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thank you for the greetings, things are still pretty wonky trying to do this so just bear with me and My energy level is low but I know this is good to bring my brain back online so I'll keep posting

Thanks Nimbus. The whole reset of the SA website where all the pages were wiped clean really had me at a low point. The last six months of it's life I had been just stomping on the gas pedal tryi

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15 hours ago, hobot said:

 

 

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Great construction pic Hobot!  I'll take a guess and say that view looks something like this today....

milsons point.JPG

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Macro-encabulator?

FB_IMG_1624159120778.jpg

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16 hours ago, hobot said:

 

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I think that's at Dulles. saw the shuttle fly over DC a couple times and went out to see it in static display out there.

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https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2021_06/FB_IMG_1623342294690.jpg.a26d04b6d3e3f1f2d366fee9814d98a5.jpgI recall reading a little about this, "M" class auckland harbor heading up the ditch and swerving under control to avoid a capsized boat, looks pretty dramatic though

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FBD717B7-61F4-43A9-AAAE-1BAD403C3763.jpeg

Long ago I was riding from my house in Running Springs up and around Big Bear Lake and back. I was just  in downtown Big Bear Lake when a convertible pulls alongside me and the 2 kids in the back seat sprayed me down with super soakers. I didn't really mind, it was August, and the MILF behind the wheel was keeping my pace and laughing cutely until the kids ran outta water, when she took off.

Unfortunately for her she hit the red light just 1/4 mile up  the road and I was able to catch up to them. She's looking over her shoulder pleading with me "Oh please, no!!!" as I got out my second water bottle and emptied it on the 3 of them and all over the inside of her car.

The cars pulling up behind me all sounded their horns and hooted. A very satisfying moment for me.

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2 hours ago, Willin' said:

FBD717B7-61F4-43A9-AAAE-1BAD403C3763.jpeg

Long ago I was riding from my house in Running Springs up and around Big Bear Lake and back. I was just  in downtown Big Bear Lake when a convertible pulls alongside me and the 2 kids in the back seat sprayed me down with super soakers. I didn't really mind, it was August, and the MILF behind the wheel was keeping my pace and laughing cutely until the kids ran outta water, when she took off.

Unfortunately for her she hit the red light just 1/4 mile up  the road and I was able to catch up to them. She's looking over her shoulder pleading with me "Oh please, no!!!" as I got out my second water bottle and emptied it on the 3 of them and all over the inside of her car.

The cars pulling up behind me all sounded their horns and hooted. A very satisfying moment for me.

Instant Karma, American Graffiti style. :D

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Princess Point in the foreground, it was ground away and became the fill for the island and shore side of Dana Point Harbor.

 

FB_IMG_1624381937384.jpg

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47 minutes ago, hobot said:

gnrry5elfsp61.jpg

Interesting difference in wakes.

How many acres of teak forest did that battlewagon's deck cost?

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16 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

CV required moire..........                      :)

Steel deck on that airfield.  Essex and Midway classes were last ones built with teak decks

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40 minutes ago, Liquid said:

The FL Wright style is strong with that one!

That's way better than any FLW interior I've ever seen.

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4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:
44 minutes ago, Liquid said:

The FL Wright style is strong with that one!

That's way better than any FLW interior I've ever seen.

Nowe you our juste benig meane...............               :)

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Interesting difference in wakes.

How many acres of teak forest did that battlewagon's deck cost?

 

Perhaps the battleship was going twice the speed of the Carrier???

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3 hours ago, ropetrick said:

Steel deck on that airfield.  Essex and Midway classes were last ones built with teak decks

The Midway had a 3.5" armored flight deck at commissioning.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway-class_aircraft_carrier  

She's now a Museum Ship in Sandy Eggo. If you get a chance, don't miss going aboard her. Charlotte and I spent most of a day roaming the ship - until SWMBO had her fill of gray paint and mutinied.    

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4 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

The Midway had a 3.5" armored flight deck at commissioning.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway-class_aircraft_carrier  

She's now a Museum Ship in Sandy Eggo. If you get a chance, don't miss going aboard her. Charlotte and I spent most of a day roaming the ship - until SWMBO had her fill of gray paint and mutinied.    

 

She Who Must Be Obeyed!!  I told my boss, I would give him another year, until I came home, and SWMBO said NO WAY!!  As soon as they can hire someone, and I can train them, I am outta there!!  I envision spending the 3rd week of December through March on Sullivan's Island looking at Fort Sumter and the ships going by, just offshore...

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23 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

She Who Must Be Obeyed!!  I told my boss, I would give him another year, until I came home, and SWMBO said NO WAY!!  As soon as they can hire someone, and I can train them, I am outta there!!  I envision spending the 3rd week of December through March on Sullivan's Island looking at Fort Sumter and the ships going by, just offshore...

Congratulations!  Approaching that milestone meownself. However, the current crop of mismanagment is threatening to pull the date to the left.  

And it took one hell of a dinner for Charlotte to forgive me for dragging her down miles of gray companionways, up and down ships ladders, while babbling about steam plants, aircraft, hanger decks, catapults, arresting gear... In my defense, I warned her.  But, she didn't want to let me go wandering about a strange city (and Dago is strange) without adult supervision. 

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19 hours ago, 167149 said:

https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/uploads/monthly_2021_06/FB_IMG_1623342294690.jpg.a26d04b6d3e3f1f2d366fee9814d98a5.jpgI recall reading a little about this, "M" class auckland harbor heading up the ditch and swerving under control to avoid a capsized boat, looks pretty dramatic though

1950's X Class 14ft with a bit on.

The X class competed for the Sanders Cup presented in memory of Lieutenant Commander William Sanders the only NZ recipient of the Naval Victoria Cross and DSO captaining the Q boat HMS Prize during WW1.

 

1400905173_XClassFlying(2)(2).thumb.jpeg.a00513914cb9df54592faf7afb400f29.jpegEMERALD166-Small-1.jpeg.9bfb38bcf2c4bb9a677b44a6d93ff744.jpegyysw236214.thumb.jpeg.7576c95449b048f4039709c4b0e5cc78.jpegpt3082.thumb.jpeg.f7d944a6db174cc13320892cfee1e1ad.jpeg

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/last-post-first-light/91961652/flashback-master-mariner-gunner-billy-only-kiwi-to-win-naval-vc

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1 hour ago, trt131 said:

For those who know this stuff, why is the island moved so far aft with the new carriers compared to this one.

gnrry5elfsp61.jpg

Cmdr. John Peterson, the Air Boss on Ford, said the layout of the flight deck brings great potential for efficiency. Ford’s island is farther back than the island on a Nimitz-class carrier; on a Nimitz CVN, some aircraft would be parked behind the island to make use of that space. However, to tow those aircraft into position to be launched, or tow them forward on the flight deck to be rearmed or refueled, they’d have to cross into the area where planes would be landing – meaning that, if jets are landing, any aircraft parked behind the island has to stay behind the island until aircraft recovery ends.

“By moving the tower aft, it allows us to put more aircraft out front, and that means we can move them around and we don’t have to stop landing aircraft in order to be able to generate sorties, to move people up, to send them up to the catapult. So that’s a huge advantage that we have on this boat that will make it more efficient so we can generate more sorties.”

As USS Gerald R. Ford Nears Shock Trials, Carrier Remains Busy With Testing, Fleet Support

The Ford class was actually built to conduct about 30 percent more sorties than the Nimitz class.

With a larger flight deck than the Nimitz class and its tower moved closer to the stern of the ship, Cummings said the flight deck layout and space will help the crew reach its goal of launching more aircraft faster.

“I’ll tell you this: being this close to the stern is great. So any ship captain is worried about their stern. So here, the stern is right here,” Cummings told reporters in Ford‘s bridge. “Because your stern swings, it gets you in trouble. I have a very clear picture of where the stern is because I’m basically sitting on it. Nimitz class, you’re further forward. You got to estimate where the stern is because the island is further forward. Here, I know exactly where my stern is. I know how it’s moving and I know how to keep myself out of trouble. That’s a nice benefit of the island being further aft.”

USS Gerald R. Ford Making Steady Progress Ahead of Deployment

 

 

 

 

 

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Not seeing much further aft shift of the island in the near future. It's been moved as far as aft as possible for safe efficient flight operations. Already the Ford design introduced two dozen new technologies into a vessel that superficially looks similar to the Nimitz class of carriers it will replace. But the Ford will do this more flexibly and efficiently, while requiring far less manpower.

The most important metric of carrier lethality is how many sorties (flights) the carrier can generate each day. The Ford design replaces steam-powered catapults used for launching planes with a more efficient electromagnetic system, and introduces a new arresting gear for stopping planes on return. It also rearranges weapons handling procedures and provides more deck space. All of these changes enhance the carrier’s ability to launch aircraft smoothly.

The Navy’s goal is to achieve a 33% increase in sortie generation - 160 sorties per day under normal conditions, 270 during wartime surge operations. It will take time and practice to achieve those goals, but with each strike fighter carrying multiple smart bombs, it doesn’t require much imagination to see how lethal 200+ sorties per day could be against most enemies. The Navy’s ability to find elusive targets is growing fast, so the more sorties generated, the more lethal sea-based aviation is likely to become.

The next step is increased use of unmanned aircraft. Unmanned systems are expected to be ubiquitous in what the Navy calls “distributed maritime operations,” but existing launch and arresting systems subject unmanned aircraft (“drones”) to excessive stress. The new catapult and arresting gear on the Ford class will enable carriers to launch and recover a more diverse array of aircraft, both lighter and heavier than those hosted on a Nimitz carrier today. That includes drones for collecting reconnaissance, delivering weapons, and refueling manned aircraft.

Increased electric power. The nuclear reactors on Nimitz-class carriers cannot generate enough electricity to power all of the warfighting systems likely to be needed in the future. The Ford class uses two smaller but more powerful reactors that can generate all the power needed on a modern warship while providing substantial growth margin for future upgrades. In addition to powering systems like the Ford’s electromagnetic catapult and multifunction radar, the increased generating capacity may be needed in the future to support new ship defenses utilizing directed-energy weapons (like high-power lasers).

Increased efficiency in weapons handling. The pathways for moving ordnance within Nimitz-class carriers were laid out many decades ago, and are not optimized for today’s smart weapons. They are a major constraint on the rate at which sorties can be generated. The Ford design rearranges these pathways to facilitate the movement of munitions to strike fighters, introducing automation and other features to reduce manpower requirements and accelerate the pace of operations on the flight deck.

Increased radar functionality. Carrier radars play an essential role in detecting threats, but the Nimitz class requires half a dozen different radars to accomplish all the necessary functions, from detection to tracking to target identification. The Ford design replaces this collection of sensors with a single multifunction radar that takes up much less space. The system is much more sensitive than previous air-defense radars and easy to maintain (it has no moving parts). Because it requires less space, the structure above the flight deck—called the island—can be smaller, reducing the carrier’s own radar signature.

Increased flight deck space. Relocation of the island further back on the Ford-class hull enables more efficient utilization of the carrier’s flight deck. Like Nimitz, Ford will have over four acres of deck space, but with a more diverse array of aircraft likely to be included in future carrier air wings, additional space will be needed on deck to support simultaneous operation of strike fighters, radar planes, airborne jammers, rotorcraft and various drones. That is especially true if the Ford class is to safely meet its goals for increasing the air wing’s daily sortie rate.

Increased ship stability. The ten Nimitz-class carriers in today’s fleet were gradually upgraded in response to emerging threats and missions. However, a 2005 RAND report noted that “with modernizations undertaken over the years, the ships’ weight has increased and their center of gravity has risen (i.e., worsened) to the point where further increases in topside weight are unacceptable.” The Ford class restores growth margin to the carrier fleet for coping with future challenges, assuring that needed improvements will not impact ship stability at sea.

Decreased manning requirements. Personnel are a major driver of carrier operating costs, because thousands of people are needed to crew the ship and support the carrier air wing. The Nimitz was designed at a time when personnel costs were relatively low and options for automating functions were limited. The Ford class was designed to substitute technology for manpower in many activities, thereby reducing the crew size 20%. Time will tell whether this goal is fully achieved, but there is little doubt that operating a Ford-class carrier will be much less manpower-intensive, reducing onboard headcount by hundreds of sailors compared with what is typical for a Nimitz-class carrier.

Decreased maintenance requirements. Maintenance is another driver of carrier costs, both at sea and in shipyards. But several features of the Ford design contribute to reduced maintenance requirements. For instance, the carrier reactors are simpler than those on a Nimitz even though they generate much more power, and they do not need as much maintenance. The multifunction radar is easier to maintain. The electromagnetic catapult for launching planes will be easier to support than its steam-powered predecessor. These and other applications of new technology will cumulatively reduce the maintenance burden of keeping each Ford-class carrier in a high state of readiness by hundreds of millions of dollars.

Decreased cost of operation. Building aircraft carriers for the Navy only costs about one day’s worth of federal spending every five years. Most of the life-cycle costs associated with owning the world’s only fleet of large-deck, nuclear-powered carriers come after they are built, in the form of operating and support expenses. However, the Navy figures that because of savings on crewing, maintenance and various other functions, a Ford-class carrier will cost $4 billion less to operate across its 50-year lifetime than a Nimitz-class carrier. That is not a bad deal for a warship that will be far superior to what came before in virtually every performance metric.

 

 

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Didn't Trump say at one time that he was telling the Navy not to use EM catapults and that they would use steam on the Ford class by presidential order?

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Our military flag officers began ignoring Trump in 2017, and his support continued to decline by our military in 2018. Trumps support by the military after his supreme fuckup, bungling and abandoning our Syrian Kurd allies in October of 2019, pretty much sealed his being ignored by our military - when the US realized we had to send our military back into Syria within a couple weeks to protect the CONOCO refinery. Our military was handling Syria quite well with light Special Forces and SEALS, before Trump's shortsighted fuckup - without having to install an Armored Division, but required an Armored Division and all the support that Division requires, which required two division of support by a Infantry Division and a Supply Division, as well as air support to protect the Armored Division.

The Military realized they can't follow anymore boneheaded blunders by the Phuckwit in Chief. Why would anyone with half a brain consider anything Trump spouts to be relevant, is beyond my comprehension, especially after Trump's bungling of the pandemic - when we had a game plan in place - and Trump refused to give a single order to act upon it. Of note: closing west coast airport ports of entry to Chinese, without closing all international routes from Europe and elsewhere is a display of bonehead logic - Trump never even got out of the first inning, of doing what should have been done. Someone should have slapped that boneheaded fool right then, with some choice words.

With Trump continuing to lose the support of the military overall since 2018, and more importantly flag officers choosing to ignore Trump. Also of note, with Trump continuing to lose support, with less then 50% supporting him by December of 2019. Then Trump''s continued ignoring global warming and the US Navy's largest base and many eastern seaboard and gulf coast bases, threatened by rising waters in hurricanes, the US Navy choose to ignore anything the Phuckwit POTUS spouted, and choose to continue development for various reasons - easily found via a quick internet search. Despite glitches in testing and development, the US Navy decided to continue development and advance the EMALS.

USS Gerald Ford Done Proving It Can Launch Planes, Ready to Tackle Warfighting Operations

Half of active-duty service members are unhappy with Trump, new Military Times poll shows

The clash between Trump and his generals

Top Military Officers Unload on Trump

Climate Change’s Threat to the U.S. Navy

The US removing Special Forces troops and then deploying more troops to Syria....

Of note: Don't bring up that Phuckwit's name in General Anarchy - take it to PA.

 

 

 

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