Jump to content

Final Details- Trip Planning


Recommended Posts

I feel like I'm not very organized for this singlehanded trip to Maine so I'd like to run a few things by you guys.  Chime in if I've left out anything major.  Here's what I've done or plan on doing before departure:

  • A simple will (Legalzoom), adequate life insurance
  • PLB (I'm singlehanded so an EPIRB seems useless if I fall off the boat)
  • Rocna Vulcan 33lb for my 33 foot boat, 25lb Manson spare anchor
  • All navigation lights clearly visible and tested
  • Propane system properly installed, sniffer and blower functional
  • SPOT tracker (I already had this, I just re-activated my subscription)
  • New plotter, fresh charts, some paper backups. Multiple GPS backups
  • VHF w/AIS and DSC, handheld VHF w/DSC as backup
  • Reasonably functional auto pilot
  • Engine health checked (oil analysis, new transmission, new HX, fresh impeller, fresh hoses, new exhaust elbow)
  • Fuel system is clean, spare filters onboard
  • High capacity electric bilge pump and dual action manual pump installed
  • LED headlamps
  • Powerful "sun gun" spotlight
  • Fresh boat batteries, solar and shore charger
  • Bilge, toilet, holding tank transfer and fresh water pumps all freshly serviced
  • Standing rigging inspected (no meathooks, no visible cracks on any fittings, cotter pins all secure, spare blocks onboard)
  • Running rigging in good condition, (furler line is fairly new which I consider important)
  • Boom brake/preventer installed
  • A reasonable complement of mechanical and electrical tools and repair parts
  • Working jib and Genoa onboard, all reefing lines rigged
  • Steering gear inspected and lubricated
  • All hatches seal tightly and securely
  • Jacklines will be rigged
  • Line cutter will be installed
  • 6 gallon water jug independent of the boat's water system stowed in the V-berth notch
  • Packs of batteries
  • LED "flare" as well as conventional pyrotechnic flares and orange distress flags
  • Ship's bell, air horn w/spare cartridges
  • New radar reflector
  • Emergency underwater curing epoxy repair kit
  • A variety of auto-inflating PFDs w/harnesses are onboard as well as an orange, solid Type I offshore PFD and 2 Type II orange PFDs.
  • Harnesses & tethers, crotch straps for the PFDs
  • SOS inflatable Dan-buoy
  • Lifesling
  • 3 fire extinguishers, fire blanket
  • 2 first-aid kits plus ordinary daily medicinals (Tylenol, Ibuprofin, band-aids, motion sickness patches)

On the human side:

  • New offshore grade foulie jacket is enroute (my 8 year old jacket finally gave out last weekend)
  • Wet suit for emergency dives to cut away pot lines
  • Wool sweaters, fleece tops and thermal undergarments
  • Hot weather clothing, wide brimmed hat
  • Foulie boots, deck shoes, sailing gloves
  • One-handed, pre-prepared snacks as well as a variety of dry/canned easy to prepare provisions
  • Insulated water bottles
  • Secure stowage under the helm seat for food and water in case I cannot leave the wheel.

Some stuff I haven't done:

  • I have failed to install some sort of washboard retention system
  • I have not devised any kind of system to secure lockers and bilge boards in the event of a complete inversion
  • Radar not fitted
  • No wind steering fitted
  • I need to make a ditch bag

 

Thoughts?

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 508
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Ajax carries a deflated Achilles. (Inspect heel of tubes for arrow puncture!)

Seriously - Is the weather that bad in summer? I'd be worried about a lack of wine, but that's just me.

Do you have a towel???   A towel is just about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can carry. Partly because it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you f

Posted Images

Looks very thorough to me, Ajax.  A nice checklist for just about anyone doing a offshore passage (but what do I know - never done one singlehanded). But this one immediately caught my eye.

”Reasonably functional auto pilot”

Reasonably.  I know you’re not crossing a full ocean (i don’t know your route), but I think I’d want to be pretty confident in my self-steering, especially re: fatigue.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Looks very thorough to me.  But this one immediately caught my eye, Ajax

”Reasonably functional auto pilot”

I know you’re not crossing a full ocean (i don’t know your route), but I think I’d want to be pretty confident in my self-steering, especially re: fatigue.

It's a wheel pilot.  You know how they are.  It always holds a course reliably. Under heavy rudder loads the belt will slip once in awhile but that's my fault for not trimming the sails properly. If I relieve the weather helm, it never fails.  It is definitely reliable with sails down, motoring.

I have several bail out points (Cape May, Sandy Hook/LIS, Block Is/Buzzard's bay).   I don't have to do any long legs if I don't feel up to it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Ajax said:

It's a wheel pilot.  You know how they are.  It always holds a course reliably. Under heavy rudder loads the belt will slip once in awhile but that's my fault for not trimming the sails properly. If I relieve the weather helm, it never fails.  It is definitely reliable with sails down, motoring.

I have several bail out points (Cape May, Sandy Hook/LIS, Block Is/Buzzard's bay).   I don't have to do any long legs if I don't feel up to it.

Cool - I actually don’t know wheel pilots, but I understand your description.  Just looking out for ya, man! :-). (Was going to ask if you had a tiller or wheel - tiller handy for sheet/tiller steering, where/when possible.). And, BTW, thanks for sharing your list - great food for thought/mental list for me for future solo plans.  Lots to think through.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Chamois leather.  Just the job for drying hands, oilskins etc so you don't drip on the chart table.  Plus it never runs out of the ability to dry things.  

My don't go to sea without list includes a couple of builder's rubble sacks and a la Tilman, onions.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Thoughts?

where's the fun factor and ffs STOP over thinking it .

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

We like Sandy Hook, beautiful spot.  Going threw NYC up/down the East River is very cool.  Long island sound is lovely, Manhasset Bay, Port Jeff and Gardener Bay are worth a stop.  It's fun going along the coast, different then offshore jumps but interesting.  Either way you'll have a good time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Mid said:

where's the fun factor and ffs STOP over thinking it .

I’ve posted this vid somewhere in CA before - fun watch.  Singlehanded 4,000 miles in a Wayfarer 16 open dinghy all around Greece, across the Med, up the Nile to Cairo, back to Greece. (May help you get in a singlehanded frame of mind, Ajax :-) )

He goes over his list of gear starting at around the 9:00 mark.  You’ll be surprised at what he considered one of his most important pieces of gear.  The fun factor - the yellow thing he brought. :-)  (I suspect for many, me included, the fun factor is simply successfully executing the solo journey, day by day.)

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Mid said:

where's the fun factor and ffs STOP over thinking it .

Well, I didn't want to state it publicly but I did pack the blow up doll.  Your comment is encouraging so I'll start to relax.

wifeinabox.thumb.jpg.7476d22e9ed37ee99497bf6b85f1782f.jpg

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Because foreign seafarers attract the authorities please prepare your head Y-Valve for the inspection. Plus everything else on their short list. Like one totally official yet uncomfortable PFD that is never used lest the rating label wears off — stored openly. Oh yeah: the placards and waste plan. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Quality list. Might I suggest...

Spare impeller and belt for the engine, and some extra oil and coolant as required would be on my list.

Oh and tons of sunscreen because who wants to feel like they were set on fire after a long day on the water.

Hope you have a good adventure with managable dramas.

Oh and a vinyl repair kit lest your hostess springs a leak from well....., from whatever.

Do you have your wood plugs lashed next to your thru hulls?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Borracho said:

Because foreign seafarers attract the authorities please prepare your head Y-Valve for the inspection. Plus everything else on their short list. Like one totally official yet uncomfortable PFD that is never used lest the rating label wears off — stored openly. Oh yeah: the placards and waste plan. 

Great points. I will have lockwire for the Y-valve.

I already have the oily discharge warning placards and waste plan. I will store the Type I PFD openly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, blunted said:

Quality list. Might I suggest...

Spare impeller and belt for the engine, and some extra oil and coolant as required would be on my list.

Oh and tons of sunscreen because who wants to feel like they were set on fire after a long day on the water.

Hope you have a good adventure with managable dramas.

Oh and a vinyl repair kit lest your hostess springs a leak from well....., from whatever.

Do you have your wood plugs lashed next to your thru hulls?

Thanks for pointing these out.  I have everything you mentioned except for the vinyl repair kit for my "travel wife."  In addition to the wood plugs, I have one of those large Forespar foam plugs. I also have a spare quart of transmission fluid along with the engine oil and coolant.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Blue Crab said:

The box "contains 34" inflatable wife." I prefer taller wimen meself. Are you a really short guy? NTTAWWT

Well, she rides on top so it's OK.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a quite complete list to me, Ajax. I think you can relax w.r.t. the boat, watch weather, and set out confidently.

Once you get the sails set and the engine off you'll forget the what-if's and the anxiety will melt away.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Disclaimer: I have single-handed but only a 15' boat and not very far.

I didn't see a life-raft on the list, was it considered and rejected?

Passage plans for the various legs, including bailout options.

Music and/or books.

Treats for self-rewarding (chocolate, rum, cigar, whatever works for you).

Apologies if I'm presumptuous.

I'm envious, you'll have a great time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Black Sox  I've decided against a life raft because I'll be coastal nearly the entire trip. I have a wet suit which I can don. I do have the PLB. The wet suit will provide warmth and buoyancy along with my PFD.

  • Passage plans- Yes, I have them.
  • Music/books- Yes, on my smartphone. I decided against a Kindle for now. Just more shit to cram onboard.
  • Movies- I'm bringing my laptop for navigation purposes so I'll download a few movies for quiet nights at anchor or in marinas but I don't expect to watch them.
  • Rewards- I have rum. I'm trying to abstain from stuff like chocolate. One reward that I want, is a lobster roll which is a local sandwich made from the bugs.
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to mention-

I think that I've decided to forgo the hard dinghy for safety reasons. It only fits on the foredeck and I'm nervous about it hogging the entire foredeck if I should have to go forward to unfuck the furler or a snagged jib sheet or something.  I've only ever stowed it on deck once. If I had more experience dealing with it by myself, I'd bring it.

I'll be deflating and stowing my inflatable dink on the cabin top or in the Q-berth. I'll bring my little electric trolling motor to supplement the oars.  The inflatable dink has a hard floor made of removable panels, so it's not terrible to use.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

some nice surprises/presents for the SO?

Keeping her happy when she joins you is more important than any safety shit B)

Out at anchor, under a full moon and starry sky . . . . "Dear I love you so much, and I am over the moon with joy that we can share this spectacular evening together"  as you pull The Rockefeller Sapphire out of a drawer and put it on her finger.  She just might agree to go cruising. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jsaronson said:

Bug spray, hat, sunglasses, medicines, spare cartridge for PFD, emergency antenna?

Everything but the emergency whip but I have a spare hand held. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, estarzinger said:

some nice surprises/presents for the SO?

Keeping her happy when she joins you is more important than any safety shit B)

Out at anchor, under a full moon and starry sky . . . . "Dear I love you so much, and I am over the moon with joy that we can share this spectacular evening together"  as you pull The Rockefeller Sapphire out of a drawer and put it on her finger.  She just might agree to go cruising. 

 

Showing her real whales and other sea life would carry more weight. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Ajax said:

I have not devised any kind of system to secure lockers and bilge boards in the event of a complete inversion

Seriously - Is the weather that bad in summer?

I'd be worried about a lack of wine, but that's just me.

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Seriously - Is the weather that bad in summer?

I'd be worried about a lack of wine, but that's just me.

Bloody flat-boat catamaran sailors! :-)

But seriously, aren’t “Nor’easters” a thing over there even in summer?  (I dunno.) Ok, “complete inversion” pretty unlikely, though...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not going to sweat the lockers. The washboards just need a $1.50 barrel bolt to keep them from washing away. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I'm not going to sweat the lockers. The washboards just need a $1.50 barrel bolt to keep them from washing away. 

If there is anything inside and outside to tie to (like hand grips or pad eyes or such) - you can tie a cord over the top of them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For our inside settee lockers on our first mono, just bought some brass flat bar, cut into little 1"x2" rectangles, drilled one hole at the 1/3 point, and thru bolted to the plywood locker top. 2 each for locker lid. Simple home made turnbuttons and since they were quite flat, you couldn't feel them through a cushion.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about a watertight grab bag in its dedicated place near the companionway. Contains your passport, credit cards, some cash, flares, orange smoke, spare reading glasses, a candy bar... plus a spare handheld VHF and an EPIRB if you have those.... OTOH, you don’t have a liferaft, so it might be more practical to wear most of that stuff on your body. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A plastic container tied onto the lifelines so you can pee in the cockpit, I actually use a plastic hospital urinal, just throw it overboard once it has been used and pull it back in a minute later.

Dont pee over the rails.

Especially important if your autopilot packs up, just ask me…

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

You seem well prepared.   Regarding your emergency water curing epoxy putty.  I once heard that a toilet wax ring is a good idea too, (& cheap), for getting something on a hole ASAP.  Backed up by a chunk of plywood, book, floorboard or whatever and weight/screws to hold it down.  Not the kind with the plastic collar of course, just the wax only.  I crammed two of em in a plastic sandwich container with a pair of exam gloves taped to the top if you've time to be fussy.  As any plumber or DIYer will tell you it's sticky as heck stuff.  Might keep it near the engine so is more malleable.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, eric1207 said:

You seem well prepared.   Regarding your emergency water curing epoxy putty.  I once heard that a toilet wax ring is a good idea too, (& cheap), for getting something on a hole ASAP.  Backed up by a chunk of plywood, book, floorboard or whatever and weight/screws to hold it down.  Not the kind with the plastic collar of course, just the wax only.  I crammed two of em in a plastic sandwich container with a pair of exam gloves taped to the top if you've time to be fussy.  As any plumber or DIYer will tell you it's sticky as heck stuff.  Might keep it near the engine so is more malleable.  

I have carried a wax ring for years, thankfully never had to use it.

One thing that has come in handy repeatedly is a 4'X4' piece of heavy poly film and duct tape. Tape it over a leaky hatch, put it down before you start an oil change, make a funnel out of it, or (the big one) put it down before working on the black water tank. Keeping sewage out of the bilge is important.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, eric1207 said:

You seem well prepared.   Regarding your emergency water curing epoxy putty.  I once heard that a toilet wax ring is a good idea too, (& cheap), for getting something on a hole ASAP.  Backed up by a chunk of plywood, book, floorboard or whatever and weight/screws to hold it down.  Not the kind with the plastic collar of course, just the wax only.  I crammed two of em in a plastic sandwich container with a pair of exam gloves taped to the top if you've time to be fussy.  As any plumber or DIYer will tell you it's sticky as heck stuff.  Might keep it near the engine so is more malleable.  

Nice account of fixing a crack in a metal hull (a weld, I think?) in Dave and Jaja Martin’s book, “Into the Light” (title sounds like a weird christian inspirational story; thankfully it’s nothing of the kind - it refers to high northern hemisphere summer light).  Somewhere between Bermuda and Iceland, far from anywhere, they discovered a crack in their bilge.  They made a very effective repair by building a small, rectangular plywood “box” that they placed over the crack and secured to the hull with polysulfide adhesive sealant...good solution, but this for a relatively slow leak, not a gusher (as from a collision).

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2021 at 2:02 PM, Ajax said:

I have a wet suit which I can don.

How long does it take you to put it on? Takes me a few minutes to get into mine.

image.png.b716eb31f818d70498c8f776ebbb3bfe.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2021 at 5:13 AM, Ajax said:

I feel like I'm not very organized for this singlehanded trip to Maine so I'd like to run a few things by you guys.  Chime in if I've left out anything major.  Here's what I've done or plan on doing before departure:

  • A simple will (Legalzoom), adequate life insurance
  • PLB (I'm singlehanded so an EPIRB seems useless if I fall off the boat)
  • Rocna Vulcan 33lb for my 33 foot boat, 25lb Manson spare anchor
  • All navigation lights clearly visible and tested
  • Propane system properly installed, sniffer and blower functional
  • SPOT tracker (I already had this, I just re-activated my subscription)
  • New plotter, fresh charts, some paper backups. Multiple GPS backups
  • VHF w/AIS and DSC, handheld VHF w/DSC as backup
  • Reasonably functional auto pilot
  • Engine health checked (oil analysis, new transmission, new HX, fresh impeller, fresh hoses, new exhaust elbow)
  • Fuel system is clean, spare filters onboard
  • High capacity electric bilge pump and dual action manual pump installed
  • LED headlamps
  • Powerful "sun gun" spotlight
  • Fresh boat batteries, solar and shore charger
  • Bilge, toilet, holding tank transfer and fresh water pumps all freshly serviced
  • Standing rigging inspected (no meathooks, no visible cracks on any fittings, cotter pins all secure, spare blocks onboard)
  • Running rigging in good condition, (furler line is fairly new which I consider important)
  • Boom brake/preventer installed
  • A reasonable complement of mechanical and electrical tools and repair parts
  • Working jib and Genoa onboard, all reefing lines rigged
  • Steering gear inspected and lubricated
  • All hatches seal tightly and securely
  • Jacklines will be rigged
  • Line cutter will be installed
  • 6 gallon water jug independent of the boat's water system stowed in the V-berth notch
  • Packs of batteries
  • LED "flare" as well as conventional pyrotechnic flares and orange distress flags
  • Ship's bell, air horn w/spare cartridges
  • New radar reflector
  • Emergency underwater curing epoxy repair kit
  • A variety of auto-inflating PFDs w/harnesses are onboard as well as an orange, solid Type I offshore PFD and 2 Type II orange PFDs.
  • Harnesses & tethers, crotch straps for the PFDs
  • SOS inflatable Dan-buoy
  • Lifesling
  • 3 fire extinguishers, fire blanket
  • 2 first-aid kits plus ordinary daily medicinals (Tylenol, Ibuprofin, band-aids, motion sickness patches)

On the human side:

  • New offshore grade foulie jacket is enroute (my 8 year old jacket finally gave out last weekend)
  • Wet suit for emergency dives to cut away pot lines
  • Wool sweaters, fleece tops and thermal undergarments
  • Hot weather clothing, wide brimmed hat
  • Foulie boots, deck shoes, sailing gloves
  • One-handed, pre-prepared snacks as well as a variety of dry/canned easy to prepare provisions
  • Insulated water bottles
  • Secure stowage under the helm seat for food and water in case I cannot leave the wheel.

Some stuff I haven't done:

  • I have failed to install some sort of washboard retention system
  • I have not devised any kind of system to secure lockers and bilge boards in the event of a complete inversion
  • Radar not fitted
  • No wind steering fitted
  • I need to make a ditch bag

 

Thoughts?

 

 

Do you need emergency rudder or tiller for your trip? I am not sure where you are leaving from. If it is coastal then maybe it is not considered necessary. Or if your rudder is secured to a full-length keel (but then an emergency tiller might still be a good idea).

Did you make sure all the seacocks open and close? And place bungs near each through-hole? You can double-check all the hose clamps while you are doing that.
Sounds like you checked the bilge pumps which is good.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2021 at 9:46 AM, Ajax said:

...

I have several bail out points (Cape May, Sandy Hook/LIS, Block Is/Buzzard's bay).   I don't have to do any long legs if I don't feel up to it.

 

I don't know if this will help, since I've never done a trip of this length solo, but here is a philosophy that has served me well at sea and in the mountains.  Have a good idea of what you and your gear can handle, and then just stay on the right side of that line.  You can always dream up some scenario that will be beyond you or your gear (e.g., total inversion).  But you can probably avoid those situations if you're at all prudent, mainly by seeking shelter when you need rest, or the forecast is bad.

It sounds like you are both well prepared and prudent, and you have bail out points in mind, so as long as you don't get too goal- or schedule- oriented ("I must reach Penobscott Bay by the summer solstice!"), I suspect you'll have a great trip.  Sail when it's fair, anchor when it's (forecast to be) foul, and enjoy the trip.  

I'm quite envious.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do I need to send you a bottle of Capt'n Dickweed's so you can just relax and go sailing?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Do I need to send you a bottle of Capt'n Dickweed's so you can just relax and go sailing?

No, no I got it. I just don't want to be "that guy" on the news. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know your route, but when venturing offshore I like having a "weather buddy" ashore I can touch base with, who is a sailor with broadband internet, who flips through all the available weather forecasts and condenses it into a summary focused on where I am and what I'm trying to accomplish.  Sort of like what you get from a routing service, but you can chat up a little and compare notes. Works well with a Spot or similar via text, or satphone for voice.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, sugarbird said:

Don't know your route, but when venturing offshore I like having a "weather buddy" ashore I can touch base with, who is a sailor with broadband internet, who flips through all the available weather forecasts and condenses it into a summary focused on where I am and what I'm trying to accomplish.  Sort of like what you get from a routing service, but you can chat up a little and compare notes. Works well with a Spot or similar via text, or satphone for voice.

Ha! You make me think, I am that weather buddy on shore for my kids. My son wakes up on the $1 sailboat and texts me, " Dad, can you give me the weather report?" I know that means: 'is there anything I need to know about reefing, sailing direction, time frame,  etc?'. 

It's not that they can't find the info, he just wants another opinion, just in case. It's good to have the opinion of a trusted source on land who can give an opinion of how to sail, or if to even go. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2021 at 7:22 PM, Ajax said:

I'm not going to sweat the lockers. The washboards just need a $1.50 barrel bolt to keep them from washing away. 

There’s not a handgrip on your companionway ladder to which you can tie a string?

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, mckenzie.keith said:

Do you need emergency rudder or tiller for your trip? I am not sure where you are leaving from. If it is coastal then maybe it is not considered necessary. Or if your rudder is secured to a full-length keel (but then an emergency tiller might still be a good idea).

Did you make sure all the seacocks open and close? And place bungs near each through-hole? You can double-check all the hose clamps while you are doing that.
Sounds like you checked the bilge pumps which is good.

My boat is wheel steered. I do have an emergency tiller if the steering gear craps out. I do not have an emergency rudder. If I were sailing to Bermuda, I'd probably work one up. Since this is coastal, I don't think it's necessary. I can fab something up out of plywood bunk pans or a door removed from the hinges and lash it to my spinnaker or whisker pole if necessary.

Yes, all seacocks open and close. I exercise them regularly and lubricate the balls at every haul out. All sea water through hulls are double clamped. Yes, I have bungs everywhere and one of those large foam Forespar plugs that can be jammed into holes and cut to fit if necessary. I also have 2 pints of underwater curing emergency repair epoxy.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh- In a fit of paranoia, I did a deep dive into my PFD's.  Two of them had badly corroded CO2 cartridges. One of those had badly corroded fasteners (it's an ancient SOSpender model).  All the rest are in perfect shape.

I punctured and discarded the old SoSpender PFD.  I re-armed the other unit with a fresh cartridge and then I bought a brand new Spin-Lock deck vest copycat from West Marine.  I've fitted my new PLB to the interior of the new PFD.

Although I had added crotch straps to my PFDs, the new WM deck vest copycat came with thigh straps which is even better.  It has an inspection window so I can check the cartridge and bobbin and integrated harness. For WM gear it seems pretty decent.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Bull City said:

No. This guy:

IMG_0738.jpg.4722112e57a599fc3c53c5ba243745dd.jpg

Who makes this stuff

IMG_0736.jpg.3484e4d8b15fc3f08feee23c1ffdd17c.jpg

With these "special" properties:

IMG_0737.jpg.bbd9ee6feb66e2c313455f92bbe12f89.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Ajax said:

Oh- In a fit of paranoia, I did a deep dive into my PFD's.  Two of them had badly corroded CO2 cartridges. One of those had badly corroded fasteners (it's an ancient SOSpender model).  All the rest are in perfect shape.

I punctured and discarded the old SoSpender PFD.  I re-armed the other unit with a fresh cartridge and then I bought a brand new Spin-Lock deck vest copycat from West Marine.  I've fitted my new PLB to the interior of the new PFD.

Although I had added crotch straps to my PFDs, the new WM deck vest copycat came with thigh straps which is even better.  It has an inspection window so I can check the cartridge and bobbin and integrated harness. For WM gear it seems pretty decent.

That's not paranoid. My parents got 6 older inflatable PFDs when they bought their boat this last Winter. I convinced them that: a) they make bad PFDs for inspection porpoises because as a type 5 they don't "count" unless worn and b) You can't assume they work.  Of the 6, 2 failed when tested.  Very glad we tested them.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I tested my inflatable the trigger and cylinder worked perfect. The bladder burst. Rather a gimmick given the lack of maintenance prevalent in our sailing world.

Store two new static Type I PFD next to the companionway during offshore passages. You won't need to worry about that safety or inspection issue again.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fast, slightly divergent question. My West pfd fired off awhile back. I found the kits are $30 ...  seems like a lot for a co2  cartridge. Cheaper fix?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Blue Crab said:

Fast, slightly divergent question. My West pfd fired off awhile back. I found the kits are $30 ...  seems like a lot for a co2  cartridge. Cheaper fix?

Nope. The kits seem priced the same everywhere I've looked. Properly stored, they last for years.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Ajax said:

Nope. The kits seem priced the same everywhere I've looked. Properly stored, they last for years.

But don't they still have an expiration date? I mean, don't they expire whether or not you install them?

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Borracho said:

When I tested my inflatable the trigger and cylinder worked perfect. The bladder burst. Rather a gimmick given the lack of maintenance prevalent in our sailing world.

Store two new static Type I PFD next to the companionway during offshore passages. You won't need to worry about that safety or inspection issue again.

One of two failures was a bladder.   They got approved kayak lifejackets since those can do double duty when using the dinghy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

But don't they still have an expiration date? I mean, don't they expire whether or not you install them?

Technically yeah. I'm speaking strictly of the dissolving bobbin type, not the hydrostatic (HIT) type. I have no experience with the HIT PFDs.

I live in the very damp and humid Chesapeake. I'm absolutely amazed at how the bobbins survive our climate without prematurely firing off. The bobbin is the only part where you should be concerned about the expiration date. As long as the CO2 cartridge isn't corroded, it's good forever. You *can* buy the bobbins separately and keep a box of them onboard or even in drier storage at home and just replace the bobbin on a yearly basis. That would be cheaper, as long as the CO2 cartridge isn't getting grungy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a bobbin spontaneously let go in the hanging locker. But yeah, that was when the boat was in a more humid environment - basically the middle of a big swamp.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you are ready to go.  

The Apollo 13 guys made air filter cartridge holders out of procedure binders, plastic and tape while in space.  Be sure to pack a little 'can do' attitude and a bucket of elbow grease (which you seem to have lots of anyways).  

I wish you fair weather and good sailing!  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You are way more organized than I ever am.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, notallthere said:

add mask to your kit for when you foul a pot and need to clear the prop

 

have fun!

I have mask, snorkel and fins. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Duct tape and WD40?

Yup. And McLube dry lubricant for sail tracks, blocks, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good advice, it might have been mentioned, but I like to have a plastic bottle / container for urinating, dont like the over-the-side routine any more...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Tender said:

Lots of good advice, it might have been mentioned, but I like to have a plastic bottle / container for urinating, dont like the over-the-side routine any more...

 

I agree. My stern isn't well suited for overboard micturation. I have a bottle but if it's hot and calm, I'll just whizz down one of the cockpit drains and chase it with a splash of water.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/5/2021 at 12:13 AM, Ajax said:

PLB (I'm singlehanded so an EPIRB seems useless if I fall off the boat)

If you're unconscious, a PLB is also useless since they can't be rigged to fired automatically like the AIS/DSC personal beacons can. Though those need to be set up right and programmed with an MMSI.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have a towel???

 

A towel is just about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can carry. Partly because it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapours; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine so redly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a miniraft down the slow heavy River Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand combat; wrap it around your head to ward off noxious fumes or avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mind-bogglingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you — daft as a brush, but very very ravenous); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course you can dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.

More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag discovers that a hitchhiker has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, washcloth, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet-weather gear, space suit etc., etc. Furthermore, the strag will then happily lend the hitchhiker any of these or a dozen other items that the hitchhiker might accidentally have "lost." What the strag will think is that any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the Galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through and still knows where his towel is, is clearly a man to be reckoned with.

Hence a phrase which has passed into hitch hiking slang, as in "Hey, you sass that hoopy Ford Prefect? There's a frood who really knows where his towel is."

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ajax said:

Yup. And McLube dry lubricant for sail tracks, blocks, etc.

Don't forget your Flexall

Flex Seal® Screen Door in a Boat Commercial | Flex Seal® - YouTube

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2021 at 7:13 AM, Ajax said:

I feel like I'm not very organized for this singlehanded trip to Maine so I'd like to run a few things by you guys.  Chime in if I've left out anything major.  Here's what I've done or plan on doing before departure:

  • A simple will (Legalzoom), adequate life insurance
  • PLB (I'm singlehanded so an EPIRB seems useless if I fall off the boat)
  • Rocna Vulcan 33lb for my 33 foot boat, 25lb Manson spare anchor
  • All navigation lights clearly visible and tested
  • Propane system properly installed, sniffer and blower functional
  • SPOT tracker (I already had this, I just re-activated my subscription)
  • New plotter, fresh charts, some paper backups. Multiple GPS backups
  • VHF w/AIS and DSC, handheld VHF w/DSC as backup
  • Reasonably functional auto pilot
  • Engine health checked (oil analysis, new transmission, new HX, fresh impeller, fresh hoses, new exhaust elbow)
  • Fuel system is clean, spare filters onboard
  • High capacity electric bilge pump and dual action manual pump installed
  • LED headlamps
  • Powerful "sun gun" spotlight
  • Fresh boat batteries, solar and shore charger
  • Bilge, toilet, holding tank transfer and fresh water pumps all freshly serviced
  • Standing rigging inspected (no meathooks, no visible cracks on any fittings, cotter pins all secure, spare blocks onboard)
  • Running rigging in good condition, (furler line is fairly new which I consider important)
  • Boom brake/preventer installed
  • A reasonable complement of mechanical and electrical tools and repair parts
  • Working jib and Genoa onboard, all reefing lines rigged
  • Steering gear inspected and lubricated
  • All hatches seal tightly and securely
  • Jacklines will be rigged
  • Line cutter will be installed
  • 6 gallon water jug independent of the boat's water system stowed in the V-berth notch
  • Packs of batteries
  • LED "flare" as well as conventional pyrotechnic flares and orange distress flags
  • Ship's bell, air horn w/spare cartridges
  • New radar reflector
  • Emergency underwater curing epoxy repair kit
  • A variety of auto-inflating PFDs w/harnesses are onboard as well as an orange, solid Type I offshore PFD and 2 Type II orange PFDs.
  • Harnesses & tethers, crotch straps for the PFDs
  • SOS inflatable Dan-buoy
  • Lifesling
  • 3 fire extinguishers, fire blanket
  • 2 first-aid kits plus ordinary daily medicinals (Tylenol, Ibuprofin, band-aids, motion sickness patches)

On the human side:

  • New offshore grade foulie jacket is enroute (my 8 year old jacket finally gave out last weekend)
  • Wet suit for emergency dives to cut away pot lines
  • Wool sweaters, fleece tops and thermal undergarments
  • Hot weather clothing, wide brimmed hat
  • Foulie boots, deck shoes, sailing gloves
  • One-handed, pre-prepared snacks as well as a variety of dry/canned easy to prepare provisions
  • Insulated water bottles
  • Secure stowage under the helm seat for food and water in case I cannot leave the wheel.

Some stuff I haven't done:

  • I have failed to install some sort of washboard retention system
  • I have not devised any kind of system to secure lockers and bilge boards in the event of a complete inversion
  • Radar not fitted
  • No wind steering fitted
  • I need to make a ditch bag

 

Thoughts?

 

 

The list look thorough and well thought out.

Did you inspect the rudder post and bearings?  That was the biggest issue during the last Transpac, 4 boats retired and one sank. 
When your register the PLB on the US Beacon Registry be sure to notate your boat's information as well.
I've never used a PLB.  Can recreational boats see a PLB position?  Are they notified when it is set off?  
An MOB1 broadcasts on AIS, allowing nearby boats to quickly respond.
A guy brought a pack of Shamwows on my last transocean.  They are now on my must have list.
Glow in the dark tape ($11 on Amazon).  Mark things you need to reach for at night, (winch handle, hatch board, etc...) so you don't have to constantly use your headlamp. You can also write on it with a sharpie for things like clutches, a light switch or ditch bag. 
Boudreaux's butt paste is an absolute necessity and don't wait until you need it to put it on.   The one guy that refused to use it had a baboon's ass covered in scabies by day 6.   

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Spinsheet said:

The list look thorough and well thought out.

Did you inspect the rudder post and bearings?  That was the biggest issue during the last Transpac, 4 boats retired and one sank.

I dropped the rudder and inspected all of this when I bought the boat. I lubricate the post via the zerc fittings and inspect it each year.
When your register the PLB on the US Beacon Registry be sure to notate your boat's information as well.

Done.
I've never used a PLB.  Can recreational boats see a PLB position?  Are they notified when it is set off?  

No. This is a satcom signal picked up by SAR. It's like a wearable EPIRB. Nearby vessels can see the AIS/DSC personal locators.
An MOB1 broadcasts on AIS, allowing nearby boats to quickly respond.
A guy brought a pack of Shamwows on my last transocean.  They are now on my must have list.
Glow in the dark tape ($11 on Amazon).  Mark things you need to reach for at night, (winch handle, hatch board, etc...) so you don't have to constantly use your headlamp. You can also write on it with a sharpie for things like clutches, a light switch or ditch bag. 

Glowie tape- Now that's a fine idea.
Boudreaux's butt paste is an absolute necessity and don't wait until you need it to put it on.   The one guy that refused to use it had a baboon's ass covered in scabies by day 6.

I've never had a problem like this but still a great idea, and cheap. I'll add this to my medicinals.   

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Desitin cream and baby wipes. 

Rum and Ginger Beer for once the anchor is down. Or the aforementioned Cpn DW's.

1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Ajax is coastal cruising to Maine not crossing an ocean. He will have the opportunity to bathe and avoid baboon ass.

^^^

This.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Rum and Ginger Beer for once the anchor is down. Or the aforementioned Cpn DW's.

^^^

This.

 

Cpn DW makes a great sundowner...Kentucky Mule

Link to post
Share on other sites

two questions ..

 

does the fine ship still float

 

will the list ever be complete and the said vessel depart .

 

???????????????

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a couple of these.  Pretty cool idea.

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/seabung-breach-control-plug/seabung

https://www.svb24.com/en/seabung-emergency-plug.html

I saw in the Fix-it threads about securing floorboards.  Someone mentioned heavy duty velcro...sounded crazy but maybe there is something to that.  I use velcro to mount picture frames and such to the bulkheads.  That shit is sticky and it can be a bitch to get the frame off the wall.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mid said:

two questions ..

 

does the fine ship still float

 

will the list ever be complete and the said vessel depart .

 

???????????????

Hey,  I'm leaving the weekend of July 4th whether the list is "done" or not. Until then,  I have nothing to do except work on my preparedness. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I seek the opinion of the quorum-

Is bringing a second anchor and rode overkill?  I have it all assembled, it's just bulky and heavy.

My primary anchor is a Rocna Vulcan 33lb. Of course, it's not that the primary is inadequate, it's that the backup anchor is in case I lose the first anchor or the rode parts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Elegua said:

Solo trip. Superfluous for this particular venture. 

Ahem. Solo start to the trip.

 

One never knows how these things will end up if one's mind is open enough.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Whinging Pom said:

IRRC the Offshore Special Regulations makes two anchors and rode mandatory for all racing boats over 28'.

Good point. The Offshore racing rules are a good template for cruising safety.

My boat is old enough that it wasn't constructed with backing plates for the through-hulls that allow them to withstand ridiculous amounts of side loading and impact as per current ABYC standards. As such, I refuse to store anything heavy near a through-hull that could shift and damage one. This is what's causing my storage issue.

I need a good old fashioned, US Navy issue seabag to shove the spare anchor rig into, then I can lash it down somewhere properly.  My lazarette is huge but it's curved and has no shelving and only a few light wooden hooks for hanging lines. Until I build some organization into it, it's difficult to store much down there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, I carry 3 anchors and rodes. I've used the second rode twice in 10 years and once was for a stern shore-tie.  You probably won't need it, but if you ever did...

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Until I build some organization into it

for anchors - one relatively easy solution is to get some heavy duty fiberglass L beams (like https://www.mcmaster.com/beams/structural-frp-fiberglass-90-angles/).

Epoxy them so they act as chocks for the anchors edges and shanks, and drill holes thru them for lashings.

Is super easy and super secure.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot believe I forgot to mention this critical item, it's light, it's easy to carry and is great at the end of the day or at 4:20 as the mood strikes.

A nice bag of MJ to unwind at the end of the day.

Oh right, bummer, you're Murican so I guess it's off the table.

Oh well, enjoy the trip anyhow my friend.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, estarzinger said:

for anchors - one relatively easy solution is to get some heavy duty fiberglass L beams (like https://www.mcmaster.com/beams/structural-frp-fiberglass-90-angles/).

Epoxy them so they act as chocks for the anchors edges and shanks, and drill holes thru them for lashings.

Is super easy and super secure.

I like this.  It won't get done before the trip but this will be on my winter punch list for sure.  My boat has a propensity to collect stuff on the port side which exacerbates a natural list that it has. These chocks will allow me to stow the anchor on the stbd side.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, blunted said:

I cannot believe I forgot to mention this critical item, it's light, it's easy to carry and is great at the end of the day or at 4:20 as the mood strikes.

A nice bag of MJ to unwind at the end of the day.

Oh right, bummer, you're Murican so I guess it's off the table.

Oh well, enjoy the trip anyhow my friend.

It's not so much that I'm Murican, it's that I hold a high security clearance that I'm not ready to forfeit.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites