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Scripps Medical under Cyber Attack .. Closed !


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Scripps Medical under Cyber Attack .. forget your Appointment for at least Today ... Closed ! For Emergencies Go to Closest Hospital Sharp, Kaiser etc.

Last week Verizon had system wide issues in Kalifornia 

Are we at the beginning of this becoming the norm ???

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has been happening all over and very brazen. Scripts medical and related networks is going to pay the hackers. I suspect their negotiators are working out payment and have already sent the digital currency demand. I have a buddy that does it for a living - he and his team are so busy and they always advise to pay.   A very deadly clean up team has been notified if the demand gets too big without release of the networks and data and if the insurance company decides they had enough from these extortionists. 

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7 minutes ago, Black Jack said:

has been happening all over and very brazen. Scripts medical and related networks is going to pay the hackers. I suspect their negotiators are working out payment and have already sent the digital currency demand. I have a buddy that does it for a living - he and his team are so busy and they always advise to pay.   A very deadly clean up team has been notified if the demand gets too big without release of the networks and data and if the insurance company decides they had enough from these extortionists. 

that's Not encouraging

between everything merging and wanting you to have a 1 for all login, email & user name

and the incompetent fucks who put ALL your Data into 1 basket

The Stakes keep getting Higher for a Hack as if you get in 1 place and You Have it ALL

Our information is being gathered and sorted like We are Stupid

But it's the Requirements of Business as Usual, Exploiting Us and forcing us to be Vulnerable

All CellFone Data one week and All Medical Data the next

More SPAM Calls and Junk eMail than ever

Open Borders w Full Rights for illegal Aliens, releasing Prisoners, Throwing Money at Drug Addicts

And Raising TAXES on the former middle class to Pay for it

We are getting Fucked from Every possible angle

 

I hope Throat Warbler Mangrove chimes in

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if organizations had a active backup plan, they could have restored up to the day before in 24 hours, reset all the passwords and be happliy going about their business.   But not everyone has a CIO who understands risks/level of destruction.  Or they have a board that is too cheap and/or stupid to pay for proper backup.

 

 The money on the line is at a level of inconvenience.  You gore the big boys, they will hunt you down like a dog.    Back in the 90s, some of you may remember the KAOS computer hackers coming out and saying they had hacked the Pentagon and NASA.  Made the news worldwide.  What never got reported was how it went down and why.

The majority of those hackers were in Europe and thought they were pretty clever crisscrossing the globe using other people's connections,  but what they did not know was there are AI tools doing exactly what they do in real time to identify them as breaches are identified.  As illegal as what they are doing, but they are there for "good" purposes and usually working hand in hand with the authorities.  Anyways, when the breach was uncovered, the organization being attacked at the time was the West German equivalent of the CIA (forget the letters they use) who was immediately informed.  The director put out a message saying these people at these addresses are fucking with us and if something were to happen to them, well it would not be a great loss for the world.  The hackers understood he had just put out a pro bono hit on them and they freaked out and told the world who they were so as to be in the public eye.   They also ceased to play games after that. 

 

Was part of the team that investigated how they got into the German CIA site.  It was via poorly secured portals between many, many organizations around the world.  The initial attack was at a site in Japan with the worst security in the whole world.  We were banging our heads on our desks after interviewing their IT folks in Tokyo.  But the company had some links to some of their government site portals and those had links to other government systems around the world.  The hackers just followed each path to see what was vulnerable.   We called it distributed computing back then. You know it as the cloud. 

Woody is very close in his appraisal.  The data is not all in one basket, but due to distributed computing, you can have a single logical "basket" if organizations do not secure their portals properly.  

and every company has to have backup systems that take the data offline with the ability to be restored within 24 hours with test runs done periodically.  Not cheap but it has to be done.   Anyone not paying for such activities is risking their business as 90% of companies that lose access to their data for 30 or more days go out of business within a year.

 

For those of you who put all your data into Amazon's data centers thinking they now own the problem, have you ever wondered what you will do should some state player (cough North Korea cough) hack Amazon and take out all their data centers?   Have you asked how long until they get around restoring your company's data compared to the insurance companies, banks, government sites, fortune 100 corporations?    Should not assume you will be at the top of their list..  To me Amazon is fine for marketing data for short term projects that need to scale quickly, but for the family jewels (eg employee personnel records, CRM, engineering drawings etc), that should stay on company premises and be locked down and backed up carefully.

 

To finish, so how many of you have a backup of all your PC files on a media that is not connected to your laptop and how current is it?

It can be as simple as coping all your files in My Documents and pictures to a thumb drive once a month and keeping it in your safe deposit box or parent's house.

Could you afford to lose all your data due to a hacker or a disk drive grenading?

Do something now while you have a chance.  Do not be like Scripps Medical..

 

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As of 1 min ago Scripps still off-line/out of Buisness.

This is Day 4 of people Not getting whatever was scheduled  done

And taking away a Major Player in our ability to handle any medical crisis  (remember COVID) in earthquake country

I have/had a general yearly check-up scheduled in one week. I can see forgetting about that as if they get things up and running by then Others  with more urgent needs shall be backed up for awhile. 

I wonder if Kaiser or Sharp have a Ransom over their heads for X amount by ?? or they go down Country Wide.

I'm guessing Scripps is a small fish Nationally and their fate may be in the hands of the Big Players who are getting shaken down

Scripps might not even be invited to buy their way out before the others Must.

As I mentioned above, Verizon Statewide one week and Scripps the next

What's in store for this week and the next ??

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On 5/3/2021 at 11:25 AM, Black Jack said:

has been happening all over and very brazen. Scripts medical and related networks is going to pay the hackers. I suspect their negotiators are working out payment and have already sent the digital currency demand. I have a buddy that does it for a living - he and his team are so busy and they always advise to pay.   A very deadly clean up team has been notified if the demand gets too big without release of the networks and data and if the insurance company decides they had enough from these extortionists. 

What is a "deadly clean up team", specifically?

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32 minutes ago, mikewof said:

What is a "deadly clean up team", specifically?

And why is their mission not yet completed ?

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46 minutes ago, mikewof said:

What is a "deadly clean up team", specifically?

a very capable team made up of former intellegence and operational professions will attempt to collect the stolen data, recover the demand money, get a porition of the bounty and likely eliminate any further the criminal cyber extortion activity from these cyber criminal cells. Nobody including legit insurence carriers likes to pay 10s to 100s of millions of dollars out in extortion only to be taken again from the same criminals. Major international law enforcement welcomes these cowboys to do clean up.

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1 hour ago, Black Jack said:

a very capable team made up of former intellegence and operational professions will attempt to collect the stolen data, recover the demand money, get a porition of the bounty and likely eliminate any further the criminal cyber extortion activity from these cyber criminal cells. Nobody including legit insurence carriers likes to pay 10s to 100s of millions of dollars out in extortion only to be taken again from the same criminals. Major international law enforcement welcomes these cowboys to do clean up.

Shit. That sounds terrifying.

Is it common for them to capture cyber criminals that are insulated behind many layers of VPNs, and anonymous crypto transfers and such?

Could you imagine being a skinny little hacker somewhere in someone's basement in Estonia, and you get a knock on the door to see a team of these "cowboys" standing there?

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1 hour ago, DA-WOODY said:

And why is their mission not yet completed ?

Beats me, I know fuck-all about this topic. More Cowbell's post up there is something I've been thankfully able to avoid, and luckily, given that my computer skills are minimal.

I will say this though ... I bought little bottle of Stacker 2 Energy Shot, and it claims to 10,000% the U.S. Daily Recommended Allowance for Vitamin B12. It really makes me feel like I could fight hackers, if I knew something about computers. But seriously, 10,000%? What the actual fuck, Woody?

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20 minutes ago, mikewof said:

Shit. That sounds terrifying.

Is it common for them to capture cyber criminals that are insulated behind many layers of VPNs, and anonymous crypto transfers and such?

There is always a trail. Having the desire and resources to do it is another thing. Tracking the demand payment and finding the criminals is a matter of time. Most cyber criminals try to keep the demand low enough to not trigger the response. Any demand for over 10 million will trigger an active response team. I heard that atleast 1000 US based privately held companies paid 1.5 million per or a lot more in demands after hacked in this 2020 year. Larger Hospital networks and Univerities have been struck really hard since their data is really mission critical and takes months, years to rebuild the data bases after the hack. The big concern is to avoid the resale of the breeched data on the dark web including credit, health records and other personal information of their cleints. Bounties are out there and are being collected.

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1 hour ago, Black Jack said:

There is always a trail. Having the desire and resources to do it is another thing. Tracking the demand payment and finding the criminals is a matter of time. Most cyber criminals try to keep the demand low enough to not trigger the response. Any demand for over 10 million will trigger an active response team. I heard that atleast 1000 US based privately held companies paid 1.5 million per or a lot more in demands after hacked in this 2020 year. Larger Hospital networks and Univerities have been struck really hard since their data is really mission critical and takes months, years to rebuild the data bases after the hack. The big concern is to avoid the resale of the breeched data on the dark web including credit, health records and other personal information of their cleints. Bounties are out there and are being collected.

Bounties? So it's a straight up Old-West kind of deal? Deliver a body to law-enforcement, get the reward? Any abuse of that, like delivery of some anonymous stooge set up to have roughly the same digital breadcrumb trail as the actual hacker?

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A friend long ago (FBI Agent) said he LOVED the computer/internet age

as they no longer need to tap in LiveRealTime to get whatever they need

he said Everything Is There and Shall Remain more or less Forever

does that mean you can recover whatever You lost Yes/No

is it economically worth it ... depends but most often not

if you make a threat or do something else Stupid and become a Target

"They" have all the Time and Money to dig it out if it's worth their time

But you need to be more important than other stuff

I'm Not Happy being w/o Scripps being open "Just in case"

and WTF Next, the others Fall too, leaving us without Medical in SoCal ???

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https://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/on-day-4-of-outage-scripps-health-still-doesnt-know-extent-of-cyberattack/2595568/

On Day 4 of Outage, Scripps Health Still Doesn't Know Extent of Cyberattack

Scripps Health officials are not answering specific questions about Saturday’s cyberattack, but someone is responding to patients’ questions via Scripps Facebook account.

By Eric S. Page, Dana Griffin and Christina Bravo Published May 4, 2021 Updated on May 4, 2021 at 7:29 pm

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Scripps Health officials are not answering specific questions about Saturday’s cyberattack, but someone is responding to patients’ questions via Scripps Facebook account, reports NBC 7’s Dana Griffin.

It’s Day 4 of the Scripps Health cyberattack, which forced the healthcare system offline.

On Tuesday, NBC 7 asked a spokesman from Scripps about the impact to patients and their personal information, but he declined to comment. On Monday, though, the healthcare provider said the cyberattack had prompted some patients to reschedule appointments and would be contacting them to do so. At the time, it was not clear how providers would be making contact with patients.

Poway patient Chris Sheridan told NBC 7 on Tuesday that he -- like many others -- learned they still had appointments by using Scripps Facebook account.

 
 
 
 
2:02
Cyberattack on Scripps Health Creates Disruptions, Forces Some Rescheduling
On Monday afternoon, the heath-care provider had one of its media representatives send a statement from what appeared to be a personal Gmail account, reports NBC 7's Dana Griffin.

Sheridan is recovering at home after a two-hour shoulder surgery Monday at Scripps Carmel Valley. He went in with some concerns but said he got the same level of care he expected before the cyberattack.

“I was worried going in that something was going to be different,” Sheridan said. “I was very happy to have my shoulder surgery go on as planned.”

Sheridan contacted his health-care providers via Facebook's Instant Messenger app.

"They got back to me saying to keep my scheduled time unless I was otherwise told,” Sheridan said.

Another person asked if patients and staff should be concerned and take protection measures for possible identity fraud.

“We are still in the process of assessing the extent of this attack," Scripps wrote back. "If any patients’ information was compromised, we will be reaching out to them.”

One patient had a procedure Tuesday and wanted to know if the appointment was cancelled. Scripps asked the patient to direct message them with their name, date of birth, procedure location and doctor’s name so someone could contact the patient directly.

Sheridan said check-in was a little slow on Monday.

“I noticed they were using old school paperwork instead of using the computer for the normal information,” Sheridan said. “The nurse that was tending to me said it had been about 10 years since she had done paperwork like that and joked that she actually liked doing it the old school way.”

Sheridan said he didn’t notice a difference in care because of the cyberattack, but he’s still concerned about how much access hackers may have gained.

“I really hope they catch the people that did this because it’s not funny,” Sheridan said. “They could have potentially hurt somebody by not getting a surgery or some kind of procedure that needed to go on — if they had done so in cancelling it, it could have hurt somebody.”

The Scripps Cyberattack

Scripps Health officials said on Sunday that their technology servers were hacked over the weekend, forcing the health care system to switch to offline chart systems and causing a disruption to their patient portals.

Officials did not provide information on how the cyberattack occurred, nor did they share what systems were affected by the breach. A spokesman for Scripps declined to comment Monday when asked whether the incident was a case of ransomware, in which malicious code is introduced to a computer system, rendering it inoperable until a ransom is paid.

 
 
 
 
3:47
Expert Weighs In On Cyber Attack Targeting Scripps Health Network
NBC 7 heard from a patient who needed care while the attack was affecting the network's system, and from a cyber security expert about the scope of the attack.

On Monday afternoon, the heath-care provider had one of its media representatives send out the following statement from what appeared to be a personal Gmail account:

"As Scripps Health continues to address the cyberattack from this past weekend, our facilities remain open for patient care, including our hospitals, emergency departments, urgent care centers, Scripps HealthExpress locations and other outpatient facilities. Our technical teams and vendor partners are working tirelessly to resolve issues related to the cyberattack as quickly as possible."

Scripps also said the cyberattack had prompted some patients to reschedule appointments and would be contacting them to do so. It's not clear how that contact would be made, since it appeared Scripps' email servers were affected by the outage. Patients who had appointments in "the next several days" can call 800-SCRIPPS for more information. Scripps.org was still down on Monday.

 
 
 
 
0:59
Cyber Attack at Scripps Health
Scripps Health confirmed Sunday their technology servers were hacked overnight.

The health care system's representatives said on Sunday that they suspended access to patient portals and other "technology applications related to our operations at our health care facilities," but stressed that patient care continues using "established back-up processes, including offline documentation methods."

Some appointments were canceled on Sunday and Monday as a result of the breach.

 
 
 
 
3:04
Cyber Security Expert Explains Ransomware Attacks Targeting Hospitals
NBC 7's Omari Fleming spoke to an expert about how the attack works, and how patients can avoid becoming victims.

Government Response to Scripps Cyberattack

The San Diego County Office of Emergency Services (OES) said on Sunday that ambulances were being diverted from Scripps' facilities to other hospitals in the area but that it was a precautionary measure. On Monday, an employee with AMR, the city's ambulance provider, said Scripps was only taking trauma transports and foot traffic at that time. All other ambulance traffic to Scripps medical centers was being diverted to other facilities.

Local law enforcement and "the appropriate government organizations" were notified of the cyberattack, Scripps Health said.

OES officials said Sunday that its cybersecurity professionals were investigating the cyberattack.

Anne Cutler of the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency was asked for a comment regarding the situation. She referred NBC 7 back to Scripps for a comment.

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Scripps Health Cyberattack Delaying Critical Care for Some Patients, Workers Say

The Scripps Health cyberattack kept the health care system offline for the fifth day in a row

By Dana Griffin Published May 5, 2021 Updated on May 6, 2021 at 12:13 am

 
 
 
 
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NBC 7’s Dana Griffin spoke to a patient whose wait for surgery has been extended by the cyberattack.

NBC 7 has learned the Scripps Health cyberattack -- and lack of answers -- is prolonging care for patients, including a much-needed surgery for a woman with a rare disease.

Two months ago, Jonaliza Monforte, 21, was diagnosed with moyamoya disease -- a rare condition that restricts blood flow to the brain because of narrowed vessels. It can put people at risk for a stroke.

“Nobody can really tell how fast my progression is,” Monforte said. “I was told that I’m needing the surgery soon.”

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Monforte is a Scripps patient but needs surgery from a specialist at Stanford University.

But here’s the problem: Saturday’s cyberattack forced Scripps Health offline and Monforte said she can’t get her medical records and images sent to Stanford, which is prolonging her surgery.

She said she can’t get answers from Scripps when she calls.

“Every time I would call they would just tell me that their system is still down and to keep calling every day.”

During business hours on Wednesday, a Scripps representative declined to comment further on the state of the attack and the damage it has caused, but someone was answering questions on the Scripps Facebook page.

“We are actively working to restore our systems as soon as it is safe. We are working with the top global experts in the field of cyber security as well as local and federal government. Systems will be restored as soon as possible,” Scripps posted via the app.

Scripps Health Statement Released Wednesday

Toward 5 p.m. Scripps Health sent out the following statement via what appeared to be an employee's persona Gmail account:

On May 1, Scripps Health began experiencing a network outage that resulted in a disruption to our IT systems at our hospitals and facilities. Upon discovering the outage, we immediately initiated an investigation and took steps to contain the outage, including by taking a significant portion of our network offline as a proactive security measure. An independent cybersecurity firm was engaged to assist in our investigation and restoration efforts. While the investigation is ongoing and in the early stages, we have determined that the outage was due to a security incident involving malware on our computer networks. Scripps technical teams are working 24/7 to restore our systems as quickly and safely as possible, and in a manner that prioritizes our ability to provide patient care. 

While this incident has resulted in operational disruptions at our hospitals and facilities, our clinical staff is trained to provide care in these types of situations, and are committed to doing so. Scripps Health physicians, nurses and staff are implementing workarounds to mitigate any disruptions and provide uninterrupted care to our patients. 

As a result of this incident, we need to reschedule some patients’ appointments and are reaching out to them to do so. Patients who have appointments scheduled during the next several days and are unsure about their status may call 1-800-SCRIPPS for more information.

Scripps Health Staffers Share Concerns

Two Scripps health care workers who asked to remain anonymous told NBC 7 earlier in the day that they’re concerned about patient care.

“It’s very frustrating,” one worker said. “We’re on the front lines with our patients and we’re being asked questions and we don’t have information to give them.”

Another works with cancer patients and said that treatments have been postponed.

It’s been five days with Scripps providing minimal information. It’s unclear how long the system will remain unavailable and how big the scope of this cyberattack is on patients’ health.

“I do understand that this thing is hard for them, but I just hope there was a backup for them to get a hold of some medical records, especially for other patients as well that are in a life-threatening situation,” Monforte said.

Many are also wondering what systems were in place to thwart an attack and how long it took to inform outside agencies that handle these types of attacks.

Several patients have been able to get surgeries. Others have had important appointments canceled.

San Diego County Comment on the Outage

Donnie Ryan, the communications officer for San Diego County's Public Safety Group, told NBC 7 the following regarding the hack at Scripps: "Requests for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) responses continue to be met in San Diego County while Scripps Health recovers from the cyberattack that occurred over the weekend. The emergency health care system in the county is less stressed now than it was during the heights of COVID, and the public should be reassured that emergency response needs are being met. We recommend contacting Scripps directly for the latest updates on the cyberattack."

Ryan also issued the following statement regarding ambulance services: "Ambulance-patient routing (for both paramedic and EMT ambulances) is being handled through the base hospital system, as usual. The system is designed to get the patient to the best location for care depending on location, type of injury and hospital capacity at that time."

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State regulator watching Scripps Health ransomware attack closely

A view of Scripps Memorial Hospital in Hillcrest on Monday, May 3, 2021.
A view of Scripps Memorial Hospital in Hillcrest on Monday, May 3, 2021.
(Sandy Huffaker/For The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Patient care continues at impacted hospitals as others take up the slack

May 5, 2021 6:55 PM PT

The California Department of Public Health confirmed Wednesday that it is monitoring the ransomware attack that has severely impacted Scripps Health facilities throughout San Diego County, but has thus far determined that emergency procedures under way since Saturday have been adequate to ensure patients are safe.

The agency, which oversees all hospitals in the state, said that Scripps notified it of the “ransomware attacks” and that it is “actively monitoring” the situation.

“These hospitals are operational and caring for patients using appropriate emergency protocols in inpatient areas of the hospital,” a statement said.

CDPH further noted that it has the authority to “involuntarily suspend” the licenses of facilities if it determines that the care being provided is unsafe. However, the mere fact that a hospital is operating under “emergency protocols” does not, in and of itself, “warrant such action.”

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Wednesday was the fourth day of the attack, and ambulance services were still being diverted from most facilities, though a county emergency medical services director said late Tuesday that the situation was not absolute. Depending on the need at any given moment, facilities might take trauma or other emergency cases if diversion was impractical.

Other health systems in the area were helping to pick up the load shed by San Diego’s second-largest health system as measured by total patient discharges, behind only Sharp HealthCare, according to state data.

Dr. Christian Dameff, an emergency medicine specialist and cybersecurity researcher at UC San Diego Health, said Wednesday that the situation has definitely been noticeable in the volume of patients arriving daily for treatment.

“What we’ve seen in an influx of Scripps patients into the UCSD system as their capacity to take care of patients has gone down a little bit,” Dameff said.

 

He said that everyone in San Diego’s large medical community feels responsible to help in such a situation.

“We really are a giant ecosystem, and when one organization is attacked, it can impact all of the others,” Dameff said. “Everyone’s kind of coming together in the greater San Diego area to try to help facilitate that care.

“Patients aren’t going to stop getting sick just because one of the health systems is under attack.”

The current status of the attack at Scripps remained uncertain. Patients have indicated that it has not just been Scripps’ four hospitals affected by the attack but also the information systems that serve its clinics and outpatient surgery centers.

After saying nothing about the situation Tuesday, the company issued a brief statement late Wednesday afternoon indicating that it has hired an independent cybersecurity firm to get to the bottom of the problem. That investigation, Scripps said, is “ongoing and in the early stages” but has been determined to be related to “malware” on its computer networks. Attempts to contain the threat, Scripps said, have forced it to take a significant portion of its data network offline, “as a proactive security measure.”

“Scripps technical teams are working 24/7 to restore our systems as quickly and safely as possible, and in a manner that prioritizes our ability to provide patient care,” the statement said.

Wednesday afternoon, Jason Cabot, an attorney from Normal Heights, lay in a bed at Scripps Mercy Hospital in Hillcrest recovering from surgery earlier in the day.

It was not clear until the very last minute whether the procedure, which Cabot said he preferred not to disclose, would go forward. Schedulers had been unable to access his medical record or the surgical schedule when he called.

But the procedure proceeded pretty much as planned. Some might wonder, why not just postpone until things are running normally again? In his case, the surgery had already been significantly delayed due to COVID-19 restrictions.

“I don’t think it’s as easy as people think to reschedule given the large backlog of surgeries already due to COVID,” he said. “Most surgeries had been on hold for the better part of the year as it is.”

He said there were some signs of progress visible at Mercy Wednesday afternoon. Electronic telemetry systems were back online, after having been initially part of the shutdown, causing one family who gave birth at Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas to have a nurse in the room to hand-record vital signs on paper Sunday and early Monday.

The patient medical record, though, was still being written out in ink rather than typed into a computer. That situation, Cabot said, comes with its own obvious issues.

“The biggest concern from the patient care standpoint is that things could fall through the cracks like patient orders, allergies, record of medication administration and so on ... in some ways, this is reminiscent of ‘90s experience or even ‘80s,” Cabot said.

But he added that the people delivering the care were far from retro in their approach.

“Ultimately, the staff did a great job, although it was obviously a bit of an unfamiliar process for them,” he said.

That was the experience of Judy Nauta, a downtown resident who had an echocardiogram scheduled for Thursday and a chemical stress test set for Friday.

Though scheduling information has often been unavailable, she said the attitude of employees has remained professional.

“I found that everyone I’ve spoken to has been so kind and helpful,” she said in an email.

Surely the question on everyone’s mind is: How much longer will the current situation last?

Scripps has not put forth a timeline, making the answer to that critical question anyone’s guess.

Dameff, the UC San Diego cybersecurity researcher and physician, said he does not know the exact nature of the attack at Scripps or how deeply it penetrated network resources. It can take weeks to recover from the most-severe ransomware attacks.

Part of the problem, he said, is that starting over is not just a matter of hitting reset buttons on the wide range of technology that modern medical facilities employ. Information technology teams must methodically verify that malicious software is truly gone before they can bring systems back online. And, if it is necessary to reset large swaths of equipment to new condition, wiping out their previous configurations, getting everything reloaded and reset can take what seems like forever.

“It needs to be done carefully, because, if you start a system back up and you haven’t closed all of the doors and the hackers can still get in, they’ll just do the same thing again,” he said.


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Health Care Workers, Patients Share Concerns About Scripps Health's Handling of Cyberattack

A patient recovering from surgery Mercy Hospital said his level of care has been excellent but thinks Scripps leadership needs to be more transparent

By Dana Griffin Published May 6, 2021 Updated on May 6, 2021 at 5:15 pm

 
 
 
 
 
 
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NBC 7’s Dana Griffin continues to follow the Scripps cyberattack, which was affecting Scripp’s data systems for the sixth day.

On Day 6 of the Scripps Health cyberattack, the health-care provider's website is still unavailable, as is specific information for patients and staff.

Jason Cabot showed up Wednesday morning to Mercy Hospital, unsure if he would be able to have his procedure performed.

“Preparing for surgery is difficult," Cabot said. "Besides needing to get up at about 4:30 in the morning, you have to not eat anything for an entire day, you have to empty your bowels, you have to do all sorts of prep work."

 
 
 
 
 
 
1:48
Cyberattack on Scripps Health Network Interrupting Patients Waiting for Surgery
NBC 7's Dana Griffin spoke to a patient whose wait for surgery has been extended by the cyberattack.

While Cabot's surgery was performed, he had no idea if it was still on the schedule in the days leading up to it.

Cabot told NBC 7 he called and emailed Scripps beforehand.

“They had no access to patient records,” Cabot said. “And that email bounced back because all of Scripps emails are down.”

Cabot then wrote this message on the Scripps Facebook page:

“I have surgery scheduled for tomorrow morning and have heard absolutely nothing. I have been fasting all day and plan to show up at the hospital [at] 5 a.m. as instructed but will be very disappointed if this surgery is canceled. I have been waiting a long time for it.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
1:49
On Day 4 of Outage, Scripps Health Still Doesn't Know Extent of Cyberattack
Scripps Health officials are not answering specific questions about Saturday’s cyberattack, but someone is responding to patients’ questions via Scripps Facebook account, reports NBC 7's Dana Griffin.

Once at the hospital, Cabot said, workers were using paper charts.

“It was frankly a little bit like being in the hospital in the '80s and '90s before the advent of computerized systems," Cabot said. “Everything was being done by paper.”

Cabot also said that during his visit he saw a relatively young surgeon who was irate about not having access to records and who canceled on another patient right on the spot.

“Now, the surgeon I had was an older guy who was more experienced, so I think he was around before computerized systems were widely used,” Cabot said, “But there were definitely younger staff there who had only worked with computerized systems, and they were obviously out of their element a little bit.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
3:47
Expert Weighs In On Cyber Attack Targeting Scripps Health Network
NBC 7 heard from a patient who needed care while the attack was affecting the network's system, and from a cyber security expert about the scope of the attack.

NBC 7 also spoke with a nurse who asked to remain anonymous. She said it was frantic inside her Scripps Health facility. She said nurses were crying and feeling uncomfortable, and that some believed Scripps was downplaying the impacts of the outage.

The nurse added that doctors can cancel elective procedures, especially when they don’t have a patient’s history. She said doing so would be for the patient’s own safety. She’s more concerned, though -- because nurses can’t look information up online -- about people having heart attacks or strokes, and those who can’t speak for themselves and don’t know their medical history

Cabot said the quality of care was very good, but he still had concerns about personal information getting exposed because of the cyberattack and staff being kept in the dark.

 
 
 
 
 
 
2:02
Cyberattack on Scripps Health Creates Disruptions, Forces Some Rescheduling
On Monday afternoon, the heath-care provider had one of its media representatives send a statement from what appeared to be a personal Gmail account, reports NBC 7's Dana Griffin.

“[Workers] don’t know, sort of, what the cause of this is, when it’s gonna go back up or what to expect as far as how long this is gonna go forward," Cabot said. "So, obviously, as far as the Scripps leadership is concerned, I certainly think this could have been handled in a better way.”

NBC 7 asked a Scripps Health spokesman again on Thursday to provide more info about the malware that had infected their technology systems and when the health system expects to be back online. The spokesman declined to comment.

 

Now day 5 and ???????????

they are Not even making a guess @ this point

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45 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

Anarchy under attack!

going for the Low Hanging Fruit

 

Scripps Still Down 5 days and counting

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Now Spectrum down ... no idea how far or wide But where I am anyway

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No End in sight for Scripps :-(

AND

 

SBNIcon4_512px.png 10 Major Cyber Attacks Witnessed Globally in Q1 2021

 

10 Major Cyber Attacks in Q1 2021

Cyber crime has been on the rise for years now and it is not showing any signs of slowing down. To make it worse, the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 just fueled the situation. Those who were expecting relief from the increasing terror of cyber crimes in 2021 are to be disappointed as the number of attacks is only increasing day after day.  

 

We have barely crossed the first quarter of 2021 and already several huge cyber attacks have made the headlines. Here is a list of some of the major cyber attacks that took place in Q1 2021:

 

#1 Channel Nine

Australian broadcaster Channel Nine was hit by a cyber attack on 28th March 2021, which rendered the channel unable to air its Sunday news bulletin and several other shows. With the unavailability of internet access at its Sydney headquarters, the attack also interrupted operations at the network’s publishing business as some of the publishing tools were also down. Although the channel first claimed that the inconvenience was just due to “technical difficulties”, it later confirmed the cyber attack. 

 

Channel Nine Cyber Attack

 

#2 Harris Federation

In March 2021, the London-based Harris Federation suffered a ransomware attack and was forced to “temporarily” disable the devices and email systems of all the 50 secondary and primary academies it manages. This resulted in over 37,000 students being unable to access their coursework and correspondence.

Harris Federation Cyber Attack (Source: Twitter)

 

#3 CNA Financial

One of the biggest cyber insurance firms in the US CNA Financial suffered a ransomware attack on 21st March 2021. The cyber attack disrupted the organization’s customer and employee services for three days as CNA was forced to shut down to prevent further compromise. The cyber attack utilized a new version of the Phoenix CryptoLocker malware, which is a form of ransomware. 

CNA Cyber Attack Statement by CNA (Source: CNA’s Website)

#4 Florida Water System 

A cyber criminal attempted to poison the water supply in Florida and managed by increasing the amount of sodium hydroxide to a potentially dangerous level. The cyber criminal was able to breach Oldsmar’s computer system and briefly increased the amount of sodium hydroxide from 100 parts per million to 11,100 parts per million.

FLorida Water Supply Cyber Attack Politician Marco Rubio’s Tweet About the Attack (Source: Twitter)

#5 Microsoft Exchange Mass Cyber Attack 

A mass cyber attack affected millions of Microsoft clients around the globe, wherein threat actors actively exploited four zero-day vulnerabilities in Microsoft’s Exchange Server. It is believed that nine government agencies, as well as over 60,000 private companies in the US alone, were affected by the attack.

Microsoft Exchange Mass Cyber Attack CISA’s Tweet After Microsoft Exchange Vulnerabilities Came to Light (Source: Twitter)

#6 Airplane Manufacturer Bombardier

A popular Canadian plane manufacturer, Bombardier, suffered a data breach in February 2021. The breach resulted in the compromise of the confidential data of suppliers, customers and around 130 employees located in Costa Rica. The investigation revealed that an unauthorized party had gained access to the data by exploiting a vulnerability in a third-party file-transfer application. Also, the stolen data was leaked on the site operated by the Clop ransomware gang.

Bombardier Cyber Attack Bombardier’s Data Leaked Online (Source: Security Affairs)

#7 Computer Maker Acer

The globally renowned computer giant Acer suffered a ransomware attack and was asked to pay a ransom of $50 million, which made the record of the largest known ransom to date. It is believed that a cyber criminal group called REvil is responsible for the attack. The threat actors also announced the breach on their site and leaked some images of the stolen data.

Acer Cyber Attack Acer’s Stolen Data on REvil’s Data Leak Site (Source: Bleeping Computer)

#8 University of the Highlands and Islands

A cyber attack targeted the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI), forcing the university to close all its 13 colleges and research institutions to students for a day. Security professionals uncovered that the attack was launched using Cobalt Strike, a penetration testing toolkit commonly used by security researchers for legitimate purposes. This incident is just another in a series of cyber attacks targeting the education sector

UHI Cyber Attack (Source: Twitter)

#9 Sierra Wireless 

On 20th March 2021, the multinational IoT device manufacturer Sierra Wireless was hit by a ransomware attack against its internal IT systems and had to halt production at its manufacturing sites. Its customer-facing products weren’t affected and the company was able to resume production in less than a week. 

 

“This ransomware attack highlights the complexity and far-reaching damage of a B2B data breach. As evidenced by this and many other recent ransomware attacks, it’s no longer an issue of just whether or not to pay the ransom. It’s important to adopt a proactive and threat-informed approach to security strategy that allows for an organization to know it can thwart ransomware attacks.”

– Stephan Chenette, Co-Founder & CTO of AttackIQ

#10 Accellion Supply Chain Attack

Security software provider Accellion fell victim to a breach targeting its file transfer system FTA. Many of its clients were affected by the breach. Some high-profile organizations that got caught in the crossfire include grocery giant Kroger, telecom industry leader Singtel, the University of Colorado, cyber security firm Qualys and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC). A lot of confidential and sensitive data stolen from various companies by exploiting the vulnerabilities in Accellion’s FTA tool was leaked online.

 

Accelion Supply Chain Attack Qualys’ Income Tax details leaked online (Source: Cyble)

 

How to Protect Your Organization Against Cyber Attacks?

Witnessing the extent of damage cyber attacks can cause should be reason enough to take the necessary preventive measures right away. So, here are some steps you can take to reinforce your organization’s cyber security framework and keep it shielded from cyber attacks.

 

  • Generate Cyber Security Awareness: Unaware employees can prove to be an organization’s biggest weakness when it comes to cyber security. Generating awareness among your employees about the prevalent and emerging cyber threats is one of the most effective ways of protecting your business against cyber attacks. You can utilize cyber security awareness training tools like ThreatCop to educate your employees. 

 

  • Implement a Phishing Incident Response Tool: Educating your employees will only take you so far if you don’t equip them with the means of dealing with cyber threats. A phishing incident response tool like TAB can empower your employees to detect and report suspicious emails right away, significantly reducing cyber risks. 

 

  • Carry Out VAPT: Conduct periodic Vulnerability Assessment and Penetration Testing (VAPT) to detect any exploitable vulnerabilities in your organization’s IT infrastructure including applications, servers and networks. Make sure to fix the detected weaknesses on priority.

 

  • Keep the Systems Updated: Keep all your hardware and software up-to-date with the latest security updates and patches. Failing to do so can create weaknesses in your security infrastructure and lead to cyber attacks. 

 

  • Implement MFA: Enable Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) across all the applicable endpoints of your organization’s networks. This will not only add an extra layer of security but also protect you in case your employees’ user credentials are stolen.

 

So, don’t wait for your company’s name to be on the list of cyber attack victims and take the necessary precautions immediately.

 

Would you like to add something to the tips mentioned above? Leave a comment below!

Turn Your Employees Into A Cyber Threat Shield

Make your employees proactive against prevailing cyber attacks with ThreatCop!

The post 10 Major Cyber Attacks Witnessed Globally in Q1 2021 appeared first on Kratikal Blog.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Kratikal Blog authored by Dhwani Meharchandani. Read the original post at: https://www.kratikal.com/blog/10-major-cyber-attacks-witnessed-globally-in-q1-2021/

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Scripps Health CEO addresses cyberattack in an internal memo

 
Scripps Health patients are still struggling to learn when the hospital system's operations will be back to normal 10 days after a cyberattack.poster_a25842845f8a4225907ea89ecf01dd6e.jpg
Scripps Health
Posted at 6:06 PM, May 11, 2021
and last updated 6:06 PM, May 11, 2021

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) - Patients are still struggling to get information about when appointments will be back to normal within the Scripps Health system, 10 days after a cyberattack crippled the system's network and forced numerous cancellations of surgeries and appointments.

Greg Miner is an IT specialist for a local law firm. He and his family have been patients with Scripps for more than twenty years.

"As somebody involved in computer resilience and system resilience, my biggest concern is what's the plan?" said Miner.

RELATED COVERAGE:

 

Hundreds of patients are asking questions and getting some answers on the Scripps Facebook page, but the corporate leadership has been unusually quiet. Employees have also told ABC 10News that they're frustrated with the lack of information.

"It's not even so much that it's been down, which is highly irritating, but it's the failure to communicate with people in alternative fashions in any way, shape, or form," said Miner.

Scripps Health CEO and President Chris Van Gorder addressed the staff for the first time Monday with this internal memo:

"After more than a year caring for our patients, community, and each other during the worst pandemic in more than 100 years, I was looking forward to the numbers dropping with our new widespread vaccination program and getting back to our new normal – whatever that was going to look like going forward. I suspect that like all of you, I was hoping for a bit of a break – not that we ever get much downtime in health care. But unfortunately, we are facing another challenge on top of everything else we are doing.

As you know, on May 1st Scripps was hit with a cybersecurity incident with malware placed on our information system. Our team prepares for this type of situation and immediately took steps to contain the malware by taking a significant portion of our network offline. We – and you – implemented our downtime protocols and initiated our command centers once again. We also immediately engaged outside consultants and experts to assist us in our investigation and other experts to help us restore our systems and get back online as soon as possible. They are all working 24/7 as I write this note to you.

I want to thank you all for the manner in which you have taken on one more major challenge on top of everything else. I’ve been asked how much more you can all take on top of what you have already done over the past 15 months and more. My answer is Scripps will always do what is necessary to care for our patients first so that means we will do whatever it takes to do so – and you are. Using our manual systems for a couple of hours is one thing – it’s another altogether to do it for days – but you are. I’ve been sent wonderful photos and notes of teams using manual techniques to make sure the patients are getting the care and support they need.

I should point out that patient care decisions are being made locally between our physicians and clinical team – not at the corporate level. Centrally, we are working to get our systems back up as soon and safely as we can and supporting decisions being made at the patient care level. Thank you for the extraordinary way in which you are caring for our patients and helping me bring Scripps back to normal operations. I’m no longer surprised by your focus, dedication, support and innovation. You have proven yourselves over and over again.

I do want to speak briefly about communication and transparency. My philosophy and Scripps’ philosophy is to be as open and transparent as possible. I will continue to do that but I want you to know this is a different kind of situation which limits what and when I can say things. We need to let our investigation proceed and work with our consultants and outside governmental agencies, and when I can share, I will. I do want you to know that this malware attack targeted our information systems. At this time, we have no reason to believe individual data incidents affecting employees, physicians or patients are related to our current incident.

We plan for all emergencies – as we did for this type of situation – even though we had a number of safeguards in place to prevent this happening. As you know, there are many other hospitals, governmental organizations and businesses that have had to go through this type of situation - some are going through this at the same time across our country and around the world. We are committed to continuing to evolve and enhance our security measures, and look to our government to help private enterprises combat this significant threat to health care.

For our part we are in this battle, but our patients come first. Because of you, our patients are being cared for safely. If you ever have concerns about patient safety, please talk to your managers, physician leaders and location administration right away so we can address immediately.

To our physicians, nurses, clinical staff, support staff, information services and all of you who have shifted jobs to act as runners or support the front line – thank you. Once again, we will get through this together and become a resource for those organizations that will be impacted by situations like this in the future, because as we contain one virus in our country, it appears we have another to confront as a society."

Van Gorder did not refer to the attack as a case of ransomware, but as each day passes, patients like Miner are losing confidence.

"I want the resilience of being able to go into a doctor's office, critical care facility, or emergency room and not have a fear that they don't know who I am, what I am, what my conditions are, and the nuances of me as an individual," said Miner.

Patients with upcoming appointments are still advised to call 1-800-Scripps for information.

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Scripps' IT outage passes 2-week mark: 6 updates

Molly Gamble (Twitter) - yesterday Print  | Email
 
 

Leaders at San Diego-based Scripps Health say the system is "working around the clock" to restore its IT systems, which were forced to shut down by a May 1 cyberattack. 

Here are six of the latest developments from Scripps Health, according to a May 15 memo sent to patients from Anil Keswani, MD, CMO of ambulatory and accountable care, and Ghazala Sharieff, MD, CMO of acute care, clinical excellence and experience. The memo was sent to Becker's by CEO Chris Van Gorder. 

1. Scripps describes the disruption as a cybersecurity incident involving malware and is unable to provide a specific timeline for when IT systems will be restored. An investigation into the scope of the incident, including whether patient data was affected, is ongoing.

2. Scripps' four hospitals, emergency departments, urgent care centers, clinics and affiliated practices are open and seeing patients. The system is contacting patients directly if scheduled surgeries or appointments need to be rescheduled. Virtual visits are still taking place. 

3. The system partnered with Quest Diagnostics and Labcorp to help provide laboratory services until its systems are restored.

4. If patients fill their prescriptions at a Scripps retail pharmacy, the system asks them to call the pharmacy to assist with their refill. If they use a non-Scripps retail pharmacy, the system recommends checking if they can now access their prescription refill or get an emergency supply.

5. Patients can expect paper processes and backup workflows when they arrive for appointments. Clinical staff meet patients at each entrance to discuss options for care, and patient care teams currently have view-access to certain patient history and records.

6. Patients will have a grace period of 14 days after IT systems go live to pay bills and be considered on time. Accounts will not default, be considered late or be sent to collections during this network outage.

Mr. Van Gorder thanked all employees and physicians May 10 in an internal memo. Read more about that communication here



 

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Scripps Health
Dear Valued Scripps Patient, 

I want to provide an update for you about Scripps’ continued response to our recent cyber incident. We know the last few weeks have been difficult for our community members, and at times it may have seemed like we weren’t communicating enough. We care deeply about our relationship with you and all of our patients, and I am sorry this has caused frustration.  

In our current situation, openly sharing the details of the work we have been doing puts Scripps at an increased risk of coming under further attack, and of not being able to restore our systems safely and as quickly as possible for you. This is not hypothetical. Other attackers are already using what is being reported in the media to send scam communications to our organization. I know that, for some of you, the reasons why we haven’t provided more frequent updates may not matter. But it was important for me to share and assure you that our patients’, employees’, and physicians’ safety and security are our constant guides. 

That being said, we are now at a point where we can share some additional updates. We are continuing to investigate the incident, which I can confirm involved ransomware. We reported this to federal law enforcement, and continue to support their investigation as well. Our IT teams and outside consultants are literally working around the clock to restore our systems. Rest assured, we have thorough backups and are using them to help our restoration efforts. Even so, there is no “easy button.”

We continue to make progress. When you come in for care, your medical history is again at our fingertips electronically, and we’ve increased capacity at our internal call center to help answer patients’ questions. In addition, we anticipate our electronic health record will be back online the latter part of this week, including your ability to log into your MyScripps account to see your health care information. While this progress is meaningful, there is work left to be done. We look forward to building on these efforts and restoring the remaining Scripps systems as soon as possible.

In the meantime, as always, providing you with exceptional health care is our number one priority, so please don’t hesitate to come in for needed care. 

We know that this incident has been a hardship for our patients, our employees, and our physicians, and we are truly sorry.
 
Thank you again for your patience and understanding during this challenging time. We are committed to continuing to serve you and our community, and will continue to provide you with updates.

Thank you,
Chris Van Gorder
President and CEO
Scripps Health
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