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How do you change your headsail?


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I am trying to figure out the best sequence to change headsails with hanks. Currently we are

1 preparing

2 dropping the old sail and tying it down

3 unclipping it

4 clipping the new sail on a new tack

5 tacking

6 hoisting

7 clearing the old sail

It requires about 4 minutes bare headed

... way too long

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Trick is to start clipping on the new one earlier:

1. Get the tack & change sheet at the clew on

2. Drop the old sail + bungee it

3. Clip the new one around the old one (you probably need to miss out the bottom hank at this stage)

4. Swap the halyards, tack and hoist

5. Get a rough trim on the new jib then start cleaning up the old one on the windward side.

6. Get the last hank on the new one and add more halyard tension

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The real trick is to unhook the bottom couple of hanks on the current sail, then attach the tack/sheets and all the hanks from the new sail.  When you drop the halyard, unhank the old jib as fast as you can, swap the halyard to the new sail and hoist.  Should only take about 30 seconds bald headed if you're doing it right. There is still some cleanup and sorting to do but at least you'll be powered up.  Its usually easier if the new sail is on the lee side.

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4 hours ago, sam_crocker said:

The real trick is to unhook the bottom couple of hanks on the current sail, then attach the tack/sheets and all the hanks from the new sail.  When you drop the halyard, unhank the old jib as fast as you can, swap the halyard to the new sail and hoist.  Should only take about 30 seconds bald headed if you're doing it right. There is still some cleanup and sorting to do but at least you'll be powered up.  Its usually easier if the new sail is on the lee side.

This ^ 
 

the times I’ve done this have been when we’ve been racking up a coast line. Sail towards the cliff and hank the new sail on the windward side and attach the lazy sheet to the clew, remove the bag from the new jib and place it under the old jib, start dropping the old jib into the new bag pulling the hanks off as it drops, halyard straight onto the new sail and hoist going through the tack, zip the bag up on the old jib and carry it away

(yes I know the jibs are then bagged wrong but I’d do this 2 handed and always know which sails are in which bags)

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3 hours ago, Misbehavin' said:

What was wrong with your last topic on the same subject? Have a look at my post, the first reply to your thread.

 

 

You are right. Perhaps I was not very clear :)

 

At the time I sailed with furler and double track foil and my question was more related to how to set up foredeck and prefeeder.

Now, with hanks, I wonder how the actual swap is executed by you guys, to sail bare headed as briefly as possible.

 

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2 minutes ago, VeloceSailing said:

You are right. Perhaps I was not very clear :)

 

At the time I sailed with furler and double track foil and my question was more related to how to set up foredeck and prefeeder.

Now, with hanks, I wonder how the actual swap is executed by you guys, to sail bare headed as briefly as possible.

 

I'll just repost my reply from the old thread then ;-)

 

1) Take off a couple of the lower hanks of the already hoisted sail, and hank on the new sail on the windward side.

2) Lead the new sheets back. Both headsails have their own continous sheet with a soft shackle in the middle. Tighten the lazy sheet.

3) Tack

4) Pull the old headsail down at lightspeed, taking the hanks off as it goes down, and transfer the halyard to the new sail and pull it up. The old headsail is now down on the deck to the windward side of the new headsail.

5) Fine-trim headsail.

6) Down with the old sail through the foredeck hatch.

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1 hour ago, VeloceSailing said:

I guess that the tack of the old sail stay attached until the sail is down, right?

Yes.

Or it would get ugly very quickly. If you think about it, it could be the last detachment as it helps keep the sail from going over the side whilst you're hoisting the new headsail. 

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Gee, someone should write a book on this.  

Since this is the shorthanded forum, I assume you are single or double handed.   The key is to reduce the amount of time in which you are not sailing with a headsail up and drawing..   I've got it down to 48 seconds, and that's singlehanded.  I assume you are beating upwind.

1. Tack.

2. Hank on the new sail on the windward side of the boat, below the lowest hank of the old sail.  Don't worry if you can't get the tack on. 

3. Shift the unused sheet to the new sail.  Don't sheet in on it.

4. Tack back into your desired direction, and as you are tacking release the jib halyard so that the old sail drops onto the foredeck.  This becomes the windward side, so the sail will not drop in the water.  It will be held on deck by the new sail.

5. Go to the foredeck and unclip the old sail hanks and swap the sail tacks and halyard.  The old sail will still be held on deck by the new sail.

6. Return to the cockpit and raise the new sail, and sheet in as appropriate.

7. Get sailing at full speed.

8. Go to the foredeck and shift the other sheet and roll up the old sail, starting at the bow and moving backwards.

As I said, 48 seconds from sail up to sail up.

Have Fun!

 

 

 

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we swapped to winchard snap on hanks so hanking on the new jib takes way less time.   The goal is to keep the boat sailing as fast as possible for as much of the time as possible.   So our set up worked like this: 

Set up new jib changing sheet

plug in new jib tack and changing sheet  

drop old jib 

snap on new jib hanks (45 seconds max)

hoist new jib

trim new jib 

get boat back up to speed, 

set up lazy sheet, I like to be able to tack if required 

go and clean up the old jib, unhank, fold, bag, tie to the rail if allowed

clean up old jib sheets 

go back to sleep 

 

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8 minutes ago, IMR said:

we swapped to winchard snap on hanks

Absolutely, Wichard hanks are much faster than piston hanks. Also Wichard hanks only require one hand to hank on or off. Piston hanks require two hands, so you can't hang on to your bouncing boat.

BUT!!!    DO NOT BUY THE SILVER WICHARD HANKS.  THEY WILL RIP YOUR SPINNAKERS AND THE CLIP POPS OUT OF THE HANK.   Only buy the brass Wichard Hanks.  they are much better.  I am fighting my sailmaker over this right now.

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2 hours ago, Foolish said:

Gee, someone should write a book on this.  

Since this is the shorthanded forum, I assume you are single or double handed.   The key is to reduce the amount of time in which you are not sailing with a headsail up and drawing..   I've got it down to 48 seconds, and that's singlehanded.  I assume you are beating upwind.

1. Tack.

2. Hank on the new sail on the windward side of the boat, below the lowest hank of the old sail.  Don't worry if you can't get the tack on. 

3. Shift the unused sheet to the new sail.  Don't sheet in on it.

4. Tack back into your desired direction, and as you are tacking release the jib halyard so that the old sail drops onto the foredeck.  This becomes the windward side, so the sail will not drop in the water.  It will be held on deck by the new sail.

5. Go to the foredeck and unclip the old sail hanks and swap the sail tacks and halyard.  The old sail will still be held on deck by the new sail.

6. Return to the cockpit and raise the new sail, and sheet in as appropriate.

7. Get sailing at full speed.

8. Go to the foredeck and shift the other sheet and roll up the old sail, starting at the bow and moving backwards.

As I said, 48 seconds from sail up to sail up.

Have Fun!

 

 

 

Rolling....do you have a sausage bag or a normal sail bag?  I have the normal and like to roll the flaked (dacron) sail from the clew to the tack to have the tack and hanks available to attach when it comes out of the bag but that puts you doing a lot of stuff up on the bow.  Would like a better way.

.  

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On 5/21/2021 at 3:06 PM, bridhb said:

Rolling....do you have a sausage bag or a normal sail bag?

Usually when I change from my #1 to #3, the wind is blowing above 15 and the bow of my boat is bouncing up and down in the water, so I want to spend as little time as possible on the bow.  So rather than pack the sail carefully, I just start at the bow and roll the whole sail into a pack and tie it with a long sail tie, then just stuff it down the main hatch.  It's not pretty, but it gets the job done. 

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Great tips guys. Thanks.

Foolish, yes you assumed correctly I was talking about the shorthanded procedure. Alone however..needs some practice. The biggest problem solo is cleaning up if I change from a genua to a jib as the jib, with battens is difficult to handle alone and does not go through the foredeck hatch.

A few difficulties I encounter with similar procedures:

- even if I release the lowest hank, with the tensioned luff, it is very difficult to hank on the new sail which is stiff (not dacron). Perhaps it should be flaked with all the folds on the same side, but that means that it can only be hanked on always on the same tack. 

- the old sail does not crush on deck if I relrease the halyard while tacking. Again, the canvas is stiff and bending the hanks causes friction on the forestay. Somebody needs to "help" the sail down. Perhaps a line tied at the head can help.

 

I like whichard hanks, but they have a tendency to clip the guy when dousing the spinnaker. They might on the other side solve the problem with friction as they are way wider!

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On 5/22/2021 at 6:51 AM, Foolish said:

Absolutely, Wichard hanks are much faster than piston hanks. Also Wichard hanks only require one hand to hank on or off. Piston hanks require two hands, so you can't hang on to your bouncing boat.

BUT!!!    DO NOT BUY THE SILVER WICHARD HANKS.  THEY WILL RIP YOUR SPINNAKERS AND THE CLIP POPS OUT OF THE HANK.   Only buy the brass Wichard Hanks.  they are much better.  I am fighting my sailmaker over this right now.

I ran Wichard hanks on the staysail and am a fan. One issue I didn't like though was the beak had a tendency to bite into the dyneema forestay when you were hanking on. They could do with blunting off the end a bit.  

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I had a weird failure mode with Wichard brass hanks where they clipped into each other when the sail was dropped & bungeed going downwind. New jib has soft hanks which I would imagine don't do this.

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18 hours ago, VeloceSailing said:

 with battens is difficult to handle alone and does not go through the foredeck hatch.

- even if I release the lowest hank, with the tensioned luff, it is very difficult to hank on the new sail which is stiff (not dacron). Perhaps it should be flaked with all the folds on the same side, but that means that it can only be hanked on always on the same tack. 

- the old sail does not crush on deck if I relrease the halyard while tacking. Again, the canvas is stiff and bending the hanks causes friction on the forestay. Somebody needs to "help" the sail down. Perhaps a line tied at the head can help.

 

 

Just tie it to the lifelines and leave it on the foredeck until you get back to the dock.

Make sure that when you drop a sail in normal conditions, you leave it hanked to the forestay while you fold it up from the rear, then unhank it last. This will position the hanks right where you want them for the next haul up.

It's not a problem if you have to go to the bow to drop your sail.  It will still fall on the high side of the boat.

 

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2 hours ago, Foolish said:

Just tie it to the lifelines and leave it on the foredeck until you get back to the dock.

Make sure that when you drop a sail in normal conditions, you leave it hanked to the forestay while you fold it up from the rear, then unhank it last. This will position the hanks right where you want them for the next haul up.

It's not a problem if you have to go to the bow to drop your sail.  It will still fall on the high side of the boat.

 

Yeah, that is what I do.  That is why I didn't understand your previous advice tp roll it to the rear?  I must not be understanding what you intended.

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When races allow, I have had good luck with getting a square spinnaker bag off of a larger boat.   You then tie this to the rail and drop the jib into it, you then use the internal sail ties to tie it to the windward lifeline.  This helps keep below deck dry by not dropping the sail down the hatch, it get the weight of the jib on the windward side of the boat, and when it choppy out it block some of the waves from rolling into driver.    

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Most everything @Foolish wrote is good advice, except for one thing.

For certain: you want the luff and hanks all together, and the first thing outa the bag. With a sausage bag (of course), you drag the sail on deck, in the bag, open just the forward end, and hank the new sail on.

As everyone mentions, set it up so the new sail is to leeward so it will help keep the old sail on the foredeck.

Often, you will need to disconnect the lowest hank or three on the old sail. Attach all the hanks from the new sail BEFORE dropping the old sail.

Shorthanded (this forum), heading up to head to wind to drop is a good thing to do. Ya gotta ensure the sheet is slacked as the halyard is dumped so the sail actually falls to the deck.

Back in the day, sail changes were almost always aligned with tacking: drop the old as the sheet is blown at head-to-wind, and hoist the new (to leeward) on the new tack. This allows the crew to stay on the windward side of the foredeck.

Another key tip: when you drop the sail, and remove the hanks from the headstay, you want a sail tie (gasket) through all the hanks, to keep them together and in the right order. And of course this keeps the sail under control on deck.

Then, hoist the new sail.

Better: Go with carbon sails, and you won't have to change headsails. Overlap is a waste of sail cloth (and your money). If the sail does not stretch (is not dacron), you won't need to change as the wind comes up because the shape does not go the hell and get full with the draft moving aft. Just twist a little.

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I personally like to hank on the new sail after I drop the old one. I found it much quicker. 

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10 hours ago, IMR said:

I personally like to hank on the new sail after I drop the old one. I found it much quicker. 

IMR, I've been considering this as well. Especially as the wind comes up it seems faster to level the deck, clear the old sail, hank the new sail and raise it. I realize your headless for a moment but it seems like the entire job is accomplished much more quickly and safely. Critical for short handing.

When the wind is lessening I'm more open to method of hanking on the new sail before dropping the old. 

J

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I like to drop the old jib, leave the old jib hanked on and just hank the new jib on top of the old one. You might not get the bottom hank but that’s fine. Then set the new jib and get the boat moving before cleaning up the old jib. 

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Just now, IMR said:

I like to drop the old jib, leave the old jib hanked on and just hank the new jib on top of the old one. You might not get the bottom hank but that’s fine. Then set the new jib and get the boat moving before cleaning up the old jib. 

I tend to get whichever is the bigger jib hanked on first. So - if changing down a size, get the old one down then clip on the new one, but if changing up a size clip the new bigger one on first then get the old one off.

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Dropping and then hanking on the new sail when changing down and vice versa when changing down (or as Snowden says, hank on the larger sail first) sounds a sensible approach to minimize risk.

 

I can see that some of you change sheets (and let the old ones on the old sail), some use changing sheets, and some shift the same sheets from a sail to the other. I usually use the same sheets if alone or a new set of sheets doublehanded. My reason for not using one changing sheet is that I often race inshore and I may need to tack immediately after the new sail is up.

 

 

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On 5/21/2021 at 4:51 PM, Foolish said:

Absolutely, Wichard hanks are much faster than piston hanks. Also Wichard hanks only require one hand to hank on or off. Piston hanks require two hands, so you can't hang on to your bouncing boat.

BUT!!!    DO NOT BUY THE SILVER WICHARD HANKS.  THEY WILL RIP YOUR SPINNAKERS AND THE CLIP POPS OUT OF THE HANK.   Only buy the brass Wichard Hanks.  they are much better.  I am fighting my sailmaker over this right now.

Is this true? I am considering going to hanks and my sailmaker who’s judgement I respect says I’m risking tearing my spin. Anyone else have experience with this to share?

edit: by using the one handed clip on hanks

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4 hours ago, inneedofadvice said:

Is this true?

i've never had any problem with catching my spinnaker with the brass Wichard hanks, and I've done thousands of launches, gybes and douses singlehanded. But the silver ones!!! Absolute crap - believe me. I'm making my sail loft change them.

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9 hours ago, inneedofadvice said:

Is this true? I am considering going to hanks and my sailmaker who’s judgement I respect says I’m risking tearing my spin. Anyone else have experience with this to share?

edit: by using the one handed clip on hanks

If it’s the Wichard snap hook type Hank I would be very careful with the spinnaker and also halyards. Our jib has them hooking to the right which is fine for port roundings when setting the kite but light airs gybing is always risky, the sail has to be walked round, and when spinning a kite halyard (ours are tapered) round the forestay they can pierce the halyard and trap it. The only solution is to drop the jib to free the halyard. On the plus side they’re very quick to Hank a jib on with

 

1B7EBE95-42AE-4E28-A70D-DDFAAEB91DAC.jpeg

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4 hours ago, JL92S said:

If it’s the Wichard snap hook type Hank I would be very careful with the spinnaker and also halyards. Our jib has them hooking to the right which is fine for port roundings when setting the kite but light airs gybing is always risky, the sail has to be walked round, and when spinning a kite halyard (ours are tapered) round the forestay they can pierce the halyard and trap it. The only solution is to drop the jib to free the halyard. On the plus side they’re very quick to Hank a jib on with

 

1B7EBE95-42AE-4E28-A70D-DDFAAEB91DAC.jpeg

So as walking the chute through the jibe single handed is out of the question, what style do you recommend?

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9 hours ago, Foolish said:

i've never had any problem with catching my spinnaker with the brass Wichard hanks, and I've done thousands of launches, gybes and douses singlehanded. But the silver ones!!! Absolute crap - believe me. I'm making my sail loft change them.

I want to accept this and hope you’re correct as they are my first choice. 

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18 hours ago, inneedofadvice said:

So as walking the chute through the jibe single handed is out of the question, what style do you recommend?

The soft hanks 

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22 hours ago, inneedofadvice said:

I want to accept this and hope you’re correct as they are my first choice. 

Have experienced and seen problems with chutes catching on Wichard hanks both stainless and brass.  Beware...

Cheers!

 

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4 hours ago, inneedofadvice said:

Like these or is there an option that isn’t $31 a piece?

Making your own soft hanks is very easy. You can use some old line so they are free.  But you do need to consider how difficult it is to get them on and off. Think about changing your sails from a #1 to a #3, in 15 knots of wind and a 3' chop.  You'd have a heck of a time hanging on.   This is the beauty of Wichard hanks that can be done with just  one hand.

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That's why the clip hanks (not knotted Dyneema soft shackles) are good - possible to (dis)connect with cold gloved fingers. The cost is higher but in the context of a £3k 3Di jib it's all relative.

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3 hours ago, Snowden said:

That's why the clip hanks (not knotted Dyneema soft shackles) are good - possible to (dis)connect with cold gloved fingers. The cost is higher but in the context of a £3k 3Di jib it's all relative.

My only experience with those is on a 29er. They were constantly coming undone. I assume the ones you’re describing are better quality?

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On 5/29/2021 at 5:06 AM, inneedofadvice said:

I’m intrigued. Go on....

I remember some thirty odd years ago, there was a Hank System that had a trigger plate underneath the jaws. So as the old sail is lowered, they will open on their own. Then switch halyard to the new Genoa and hoist. Then clean up the old Genoa.  Nice idea but never worked well. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a slab (well horizontally rolled and then zipped) reefed headsail on the mini which works well, means much less work changing down!

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/21/2021 at 1:51 PM, Foolish said:

Absolutely, Wichard hanks are much faster than piston hanks. Also Wichard hanks only require one hand to hank on or off. Piston hanks require two hands, so you can't hang on to your bouncing boat.

BUT!!!    DO NOT BUY THE SILVER WICHARD HANKS.  THEY WILL RIP YOUR SPINNAKERS AND THE CLIP POPS OUT OF THE HANK.   Only buy the brass Wichard Hanks.  they are much better.  I am fighting my sailmaker over this right now.

UK Sailmakers doesn't like them:

The choice is there between piston hanks and Wichard snap hanks. I am quite used to piston hanks and never tried the “one-hand hanks” from Wichard. My sailmaker has however scared me with nightmare stories of sailors getting either a flying spinnaker halyard or lazy guy “hanked”. That thought was enough -- piston hanks it is.

I'm in the pop off one or two  active jib bottom hanks, hank on the new jib below them, tack (or not), drop the old jib whilst popping off its hanks & hoist the new jib.  Clearly the fastest way to switch hanked on jibs.  Not noted in this thread is if it's blowing the old jib will not "drop" to the deck when the halyard is blown, it either has to be pulled down or a light brailing line run through a few hanks to the uppermost hank to a turning block at the tack led aft so the afterguard can pull the jib down.

Double headfoil setups are superior for nearshore racing, peels and tack peels cost nearly nothing but over the years I've seen Carbo/Geon foils blow up, aluminum foils get dented by an errant spinnaker pole, luff tapes pull out of the foil, and high friction loads when prehoisting the new jib sometimes make things difficult.

Obviously roller furling is out of the question unless required by Class Rules; you cannot furl a decksweeper genoa because the clew will end up at the bottom of the furled sail.

Hanked on sails however primitive still have some virtues. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, axolotl said:

UK Sailmakers doesn't like them:

The choice is there between piston hanks and Wichard snap hanks. I am quite used to piston hanks and never tried the “one-hand hanks” from Wichard. My sailmaker has however scared me with nightmare stories of sailors getting either a flying spinnaker halyard or lazy guy “hanked”. That thought was enough -- piston hanks it is.

 

 

 

Actually I wrote that article published in the doublehanded section by UK Sails. It is about the rationale for abandoning furler and foil and going back to hanks. After half a season with pistol hanks I believe it was the right choice. 

Can't say that I manage a headsail change solo as fast as I wish, but under 10 mins from decision to clear deck. At the moment, the most time consuming part is being able to pack away the old sail so that I can change back.

Also, blowing the halyard is not enough as I need to pull down the sail hand over hand

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20 hours ago, axolotl said:

My sailmaker has however scared me with nightmare stories of sailors getting either a flying spinnaker halyard or lazy guy “hanked”. That thought was enough -- piston hanks it is.

In doing thousands of singlehanded launches, gybes and douses, I have only one time caught my spinnaker on a brass wichard hank.  But have done it several times on the silver hanks.   So I can speak from long experience about this issue.

Once you've been up on the bow, bouncing in a 4 foot chop, you'll realize the absolute need to have one hand for yourself, one hand for the boat.  Piston hanks just take 2 hands.

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18 hours ago, Foolish said:

In doing thousands of singlehanded launches, gybes and douses, I have only one time caught my spinnaker on a brass wichard hank.  But have done it several times on the silver hanks.   So I can speak from long experience about this issue.

Once you've been up on the bow, bouncing in a 4 foot chop, you'll realize the absolute need to have one hand for yourself, one hand for the boat.  Piston hanks just take 2 hands.

I noticed last time I was out I have been doing piston hanks mostly one handed, just never noticed that I did until I paid attention.  I do keep them lubed and there are a couple with slightly bent pins that need two. hands.  I should take care of that.

I put some of those bronze Wichard hanks on a nylon drifter I picked up but have not had a chance to use them.  I am sure they are easier than pistons.

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8 hours ago, VeloceSailing said:

What lubricant?

It is a teflon dry lube similar to the pricy "mclube" stuff.  I will get the brand name next time I  am on the boat (have a dog recovering from knee surgery so don't make it to the boat that often right now).  It leaves a white sort of nongreasy film on things.

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8 minutes ago, bridhb said:

It is a teflon dry lube similar to the pricy "mclube" stuff.  I will get the brand name next time I  am on the boat (have a dog recovering from knee surgery so don't make it to the boat that often right now).  It leaves a white sort of nongreasy film on things.

Thx

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On 6/30/2021 at 5:01 AM, bridhb said:

I noticed last time I was out I have been doing piston hanks mostly one handed, just never noticed that I did until I paid attention.

You can hank on a jib with one hand, while the other hand holds on to the pulpit?  I'd love to see a video of how you do that.

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19 hours ago, Foolish said:

You can hank on a jib with one hand, while the other hand holds on to the pulpit?  I'd love to see a video of how you do that.

A vid probably won't happen and I tend to hold on to the forestay, but maybe I can get a photo next time I go sailing.

As I wrote, I didn't even notice until I studied this thread and paid attention last time I went sailing.  It is sort of a grab the end of the piston and wedge your knuckle against the hank movement.  I am sure the spring hanks are easier and I hope to find out if I ever get my drifter up.

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On 6/30/2021 at 9:25 AM, VeloceSailing said:

What lubricant?

Checked today during "storm" prep.  It is this stuff:  See the source image

Might try the real "mclube"  to see if there is a difference when this runs out.

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1 hour ago, bridhb said:

Checked today during "storm" prep.  It is this stuff:  See the source image

Might try the real "mclube"  to see if there is a difference when this runs out.

Great thanks

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