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I'm sort of surprised, and not at the same time, that our all powerful governments around the world can't squash these cockroaches.

Malaise?  Are they in on it?  Are they all sponsored actors?

From granny getting all her savings wiped out to pipeline operators...

There is a special place in hell for these people.

https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/statement-suspected-us-pipeline-hackers-say-they-dont-want-cause-problems-2021-05-10/

 

 

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People get lazy with Cyber=security. We had briefings frequently when I worked at DoD. All it takes for penetration is a work email address slipping into the wrong hands and an innocent or familiar looking email to pop up. MS Exchange was extremely vulnurable to this sorta shit for way too long. 

to the point where the IT directorate at our offices put filters in place that would block all incoming email from non .mil or .gov addresses that were not in an "allowed" list.

most of our issues stemmed from folks using the preview pane in Outlook that automatically opened part of the email in a smaller window. poof - hacked. After that happened 3 or 4 times they eliminated the preview pane as an option. I guess the bad guys are getting sophisticated enough now to gain entry into system via other means than email.

been out of the biz for a while now, so not up to speed on most of this shit anymore.

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Acer got hit in March.    It seems a matter of time before Intuit, MS, or another other cloud based data firm is compromised at the expense of its entire clientele.  

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Spoke with someone today who does security. He stated some of these may go back years to get around back ups. That way can't "go back to the system a few days ago" and get back to normal. Plus some systems are very old. Scary

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2 minutes ago, burndoc said:

Spoke with someone today who does security. He stated some of these may go back years to get around back ups. That way can't "go back to the system a few days ago" and get back to normal. Plus some systems are very old. Scary

That’s discouraging,   My IT company is of the belief most cases are greedy and strike as soon as they can, so back ups beyond a few days are unnecessary.   I should do some manual back ups tomorrow on a portable drive and stick it in my safe, just in case your guy is smarter then mine.   An old school monthly or quarterly back up on media I own might be something when one of the big data storage companies is compromised.    I do back up financial records on a different cloud service from the one IT uses to mirror the server.

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I expect the government will be kicking down some bedroom doors and hauling the hackers off to the who-scow to make a statement.

US Chamber of Commerce to High Tech in Silicon Valley will be calling the Treasury Secretary and Homeland Security head out of a dinner party and demanding they do something. May not get the true puppet masters, but the word will get out this is not the time to be fucking around cause the giant only needs to glance off you and you are still squashed..

 

The Colonial pipeline hack was some serious shit.  You can grind the economy of the East Coast to a halt if those pipes are not moving product.

 

Sightly off topic, changes to stop robocalls is underway.  ATT, Verizon and T-Moble are stalling saying they agree in principal, but what if someone who is traveling in India needs to call mom in the states.  It could get blocked depending upon the telephone company in India.  Legislators are balking saying what are number of such occurrences vs the billions of bogus calls a day.

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4 hours ago, Foreverslow said:

the shit has now officially hit the fan.

There are gas shortages due to the ransomware

https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/gas-run-has-begun-fuel-stations-run-dry-amid-hacked-pipeline

 

 

NE gas prices may clime close to Kalifornia prices 

Could Joe be in on shutting down another pipeline 

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merely opening an email doesn't pose a risk.  opening an attachment in an email can bring all sorts of misfortune.

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should be all kinds of fun by this evening..

https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/gas-run-has-begun-fuel-stations-run-dry-amid-hacked-pipeline

 

Of course this investigation falls under the cybersecurity quizkids at DHS who were sleeping at the wheel when all the other sites were attacked by the same group.

Most useless department in the US Government.  From the TSA body gropers at the airport who miss 90% of the test bombs to these lazy SOBs who should have put a stop to the shenanigans weeks ago.  Nothing but a US version of the Stazi to spy on US citizens.

But DHS says they know who did it.  Well Sherlock, the fact they put there name on the ransom email was quite the clue eh?

Fire the whole lot and we would be better off.

 

Would also be a great time to put the CEO of Colonial Pipelines in lockup due to Sarbanes Oxley violations as they did not have a properly documented and and executing  operating system.  You toss one fat cat in stir and all the other CEOs/board members will be all over their CIOs like a hair jacket by the next day.

 

Thank God they did not go after the power grid.  Total FUBAR..

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We're supposed to drive from Atlanta to west Texas on Thursday. I'm sure gas will be expensive, but worrying about whether or not we'll even be able to buy gas along the way is another thing altogether. 

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I hear you Moon.  Need to do a round trip to DC tonight/tomorrow.

Have enough plus 30 miles if everything is tapped out.

 

Guy from Long Island who bought a buddy's Sabre is heading home tomorrow in his pickup after working on it for a week.  I do believe he will be screwed.

The US can release all the reserves they want. If there is no way to move them up the coast, it is useless.

Thank Goodness additional capacity has been built over the past 10 years which hopefully can pick up a bit of the slack. But there is damn little excessive capacity due to the costs and lead times of pipelines.  Used to invest in the companies that actually build/own the pipelines (colonial only leases them) and the margins were very nice due to the inability of competitors to just jump into the business.  That Wide Moat as Warren Buffet likes to say about great companies to invest in is about to bite us in the backside.

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If the news isn’t missing a huge story, it sounds like price disruption has been minimal and shortages rare.    Supplies might hold out until today’s commuter rush all decide to top off their tanks, just in case.    

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1 hour ago, Foreverslow said:

should be all kinds of fun by this evening..

https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/gas-run-has-begun-fuel-stations-run-dry-amid-hacked-pipeline

 

Of course this investigation falls under the cybersecurity quizkids at DHS who were sleeping at the wheel when all the other sites were attacked by the same group.

Most useless department in the US Government.  From the TSA body gropers at the airport who miss 90% of the test bombs to these lazy SOBs who should have put a stop to the shenanigans weeks ago.  Nothing but a US version of the Stazi to spy on US citizens.

But DHS says they know who did it.  Well Sherlock, the fact they put there name on the ransom email was quite the clue eh?

Fire the whole lot and we would be better off.

 

Would also be a great time to put the CEO of Colonial Pipelines in lockup due to Sarbanes Oxley violations as they did not have a properly documented and and executing  operating system.  You toss one fat cat in stir and all the other CEOs/board members will be all over their CIOs like a hair jacket by the next day.

 

Thank God they did not go after the power grid.  Total FUBAR..

Yeah, but.... that's kind of like training a horse to high jump by shooting the ones that don't make it over.

Cyber security is really important, and it's obvious now (if it wasn't before) that it is a BIG part of infrastructure, when "the internet of things" include our electricity, our water, our transport & our transport's fuel supply.

A practical and forward-looking national policy to make sure that as companies get bigger and take over a bigger share of these markets, they are NOT doing so by cutting corners. That's been the default business mode since Reagan, the race to the bottom. We need a race to the top!

- DSK

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2 hours ago, Foreverslow said:

I hear you Moon.  Need to do a round trip to DC tonight/tomorrow.

Have enough plus 30 miles if everything is tapped out.

 

Guy from Long Island who bought a buddy's Sabre is heading home tomorrow in his pickup after working on it for a week.  I do believe he will be screwed.

The US can release all the reserves they want. If there is no way to move them up the coast, it is useless.

Thank Goodness additional capacity has been built over the past 10 years which hopefully can pick up a bit of the slack. But there is damn little excessive capacity due to the costs and lead times of pipelines.  Used to invest in the companies that actually build/own the pipelines (colonial only leases them) and the margins were very nice due to the inability of competitors to just jump into the business.  That Wide Moat as Warren Buffet likes to say about great companies to invest in is about to bite us in the backside.

The pipeline was shut down for a couple of weeks following a hurricane (Rita I think?) in 2008-2010 period. Gas got really short here in ATL and up and down the SE. Panic buying was the real culprit for many of the shortages at that time. Prices went nuts too. 

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2 hours ago, MisterMoon said:

We're supposed to drive from Atlanta to west Texas on Thursday. I'm sure gas will be expensive, but worrying about whether or not we'll even be able to buy gas along the way is another thing altogether. 

Colonial doesn't go west. It's the first part of your trip that may be an issue.

Where in west Texas?

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I live in the DC area and no shortages here, yet.

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14 hours ago, Lark said:

That’s discouraging,   My IT company is of the belief most cases are greedy and strike as soon as they can, so back ups beyond a few days are unnecessary.   I should do some manual back ups tomorrow on a portable drive and stick it in my safe, just in case your guy is smarter then mine.   An old school monthly or quarterly back up on media I own might be something when one of the big data storage companies is compromised.    I do back up financial records on a different cloud service from the one IT uses to mirror the server.

if they're greedy and smart enough to do this shit in the first place, they're also smart enough to know about the existence of backups. 

so there's no need to fire all your bullets the minute you get in... the goal is disruption and frustration to make them pay. the minor annoyance of having to restore a couple day old system wont do that. 

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The best way to combat this is to sterilize the source code for your site then make transfers to the production system one-way only. 

Keep database extracts on a second computer, again not connected to the net. 

If you always have clean source code, and database extracts, it should be possible to reconstruct your system from scratch.  

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Is the toilet paper pipeline operating regularly?  It is a constitutional issue.

No panic buying yet, but new legislation keeps rolling out.

I will keep making daily deposits.

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3 minutes ago, Windward said:

Is the toilet paper pipeline operating regularly?  It is a constitutional issue.

No panic buying yet, but new legislation keeps rolling out.

I will keep making daily deposits.

hehehehe

 

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Ransomware gang threatens release of DC police records

By ALAN SUDERMAN, Associated Press - 1h ago
 
 
5
image.png.6ce37d987ed1d6d13be567cc48f2e230.png
FILE - In this April 2, 2021, file photo, Washington Metropolitan Police Department chief Robert Contee speaks during a news conference in Washington. Political hand-wringing in Washington over Russia's hacking of federal agencies and meddling in U.S. politics has mostly overshadowed a worsening digital scourge with a far broader wallop: crippling and dispiriting extortionary ransomware attacks by cybercriminal mafias. All the while, ransomware gangsters have become more brazen and cocky as they put more and more lives and livelihoods at risk. This week, one syndicate threatened to make available to local criminal gangs data they say they stole from the Washington, D.C., metro police on informants. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
© Provided by Associated PressFILE - In this April 2, 2021, file photo, Washington Metropolitan Police Department chief Robert Contee speaks during a news conference in Washington. Political hand-wringing in Washington over Russia's hacking of federal agencies and meddling in U.S. politics has mostly overshadowed a worsening digital scourge with a far broader wallop: crippling and dispiriting extortionary ransomware attacks by cybercriminal mafias. All the while, ransomware gangsters have become more brazen and cocky as they put more and more lives and livelihoods at risk. This week, one syndicate threatened to make available to local criminal gangs data they say they stole from the Washington, D.C., metro police on informants. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A Russian-speaking ransomware syndicate that stole data from the Washington, D.C., police department says negotiations over payment have broken down and it will release sensitive information that could put lives at risk if more money is not offered.

The extortion threat comes amid a separate ransomware attack on a major pipeline that's affected part of the U.S.'s fuel supply, highlighting the power of internet-savvy criminal gangs to sow mayhem from a half a world away with impunity.

The Babuk group said on its website late Monday that it would release “all the data” it stole from the Washington police department if it did not “raise the price.”

“The negotiations reached a dead end, the amount we were offered does not suit us,” the group said.

The department did not immediately return a request for comment, and has not said whether it's negotiated any possible payment. If true, it's an example how complex the ransomware problem is when even police find themselves forced to consider making payments to criminal gangs.

FILE - In this June 1, 2020, file photo, an officer holds a baton and shield as demonstrators gather to protest near the White House in Washington. Police departments big and small have been plagued for years by foreign hackers breaking into networks and causing varying level of mischief, from disabling email systems to more serious problems with 911 centers temporarily knocked offline. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
© Provided by Associated PressFILE - In this June 1, 2020, file photo, an officer holds a baton and shield as demonstrators gather to protest near the White House in Washington. Police departments big and small have been plagued for years by foreign hackers breaking into networks and causing varying level of mischief, from disabling email systems to more serious problems with 911 centers temporarily knocked offline. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The group posted screenshots of the data it held, including what look like disciplinary files of police officers

 

Late last month, the group said it had hacked into the network of the city’s police department and threatened to leak the identities of confidential informants unless an unspecified ransom was paid. Experts said such a release could endanger the lives of the informants.

A day after the initial threat was posted, the gang tried to spur payment by leaking personal information of some police officers taken from background checks, including details of officers’ past drug use, finances and — in at least one incident — of past sexual abuse.

Ransomware gangs have been leaking sensitive data from victims for well over a year, but experts said they’ve not seen such aggressive new tactics used before against police departments. The cybercriminal mafias mostly operate in foreign safe havens out of the reach of Western law enforcement.

The Biden administration has said that curbing ransomware attacks are a top priority, saying they are a threat to national security.

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Colonial doesn't go west. It's the first part of your trip that may be an issue.

Where in west Texas?

Yeah, we've got to get past Jackson, MS I think and then we should be OK through northern LA and the rest of TX. Our car won't make it to Jackson without filling up once, so hopefully the Buc-ees in Birmingham will still have some fuel when we get there. 

Heading to San Angelo. 

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40 minutes ago, Windward said:

Is the toilet paper pipeline operating regularly?  It is a constitutional issue.

No panic buying yet, but new legislation keeps rolling out.

I will keep making daily deposits.

I see what you did there

- DSK

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8 minutes ago, MisterMoon said:

Just heard the two closest stations to my home are sold out of gas. We're panic buying today just so we can be sure we can leave on Thursday. 

 

 

Where is this?  Guess I better top up on the way home from work; at a quarter tank now..

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Gas Station Owner's Uniform for foreseeable future 

Screenshot_20210511-081010_Facebook.jpg

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5 hours ago, Foreverslow said:

Would also be a great time to put the CEO of Colonial Pipelines in lockup due to Sarbanes Oxley violations as they did not have a properly documented and and executing  operating system.  You toss one fat cat in stir and all the other CEOs/board members will be all over their CIOs like a hair jacket by the next day.

 

It's my understanding Colonial is an LP therefore not subject to Sarbanes. 

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Hackers when caught, should have their balls or tits hacked off then throw the fucks in a pit with hungry hyenas. Or do what the Roman's did, Crucify them upside down.

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2 hours ago, Rain Man said:

The best way to combat this is to sterilize the source code for your site then make transfers to the production system one-way only. 

Keep database extracts on a second computer, again not connected to the net. 

If you always have clean source code, and database extracts, it should be possible to reconstruct your system from scratch.  

All good points. I would just add that if the code does not sanitize data going in and out of the database, one could still have a problem when they restore the database and push the clean code out to the production system. No easy task, since some of these companies are still running COBOL code which is as old as I am. Decades of prioritizing short term financials over long term growth and stability is going to take some time to undo. 

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3 hours ago, MisterMoon said:

Suburban Atlanta. 

 

Went to a very rural Sunoco station, because no one else has 91 octane, and I don't need to pay for Ultra 93, if there's and alternative.  This station rarely has another car there, when I stop by.  All 4 pumps were full, and there was someone waiting in line ahead of me.  I told all my family and friends, to fill up now, and try to stay full.

Need to make sure I have a 5 gallon jug full for the Generator, for when we lose power....

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5 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Went to a very rural Sunoco station, because no one else has 91 octane, and I don't need to pay for Ultra 93, if there's and alternative.  This station rarely has another car there, when I stop by.  All 4 pumps were full, and there was someone waiting in line ahead of me.  I told all my family and friends, to fill up now, and try to stay full.

Need to make sure I have a 5 gallon jug full for the Generator, for when we lose power....

I'm seriously considering strapping a 5 gallon can on hitch carrier for the drive out just to give us an extra 100 miles of range.

 

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1 minute ago, MisterMoon said:

I'm seriously considering strapping a 5 gallon can on hitch carrier for the drive out just to give us an extra 100 miles of range.

 

 

Jerry Jugs we used to call them, can be useful in a gas crisis....  Especially when we lose power.....

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25 minutes ago, MisterMoon said:

I'm seriously considering strapping a 5 gallon can on hitch carrier for the drive out just to give us an extra 100 miles of range.

 

That's called a Pinto Conversion

Pin on Old Vehicles

 

Why The Ford Pinto Was One Of The Worst Cars Of All Time

 

 

 

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oh for fucks sake. if everyone just went about their business as normal we'd probably get thru this shit without a run on gas. 

 

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23 hours ago, Foreverslow said:

I expect the government will be kicking down some bedroom doors and hauling the hackers off to the who-scow to make a statement.

 

the problem is that some of these groups are  state backed groups from Russia, North Korea, Iran and China...   how are you going to get to them...

I'm surprised that companies haven't started stripping attachments and links out of emails...     but I have no sympathies to corporations who decided server based systems were cheaper / better than Big Iron...   

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47 minutes ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Pre-Internet life was better in so many ways...

Yeah, you couldn't complain to strangers from your keyboard.

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6 hours ago, LenP said:

All good points. I would just add that if the code does not sanitize data going in and out of the database, one could still have a problem when they restore the database and push the clean code out to the production system. No easy task, since some of these companies are still running COBOL code which is as old as I am. Decades of prioritizing short term financials over long term growth and stability is going to take some time to undo. 

You are challenging the core of American capitalism and the holy Gospel of Milton right there:  Annualized gains for shareholders are the entire purpose of a corporation, don't you know.    

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19 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

You are challenging the core of American capitalism and the holy Gospel of Milton right there:  Annualized gains for shareholders are the entire purpose of a corporation, don't you know.    

And “Our” American “Health Care” “system”.

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1 hour ago, Left Shift said:

You are challenging the core of American capitalism and the holy Gospel of Milton right there:  Annualized gains for shareholders are the entire purpose of a corporation, don't you know.    

 

46 minutes ago, dolphinmaster said:

And “Our” American “Health Care” “system”.

like Scripps :angry:

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10 hours ago, Left Shift said:

You are challenging the core of American capitalism and the holy Gospel of Milton right there:  Annualized gains for shareholders are the entire purpose of a corporation, don't you know.    

Yep, I have been told that before. I believe that this is substantively different from quarter to quarter thinking 3 or 4 decades ago, and part of the challenge of getting folks to change their perspective is that there is history that shows it can work well, often for the length of a CEOs career. What is changing is the speed at which business, technology, and society are moving. Just like driving at 70 requires you to look much further down the road than if you are traveling at 30. The risks of crashing and burning from not looking past the next quarter or fiscal year are getting much graver, plus in a complex capitalist economy some of many of those risks fall on the customers or people, not just the business. That is what China is banking on, that our business leaders will continue on the current path and China will run roughshod over the top of us. I don't think it will work, I think we are more adaptable than that, but it may take a number of additional painful lessons for it to sink in and for behaviors to change. 

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 in college, (engineering), a professor once said, "If a machine or program is made by humans, it is easily repairable, replaceable and re-programmable...".

= Hackable 

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8 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Or their gap-tooth cousins

- DSK

I was being serious. Who are these clowns that can crater our economy in the name of deregulation? We are all this together,

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20 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Pre-Internet life was better in so many ways...

and flip phones were much safer for ones privacy and public persona! 

 

sometimes I really kinda miss my bagphone ;)

 

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22 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

oh for fucks sake. if everyone just went about their business as normal we'd probably get thru this shit without a run on gas. 

 

https://www.local10.com/news/local/2021/05/12/stop-hoarding-south-florida-is-not-in-a-gas-shortage/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/05/12/gas-shortage-colonial-pipeline-live-updates/

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20 hours ago, Left Shift said:

You are challenging the core of American capitalism and the holy Gospel of Milton right there:  Annualized gains for shareholders are the entire purpose of a corporation, don't you know.    

I think that "core" is becoming a fading tenet.  Good riddance.

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Bwaaa haaa haaa

https://www.insider.com/gasoline-shortage-plastic-bags-product-safety-commission-2021-5

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission on Wednesday gave some common-sense advice about what people should use to store gasoline amid a fuel shortage impacting the south and east coast. 

"Do not fill plastic bags with gasoline," the agency said in a tweet. 

 

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I think the gasoline shortage is a hoax.

And then I see the water where fill your tank in a minute. And is there a way we can do something like that, by using water in the car or almost any liquid?
So it'd be interesting to check that. I'm not a scientist. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.

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some observations:

Went to Arlington Va last night (suburb of DC, home of Pentagon).

Saw a lot of tankers including a lot of old equipment with no names on the sides which was likely brought online to help stem the demand.

 

On Route 50 (road out of DC into the sticks out west), about 20 percent of gas stations were closed and the rest had long lines as the night progressed.

Reminded me of the 70s, though the lines were about half as long. Could be cars are only half the size of the monsters we used to drive back then..

They were also running public transit much later into the evening.

By this afternoon, most stations only had a couple cars getting gas..

BUT...

You get out of the cities off US 95 and it is a different story as there is no public transit and a lot of usage of fuel for tractors, business vehicles, and power equipment.  There is not an open station within 40 miles of my locale.

 

Current word is a full restart was to start 2 hours ago with full restoration by Saturday.

We shall see.

Did the speed limit on the way up for the first time in 20 25 years.  Boy did that suck, but the MPG went from 25 to 31 and gave me a healthy cushion once home.  Ate some of that doing 5 over on the way back.   Still have a third of a tank left for the rest of week and it is only 4 miles to boatyard so I am good..

 

 

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Gas Buddy reports the following % out of gas:
AL 9%
DC 35%
DE 4%
FL 25%
GA 49% (but metro ATL > 70%)
KY 3%
LA 0%
MD 22%
MS 6%
NC 71%
NJ 1%
SC 51%
TN 24%
TX 0%
VA 52%
WV 6%

We are driving to TX tomorrow from ATL. No gas anywhere near me, but we have a full tank, enough to get to Meridian, MS and maybe even Jackson. Looks like we’ll be ok once we get past Birmingham and able to run at inefficient speeds once we get to LA. 
 

If we were heading north out of here, it looks a lot more risky with no gas in SC, NC, and VA. 

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I think it's time for the NSA, CIA and all the other black helicopter-owning shady agencies to stop bothering the Taliban (rats fighting for lordship of the dunghill) and pop a cap in a few Russians, Chinese and anyone else they can find disrupting US companies and bilking grannies out of their life savings. The world won't weep for Nigerian princes stabbed while walking home through a bad neighborhood, very smart Russian teenagers lying in a bloody puddle at the bottom of their apartment stairwell or PLA hackers found floating face down in Hangzhou Bay.

 patrick swayze be nice until it's time to not be nice gif - Google Search |  Patrick swayze, Swayze, Funny pictures

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1 hour ago, MisterMoon said:

 

Gas Buddy reports the following % out of gas:
AL 9%
DC 35%
DE 4%
FL 25%
GA 49% (but metro ATL > 70%)
KY 3%
LA 0%
MD 22%
MS 6%
NC 71%
NJ 1%
SC 51%
TN 24%
TX 0%
VA 52%
WV 6%

We are driving to TX tomorrow from ATL. No gas anywhere near me, but we have a full tank, enough to get to Meridian, MS and maybe even Jackson. Looks like we’ll be ok once we get past Birmingham and able to run at inefficient speeds once we get to LA. 
 

If we were heading north out of here, it looks a lot more risky with no gas in SC, NC, and VA. 

we're no 1,  we're no 1...       my wife asked if I filled up the tank on her car...  I asked why ...  she said because of the gas shortage..   I said they can't pump gas to the east coast and we're in texas..   I said with all that extra gas, I expect prices to go down...

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15 hours ago, Voyageur said:

Is the Colonial pipeline run by the same morons that run the Texas power grid?

well the republicans were running the tx power grid and they've been sucking big oil's dick for a long time , so probably

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well all those stupid people who were running out to get toilet paper are out after gas... personally I hope they all go up in flames and die a horrible death....

aLp4PYx_460swp.webp

the trash bags full are a nice touch.. I hope they light a cigarette on the way home..

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

well all those stupid people who were running out to get toilet paper are out after gas... personally I hope they all go up in flames and die a horrible death....

aLp4PYx_460swp.webp

the trash bags full are a nice touch.. I hope they light a cigarette on the way home..

electric windows and door locks should be a nice touch

maybe pinch that bottom one when ya close the hatch

and I bet each one votes

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On 5/10/2021 at 8:49 AM, Windward said:

I'm sort of surprised, and not at the same time, that our all powerful governments around the world can't squash these cockroaches.

Malaise?  Are they in on it?  Are they all sponsored actors?

From granny getting all her savings wiped out to pipeline operators...

There is a special place in hell for these people.

https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/statement-suspected-us-pipeline-hackers-say-they-dont-want-cause-problems-2021-05-10/

 

 

   https://www.cybereason.com/blog/cybereason-vs-darkside-ransomware

They clearly thought that limiting the targets would keep them just off the world's unofficial 10 most wanted list. They hit the company's IT, probably didn't anticipate the company would shut down the entire pipeline because their IT was off line. Oopsies. 

  Now they will have the full attention of the CIA, NSA, pretty much everybody's best and brightest, all wanting to be the one who gets the trophy. Not to mention the white-hot glare of the Russians intell services, who probably already know who they are. 

Lotsa luck, douchebags. 

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3 hours ago, MisterMoon said:

 

Gas Buddy reports the following % out of gas:
AL 9%
DC 35%
DE 4%
FL 25%
GA 49% (but metro ATL > 70%)
KY 3%
LA 0%
MD 22%
MS 6%
NC 71%
NJ 1%
SC 51%
TN 24%
TX 0%
VA 52%
WV 6%

We are driving to TX tomorrow from ATL. No gas anywhere near me, but we have a full tank, enough to get to Meridian, MS and maybe even Jackson. Looks like we’ll be ok once we get past Birmingham and able to run at inefficient speeds once we get to LA. 
 

If we were heading north out of here, it looks a lot more risky with no gas in SC, NC, and VA. 

not sure what those percentages mean... is that what's gone or what's left?

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We have plenty of gas here, c'mon over and fill up.  It's almost $6.00 a gallon but hey, there's no shortage of it.

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9 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

well all those stupid people who were running out to get toilet paper are out after gas... personally I hope they all go up in flames and die a horrible death....

aLp4PYx_460swp.webp

the trash bags full are a nice touch.. I hope they light a cigarette on the way home..

Ethanol, high heat, and those anti siphon devices that require a special funnel to add gas to their car tank... There’s going to be a lot of skanked gas dumped down the storm sewer next month.    It will be funny when the wrong plastics start dissolving like a milk jug full of used motor oil,  

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3 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

We have plenty of gas here, c'mon over and fill up.  It's almost $6.00 a gallon but hey, there's no shortage of it.

Begs the question, how much is a $1.00 in non metric money

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If the hackers can get to a pipeline, they can get to almost anything at anytime and may have already placed the bots (or whatever it is called).

I think the worst is yet to come and I am generally a optimistic person..

 

Sail Safe! 

Edlu 2021.jpg

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On 5/11/2021 at 8:11 AM, burndoc said:

Really. An act of war

Yup, and but one tool of economic warfare.

And then we shrug our shoulders and go back to building catapults, vats of boiling oil, moats, F-35s, and stealth littoral combat ships.

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17 minutes ago, MisterMoon said:

Ffs. Some folks can’t grasp what’s actually going on.   

That would be our Da-Woodhead, yet another tender snowflake who posts his political crap everywhere except in PA.  Because posters are mean to him.

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On 5/12/2021 at 4:58 AM, Voyageur said:

Is the Colonial pipeline run by the same morons that run the Texas power grid?

It's a Private Company says the Feds. but so are the Airlines and yet we protect them.

Fuel is so much more important that air travel. It is  complete foolishness to let our infrastructure to be exposed.

I hope if they fid these hackers, they get flogged to death

On 5/11/2021 at 4:59 PM, NaptimeAgain said:

Pre-Internet life was better in so many ways...

Yea, it was great. We used to have to go visit our friends to fuck off. The Net is good in some ways but we can Blame Al Gore for inventing it. :) 

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57 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

That would be our Da-Woodhead, yet another tender snowflake who posts his political crap everywhere except in PA.  Because posters are mean to him.

Why are you so mean :lol:

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18 hours ago, MisterMoon said:

 

Gas Buddy reports the following % out of gas:
AL 9%
DC 35%
DE 4%
FL 25%
GA 49% (but metro ATL > 70%)
KY 3%
LA 0%
MD 22%
MS 6%
NC 71%
NJ 1%
SC 51%
TN 24%
TX 0%
VA 52%
WV 6%

We are driving to TX tomorrow from ATL. No gas anywhere near me, but we have a full tank, enough to get to Meridian, MS and maybe even Jackson. Looks like we’ll be ok once we get past Birmingham and able to run at inefficient speeds once we get to LA. 
 

If we were heading north out of here, it looks a lot more risky with no gas in SC, NC, and VA. 

You might consider voting for investment in infrastructure and think about reducing your carbon footprint.

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30 minutes ago, Knut Grotzki said:

You might consider voting for investment in infrastructure and think about reducing your carbon footprint.

you say voting like it makes any difference

 

 

San Diego, California, Measure C, Lodging Tax for Convention Center Expansion, Street Repairs, and Homelessness Programs (March 2020)

"AFTER IT FUCKING FAILED to PASS"

 
Local ballot measure elections in 2018
San Diego Measure C
LocalBallotMeasures Final.png
Election date
March 3, 2020
Topic
Local hotel tax
Status
Approved Approved
Type
Initiative
Origin
Citizens

 

A citizen initiative designed to increase the lodging tax, expand the convention center, and fund streets and homelessness programs was on the ballot for San Diego voters in San Diego County, California, on March 3, 2020. On April 6, 2021, the San Diego City Council voted to declare Measure C as approved.

A "yes" vote supported authorizing the city to increase the tax levied on overnight lodging guests with a tiered range from 1.25% to 3.25%, with revenue dedicated to expanding the San Diego Convention Center, improving streets and related infrastructure, and funding programs to reduce homelessness.
A "no" vote opposed authorizing the city to increase the tax levied on overnight lodging guests, thereby leaving the city's hotel tax rate at 10.5%.

 


BP-Initials-UPDATED.png This article contains a developing news story. Ballotpedia staff are checking for updates regularly. To inform us of new developments, email us at editor@ballotpedia.org.


Measure C was a special tax. In California, special tax measures enacted by local governments require a two-thirds (66.67 percent) supermajority vote of electors. A court ruling in August 2017 put into doubt whether this requirement applies to citizen initiatives. On April 6, 2021, the San Diego City Council voted to declare Measure C as approved based on appellate court rulings stating that citizen initiatives proposing special taxes required a simple majority not a two-thirds (66.67 percent) supermajority vote for approval. The city council also asked the city attorney to seek a validation lawsuit with the California Supreme Court to confirm that a simple majority was required. The city council established that the hotel tax proposed by Proposition C would not be collected until the requirement was confirmed in a ruling on the validation lawsuit.[1]

 

Election results

San Diego Measure C

Result Votes Percentage
Yes 239,024 65.24%

Defeated No

127,349 34.76%

 

Results are officially certified.

 

Vote requirement for special taxes proposed through citizen initiatives

See also: Laws governing local ballot measures in California

Superior court ruling and appeal

San Francisco Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman ruled on July 5, 2019, that two measures (both called Proposition C) on the San Francisco ballot in June and November of 2018 were properly certified as approved by city officials. Schulman ruled that Proposition C (June 2018) and Proposition C (November 2018), which proposed tax increases for specific purposes, required a simple majority for approval because they were put on the ballot through a citizen signature petition. The ruling stated that the two-thirds supermajority vote requirement for local special taxes in California applies to tax measures referred to the ballot by lawmakers but not to citizen initiatives.[2]

Christin Evans, a supporter of November’s Proposition C, said, “Obviously, we’re thrilled. We felt that Prop. C was on firm legal ground from the beginning, and the judge’s opinion left no question that voter-led initiatives will be possible going forward to allow the people to help shape city policy.”[2]

Rex Hime, president of the California Business Properties Association and representing the Howard Jarvis association and the California Business Roundtable, said, “We are disappointed in today’s ruling but will continue to fight to uphold the will of the voters. Prop. 13 and Prop. 218 are unambiguous — voters want a two-thirds vote requirement for special taxes. We will be filing an immediate appeal.”[2]

Appellate court ruling on Proposition C (November 2018), 2020

On June 30, 2020, a panel of three California First District Court of Appeal judges upheld Judge Schulman's ruling and said that the city was correct to apply a simple majority requirement, rather than a two-thirds supermajority requirement, to Proposition C.[3]

California Supreme Court denial to review rulings, 2020

On September 9, 2020, the California Supreme Court denied a request to review the lower courts' rulings.[4]

California appeals court ruling on Proposition C (June 2018), 2021

In August 2018, the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association filed a lawsuit seeking to invalidate Proposition C, alleging that it required a two-thirds supermajority requirement to pass. On January 27, 2021, the First District Court of Appeal ruled that the supermajority requirement did not apply to Proposition C and only applied to measures placed on the ballot by the city council, board of supervisors, or school board. Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association President Jonathan Coupal said the group was prepared to sponsor an initiative to require a two-thirds supermajority vote of the people for local tax increases for specific purposes.[5]

On April 28, 2021, the California Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal of the ruling on Proposition C (June 2018), leaving the lower court ruling in place and allowing the city to continue collecting the tax and to spend the revenue from the tax.[6]

Fresno Measure P ruling

In Fresno, a judge ruled that special sales tax initiative Measure P required a two-thirds supermajority to pass despite being put on the ballot through a signature petition drive. Click here to read more.

The ruling was appealed to the Fifth District Court of Appeal. In December 2020, the Fifth District Court of Appeal overturned Judge Gaab's ruling and stated that the measure required approval from a simple majority to pass. Representatives of the city said that it would not appeal the ruling further. The Fifth District Court of Appeal ruled that California's Proposition 218 (1996) does not apply to tax measures put on the ballot through a citizen initiative signature petition drive.[4][7]

Background and arguments

An August 2017 California Supreme Court decision raised questions about how to interpret the state constitution’s voting requirements for special taxes proposed through citizen initiatives.

California voters approved Proposition 218 in 1996, adding Article XII C Voter Approval For Local Tax Levies to the California Constitution. The article includes the requirement that local governments may only enact, extend, or increase a special tax with a two-thirds (66.67 percent) supermajority vote of the electorate.[8][9] Following the passage of Proposition 218, the two-thirds supermajority vote requirement was applied to legislative referrals, referendums, and citizen initiatives.

In August 2017, however, the California Supreme Court ruled in California Cannabis Coalition v. City of Upland that one requirement contained in Article XIII C—that general taxes must be put on the ballot during general elections—did not apply to citizen initiatives. The court categorized taxes imposed by citizen initiatives as separate from taxes imposed by local governments. This ruling brought the two-thirds (66.67 percent) supermajority vote requirement into question for special taxes proposed through citizen initiatives.

City and county officials in San Francisco argued that the court's 2017 decision meant that a simple majority—not a two-thirds supermajority—was required for the approval of local citizen initiatives, including tax measures that designate funds for specific purposes. Based on those arguments, the city certified the measures as approved. The Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association filed a lawsuit against the city and county in August 2018 stating that the commercial rent tax for childcare initiative did not receive sufficient votes.[10]

The association stated the following on its website:[10]

Because the tax is expressly for a special purpose, it required a 2/3 vote of the city’s electorate under both Propositions 13 and 218. But it did not pass by that margin. Rather, the tax proposal, designated as Measure C, received a scant 50.87% vote.[11]

—Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association

Del Norte Deputy County Counsel Joel Campbell-Blair defended the simple majority requirement in the following statement regarding Measure C, the Hotel Tax Increase for Crescent City Harbor District (November 2018):[12]

Based on the reasoning of the California Supreme Court in California Cannabis Coalition v. City of Upland, it is County Counsel’s position that, because Measure C was submitted to the electorate by voter initiative, rather than a local government, a simple majority is sufficient for approval, even though it is a special tax. Measure C has therefore passed.[11]

—Del Norte Deputy County Counsel

Initiatives in 2018 to establish special taxes

In 2018, eight local citizen initiatives in California proposing special taxes were approved by more than a simple majority but less than a two-thirds (66.67 percent) supermajority vote. Local officials declared two of the measures to be defeated based on the two-thirds supermajority requirement. The other six measures were certified as approved. In one case, Oakland Measure AA, the impartial analysis of the measure stated that it required a two-thirds supermajority vote for approval, but the city council certified the measure as approved after it received 62 percent approval. Measure AA was ruled unenforceable by Alameda County Superior Court Judge Ronnie MacLaren on October 15, 2019. MacLaren wrote that "the court determined that the city is barred from enforcing Measure AA because the ballot measures prepared by the City unambiguously advised voters that Measure AA would require two-thirds of the votes to pass."[13] These measures are listed below:

Text of measure

Findings and purpose

The initiative included the following "Findings and Purpose" section:[14]

San Diego has long been considered a “world class destination city” for tourists and visitors. Our tourism industry is one of the largest contributors to our local economy. And tourism revenues from visitor taxes, paid by overnight lodging guests – are the third largest source of revenue to the City of San Diego.

However, today, our tourism economy and local community are facing unprecedented challenges. Tourism and lodging leaders have identified three major factors that are diminishing San Diego’s status as a desirable world class destination for tourists and visitors. These factors are: a spiraling homelessness crisis, city streets full of potholes and in urgent need of repair, as well as outdated and inadequate convention and tourist facilities. Together, these factors are restricting the healthy expansion of the tourism economy which provide money for the local economy and funds for city services.

Yet, while “America’s Finest City” today faces multiple challenges to our status as a world-class destination city, we have increasingly limited financial resources available to address those challenges. Taken together, these challenges threaten our City’s reputation, quality of life, the health of our local economy, and our attractiveness to millions of tourists and visitors. This measure, if adopted, will provide significant new revenues to address these challenges and will provide a “turning point” that will restore and secure San Diego’s status as a world-class destination city for tourists and visitors for years to come. To accomplish this purpose, this measure will provide additional funding to: (1) reduce homelessness, (2) improve city streets, and (3) significantly expand visitor/tourist facilities – with revenues being raised from hotel visitors only.

With this purpose in mind, San Diego’s tourism and lodging leaders have joined with homeless advocates, community activists, business leaders, and others who represent a broad cross-section of the San Diego community to sponsor “A Better San Diego” to address these problems which are diminishing San Diego’s stature as an attractive destination for visitors and tourists. This citizen initiative measure will increase the overnight lodging tax paid by visitors to San Diego which will then generate hundreds of millions of dollars needed to address the leading problems affecting our status as a world class destination city.[11]

 

Full text

The full text of the initiative is available here.

Background

Following the verification of initiative petition signatures, this measure was scheduled to appear on the general election ballot in 2020. However, with the support of San Diego Mayor Kevin Fuckconer, the city council voted to move the initiative to the primary election ballot in March 2020.

In 2011, the California State Legislature passed Senate Bill 202, which provided that statewide initiative measures would appear on general election ballots only. From 1960 to mid-2011, statewide initiatives had been permitted on primary, general, and special election ballots. The 2011 change reinstated the law that was in place prior to 1960.[15]

As a charter city, San Diego has the authority to establish its own procedures for elections. In 2016, San Diego voters approved Measure L to require initiatives to go on general election ballots unless the city council decides to place an initiative on an earlier election ballot.

When the lodging tax and convention center expansion initiative was pushed to the November 2020 ballot, initiative supporters including Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Labor Council secretary-treasurer Keith Maddox advocated for moving it to the primary election ballot in March 2020 instead. Alliance San Diego, the group behind Measure L (2016), sent out a petition asking voters to oppose the initiative's move to the primary ballot.[16]

Ultimately, the city council voted to move the initiative to the March primary ballot.[17]

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing local ballot measures in California

This measure was put on the ballot through a successful initiative petition campaign.

In San Diego, proponents must collect signatures equal to 10 percent of the registered voters at the previous general election to qualify an initiative for the ballot. Proponents circulating the initiative petition in 2018 needed to submit 71,600 valid signatures the San Diego County Register of Voters by July 10, 2018, to place the initiative on the November 2018 ballot. The group Yes for a Better San Diego submitted 114,000 petition signatures for the initiative on July 9, 2018. The office of the registrar conducted a random count of the signatures and found that an insufficient number were valid. This triggered a full verification of all signatures, which concluded on September 20, 2018. The registrar found that proponents had collected a sufficient number of signatures to place the issue on the ballot, though the deadline had passed for November 2018. The initiative was then scheduled to go before voters in November 2020.[18][19]

San Diego Mayor Kevin Fuckconer voiced support for placing the initiative on an election ballot earlier than November 2020. On April 15, 2019, the San Diego City Council voted 5-4 in favor of moving the initiative to the March 2020 primary election ballot.[20]

 

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5 hours ago, mikewof said:

 stealth littoral combat ships.

i laugh my ass off every time i see this. some day i may grow up, but i doubt it.

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12 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

We have plenty of gas here, c'mon over and fill up.  It's almost $6.00 a gallon but hey, there's no shortage of it.

Ah...unless you want a heapin' helpin' of nation buildin' Tomahawked in, it's unwise to flaunt oil in front of Uncle Sam.

 To the OP, here's a well written and well informed take on this stuff: 

   https://freethoughtblogs.com/stderr/2021/05/12/the-ransomware-hack/

 A lot of companies like this one are still on Windows NT and wide open to the internet. He explains how that came to be. He doesn't say it outright but my IT guy says an 8th grader could probably have gotten through that crap. 

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Sixteen hours driving later we made it the 1100 miles to the in-laws in Texas. Only area without gas was the Atlanta metro. And Atlanta had zero, nada, zilch.  We had no issues  finding gas on our four stops and were even able to throw efficiency aside and drive 80mph most of the way. Traffic did seem to be lighter than normal, perhaps because folks were worried about running out. 

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6 hours ago, basketcase said:

i laugh my ass off every time i see this. some day i may grow up, but i doubt it.

What's so funny about them? Even if they're useless in the Economic War, they still have a certain ghoulishness ... like the Flyin' Hawaiian and a robotic anteater had a hormonally-enriched love child.

The best thing about Stealth Littoral Combat Ships is that they make the Mac 26x look like a rather elegant little boat in comparison.

1000w_q95.jpg&f=1&nofb=1