to for advice, are collectively saying is, 'dont throw good money after bad.' if that is not what you wanted or hoped to hear, you should look elsewhere for advice.

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1 hour ago, basketcase said:

Dood... Money or not, it looks softer than some tp i have used. I think what we, the people you came to for advice, are collectively saying is, 'dont throw good money after bad.' if that is not what you wanted or hoped to hear, you should look elsewhere for advice.

Some Idiots recycle Toilet Paper!  When I get a sail into my shop that has Tyvek Tape or Duct Tape on it as a repair, I commonly tack on an extra hour of labor ($110) for the cleaning that I have to do before and after.  The adhesive gums up the needles and hooks.  I can do a lot, but I'm not a a charity.  

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That sail's life is over, you can repair it with tape, quick fix etc. But IMHO a waste of time and money.

Plus don't ever put yourself in a position where you need to rely on it!!!

 

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28 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

No, but Tuck Tape is.  Evil tape - unless you want something permanently taped.

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/tuck-tape-60mm-x-50m-sheathing-housewrap-tape-in-red/1000181212

Yes, I have seen remnants of that on several masts. Some of them should have just wrapped the whole mast in it and called it good, that crap is impossible to remove.

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Yes, I have seen remnants of that on several masts. Some of them should have just wrapped the whole mast in it and called it good, that crap is impossible to remove.

Yeah...I think it must be 5200 in tape form :blink:

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12 hours ago, retroSail said:

Yea thanks, a lot of guys on here seem to have a problem with money burning a hole in their pockets. I know it's not gonna win any beauty contests or races but I think it has some value still. We will see. Worst case I make a hammock out of the sail. 

You can use it as a practice sail for doing repairs, if nothing else.  I believe that when a sail's time is done, God will take that sail and smite it, and it shall be in many pieces.  Until then, you can use it but as pointed out above, do not put yourself in a position where your safety or the boat's need to rely on it.

Do not put more than $50 worth of materials into it, if you do decide to give it a go.  

Did you try the rip tests on the better part of the cloth?

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5 minutes ago, Rain Man said:

You can use it as a practice sail for doing repairs, if nothing else.  I believe that when a sail's time is done, God will take that sail and smite it, and it shall be in many pieces.  Until then, you can use it but as pointed out above, do not put yourself in a position where your safety or the boat's need to rely on it.

Do not put more than $50 worth of materials into it, if you do decide to give it a go.  

Did you try the rip tests on the better part of the cloth?

Yea don't worry it's not going back on my boat. Yea I tried the rip test and it didn't rip. 

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31 minutes ago, retroSail said:

Yea don't worry it's not going back on my boat. Yea I tried the rip test and it didn't rip. 

If it was repaired and it was mine, no matter how shitty it looked, it might see service in a Wednesday night beercan race, casual day sailing, or on a delivery to a regatta.  Racing sails are crazy expensive and I always have two sets of sails on my race boats during regatta season - one for deliveries and Wednesday nights, and another for actual racing.  If it blew up during beercans or a delivery, it would get binned with no regrets. 

The fewer hours you put on your racing sails the better.  

When my sails got really old, like the one you are looking at, I gave them to a local guy who had a boat that always had hand-me-down sails on it.  He took my old sails, stitched them up the best he could, and used them for day sailing, and got a surprising amount of use out of them.  

Unlike the majority of the posters here, I think old dacron sails have uses other than wood-pile covers and hammocks.

This is my 1981 dacron North main re-purposed as described above.  The picture is from 2017.  The foot was cut off at the first reef, and the reef cringles used as tack and clew.  It worked out pretty well I'd say.  

I don't know what North was using for dacron sailcloth in 1981, but it sure as hell was bulletproof.

20170819_153452.thumb.jpg.7930a0f534cd5d95ddd40b778d7d9cde.jpg

 

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