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And the Human-Pez-Dispenser-in-Chief just keeps on racking up the body count. How much longer do we need to wait before starting the recall process, a la Govvy Gnuesome?....

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11 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

What’s for dinner tonight?

Grilled Thesher shark 'steaks', Oaxacan cheese stuffed Jalapeños ala parrilla, fresh spinach salad with Very expensive raspberry vinagrette dressing stuff....and maybe some home made g-bread. Depending on what's playing on the radio in the bedroom.....:lol:

 

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16 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

What’s for dinner tonight?

I’m feeling lazy so today so it’s frozen duck that been precooked.  Amazingly after you thaw it overnight and stick it in the oven it comes out fantastic.  The skin is even crispy.  Comes with a halfway decent orange sauce that is pumped up with some Grand Marnier.  Served with wild and basmati rice mixture.

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Leftovers: smashed roasted potatoes and pablano chili tacos with sides of black beans, guacamole, fresh pico de gallo and homemade tortillas. Modelo frio. 

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58 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

What’s for dinner tonight?

 

Cheeseburgers with carmelized onions...  Had a mushroom swiss burger at the Cafeteria at work last week, and it was pretty good!

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Last of the Bolognese I made a few months ago.  Triple batch, divvied up and frozen.  Salad, crusty bread, and some variety of short pasta.

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Grilled NY strip with a caramelized onion/mushroom/red wine reduction, asparagus, and baked potato.

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Pizza again. But friends are joining me so I'll adjust the spicyness downwards for their sensitive tastes. This week's dough is much better. The dry weather has been wreaking havoc with my dough making. Seems the flour is much dryer these days. The water content has risen from 1 2/3 cup to just over 2. I require dough sloppy and sticky enough that it can just barely be handled. Tossing it with flour just before baking is all the drying it needs. Huge crunchy bubbles in the thin crust that way. Most excellent for this hacker.

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4 minutes ago, Borracho said:

Pizza again. But friends are joining me so I'll adjust the spicyness downwards for their sensitive tastes. This week's dough is much better. The dry weather has been wreaking havoc with my dough making. Seems the flour is much dryer these days. The water content has risen from 1 2/3 cup to just over 2. I require dough sloppy and sticky enough that it can just barely be handled. Tossing it with flour just before baking is all the drying it needs. Huge crunchy bubbles in the thin crust that way. Most excellent for this hacker.

You might want to try using water that's just about 200f. It activates the gluten more completely than cooler water. I'd always been told to use water that was around 70-80f to activate yeast and flour gluten. Recently I read that hotter water works better for making a bubbly, lighter crust (Still proof your yeast in water between 70-80f before adding to your flour mix).

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1 hour ago, Fakenews said:

I’m feeling lazy so today so it’s frozen duck that been precooked.  Amazingly after you thaw it overnight and stick it in the oven it comes out fantastic.  The skin is even crispy.  Comes with a halfway decent orange sauce that is pumped up with some Grand Marnier.  Served with wild and basmati rice mixture.

Seriously? It sounds like it would come out like 4 month old Panda Express leftovers that were left out in the rain.....

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19 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

You might want to try using water that's just about 200f. It activates the gluten more completely than cooler water. I'd always been told to use water that was around 70-80f to activate yeast and flour gluten. Recently I read that hotter water works better for making a bubbly, lighter crust (Still proof your yeast in water between 70-80f before adding to your flour mix).

Typo? 200°F will surely kill the yeast, yes? And maybe even denature the gluten? I heat my water to around 120°F. I understand yeast dies around 135°F ?? Or does the 200°F water cool enough upon mixing to not kill the yeast?

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Looks like recipes don't sufficiently irritate @El Mariachi. So here is a pic of the liberal paradise so hated by RWNJs like them. Astute readers may recall that seven months ago my pizza kitchen, rat hotel and flop house here in Big Sur got overrun by a forest fire. Well the land of the free has somewhat pulled itself together pushed out a billion California Poppies and tracts of purple Lupines. My lazy ass has managed, between brilliant SA posts, to get the swimming pool going for the season's first swim:

 

1987920634_PoolPoppiesLupine-1.png

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2 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

Grilled NY strip with a caramelized onion/mushroom/red wine reduction, asparagus, and baked potato.

Fuking LOVE asparagus. Brushed with a heated up cocktail of minced garlic, olive oil, 1/2 butter half margarine mix with Cabernet Sauvginon whatever, cilantro and fresh ground pepper. Bake for 20 at 350 then broil for 8. Most fuktabulous.....

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It rather beautiful here today in our particular liberal hell hole of Seattle.  I was thinking of broiling thick cut pork chops with some Stubbs marinade.  Quick sear on the grill then bank the coals  Grilled corn and some tasty sides.   The smoke from the BBQ will blend nicely with the smoke and ashes of the fires set downtown by Antifa and thoe uppity folks who think their lives matter.  

Probably a local Tieton hard cider on ice to drink. 

 

 

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Corn. Rub with 1/2 butter and 1/2 margarine. Then minced garlic, red pepper flakes and sea salt. Then a teaspoon of olive oil.Wrap tightly in foil and throw on the grill. Squeeze & turn occasionally....you'll figure it out, time-wise....

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2 hours ago, Borracho said:

Typo? 200°F will surely kill the yeast, yes? And maybe even denature the gluten? I heat my water to around 120°F. I understand yeast dies around 135°F ?? Or does the 200°F water cool enough upon mixing to not kill the yeast?

No, yes.... You proof your yeast in 70-80f water, and add it after you have the flour hot water, salt/sugar(if you use it) mixed. By then the dough should be cool enough not to kill the yeast. The hot water actually makes the dough more elastic, and shortens rising times, and very significantly reduces kneading time.

 
 
 
 
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The Secret to Smooth Doughs and Fluffy Bread Is Already at Hand

Just-boiled water has long played a role in making pie crusts, milk breads and more shine, across cultures and cuisines. But how does it work?

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The food personality Nadiya Hussain riffs on a classic Victorian-era hot water pastry crust for the base of her turmeric-rich samosa pie.
The food personality Nadiya Hussain riffs on a classic Victorian-era hot water pastry crust for the base of her turmeric-rich samosa pie.Credit...David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

By Rachel Wharton

April 16, 2021

If there’s a quintessential dish from the chef Nadiya Hussain — the “Great British Baking Show” winner who has since found huge success — it’s probably the samosa pie with the turmeric crust from the very first episode of her solo cooking show “Nadiya’s Family Favourites.”

Meant to be unmolded for maximum impact, the pie stands impossibly tall and doesn’t crumble, even when sliced. Ms. Hussain likes to wrap the whole golden thing in parchment paper and take it to picnics, passing out fat, perfect wedges to family and friends.

Luckily, the trick to it — an old-fashioned British pie crust Ms. Hussain makes with flour, shortening and water at a boil — is just as easy.

 

Ms. Hussain appreciates how simply you can roll out the still-warm dough. “I really love a hot water pastry crust,” she said. “It is one of my favorite doughs to work with.”

 
 
 
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ImageMs. Hussain making onion pretzels on her Netflix cooking show “Nadiya Bakes.”
Ms. Hussain making onion pretzels on her Netflix cooking show “Nadiya Bakes.”Credit...Netflix

Hot water might not seem like the most exciting ingredient, but understanding how and when to use it can transform the way we cook and bake. Found in baked goods across the world — tortillas, milk bread, cornbread and cream puffs, to name but four — hot water can speed mixing time; make it easier to fill and form doughs; yield softer, fluffier breads; and create stunning pie crusts like Ms. Hussain’s. Best of all, it’s readily available.

Some of the science behind these benefits is straightforward: Heat increases the speed at which flour absorbs liquid, and results in a smoother dough with less resting or kneading time.

But something even more magical happens when water and flour combine at higher temperatures, said Dan Souza, the editor of Cook’s Illustrated and a host of the show “America’s Test Kitchen.”

When you heat a wet starch above 140 degrees Fahrenheit (say, as when mixing flour, which is mainly starch, with boiling water), the starch granules begin to swell quickly into a meshlike network that traps water in the dough even as it cooks, Mr. Souza said.

This process is called gelatinization. It makes a dough easier to mix and roll out with very little rest time or kneading — in fact, the dough is almost immediately smooth and supple. The gelling helps the dough stay soft but strong and sturdy after it is cooked, too.

Gelatinization is what happens when you use boiling water to make the silky, supple dumpling doughs used all over Europe and Asia. It’s a part of French pâte à choux, where water and flour are cooked together to form the foundational pastry for both cream puffs and gougères. It is also the process behind tangzhong, the Chinese method of making a soft, yeasted milk bread, which uses a similar flour-and-water roux. (You add the yeast after the heated flour mixture has cooled.)

Gelatinization can also be used to bind breads made with flour that doesn’t contain gluten, Mr. Souza said, like tapioca or cornmeal. It’s even an added benefit of nixtamalization, the process of simmering dried corn kernels in an alkaline solution to prepare them for grinding and mixing into masa.

 
 
 
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Saptarshi Chakraborty, left, and Insiya Poonawala film on the set for their YouTube channel, Bong Eats.
Saptarshi Chakraborty, left, and Insiya Poonawala film on the set for their YouTube channel, Bong Eats.Credit...Bong Eats

Saptarshi Chakraborty and Insiya Poonawala read about doughs made with boiling water while working on their recipe for roti, the round flatbread cooked on stovetops across the Indian subcontinent.

The couple, who are based in Kolkata, India, produce Bong Eats, a popular YouTube channel targeted at inexperienced cooks. Sometimes, Ms. Poonawala joked, that’s them, too. When she first tried to make roti, she struggled with the dough’s stretchiness.

 
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But as they researched techniques, they learned that boiling water limits the formation of gluten. Roti is made with atta, a type of whole-wheat flour that is very high in the proteins that become long chains of gluten when mixed and kneaded with water. Those chains are exactly what cause the stretch in a dough.

 

When they tried making roti with boiling water, the switch worked as they had hoped it would, Mr. Chakraborty said, resulting in a dough that was much easier to handle.

While the texture of their roti is slightly different from traditional versions — less gluten also equals less chew — now nearly anyone can make it on the first try, he said. The dough comes together more quickly without much kneading or resting, and is a breeze to work. Thanks to the water-trapping properties of gelatinization, the rounds also puff up higher on the griddle, and stay soft long after they’re cold.

You sometimes see the same approach with flour tortillas made across the Southwest, said Freddie Bitsoie, a Navajo chef from Arizona who led the restaurant at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian until it closed during the coronavirus pandemic. When made with boiling water, they’re softer and fluffier, he said.

His mother always made flour tortillas with water just warm to the touch, he said, but his sister now uses boiling water for tortillas. She picked up the technique from her in-laws in neighboring New Mexico, Mr. Bitsoie said, where some cooks also use it in the masa for corn tortillas or tamales.

 
 
 
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Grace Young, a cookbook author and Chinese food expert, says boiling water makes scallion pancakes easier to roll, fill, fold, and then roll again.
Grace Young, a cookbook author and Chinese food expert, says boiling water makes scallion pancakes easier to roll, fill, fold, and then roll again.Credit...Christian Rodriguez

In China, boiling water is also used in many recipes for scallion pancakes, said Grace Young, who included her mother’s recipe in her best-selling 1999 book, “The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen.” The hot water makes the pancakes easier to roll, fill, fold and then roll again into soft and flaky scallion-flecked layers.

 
 
 
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Ms. Young’s recipe for scallion pancakes, featured in her book “The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen,” uses boiling water and cold water, resulting in pancakes that are tender with a little bit of chew.
Ms. Young’s recipe for scallion pancakes, featured in her book “The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen,” uses boiling water and cold water, resulting in pancakes that are tender with a little bit of chew.Credit...David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

Like many cooks, Ms. Young’s mother always added a little cold water at the end of the mixing process, for a whisper of that glutinous chew.

Over the years, Ms. Young has experimented with all hot water or all cold water, or different ratios of both. “The way my mom taught me is the way I like to do it,” she said. “After all the other testing, I just decided, this works.”

 
 
 
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The chef and restaurateur Anita Jaisinghani makes carrot semolina bread at her restaurant, Pondicheri, in Houston.
The chef and restaurateur Anita Jaisinghani makes carrot semolina bread at her restaurant, Pondicheri, in Houston.Credit...Arturo Olmos for The New York Times

Anita Jaisinghani, the chef and an owner of Pondicheri and Bake Lab + Shop in Houston, also learned to use hot water in baking while she was growing up, and still uses it in nearly everything she bakes.

Ms. Jaisinghani makes flatbreads, tea cakes and savory quick breads with a mix of spices, grated vegetables and dried fruits, as well as flours like buckwheat, chickpea or cornmeal. (She’s even used Texas grits.)

Hot water helps hydrate the coarse flours and dried fruits, she said, or diffuse flavors and colors from grated beets or ground turmeric, which is what gives Ms. Hussain’s beautiful golden pie crust its distinctive hue.

 
 
 
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Ms. Jaisinghani’s recipe for handvo, a type of Indian snack bread, involves using hot water to meld the ingredient flavors and to hydrate two types of flour.
Ms. Jaisinghani’s recipe for handvo, a type of Indian snack bread, involves using hot water to meld the ingredient flavors and to hydrate two types of flour.Credit...David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

Ms. Jaisinghani doesn’t like the change in texture that comes with boiling water, she said, but she does enjoy all the other benefits. That’s why she usually uses water that is roughly 120 degrees Fahrenheit. At home, for example, she always makes the complexly flavored, savory Indian snack bread called handvo with the hot water leftover from making tea.

Over the years, Ms. Jaisinghani has noticed that hot water also makes her baked goods just a little fluffier, because it speeds up the reaction time of chemical leaveners like baking soda or baking powder. With hot water, she said, there’s a bit more lift happening as you slide them into the oven.

Ms. Jaisinghani was a microbiologist before she became a restaurateur, but says a lot of these science-based techniques were what she was taught as a child in India.

“Most of this never made sense to me until I figured out the why,” she said.

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Fresh corn with the husks on: throw in bucket of water. Wait a while. Get BBQ going. Throw wet corn on barbie until done or in flames. Dunk in water to put flames out and keep cooking. Have another drink. Repeat. When done, tear husks off making loud pain noises. Dredge the cob through garlic butter. Eat.

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2 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Fresh corn with the husks on: throw in bucket of water. Wait a while. Get BBQ going. Throw wet corn on barbie until done or in flames. Dunk in water to put flames out and keep cooking. Have another drink. Repeat. When done, tear husks off making loud pain noises. Dredge the cob through garlic butter. Eat.

Or slather with a combination of lime juice,paprika, and mayonnaise.

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6 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Or slather with a combination of lime juice,paprika, and mayonnaise.

And a bit of real horseradish....

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2 hours ago, El Mariachi said:

Corn. Rub with 1/2 butter and 1/2 margarine. Then minced garlic, red pepper flakes and sea salt. Then a teaspoon of olive oil.Wrap tightly in foil and throw on the grill. Squeeze & turn occasionally....you'll figure it out, time-wise....

You gave up and joined in.

I think that's awesome.

Tonight:  Shrimp in a very hot wok, tossed for about 2 minutes.  Set aside.  Throw in sliced red and green pepper into the wok and fry for about 2 minutes. Add in a mixture of minced garlic, chopped scallions, minced ginger, soy sauce, fish sauce, and cayenne.  Toss until the garlic is cooked a bit. Throw the shrimp back in along with a generous handful of chopped fresh Thai basil, and cook till heated. Serve over rice.

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2 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

No, yes.... You proof your yeast in 70-80f water, and add it after you have the flour hot water, salt/sugar(if you use it) mixed. By then the dough should be cool enough not to kill the yeast. The hot water actually makes the dough more elastic, and shortens rising times, and very significantly reduces kneading time.

Okay then...Makes sense. I'll try it and report back next week.

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44 minutes ago, El Mariachi said:

Phuk U, Ben......:lol:

What's with the half butter/half margerine thing?

Cholesterol?

And @Mrleft8 , some of your posts could be halved.

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only 'thread' more tedious than a RWNJ's baseless rant/fart is one full of food recipes.

food is fuel.

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2 minutes ago, 3to1 said:

only 'thread' more tedious than a RWNJ's baseless rant/fart is one full of food recipes.

Who shit in your Cheerios? Was it one tablespoon or two? Warm or delicately chilled?

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1 minute ago, Borracho said:

Who shit in your Cheerios? Was it one tablespoon or two? Warm or delicately chilled?

when'd you lose your will to win?

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10 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

Cheeseburgers with carmelized onions...  Had a mushroom swiss burger at the Cafeteria at work last week, and it was pretty good!

Pretty similar to what we're having tonight. In spite of spending the last five weeks or so kicking around South Island in a campervan, we still are eating in a reasonable civil fashion.

Today, we visited Edoras and took a hike to the top.

From The Two Towers:

edoras1.thumb.jpg.980f818744b9edd77f55e48203350c58.jpg

 

From this afternoon:

20210419_122136.thumb.jpg.3f05eb782ff871c2769eec17ba600662.jpg

 

From the top. We think Helm's Deep is up that valley there...

20210419_123803.thumb.jpg.01ccb3721c8296113218070f740087f0.jpg

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We did a "pantry challenge".  Grab a bunch of stuff that hadn't been used and figure out a way to make a meal out of it.

The main thing was add lots of fresh veggies.

Tonight will be what was left over.

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9 hours ago, justsomeguy! said:

What's with the half butter/half margerine thing?

Cholesterol?

And @Mrleft8 , some of your posts could be halved.

Yeah. I noticed that C&P needed editing after it had timed out. Sorry.

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9 hours ago, justsomeguy! said:

What's with the half butter/half margerine thing?

Cholesterol?

And @Mrleft8 , some of your posts could be halved.

It's just something I started doing about 20 years ago.....pure butter gets a little too buttery for my tastes these daze (thanks Grandma, the Queen of Butter, Half 'n Half and real cream) and 'pure' margerine gets a little too oily and stuff. So I started mixing the two together for things like grilling fish & chicken, various omelettes, sauteed onions and veggies and stuffed Jalapeños in the big pans, garlic bread, bruschettas {sic?}.....etc etc etc. I just like the taste of the combination of them.....

 

(P.S....and it works on lobster as well. And grilled clams)

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11 hours ago, benwynn said:

You gave up and joined in.

I think that's awesome.

Tonight:  Shrimp in a very hot wok, tossed for about 2 minutes.  Set aside.  Throw in sliced red and green pepper into the wok and fry for about 2 minutes. Add in a mixture of minced garlic, chopped scallions, minced ginger, soy sauce, fish sauce, and cayenne.  Toss until the garlic is cooked a bit. Throw the shrimp back in along with a generous handful of chopped fresh Thai basil, and cook till heated. Serve over rice.

Dude, that's Boothy..  Of course he gave in.  Food is his kryptonite.  LOL.  You will figure him out eventually...  

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7 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Pretty similar to what we're having tonight. In spite of spending the last five weeks or so kicking around South Island in a campervan, we still are eating in a reasonable civil fashion.

Today, we visited Edoras and took a hike to the top.

From The Two Towers:

edoras1.thumb.jpg.980f818744b9edd77f55e48203350c58.jpg

 

From this afternoon:

20210419_122136.thumb.jpg.3f05eb782ff871c2769eec17ba600662.jpg

 

From the top. We think Helm's Deep is up that valley there...

20210419_123803.thumb.jpg.01ccb3721c8296113218070f740087f0.jpg

That's cool BJ...  Seriously Cool..  

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23 minutes ago, shaggy said:

Dude, that's Boothy..  Of course he gave in.  Food is his kryptonite.  LOL.  You will figure him out eventually...  

(Shush, you......:lol:)

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2 hours ago, Bus Driver said:

We did a "pantry challenge".  Grab a bunch of stuff that hadn't been used and figure out a way to make a meal out of it.

The main thing was add lots of fresh veggies.

Tonight will be what was left over.

 

Sounds like one of the cooking shows Missus BB watches.  Three Chefs are each give the same random, unrelated ingredients, and see who can make the best dish out it; "Chopped", maybe?

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8 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Pretty similar to what we're having tonight. In spite of spending the last five weeks or so kicking around South Island in a campervan, we still are eating in a reasonable civil fashion.

Today, we visited Edoras and took a hike to the top.

From The Two Towers:

edoras1.thumb.jpg.980f818744b9edd77f55e48203350c58.jpg

 

From this afternoon:

20210419_122136.thumb.jpg.3f05eb782ff871c2769eec17ba600662.jpg

 

From the top. We think Helm's Deep is up that valley there...

20210419_123803.thumb.jpg.01ccb3721c8296113218070f740087f0.jpg

 

FB_IMG_1612720437156.jpg

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Just now, El Mariachi said:

 

FB_IMG_1612720437156.jpg

If I am not mistaken, the animals from which the meat and cheese came likely ate exclusively plant material.  

Thus, consuming such a thing makes one a vegetarian, once removed.

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Damn, and I thought by the title that this thread was gonna be about the recent slew of gun deaths and President Biden's failure to repeal and replace the Second Amendment.

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5 minutes ago, Willin' said:

Damn, and I thought by the title that this thread was gonna be about the recent slew of gun deaths and President Biden's failure to repeal and replace the Second Amendment.

How much did your vagina transplant set you back?....

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1 hour ago, Bus Driver said:

If I am not mistaken, the animals from which the meat and cheese came likely ate exclusively plant material.  

Thus, consuming such a thing makes one a vegetarian, once removed.

and they all knew  Kevin Bacon B)

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4 hours ago, shaggy said:

That's cool BJ...  Seriously Cool..  

Just the drive out there was amazing. It's about 24km out on a dirt/gravel road after the pavement ends through the middle of some huge ranching stations in this huge valley.

Mount Sunday is that little hump I pointed to in the second picture.

 

20210419_113200.jpg

20210419_113200_arrow.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 4/19/2021 at 11:23 AM, justsomeguy! said:
On 4/19/2021 at 10:05 AM, El Mariachi said:

pure butter gets a little too buttery for my tastes

Trying to wrap my head around that, but okie-doke!

Yeah, no.... "too much butter" is kinda like "too much garlic," words you will never hear spoken around our kitchen/dining table.

It's not so much that Boothie is into food, he just has a short attention span. Also he seems a man of great enthusiasm, one of his best qualities.

- DSK

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