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thank you for the greetings, things are still pretty wonky trying to do this so just bear with me and My energy level is low but I know this is good to bring my brain back online so I'll keep posting

Thanks Nimbus. The whole reset of the SA website where all the pages were wiped clean really had me at a low point. The last six months of it's life I had been just stomping on the gas pedal tryi

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On 10/10/2021 at 12:55 AM, Bacchus66 said:

Is that second one a Thistle? Seems like it might be too long, so not sure.

I used to mostly race e-scows with my some of my uncles, but their club also had star and thistle fleets, as well as Jet-14s (though that was around the time the Jet-14 fleet stopped racing). I raced with a neighbor of theirs on a thistle one weekend far too long ago when I was 12 or 14.

The thing I remember most about the Thistle was the lack of any deck and this hiking off that thin outer edge. I still had a great time as always when racing, but for sailing I much preferred the Jet-14s to the thistle. Very similar, just with some deck to sit on.

I did also race a few times with another uncle a Jet-14 when the e-scow was already full. I might have even sailed during the last season they had a Jet-14 fleet.

The E-scow was always my favorite though.

my first sailboat was a jet. fun little boats. definitely of the same lineage as the i14 and there's an old Bermuda Fitted Dingy at the Royal Dockyard in Bermuda that is also an Uffa Fox design.. the lines are all real close.

 

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23 minutes ago, hobot said:

 

FB_IMG_1633143331807.jpg

We ate at that cafe because of this painting.  Its in a beautiful small town called Arles.  This little French town has its own Roman Coliseum.  Pretty amazing.

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39 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

Ah, Julie Newmar was pretty hot.

Wonder what she looks like now?

Couldn't care less .. Still the best Catwoman ever. She also had a dead sexy voice, and as Dorcas was far and away my favorite of the seven brides for seven brothers.

Julie-Newmar.png

EarlySecondaryKouprey-poster.jpg

eb64b67eaaeaa0755b48ff15e1d51d16.gif

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17 minutes ago, warbird said:

Google image search does not come up with "Yamaha Big Bear Scrambler".

Possibly because it's a Suzuki.

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50 minutes ago, Bacchus66 said:
1 hour ago, justsomeguy! said:

Ah, Julie Newmar was pretty hot.

Wonder what she looks like now?

Couldn't care less .. Still the best Catwoman ever. She also had a dead sexy voice, and as Dorcas was far and away my favorite of the seven brides for seven brothers.

Julie-Newmar.png

She's still got a lot of it - at 88.

Julie Newmar on Twitter: "THE PERFECT TEAM Sean Black - photographer /  https://t.co/a6Jwbsdzvn Alexander McQueen - couture /  https://t.co/hithvQdQMU Anton Khachaturian - make up /  https://t.co/dcscsOCPKy Eve Harlowe - post production /

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1 hour ago, Bacchus66 said:

Couldn't care less .

Saw her today on a Beverly Hillbillies rerun.

As a Swede.

In a swimsuit. 

(pant, pant, pant)

I was suffering from shortness of pants.

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9 hours ago, Point Break said:

The things that REALLY made the difference - in order of importance…..by my assessment - were:

1) the deck was fully stuccoed underneath. The fire came up the steep hill from below. All those other houses had combustible decks. We call them “fire catchers”. The amount of BTU’s generated by a fully involved deck is pretty hard to offset.

2) minimal attic openings and the ones there it had were screened with very small screen. Wind driven fires very often push embers into poorly screened attics. Many many fires get established in the attic first.

3) non combustible roof material.

4) good brush clearance below the house/deck
 
5) minimal to no eaves. Once again….fire catchers.

6) double panel windows. 

7) complete stuccoed exterior…..

Stupid question PB..  But you have been involved in this situation more than most... 

 

Would you rather your house burned down with the rest of the neighborhood or would you rather your house survived??  In a one off where you are the only house on the mountain I guess it would not matter ether way(minus the loss of memories and all your shit), but if you are the last man standing...  

1.  No amenities as  everything around you is gone. (but you have all your crap.

1a.  The neighborhood is going to stink for a long while, is it even livable after??

2.  You get to look forward to massive construction over the next 5 + years before anything gets back to "normal"

3.  Local school district is prob trashed, where does your kid go? 

4.  Loss of social backstop,

There are a ton more but I am more interested in the aftermath...  

Thanks in advance my friend.

 

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6 hours ago, shaggy said:

Stupid question PB..  But you have been involved in this situation more than most... 

 

Would you rather your house burned down with the rest of the neighborhood or would you rather your house survived??  In a one off where you are the only house on the mountain I guess it would not matter ether way(minus the loss of memories and all your shit), but if you are the last man standing...  

1.  No amenities as  everything around you is gone. (but you have all your crap.

1a.  The neighborhood is going to stink for a long while, is it even livable after??

2.  You get to look forward to massive construction over the next 5 + years before anything gets back to "normal"

3.  Local school district is prob trashed, where does your kid go? 

4.  Loss of social backstop,

There are a ton more but I am more interested in the aftermath...  

Thanks in advance my friend.

 

That exact scenario happened to my friends in Wenatchee.  Their neighborhood burned down and they were one of the few left standing.

They just felt very, very lucky and asked themselves none of your questions.  

 

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29 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

That exact scenario happened to my friends in Wenatchee.  Their neighborhood burned down and they were one of the few left standing.

They just felt very, very lucky and asked themselves none of your questions.  

 

Interesting...  We had an apartment fire back in college.  Dog turned on the stove when we were out and that set the cooler on fire...  (wifie still says it was My fault...  ) lol.  Anyway, basically smoke damage, but it took weeks to get the smell out.  Neighbors etc were unaffected so I kind of get it...  

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10 hours ago, shaggy said:

Stupid question PB..  But you have been involved in this situation more than most... 

 

Would you rather your house burned down with the rest of the neighborhood or would you rather your house survived??  In a one off where you are the only house on the mountain I guess it would not matter ether way(minus the loss of memories and all your shit), but if you are the last man standing...  

1.  No amenities as  everything around you is gone. (but you have all your crap.

1a.  The neighborhood is going to stink for a long while, is it even livable after??

2.  You get to look forward to massive construction over the next 5 + years before anything gets back to "normal"

3.  Local school district is prob trashed, where does your kid go? 

4.  Loss of social backstop,

There are a ton more but I am more interested in the aftermath...  

Thanks in advance my friend.

 

I am often not around for extended conversations....fight fire and move along with the advancing fire front "bump and run" as it were at least when assigned to structure protection instead of perimeter control. During this particular fire it was kicking our ass and we had no chance at perimeter control until the wind let up. This particular couple of blocks the fire spotted in the canyon below and the firefight on those homes was around midnight to 6 am. Then the wind layed down and the perimeter did not move past that last canyon but there was still plenty of work along other blocks keeping the fire from jumping from house to house. Still plenty of work to do. But I digress.

The reactions seem to vary widely and we only see the very first reactions of relief when folks are allowed back in. Even that is a rare occurrence for us. I am aware of some of the stories our damage assessment teams have after the fire is over and they usually have any number of fire prevention, critical incident debriefing folks and our chaplains are pretty busy moving through the area looking for ways to help. They tell me that most folks are initially relieved and then many experience guilt at having their homes survive when friends and neighbors did not. We had one house that as the people were leaving the wife came up to me around 2 in the afternoon and said "Please please save my house. We love it". We didn't. But we did make a run through the house as it was obvious we were going to lose it and quickly (as the ceiling was coming down) gathered up photo albums and anything that looked like memorabilia, put them in plastic garbage bags from the garage and left them next to their mailbox. Days later I went through the neighborhood and they were going through their ashes looking for stuff. She saw me and flagged me down. I got out and walked over and she threw her arms around me as her husband stood by and sobbed a thank you. Seems we had saved some VERY important family and wedding pictures. Now I'm sobbing as well. 

Its hard on everybody. I HATED losing homes. HATED it. 

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47 minutes ago, Point Break said:

I hated losing homes. HATED it. 

There a seat reserved for you upstairs PB.

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48 minutes ago, Point Break said:

I am often not around for extended conversations....fight fire and move along with the advancing fire front "bump and run" as it were at least when assigned to structure protection instead of perimeter control. During this particular fire it was kicking our ass and we had no chance at perimeter control until the wind let up. This particular couple of blocks the fire spotted in the canyon below and the firefight on those homes was around midnight to 6 am. Then the wind layed down and the perimeter did not move past that last canyon but there was still plenty of work along other blocks keeping the fire from jumping from house to house. Still plenty of work to do. But I digress.

The reactions seem to vary widely and we only see the very first reactions of relief when folks are allowed back in. Even that is a rare occurrence for us. I am aware of some of the stories our damage assessment teams have after the fire is over and they usually have any number of fire prevention, critical incident debriefing folks and our chaplains are pretty busy moving through the area looking for ways to help. They tell me that most folks are initially relieved and then many experience guilt at having their homes survive when friends and neighbors did not. We had one house that as the people were leaving the wife came up to me around 2 in the afternoon and said "Please please save my house. We love it". We didn't. But we did make a run through the house as it was obvious we were going to lose it and quickly (as the ceiling was coming down) gathered up photo albums and anything that looked like memorabilia, put them in plastic garbage bags from the garage and left them next to their mailbox. Days later I went through the neighborhood and they were going through their ashes looking for stuff. She saw me and flagged me down. I got out and walked over and she threw her arms around me as her husband stood by and sobbed a thank you. Seems we had saved some VERY important family and wedding pictures. Now I'm sobbing as well. 

Its hard on everybody. I HATED losing homes. HATED it. 

Damn PB. Do you realize you have a hell of a start on that book with your posts here?

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18 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Youre a goode guye........                            :)

It's a tough job. Not just physically, but perhaps more so emotionally.

Hearing people screaming for help when there's no way to help. The smell of burning human flesh, the screaming of those who did get out trying to get back in to try to help the ones who are not going to make it.

 The next day, the melted personal treasures, buried in the detritus of what was once the safe place, the smell of burnt plastic, wet wood, charred appliances.... The skeletal outline in ash of a cat, or dog near what was the front door, or under the rusted springs of a bed.

 It's heart wrenching.

 I got out of the business 35 years ago, but mypulse still races every time I hear a tone, or smell a structure fire.

 

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25 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Yeah….I should get started….been distracted…..;)

I would enjoy sitting somewhere with a view and take notes for you anytime you want. Of course, the dyslexic thing comes into play but my crew always interpreted for me. Let me know if you need a hand.

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1 hour ago, Mid said:

fok me , that don't look high enough :(

A pulled apex round will work down to 50 meters, just, from the files of things I know from first hand.

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53 minutes ago, Excession said:

A pulled apex round will work down to 50 meters, just, from the files of things I know from first hand.

I'll take your word for it ........

no disrespect just no desire to prove it either .

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2 minutes ago, Mid said:

I'll take your word for it ........

no disrespect just no desire to prove it either .

Just don't have a dust devil form around you at 50m agl and you will never have too. I'd prefer that it was theoretical knowledge. 

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10 minutes ago, Excession said:

I'd prefer that it was theoretical knowledge. 

agreed

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10 hours ago, Mid said:

fok me , that don't look high enough :(

Looks way too high to be getting out of an airplane to me.

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9 hours ago, Excession said:

A pulled apex round will work down to 50 meters, just, from the files of things I know from first hand.

Watched a sky-diving championship event many years back in Athol, MA.  The German women's champion on her last jump decided to postpone opening until she was just about that low and right over the target.  The crowd was getting very, very animated but wile she did get the win, she couldn't walk away.  Stretchered off to the podium with a broken leg to get her trophy.

Wrote that sport off my list.

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8 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Wrote that sport off my list.

Made a number of jumps out of a helo into water…..I’d guess 20-25 feet at the most (at least that’s what they told us although it looked a lot higher to me…..and the smile on the crew chiefs face always made me wonder :lol:)…..and a train trestle or two mostly around midnight but alcohol was involved in those. :rolleyes: Skydiving? Uh…nope. Hang gliding? Uh….nope. Paragliding? Uh…..nope.

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Hope has screws in her back from a hard landing and she still misses participating in the sport!

I'd be happy to try one of those indoor skydiving places first and then reevaluate an airplane jump from there.

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36 minutes ago, hobot said:

I'd be happy to try one of those indoor skydiving places first and then reevaluate an airplane jump from there.

Bring about 10 friends to help defray the cost. Just a few minutes in the tunnel is quite fatiguing, but it's a lot of fun!

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2 hours ago, hobot said:

FB_IMG_1634100505649.jpg

 

Explosion on board the USS Wasp (CV-18) when a helicopter engine explodes in a hangar bay, 250 miles east of Norfolk, Virginia while carrying nuclear weapons, August 18, 1959 [image] by George Tice

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5 minutes ago, Merrill Levi said:

Explosion on board the USS Wasp (CV-18) when a helicopter engine explodes in a hangar bay, 250 miles east of Norfolk, Virginia while carrying nuclear weapons, August 18, 1959 [image] by George Tice

OK, thanks... I looked it over and didn't see some of the details, sorry

- DSK

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2 hours ago, hobot said:

Hope has screws in her back from a hard landing and she still misses participating in the sport!

I'd be happy to try one of those indoor skydiving places first and then reevaluate an airplane jump from there.

I always wanted to try skydiving but then I went parasailing in Mexico.

That was lots.

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On 10/10/2021 at 10:26 AM, MauiPunter said:

 

I wonder what they did differently or was it just random lottery winner.

They enclosed the underside of the house.  Mark Bower, famous fireproof architect, and a coworker of mine for 15 years.

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I always wanted to try skydiving but then I went parasailing in Mexico.

That was lots.

Hah! I did parasailing in Mazatlan off the beach in front of the El Cid, got high enough couldn't hear the motorboat anymore, made the mistake of eyeballing the harness web straps.

Quite the interesting experience.

:lol:

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29 minutes ago, hobot said:

Hah! I did parasailing in Mazatlan off the beach in front of the El Cid, got high enough couldn't hear the motorboat anymore, made the mistake of eyeballing the harness web straps.

Quite the interesting experience.

:lol:

Same but in Vallarta - I had a death grip on the straps the whole time.

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Left hip replacement at o dark 30 tomorrow morning (2nd of two), try not to mess with anything in the car and definitely don't change the radio settings while I'm gone.

We'll be back posting again in a couple of days.

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