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Making 4200 give up the bond


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I’m in the process of replacing stanchion bases. I’ve taken one of them up; it’s clearly bonded with plenty of 4200 and it didn’t give up easily. In fact, I thought it was 5200 at first. The bases are big - 4+ inches square, so there’s lots of surface area holding the bases to the deck. 
 

Any tricks of the trade to get these off? 

 

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1) "De-Bond" is a chemical which can help.  There are others too:  https://store.marinebeam.com/un-hesive-3m-5200-sealant-and-adhesive-remover/

2) Slicing is the best way so push them sideways, slice a bit with a utility knife blade. Take the blade out the knife. Get the multi-piece blades that are long and skinny.

3) Lee Valley flush plug cutting saw. It is a small flexible saw with teeth set to one side only. This way they cut the adhesive and don't scratch the gelcoat of the deck (too much)

4) oscillating multi tool.

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Metal stanchion?  Easy, use heat.  Heat gun works well and is less likely to damage surrounding areas than a torch.  Nonetheless, use wet rags to protect the gelcoat and have extra ones handy in the event of fire.

 

38 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Plastique C4

Tends to scorch the gelcoat and upset the neighbors.  I looked at my slip rental agreement and there's nothing in there that disallows it, though.

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I used one of these and the De-Bond stuff to slice through 6"x6" pads of 5200 that my Seaclipper used to fasten the akas and amas to the main hull. It also had big 5/8" galv eyebolts but they probably never did anything because the bonding area of those 5200 pads was probably astronomical! I was told by the 3M guys when 5200 was being provided for the Seemann Plastics C-Flex Sheathing System for old waterlogged boats that the named '5200' was a result of the earliest tensile strength tests that showed 5200 PSI on properly prepped substrates Do the math on that!

    Almost forgot the wire saw

General Tools 858 Pvc Hose, Pipe & Tubing Cable Saw, 24” Stainless Steel Serrated Cutting Cable

 

https://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-858-Stainless-Serrated/dp/B002FYUNGA/ref=asc_df_B002FYUNGA/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309832851244&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=3515864265498275750&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9012949&hvtargid=pla-420978968769&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=64417494871&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=309832851244&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=3515864265498275750&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9012949&hvtargid=pla-420978968769

    The De Bond spray doesn't really melt the 5200 so much as act as a lubricant for a cutting tool such as box cutter or the 'cheese slicer' wire garrot I am showing. Took a lot of elbow grease and when I got to really sawing back and forth the wire would start smoking! WD-40 was just as effective as a lubricant and a lot cheaper than the De Bond. After about three days of hacking, drilling, and sawing away my biceps and forearms were starting to make me look like Popeye and I bought a Sawzall and some gnarly log blades and finally got the boat apart for trailing. When I reassymbled the boat I used PolySeamSeal bathroom caulk and swore I would never demount that boat again!  

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Quickstep192 said:

Thanks everybody. 
 

I wouldn’t have thought of the multi-tool, but it might be perfect with the thin scraper blade. 

That's my go-to for all things caulk. Like a hot knife through butter.

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I've removed 4200 and even 5200 with patience. It is a strong material and bond, but it creeps. Get some leverage on it somehow or get a wedge started to get it stressed, then go away for a couple of hours. It may relax slightly, reapply the stress. Cut it where you can reach it of course. I've pulled out thru hulls intact this way that were bonded with 5200. Took about a day each, 5 minutes at a time with a couple of hours interval in between cranking on a makeshift puller. 

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My technique for DeBond: use sparingly, at the edges of the goo. Give the DeBond a bit to work, and then begin to scrape the goo off. Be sure to neutralize the DB residue, as it will keep working right into your substrate which is also plastic, you know

DB is far too expensive to use as a lubricant but I find it an excellent sealant remover. Apparently I have more patience than Rasputin22…

BTW my go-to goo remover tool is an xacto #18 blade. Spray, wait, scrape/lift away.

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I resorted to buying long 1/8" jobber drill bits that I could drill a closely spaced series of holes from the edge through the layer of 5200 bonding my hulls and beams together. This let me slide the little red tube onto the spray nozzle and inject the De Bond deep within the pad of 5200 and not evaporate so fast. After running out of the first can of De Bond I just kept doing the same thing with WD-40 and also tried PB Blaster. I used to be able to get a really cheap version of PB Blaster in Mexico that was appropriately named 'Hafla en Toto' or 'Loosens All' in English. It had that strong distinctive odor that is so unmistakable in PB.

    I did a Google search for Hafla En Toto but apparently that phrase has been appropriated by the recent craze of big asses girls who work so hard at twerking their glutes. Turn those butts loose girls!

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