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thank you for the greetings, things are still pretty wonky trying to do this so just bear with me and My energy level is low but I know this is good to bring my brain back online so I'll keep posting

Thanks Nimbus. The whole reset of the SA website where all the pages were wiped clean really had me at a low point. The last six months of it's life I had been just stomping on the gas pedal tryi

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18 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

People think that things change rapidly now but my grandfather went from oil light and horseback to men on the moon in his life.

Truly. The differences from even just 1900 to 1970 are astonishing. Throw in the next 25 years or so to when my grandfather died in the early 90's, and it just starts to seem like weird science fiction. When he passed he had been using his own PC for several years after his retirement from working in finance. Including doing early versions of online trading via modem in addition to e-mail and other uses.

BTW, if you haven't watched the science channel mini-series "Moon Machines", you should. Each of the six episodes focuses on one key aspect of building and equipping the machines and men that went to the moon.

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8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Talk about an "Oh Shit" moment.

That also happened several years ago, and there were photos from the cab with the driver looking over the edge into the water, before he was rescued.  Don't cross the bridge with an empty trailer.

I hate it when "jumpers" leap off the bridge and land on our beach!  We experience the helicopters searching for them. . . I hate it when searchlights shine into our bedroom windows crossing our beach in the middle of the night!

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1 hour ago, Autonomous said:

Sporty...  What was the tide up to?   Flood, ebb or in between?

Thanks.

It was a flood -- let me look it up, Nov 15 11AM -- about 2.4 kts flood, which would have been right to left (with the wind) in my video.  This isn't particularly fast for the San Juan Channel and the swells would have been even bigger had the current been ebbing.  Of course these waves aren't much compared to the Pacific coast, but they are still steep and nasty.  We hiked around there this afternoon and it was calm and glassy.

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Valis, as a Friday Harbor guy I have a question for you. At Front and Spring Street where the Cask and Schooner is now the previous inhabitant was a homey pub that served the best carrot cake in the world. Do you remember it? (They got run out because of the odors from their brewing but the official reason was a plumbing issue or so I was told.)

The wife and I would buy a piece after an evening there and share it for breakfast on the boat. It was awesome.

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37 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

Valis, as a Friday Harbor guy I have a question for you. At Front and Spring Street where the Cask and Schooner is now the previous inhabitant was a homey pub that served the best carrot cake in the world. Do you remember it? (They got run out because of the odors from their brewing but the official reason was a plumbing issue or so I was told.)

The wife and I would buy a piece after an evening there and share it for breakfast on the boat. It was awesome.

I moved here about nine years ago, and during this time it's always been the Cask and Schooner (but I think it changed hands just after I showed up).  I do wish they would change their menu more often though.  I remember it being quite varied and pretty good.  These days C&S has a few good choices and some blah ones -- my favorite is the "Stout Spiked Chicken Sandwich". 

Too bad about the cheesecake.

And Hobot:  Thanks for some great photos.  A couple of the recent ones deserved to be "top of the page" for sure.

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The shadows are suspect, not sure if it has been manipulated.

That said, I think those are sugar beets what do you think?

721637008288.jpg

Sugar beet story follows. Working on the railroad we were picking up some cars that had been set out at a very remote stub track in a remote canyon. A hobo appeared, he had been there awhile and had not eaten for two days. We took care of him and didn't tell him those odd round 'rocks' in the ditch were sugar beets that had fallen off of a car.

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2 hours ago, valis said:

It was a flood -- let me look it up, Nov 15 11AM -- about 2.4 kts flood, which would have been right to left (with the wind) in my video.  This isn't particularly fast for the San Juan Channel and the swells would have been even bigger had the current been ebbing.  Of course these waves aren't much compared to the Pacific coast, but they are still steep and nasty.  We hiked around there this afternoon and it was calm and glassy.

We've seen an 8' high wave with an outgoing tide and a big Westerly.  Plan your way through the the Pass carefully.  We've done circles in the whirlpools when forcing a passage.

We "always" reminded the kids to not ride logs out in our bay on an outgoing tide.  We only had to rescue them once when they disappeared around the corner.  They learned things from that.

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1 hour ago, DarthSailor said:

must be a data load, never saw a program stack that big. doesn't mean there wasn't one but shit that's a lot of cards.

And get just one of the fuckers out of sequence and you're screwed.

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45 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

And get just one of the fuckers out of sequence and you're screwed.

When I first learned to program Fortran back in the late 70's at 12, it was on a big IBM mainframe with punch card entry.

One of the very first thins the instructor told us was to always draw a slash along the edge of your cards after program was punched into cards. So that if you did drop them, or even just knock the stack over, you had a head start/visual aid on getting them back into order.

Pretty sure it wouldn't have helped on a stack that big/

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1 minute ago, Bacchus66 said:

When I first learned to program Fortran back in the late 70's at 12, it was on a big IBM mainframe with punch card entry.

One of the very first thins the instructor told us was to always draw a slash along the edge of your cards after program was punched into cards. So that if you did drop them, or even just knock the stack over, you had a head start/visual aid on getting them back into order.

Pretty sure it wouldn't have helped on a stack that big/

That's why I am assuming it's data that does not need any order to run correctly. I was fortunate to only have to use cards for my first programming class in school once you passed the basic class you could reserve 1.5 hour blocks on a terminal. Still had to code it longhand before you keyed it to maximize your terminal time, thankfully the era of Rambo coding came into existence with unlimited compiler uses. The next stage for me was debugging my code by reading the assembler portion of the compiler output since my main task at that time was writing assembler so I could read it faster and spot errors more quickly there. Working for oil companies meant that I had access to tons of processing power with very few limits. They had multiple mainframes 5+ in the data center with a Cray 1 to do the oil field projections based on sound data recorded in the field. They had standard benches to sit on which were like tits on a boar hog.

1280px-Cray-1_at_Computer_Museum_of_America.jpg

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5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

USS Los Angeles (IIRC) docked and the wind shifted.

- DSK

I'm gonna submit that it would take an impractical amount of helium or hydrogen to make the USS LA float like that...

uss-los-angeles-ssn-688-print-14.gif&f=1

 

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Spent a lot of time in places just like this back in the 60s and early 70s.. fond memories

League and team racin 

 

FB_IMG_1637170607357.jpg

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6 minutes ago, Mid said:

 

man those things are crazy fast!

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11 hours ago, hobot said:

FB_IMG_1637170607357.jpg

I never got to go to a place like this when I was kid.  I had a small tiny oval track for a gift at xmass but I always wanted to go to one of these big tracks.

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I found this interesting and thought I would share......

FB_IMG_1637239782358.jpg

In May of 1861, 9-year-old John Lincoln "Johnny" Clem ran away from his home in Newark, Ohio, to join the Union Army, but found the Army was not interested in signing on a 9-year-old boy when the commander of the 3rd Ohio Regiment told him he "wasn't enlisting infants," and turned him down. Clem tried the 22nd Michigan Regiment next, and its commander told him the same. Determined, Clem tagged after the regiment, acted out the role of a drummer boy, and was allowed to remain. Though still not regularly enrolled, he performed camp duties and received a soldier's pay of $13 a month, a sum collected and donated by the regiment's officers.

The next April, at Shiloh, Clem's drum was smashed by an artillery round and he became a minor news item as "Johnny Shiloh, The Smallest Drummer". A year later, at the Battle Of Chickamauga, he rode an artillery caisson to the front and wielded a musket trimmed to his size. In one of the Union retreats a Confederate officer ran after the cannon Clem rode with, and yelled, "Surrender you damned little Yankee!" Johnny shot him dead. This pluck won for Clem national attention and the name "Drummer Boy of Chickamauga."

Clem stayed with the Army through the war, served as a courier, and was wounded twice. Between Shiloh and Chickamauga he was regularly enrolled in the service, began receiving his own pay, and was soon-after promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He was only 12 years old. After the Civil War he tried to enter West Point but was turned down because of his slim education. A personal appeal to President Ulysses S. Grant, his commanding general at Shiloh, won him a 2nd Lieutenant's appointment in the Regular Army on 18 December 1871, and in 1903 he attained the rank of Colonel and served as Assistant Quartermaster General. He retired from the Army as a Major General in 1916, having served an astounding 55 years. 

General Clem died in San Antonio, Texas on 13 May 1937, exactly 3 months shy of his 86th birthday, and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

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13 hours ago, Willin' said:
19 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

USS Los Angeles (IIRC) docked and the wind shifted.

 

I'm gonna submit that it would take an impractical amount of helium or hydrogen to make the USS LA float like that...

uss-los-angeles-ssn-688-print-14.gif&f=1

 

Although similar in more than name, I don't think anybody is going to confuse the two

https://www.airships.net/us-navy-rigid-airships/uss-los-angeles/

- DSK

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5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Although similar in more than name, I don't think anybody is going to confuse the two

https://www.airships.net/us-navy-rigid-airships/uss-los-angeles/

- DSK

Yep. In fact the airship was only the second USS Los Angeles, of four to date.

The first was a tanker (ID-1470). The second was the Airship (ZR-3). The third was a Heavy Cruiser that entered service just as WWI was ending (CA-135). SSN 688 was of course the most recent to bear that name, and was the lead ship and namesake of her class. She served for almost just over 43 years before being decommissioned in 2010.

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Slot cars....  how did they stay on the track?  magnets?  i know there is usually a pin the fits in the slot...

i didn't have a slot car track I had a TCR track... where you can make the cars switch lanes   dad and i would spend many  hours racing...

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Just now, Marcjsmith said:

Slot cars....  how did they stay on the track?  magnets?  i know there is usually a pin the fits in the slot...

i didn't have a slot car track I had a TCR track... where you can make the cars switch lanes   dad and i would spend many  hours racing...

I was involved in this a little when I was a kid.   In addition to the slot, the cars had special soft rubber tires to increase with friction for cornering.  The video of the cars at the competition shows the cars having significant aero mods to increase downforce.  

The cars still regularly came off the track and they do in the competition video too.  The goal is to complete the most laps while the power is on.  

The video seems to suggest the cars are at full throttle all the time now.  That wasn't the case back in the day - the speed had to be modulated to try to stay on the track longer.  I might be wrong about the situation now but I don't see given the sub-second lap times how much speed control could be going on.

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