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Lightest Dinghy for 2 adults?


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Looking for a lightweight dinghy with hard hull (i.e not a Snark or an inflatable) that will carry 2 adults (say 300 lbs max). I don’t race, so ease of setup is more important than speed, size of class, etc.  Need it to be light for when I’m sailing solo and have to roll it up a steep ramp.  

Laser, Sunfish, etc all about 130 lbs.

Rocket is 90 lbs.

RS Aero is 66 lbs, but can it take 2 adults?  

UFO is 75 lbs, but also wonder about carrying capacity and cockpit size.

Topaz Topper is 95 lbs, don’t know carrying capacity 

Others? 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

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The carbon version of the Banshee--the Gryphon. That's probably also about same weight as Rocket. Have no idea how you would find one!

What does a turnabout weigh? Or an interclub? I bet they are also 140. The Penguin is about 140 also.

NS14 sometimes you see MG14 (the latter spinnaker on an NS) are quite light and design 2 person. There were few brought over to the US at somepoint. I've sailed against two of them in portsmouth!

I wouldnt be surprised if there isn't a stitch and glue dory that weighs under 100 lbs.

Imagine taking a Platt Monfort Geodesic Aerolite and putting a sail on it. Now you are in 45 pound territory!

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1 hour ago, Mudsailor said:

Taser?

might not be any in your neck of the woods

There is one within 15 miles of him that I know of. I think it is for sale and may not have sold yet.

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20 hours ago, Puzman said:

Looking for a lightweight dinghy with hard hull (i.e not a Snark or an inflatable) that will carry 2 adults (say 300 lbs max). I don’t race, so ease of setup is more important than speed, size of class, etc.  Need it to be light for when I’m sailing solo and have to roll it up a steep ramp.  

Laser, Sunfish, etc all about 130 lbs.

Rocket is 90 lbs.

RS Aero is 66 lbs, but can it take 2 adults?  

UFO is 75 lbs, but also wonder about carrying capacity and cockpit size.

Topaz Topper is 95 lbs, don’t know carrying capacity 

Others? 

Possibly one of the best boats that in my view which fits your description is the Weta.

"Lightweight and simple, rig and launch by yourself in 20 minutes. | Weta" https://www.wetamarine.com/the-boat/

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4 hours ago, RobbieB said:

How about the new Melges 15?  It looks great.

Looks like a nice boat but weights much more than a taser or L2

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RS Feva if you are both on the smaller/lighter side could work...often pitched as a kids boat, but max crew weight is over 500lbs and the XL has a bigger main

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It's not an easy nut to crack.  It's pretty much a simple relationship of skin area to weight to cost that has almost no shortcuts.

Fiberglass really isn't light if it's inexpensive. Once you start adding cores, the cost goes way up and there is no way to stay light without core.

SHC

 

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The Aero easily wins at the light bit, will carry 2 people I suppose, but not a lot of room, and in lighter winds only.

Tasar sounds like the right bit of kit if it's for 2 people more than occasionally, but you'll struggle singlehanded in more than 12 knots of breeze.

Trouble is, there is a pretty epic difference between single handers and 2 man boats, in racing dinghies.  Payload is usually the first decision from which all other decisions are made, even a 40lb sailor weight difference results in a very different boat. Boats suitable for flexible numbers of crew are not usually racing boats, so are built for toughness, rather than easy launching.  Life is full of compromises.  I think the Feva call sounds like a good stepping stone, it will do everything easily, and help you decide how you want to specialise.  

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2 hours ago, Bruce Hudson said:

Possibly one of the best boats that in my view which fits your description is the Weta.

"Lightweight and simple, rig and launch by yourself in 20 minutes. | Weta" https://www.wetamarine.com/the-boat/

What is the sailing weight of the WETA?

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43 minutes ago, 2flit said:

What is the sailing weight of the WETA?

The rig is fairly light, modern (carbon mast), no boom, and the lines are simple / somewhat minimalist.

  • WEIGHT - MAIN HULL128LB / 58KG
  • WEIGHT - FLOAT WITH BEAM FRAME40LB / 17.5KG
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2 minutes ago, Bruce Hudson said:
  • WEIGHT - MAIN HULL128LB / 58KG
  • WEIGHT - FLOAT WITH BEAM FRAME40LB / 17.5KG 

Ah... yes I saw that, but what is the sailing weight?

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We own a Tasar, and I have crewed for my son on a RS Feva at the kids sail training at the yacht club a couple of times. I have sailed both solo in light winds.

I'm close to 200 lbs, my son is about 150 lbs. It was a bit tight for me crewing on the Feva, but we had fun in 15 knots and a solid 2 ft bay chop.

Both get stored mast up and are pretty easy to rig up. I can drag either up a ramp or across sand by myself, neither is hard to move around.

The Tasar seems faster and a bit more nimble to sail. Bigger fleets locally to race 1 design.

Feva is fun to sail, I like the little kite, although it doesn't seem to massively power up the boat. Feva is definitely more responsive than the bigger Quest (which felt like a bit of a heavy dog to sail)

I think either would work well, if cost wasn't an issue I'd probably go Feva for a play boat (just for the kite) but Tasar if there was to be any racing. Tasar if you have lots of days of sub 12 knots winds.

Oh, we also have a 4.5m Nacra cat... takes 2 of us to rig and drag around,  but is the most fun to sail 2 up and is comfy for 3.

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At 145 pounds, 66 years old and a bad leg, an Aero is as much as I want to haul up a ramp (all up on a dolly it's more like 100 lbs., not 66). But I don't want another adult in my Aero at any point. Plenty of folks my size can manage getting a Laser up and down a ramp, but if you get anything above 160 lbs, I suspect you'll struggle. You said nothing about the other adult, whether they're an active participant or animated ballast, but if they're like most other people who "would love to go sailing", you'll be solo most of the time. I had a Feva and loved it, and I agree those above that it's the best option. Get a replica Dacron sail with furling points and you can single-hand it in a wide range of conditions, use the full on mylar main in the light or with crew. The boat is practically indestructable and a blast downwind. As a mediocre sailor that loved the gennaker, I dumped it a lot, but it's very easy to right. 

Singlehand a Tasar in 10-11 knots? That'll be a much better sailor than me (of which there are plenty). Maybe you're one of them.

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3 hours ago, Bruce Hudson said:

The rig is fairly light, modern (carbon mast), no boom, and the lines are simple / somewhat minimalist.

  • WEIGHT - MAIN HULL128LB / 58KG
  • WEIGHT - FLOAT WITH BEAM FRAME40LB / 17.5KG

In regard to the Weta. If it's possible at your location to break the boat down before heading up the hill it would be easy to set the floats to the side so it's only the hull and dolly that need to be pulled up the hill. The floats are bulky but could be carried up one by one apart from the main hull and dolly.

Having said that, I've needed help getting my Weta up a steep sand hill (I have parts to attempt a pully system next time I'm at that location) and I've struggled to get it up a steep paved hill (Cascade Locks dinghy launch area).

I was just thinking the other day that I wish it was easier to haul up a hill but I can't think of anything else that I could have a good time sailing solo as well as with someone else.

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13 hours ago, gmanwally said:

At 145 pounds, 66 years old and a bad leg, an Aero is as much as I want to haul up a ramp (all up on a dolly it's more like 100 lbs., not 66).

I love reading things like this regardless what someone is sailing or event doing for that matter.  Good on you!  Keep it up!  

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I used to have a Weta. Great boat for singlehanding or with two people. Stable and nifty way to recover should you capsize (see the videos).  There is something for the 2nd person to do - fly the gennaker - so they are not just along for the ride.  Of course with two, you would loose some performance but definitely not like taking two people on a Laser. 

In my opinion, based on owning one, if you can leave the boat rigged on a dolly it is great. Not much more effort required to go sailing than with a Sunfish.

However, if you must assemble / disassemble each time, that would get old fast (at least for me). IF you were to go that route, it is really important to have a proper combi-trailer to easily get the dolly + boat on and off the trailer. I sold the boat because I did not have easy access to a place to leave rigged.

As for beach / ramp launching, the fully rigged Weta is heavier than a Laser but doable. I would launch from a coarse pebble beach and having someone push until the dolly was out of the water helped but was not 100% necessary. Wider dolly tires would help in that situation.

I think the newer Weta's (built after ?) are a little lighter than older ones due to change in the build.

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I keep coming back myself to about 150 or 160 as top weight - I'm fairly strong (and 180 lbs!)- don't think I will have a problem.

I'd hate to disqualify a boat for 10 or 20 lbs- at some point the balance, the dolly, the wheel size and other factors come into play. Having been a rigger I think it would be easy to come up with something to take some of that weight off - heck, a stake driven into the ground can pull a lot of weight. There are so many electric drives of sorts these days that might be retrofitted. 

A lot depends on how many different places one might sail - and whether the car can be used at some places as a winching point. There is a company in FL that makes big wheeled carts for jet skis that look interesting....let alone all those things that move trailers. 

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/tow-tuff-electric-trailer-dolly-tmd-3500etd-1570183?cm_mmc=feed-_-GoogleShopping-_-Product-_-1570183&gclid=Cj0KCQjw2NyFBhDoARIsAMtHtZ4waDOHtlrfx2qkSMSi3THWqbinHVmiqHGDym9_QNni3XLUfmo0FKkaAmkvEALw_wcB

Someone needs to come up with a lightweight battery powered dinghy dolly! 

I'm still staying at 160 or less. 

RS Zest - a LOT less money, no kite - crew stated as 1-3 (496 lbs!). Same weight. 

As with all the other similar threads, it really does matter how you are going to use it - if double handed is rare or usual. 

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23 hours ago, gmanwally said:

At 145 pounds, 66 years old and a bad leg, an Aero is as much as I want to haul up a ramp (all up on a dolly it's more like 100 lbs., not 66). But I don't want another adult in my Aero at any point.


The RS Aero is in a class of its own.

If I had to choose between sailing an Aero by myself or sailing a heavier boat with my wife, I would choose the Aero.

And so would she!

Coming up to 50 years with my lady and 6 years with my Aero.

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19 minutes ago, tillerman said:


The RS Aero is in a class of its own.

If I had to choose between sailing an Aero by myself or sailing a heavier boat with my wife, I would choose the Aero.

And so would she!

Coming up to 50 years with my lady and 6 years with my Aero.

Hmmm...so get the aero...sail a lot and have more fun with less hassle...get the wife hooked, and a second aero!!!

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On 6/2/2021 at 2:23 AM, Spokey Doke said:

wonder if anyone can compare time/effort to rig the feva vs weta???

Surprisingly a Feva can take a while to rig until you are familiar. Mast top main halyard cleat baffles lots, the fact that you can only rig the main standing by starboard bow, the jib halyard with 2:1, how the downhaul is lead, clew strap and then there is the spinnaker. So many small things to do wrong.

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Having both a Weta and an Aero, I like this thread.  But are any of OP's choices really capable of having fun with 300 pounds on board?  I can't imagine having anyone bigger than a small child on an Aero, yet the Weta is great fun with two up (300#) in just about any condition.  As far as making it up a steep ramp, get the Weta dolly/Road King trailer combo and tow it up.

The ramp angle at my club, LCYC, is about 20 degrees.  And long.  Dragging the Aero, rig and dolly, light as they are, up heart attack hill absolutely sucks.  So I'll probably end up with yet another trailer if I can find light enough springs.

 

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Couple Fevas 2018 showing up on FB Marketplace for at least 2K under new price - if anyone is interested - use a 250 mile search radius of NYC and put in rs sailing. 

Not sure if that is a good deal - at first glance 1 K a year in savings seems good, but this depends on the life of the sails. You'd have to do the depreciation on them......chances are good these boats were raced b/c that's prob. why people buy them! 

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On 6/2/2021 at 7:21 PM, Spokey Doke said:

Hmmm...so get the aero...sail a lot and have more fun with less hassle...get the wife hooked, and a second aero!!!

My wife has been looking longingly at the pontoon boats for rent - asking me to rent one sometime. That's a dirt cheap solution and fully indicates to me that she could care less about what sailboat I get. I won't even ask her...when decision point comes. 

She's had a decade of riding on the others with me and we can still rent the Hobie...and a pontoon boat once or twice a year! That was easy. Now to check out that Aero  and see if it says "this is for old dudes" on it. 

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9 hours ago, craigiri said:

Now to check out that Aero  and see if it says "this is for old dudes" on it. 

Dudes of all ages sail the RS Aero. - but usually only one dude at a time.

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12 hours ago, craigiri said:

Now to check out that Aero  and see if it says "this is for old dudes" on it. 

I'm late sixties and no longer what I consider fit.  If I can get one on and off a pickup truck rack some 6.5 feet (2 m) off the ground without issue, it fits the old dude criterion pretty well.

 

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2 hours ago, fastyacht said:

One of the first vids on the Aero had a guy in his 60s or maybe 70s launching and sailing off a shingle beach

 

Are you talking about this one? For the record, I have never seen anyone carry and launch an RS Aero like this in real life, but I guess it's a good way to demonstrate how light it really is. Also good if you don't have a dolly.
 

 

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That guy must have been a windsurfer at some point...I know that maneuver well...and it answers a big question of mine, as the closest access point to the big reservoir I'd spend most of my time on has a pretty narrow beach that is barricaded by a line of boulders clearly put there to keep vehicles from entering (and dollies with boats on them).  The Aero hull is lighter than plenty of canoes I wouldn't think twice about carrying through the same access point...

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45 minutes ago, Spokey Doke said:

That guy must have been a windsurfer at some point...I know that maneuver well...and it answers a big question of mine, as the closest access point to the big reservoir I'd spend most of my time on has a pretty narrow beach that is barricaded by a line of boulders clearly put there to keep vehicles from entering (and dollies with boats on them).  The Aero hull is lighter than plenty of canoes I wouldn't think twice about carrying through the same access point...

Another reason to buy an Aero!

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6 hours ago, fastyacht said:

Yep! Thats it!

 

 

48 kg - I love this guy because he acts as if anyone should be easily able to just lift over 100 lbs and move it around! 

But I do get the drift....if one needs to actually lift a boat, this is great! OTOH, you are paying for the lightweight construction and I have to assume it's not as bulletproof as their rotomolded models. 

With such a high tech construction, is this boat repairable "good as new" if someone runs over a rock in the water? Any of you guys destroy one yet? Maybe insurance covers it?

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An NS 14 has a minimum official hull weight of 64kg, (141 lb) most carry around 4kg (9 lb) of lead ballast to bring them up to that weight. About 12 were sent to the Santa Barbara YC around 2000, they were mostly early 1990 designs. Probably not available on the east coast, and not the weight you want anyway.

Tasars weigh 68kg (150 lb), so out of you weight range as well.

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On 6/6/2021 at 4:12 AM, fastyacht said:

fiberglass is easier to repair than thermoplastic.

Yep. I know if a few 'racing' Fevas that were written off after a ding. The boat's ok as a boat, it's hard to destroy, but virtually impossible to put back to as new.

I can't see how you get 2 grown ups in and frankly it's not light.

 

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7 hours ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

An NS 14 has a minimum official hull weight of 64kg, (141 lb) most carry around 4kg (9 lb) of lead ballast to bring them up to that weight. About 12 were sent to the Santa Barbara YC around 2000, they were mostly early 1990 designs. Probably not available on the east coast, and not the weight you want anyway.

Tasars weigh 68kg (150 lb), so out of you weight range as well.

There are two ns/mg within 15 miles of the OP. Ironically.

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It was so hot we took a trip to LBI (jersey) - and I just rented a Zest (Harvey Cedars Marina rents hobies, zests and is an rs dealer - they had a quest there also)- really nice and laid back people.

I had fun sailing the zest - no doubt it is heavy (on land), but that also gives it a rock-solid feel. Nothing pans or dents, etc.

There was more room that I thought in it - depending on point of sail there were many places I could sit. Room for another for short rides, but I can't imagine it would be great fun unless they were crew and you threw the Jib option on. 

Due to design one might want stronger winds in this boat to add to the fun factor. It was only blowing at about 12knts which were not conditions that would excite in that boat - but, then again, my first time in it (or any real dingy), so I'm not complaining. I think I'd want 11-16knts for a fun day out.

If nothing else it confirmed that setting an upper weight limit in that area 130-140lbs)  is good idea for many - and confirms why the really light boats have a bragging point. 

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On 6/5/2021 at 1:03 PM, tillerman said:

Are you talking about this one? For the record, I have never seen anyone carry and launch an RS Aero like this in real life, but I guess it's a good way to demonstrate how light it really is. Also good if you don't have a dolly.

I have recovered and relaunched an RS Aero by picking it up like this (having sailed to the opposite end of the lake from my dolly). It really does balance well gripped like that.

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18 minutes ago, JamesWBane said:

I have recovered and relaunched an RS Aero by picking it up like this (having sailed to the opposite end of the lake from my dolly). It really does balance well gripped like that.

Since you've been here for almost three years before this first post, I'm guessing you know that you should share a little info about your wife and/or girlfriend.

Welcome to the monkey house.

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vandercraft v3000, which is (was?) the light version of the laser3000, which was the revamped version of the Laser 2 (same hull shape, but with skiff rig and layout)

don't think many around though, but I seriously considered buying one to sail with  childrens (before finding out you can do that with a 29er too ;-) )

 

http://www.vandercraft.co.uk/vandercraft-3000/index.html

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22 hours ago, RedTuna said:

Since you've been here for almost three years before this first post, I'm guessing you know that you should share a little info about your wife and/or girlfriend.

Welcome to the monkey house.

 

22 hours ago, Timur said:

In case you're innocent or naïve, he's referring to a pic of your wife/girlfriend similar to:

 

320x240.10.jpg

Don't worry, I got you: someonesGF.jpg.eaf858f0285627f2e96add686a7f446c.jpg

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On 6/2/2021 at 6:56 PM, tillerman said:


The RS Aero is in a class of its own.

If I had to choose between sailing an Aero by myself or sailing a heavier boat with my wife, I would choose the Aero.

And so would she!

Coming up to 50 years with my lady and 6 years with my Aero.

I was going to start a thread with a funny name but the subject is too simple so let me ask.

"How long is your Dinghy?" - oh, that was the funny thread title.....

Actually, my simple stupid question is what is the average sail like for most fast dinghy sailors? I used to spend maybe 2.5 hours on my sloop - but only 90 minus on my tri (it was so fast it got places quick) - and an full hour or 1:15 is fine on a Hobie.

I ask because of a lack of experience and noting the active method  - that you are hardly ever in a "comfy" position for too long and often on your knees (when tacking or maybe downwind and working). 

I wouldn't mind a short ride on an Aero to see how superior it really is or isn't for my purposes. I educated my wife a bit (about the ultimate boats being composite and lightweight) and she said "do they cost more". I said about twice as much and she didn't even flinch. I can't beat your 50 years yet (1972), but I know I can get away with spending 10G on something if it gives me pleasure. 

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In the old days at a championship we might spend 5 or 6 hours on the water while the PRO got one really good 90-150 min race in. Now we might spend 4 or 5 hours on the water for 6 30-40 min races. Alternatively we might go out for an hour for a 45 min club sail. Horses for courses.

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4 hours ago, European Bloke said:

In the old days at a championship we might spend 5 or 6 hours on the water while the PRO got one really good 90-150 min race in. Now we might spend 4 or 5 hours on the water for 6 30-40 min races. Alternatively we might go out for an hour for a 45 min club sail. Horses for courses.

Over 30 uears ago The star regattas were like the former and 505 like the latter. Different horses for sure

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19 hours ago, craigiri said:

Actually, my simple stupid question is what is the average sail like for most fast dinghy sailors? I used to spend maybe 2.5 hours on my sloop - but only 90 minus on my tri (it was so fast it got places quick) - and an full hour or 1:15 is fine on a Hobie.

I ask because of a lack of experience and noting the active method  - that you are hardly ever in a "comfy" position for too long and often on your knees (when tacking or maybe downwind and working). 

I wouldn't mind a short ride on an Aero to see how superior it really is or isn't for my purposes. I educated my wife a bit (about the ultimate boats being composite and lightweight) and she said "do they cost more". I said about twice as much and she didn't even flinch. I can't beat your 50 years yet (1972), but I know I can get away with spending 10G on something if it gives me pleasure. 

I would sail up to 5 hours on my RS Aero, but usually 2-3. It is comfortable as far as dinghies go, though if you are trying to squeak out performance, you'll spend more time kneeling, hiking, etc. If you just want a pleasure sail, I've about napped in the thing with the sail eased in light winds.

Sailing my Musto Skiff, I usually go out 1-3 hours. There's not much sitting or kneeling, except to hoist and drop the spinnaker (or on the daggerboard because the boat's on its side :( ).

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On 6/5/2021 at 11:12 PM, fastyacht said:

fiberglass is easier to repair than thermoplastic.

The only boat I'm aware of produced in thermoplastic is the O'Pen Bic, or O'Pen Skiff as it's now called, in my experience these are very hard to repair.

RS boats and most others out there are made from Rotational molded polyethylene, which if you know how to repair a fiberglass boat is just as easy to repair with something like West Systems Gflex, however it can be difficult to color match.

 

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4 hours ago, RSsailingNA said:

The only boat I'm aware of produced in thermoplastic is the O'Pen Bic, or O'Pen Skiff as it's now called, in my experience these are very hard to repair.

RS boats and most others out there are made from Rotational molded polyethylene, which if you know how to repair a fiberglass boat is just as easy to repair with something like West Systems Gflex, however it can be difficult to color match.

 

If it's so easy to fix why do so many UK racing feva hills get written off after a big ding? Answer is it's impossible to put back into full racing state. That's direct from RS UK.

Sure wheelie bin plastic is great for sailing school boats. It's very hard to do anything that makes them not sailable but it's not easy to make them as new again. So the wheelie bin ends up in the skip.

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5 hours ago, European Bloke said:

If it's so easy to fix why do so many UK racing feva hills get written off after a big ding? Answer is it's impossible to put back into full racing state. That's direct from RS UK.

Sure wheelie bin plastic is great for sailing school boats. It's very hard to do anything that makes them not sailable but it's not easy to make them as new again. So the wheelie bin ends up in the skip.

Now there's a capital idea!  Convert used RS Feva to Wheelbarrows! Briliant!

 

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12 hours ago, European Bloke said:

If it's so easy to fix why do so many UK racing feva hills get written off after a big ding? Answer is it's impossible to put back into full racing state. That's direct from RS UK.

Sure wheelie bin plastic is great for sailing school boats. It's very hard to do anything that makes them not sailable but it's not easy to make them as new again. So the wheelie bin ends up in the skip.

So, where is the fun part of the story - where we civilians get to buy those repaired boats for next to nothing b/c they can't race?

Weird - b/c you'd think having the same shape and within a kilo or two would be golden...I know a kg is a lot, but it's basically whether the crew ate a decent meal before or prunes the day before. 

Thanks for the Dinghy Length answers - it's informative b/c in sailing you are usually doing something. That is, you are learning, or you are conquering a bit of fear (tough conditions) or you are getting somewhere and back (hey, circle that island). I love afternoon delight sailing as much as anyone (sitting in a nice boat doing 6kts with good company), but I get bored more easily by myself unless the right Hendrix or Procol Harum tune comes in tune with the scene. 

If the conditions change a lot I can see that being a good reason for a longer sail. 

Now, as to how one gets comfortable in an Aero - I'll have to study the pics. 

Of course, the ultimate reward for staying out in the Bay (in RI) might be circling 1/2 million dollar yachts and feeling that you may have gotten more for your money. Ah, human emotions. Well, come to think of it, I've seen dogs and birds place around with things and looking like they are proud they have the better one. 

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On 6/10/2021 at 6:22 PM, craigiri said:

I was going to start a thread with a funny name but the subject is too simple so let me ask.

"How long is your Dinghy?" - oh, that was the funny thread title.....

Actually, my simple stupid question is what is the average sail like for most fast dinghy sailors? I used to spend maybe 2.5 hours on my sloop - but only 90 minus on my tri (it was so fast it got places quick) - and an full hour or 1:15 is fine on a Hobie.

I ask because of a lack of experience and noting the active method  - that you are hardly ever in a "comfy" position for too long and often on your knees (when tacking or maybe downwind and working). 

I wouldn't mind a short ride on an Aero to see how superior it really is or isn't for my purposes. I educated my wife a bit (about the ultimate boats being composite and lightweight) and she said "do they cost more". I said about twice as much and she didn't even flinch. I can't beat your 50 years yet (1972), but I know I can get away with spending 10G on something if it gives me pleasure. 

Well, try one of these two

https://reverb.com/item/41029502-1970-fender-stratocaster-with-rosewood-fretboard-4-bolt-neck-original-case

 

or if you're more of a Gibson guy

https://reverb.com/item/32742132-gibson-l-5-1939

Way less maintenance than another boat, but of course you also have to keep them inside

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Well, try one of these two

https://reverb.com/item/41029502-1970-fender-stratocaster-with-rosewood-fretboard-4-bolt-neck-original-case

 

or if you're more of a Gibson guy

https://reverb.com/item/32742132-gibson-l-5-1939

Way less maintenance than another boat, but of course you also have to keep them inside

FB- Doug

Just as with boats, I'm generally a newer is better guy - which is why I have a 1997 White American Strat and an Indonesian made G&L (which is fantastic, BTW). In that second case, you get double what you pay for!

I bought a Seagull during the pandemic - it would float, that's for sure. Got a deal and then Amazon gave me an extra 15% due to tiny scratch. Now - if I could get that kind of a deal on a boat, I'd be there tomorrow cash in hand. 

I forget - did anyone mention Topaz Uno in these "fairly light boats - for two" threads? Topaz seems to get left out sometimes, but it doesn't look like a bad boat. 

132 lbs. 370 crew weight. Nice amount of sail area and a jib for those that want something to do up there. 

https://www.topazsailboats.com/why-topaztopper/topaz-uno-race/

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I have to think the Taser wins in this category for adults, even if some of the sailing school boats are a little lighter. Thank you Mr. B!

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18 minutes ago, craigiri said:

Just as with boats, I'm generally a newer is better guy - which is why I have a 1997 White American Strat and an Indonesian made G&L (which is fantastic, BTW). In that second case, you get double what you pay for!

I bought a Seagull during the pandemic - it would float, that's for sure. Got a deal and then Amazon gave me an extra 15% due to tiny scratch. Now - if I could get that kind of a deal on a boat, I'd be there tomorrow cash in hand. 

I forget - did anyone mention Topaz Uno in these "fairly light boats - for two" threads? Topaz seems to get left out sometimes, but it doesn't look like a bad boat. 

132 lbs. 370 crew weight. Nice amount of sail area and a jib for those that want something to do up there. 

https://www.topazsailboats.com/why-topaztopper/topaz-uno-race/

I am extremely familiar with the Topper Topaz, it's a great little boat. Because of the lack of a gun'l, it's more difficult to carry than it should be, and for their size they are NOT light. But they're tough and they're a lot of fun. Excellent sailing characteristics.

A sailing program here has a fleet of 6, primarily used for kids but I have taught adult sailing in them.

With guitars, newer is not necessarily better. I've played some 1930s jazzboxes, they have a sweet resonance that newer guitars can't touch.  I don't have any tiller time on '50s Strats but you won't find a good one of them for 10K anyways.

FB- Doug

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3 hours ago, spankoka said:

I have to think the Taser wins in this category for adults, even if some of the sailing school boats are a little lighter. Thank you Mr. B!

Chatting with someone in the UK week or so back, they are sailing Tasar 276, a) I think it used to be Dad's (the real Mr.B) boat and b) it's got to be close to 50 years old.  Apparently non the worst for wear and still going strong, as in still racing and competitive.   That's possibly the definition of "over speced" .

            jB

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  • 2 weeks later...

OP doesn't want this upgraded (ABS) Snark, but someone should grab it - for $500 (maybe a little less), it's probably a decent find for those who REALLY need the light weight. Not many in this condition (note the condition of the label on it).

If I was collecting more boats, I'd buy it! I wonder what the wife and neighbors would think....after all, I have one acre....

https://nwct.craigslist.org/boa/d/stratford-sail-boat-snark-sunflower/7342659839.html

Slight overweight but I think most could handle the Puffer (160lbs) on a dolly as opposed to a trailer - lots of them for sale, from $250 to $950. It appears you might get what you pay for as many have been stored outside for decades (or look that way). Others look almost perfect. Given the actual "sit in it" - it would seem to satisfy the two-up daysailing. As a bonus it rows and motors. There is probably good reason so many were sold. 

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I always liked the Escape Expedition 14.5, a Laser 2 hull with a cat rig and a Hoyt-type boom. Designed to be simple for resort rentals, still goes well, and is comfortable for 2. Claimed weight is 160#. Not many around, but they do show up for sale occasionally.

Also, Megabyte, room for 2 and 150#. They've been actively raced recently, if not still. Contact the class association for boats that may be for sale.

I would buy either one for myself. I've sailed Lasers plenty, BTDT, and no room for a friend.

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Stopped by a shop and saw the Feva "in person" yesterday - that's an impressive middle-of-the-road boat - 139 lbs - and a stable looking platform for two (or more if family sailing). 

Not the lightest of all - but in the realm if we consider under 150 - which is a good weight for dolly handling in many cases....not lifting, but easy enough on a dollar on most slopes for even one strong person. 

There are a few used copies out there for about 5700 - a extra benefit for some is that many race it. 

Given the length of the thread - sorry if I am doubling up. 

https://www.rssailing.com/project/rs-feva/

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1 hour ago, craigiri said:

Stopped by a shop and saw the Feva "in person" yesterday - that's an impressive middle-of-the-road boat - 139 lbs - and a stable looking platform for two (or more if family sailing). 

Not the lightest of all - but in the realm if we consider under 150 - which is a good weight for dolly handling in many cases....not lifting, but easy enough on a dollar on most slopes for even one strong person. 

There are a few used copies out there for about 5700 - a extra benefit for some is that many race it. 

Given the length of the thread - sorry if I am doubling up. 

https://www.rssailing.com/project/rs-feva/

The Feva is a great little boat, but emphasize "little."

It's intended for junior sailors. I have sailed one, and really liked it. Many great characteristics including the ability to set ones' legs relatively comfortably... but if you put one normal size USAnian (6' 180lbs) and one smallish one (about 5'3" and maybe 110, although I should not presume to guess a lady's weight) in it, then it sit low, won't really "go" properly, and tends to let water run in over the open transom. I was impressed with it's handling and ergonomics and capsize performance, and so was the lady I sailed it with... I should say the lady was a sailing instructor from New England somewhere, whom I never met before that event nor since.

FB- Doug

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Fuck me. How hard does this have to be?

A Feva is not light.

A Feva is not suitable for two normal size adults.

Yes I have sailed one. Yes I did sail it with 2 very small children on a river in little wind. There was not enough space for more or larger people and if it had been sporty I'd have had to kick someone out.

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 A Mirror hull weighs under 100lbs. It's designed to be sailed by two and can be sailed single-handed relatively easily (there's even a forward mast foot position to balance the rig w/o a jib). It's quick and easy to rig.

 They are available to buy new, in fibreglass, within half an hour's drive of Durham.

(I know, not the one in Connecticut...)

One was listed recently in South Dakota; that's only 1600 miles away.

https://mirrordiscussforum.org/Drupal_02/node/658

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