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Final Details- Trip Planning


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I think the vast majority of swivel problems are due to installations that allow the swivel to bear side loads. The remainder are due to people failing to inspect their swivel at the same time they're supposed to perform their regular chain inspection (i.e. never). 

Like Ish, I've got a swivel installed (properly) and it cures a twist problem I had. I inspect it and the chain annually and have never had an issue or even the threat of one. 

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Ajax carries a deflated Achilles. (Inspect heel of tubes for arrow puncture!)

Seriously - Is the weather that bad in summer? I'd be worried about a lack of wine, but that's just me.

Do you have a towel???   A towel is just about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can carry. Partly because it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you f

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Did that trip in reverse some many years ago (albeit not solo.)  As I recall, no overnights until south of Sandy Hook, so no real fatigue issues.  Also, I soloed Sea of Cortez and Mex Riviera for several years, including many solo 300 mile crossings and bar crossings.  You will be just fine.

Only real comments to your preps:

1.  a stern anchor may be useful, but not likely needed on this trip.

2.  An anchor buoy can be very useful especially in crowded anchorages.

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

lobster pot minefields

I would say that is the biggest headache/danger. I rode a ferry in Maine once (part of a design job). I asked the captain how they avoided the pots EVERYWHERE. He said they have big cutters on the shaft.

"Also my brother in law is a diver so he gets called every week to cut away the pot floats when they build up enough to start banging the hull"

4 hours ago, Ajax said:

I have to play games to roll it over.

Stop hoisting when anchor stock is about 1' below the roller. Grab the chain inboard of the roller and lift up the anchor a bit and give the chain a half twist. Lower the chain and the anchor flops 180 deg.

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Oh you have packed a MIG welder haven't you? Can't do anything without one. 

Congratulations on the weight loss. I'm using an app on my phone. I just put in what I eat and it counts calories. It's easy for me to overeat in the late evenings, but if I have hit my target calories for the day I'm usually aware I need to stop snacking. Slowly losing weight that way.

Going on a sailing trip I always lose weight fast. 

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Theres always a method to the madness of pots and fishing gear.  If at all possible eliminate night time runs.  Lobster pots tend to have a two one slack and one possibly under the water.  Once you get into pots you can usually do a hard 90 and get off the depth line they are working, but not always.  Probably the easiest way is to head for the first local bar and ask how to avoid fishing gear,maybe even free drinks in it for you... fisherman tend to have a friend in Jesus so Sunday is usually open but not always.

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On 6/4/2021 at 7:30 AM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I’ve posted this vid somewhere in CA before - fun watch.  Singlehanded 4,000 miles in a Wayfarer 16 open dinghy all around Greece, across the Med, up the Nile to Cairo, back to Greece. (May help you get in a singlehanded frame of mind, Ajax :-) )

He goes over his list of gear starting at around the 9:00 mark.  You’ll be surprised at what he considered one of his most important pieces of gear.  The fun factor - the yellow thing he brought. :-)  (I suspect for many, me included, the fun factor is simply successfully executing the solo journey, day by day.)

 

 

he had tupperware as a sponsor!  :D

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9 hours ago, Veeger said:

Having two anchors on a cruising boat is a very basic requirement for safety and comfort.  You never know whether you will lose an anchor for a variety of reasons. Think for moment, about what the consequences would be if you did not have one on board and were not within easy reach of a marina or ‘someone’s’ mooring buoy.  With all the planning you’re doing, I am slightly dismayed that you’d even consider a single anchor.  But, you’re thinking (and asking) so that’s good....

One scenario for losing an anchor is if you are in an anchorage with deteriorating conditions and have to move urgently, but the anchor is fouled and you are forced to abandon it. May not be likely but it could happen.

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8 hours ago, Ajax said:

Look at it from this perspective:

Some people in this thread whom I know for a fact have serious sailing experience have made comments about my paranoia and anal-retentiveness, questioning whether I'm ever going to actually get off the dock, telling me that I'm packing too much shit, trying to cover too many eventualities.

I had the anchor rig prepared and sitting in my cockpit.  I just wanted one final set of opinions before I stuffed it down below.  Based on this morning's opinions, it sounds like a backup anchor is appropriate for me to bring, and not paranoia.

@estarzinger wrote an excellent article where he stated that you should rig the biggest anchor that you can operate on a regular basis rather than carry a fleet of anchors. With modern anchors, I don't fear that my anchor won't set or that it will break out, I worry more that I'll have to sacrifice the anchor if it gets snagged on a log or a boulder and I can't dive on it, or that the rode may part in a bad storm from chafe or something.

You are doing great. Its going to be a great trip. And I just want to send some validation your way. I am not super experienced but I did somehow make it across the pacific ocean from california to australia (via many stops in nice tropical places) many years ago. I had two anchors but only needed one except once I had to anchor fore and aft in a crowded harbor, and once I had to set an anchor with the dinghy after running aground during a rapidly falling tide. There was no question of kedging off. We had to wait until we re-floated then just reeled in the rode until we were in deeper water. It would have been difficult to set the main rode that way as it was all chain. So having a small backup fluke anchor with a bit of chain and mostly nylon rode turned out to be convenient.

Anyway, two is a good number. One is probably all you need. But it is YOUR CHOICE. And once you make it to hell with everyone else. For whatever it is worth, I also agree that you should use your best holding anchor all the time. You don't have your hurricane anchor sitting in reserve. If you have a hurricane anchor, use it all the time. Because sometimes things go to shit very fast in an anchorage, and you are probably not going to re-anchor just because the wind is starting to pick up. It would be much better to anchor EVERY TIME with the assumption that it is going to go to shit. This was advice given to us by very experienced sailors who circumnavigated on a hand-built wood boat using a sextant for navigation.

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30 minutes ago, mckenzie.keith said:

One scenario for losing an anchor is if you are in an anchorage with deteriorating conditions and have to move urgently, but the anchor is fouled and you are forced to abandon it. May not be likely but it could happen.

Having once had to abandon our trusty big 20kg/44 lb primary anchor —impossibly snagged and several days away from anywhere convenient— I was certainly relieved to have a basic second anchor.

Edit: 20kg/44lb Bruce; back up/stern anchor was a 25lb CQR that came with the boat and that I never would’ve bought...

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6 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:
30 minutes ago, mckenzie.keith said:

One scenario for losing an anchor is if you are in an anchorage with deteriorating conditions and have to move urgently, but the anchor is fouled and you are forced to abandon it. May not be likely but it could happen.

Having once had to abandon our trusty big 20kg/44 lb primary anchor —impossibly snagged and several days away from anywhere convenient— I was certainly relieved to have a basic second anchor.

I have had the anchor fouled twice in Squirrel Cove, once in Clam Bay...each time I thought I was going to have to cut and run, but managed to get free. It took a long time once in Squirrel, but we eventually worked it out. My second anchor is a genuine Bruce, same weight as my primary Delta. It really is a backup anchor, it is too far buried in the cockpit locker to use easily and it has its own chain and rode.

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15 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I have had the anchor fouled twice in Squirrel Cove, once in Clam Bay...each time I thought I was going to have to cut and run, but managed to get free. It took a long time once in Squirrel, but we eventually worked it out. My second anchor is a genuine Bruce, same weight as my primary Delta. It really is a backup anchor, it is too far buried in the cockpit locker to use easily and it has its own chain and rode.

Lost that one in Teakerne Arm...there’s undoubtedly lots of logging gear on the bottom in various places on this coast.

That 25lb CQR I just happened to have (to carry as a backup/stern anchor).  When we went up to Alaska, we had the same 20kg Bruce as a primary, but brought a 33 lb Danforth (with its own chain and rope rode) as a stern anchor/back up, since up the coast, you could really be in trouble without a good back up anchor if you lost the main one.

(The one thing I don’t like about Danforths is how the flukes move...and a 33 lb one is fairly awkward/heavy to carry.  Something about that is a pain. Was recommended to me by Dave and Jaja Martin, who took almost the same boat to the Arctic - I copied their anchoring set up verbatim, reasoning that if it worked for them up there and they trusted it having three kids on board, then...but I think I’ll acquire a different stern anchor/back up anchor that’s easier to handle l than the Danforth.  Alas, which kind of anchor and what weight is the question... :-) ... )

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5 hours ago, Slim said:

Yeah man! How????

Portion control.  It's that basic. 

Let's not get too excited about it,  i was far gone and have a long way to go. 

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40 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

a different stern anchor/back up anchor that’s easier to handle l than the Danforth. 

aluminum anchors make useful stern/kedge anchors.  Easier to handle.  Not so robust, so not for every day use, but pretty good for occasional use. Spade, fortress and a few others make pretty good ones.

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8 hours ago, Ajax said:

..you're sucking the feeling of adventure out of this for me!

 this is scary! 

you are solo so you need to be a bit Schizophrenic.  You need one personality saying 'this is scary I really need to be careful', and the other saying 'this is cake lets go go go'.  You actually seem to be managing that balance pretty well :)

I dont know if I have ever mentioned this, but before a passage I liked to read up about real Darwin award idiot who had done the passage.  Then when things got tough and I was feeling stressed I would repeat to myself "if that fool could do this, I can damn well do it with my eyes closed and hands tied behind my back'.  It actually helped me quite a bit early on - reminded me that this was not brain surgery and I was not really out of my depth or at least not any more than many other cruisers have been. It may just be my personal psychology - Beth found it a bit odd.

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1 hour ago, Blue Crab said:

"Slim" is asking weight loss advice?

True. Working from home for a year plus has me pretty un-Slim these days. 

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You may want to consider some sort of drogue.  Doing a 600Nm race on a friend's boat, the rudder sheared off 150Nm offshore in some nasty conditions.  Using a drogue on a bridle allowed us to move in the right direction to a place where we could get a tow.  We had a Seabrake which I would recommend without reservation.  Jordan Series Drogues are spoken of very highly, but I have no direct experience of them.

Alternatively, you may want to use the space for an extensive porn collection.

Enjoy your trip.

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I have had the anchor fouled twice in Squirrel Cove, once in Clam Bay...each time I thought I was going to have to cut and run, but managed to get free. It took a long time once in Squirrel, but we eventually worked it out. My second anchor is a genuine Bruce, same weight as my primary Delta. It really is a backup anchor, it is too far buried in the cockpit locker to use easily and it has its own chain and rode.

Do you remember where you were in Clam when you fouled?  I know there's one area someone could get hooked up in but it's well marked.  I'd be interested as it's my launch pad for the last day if I've been spending time on that side.    

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2 hours ago, Tunnel Rat said:

You may want to consider some sort of drogue.  Doing a 600Nm race on a friend's boat, the rudder sheared off 150Nm offshore in some nasty conditions.  Using a drogue on a bridle allowed us to move in the right direction to a place where we could get a tow.  We had a Seabrake which I would recommend without reservation.  Jordan Series Drogues are spoken of very highly, but I have no direct experience of them.

Alternatively, you may want to use the space for an extensive porn collection.

Enjoy your trip.

Drag devices may be more for people who live on big lee shores. :ph34r:  Everyone else can prolly lash up a mattress and an anchor and create something in the unlikely event of.

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5 hours ago, toddster said:

Drag devices may be more for people who live on big lee shores. :ph34r:  Everyone else can prolly lash up a mattress and an anchor and create something in the unlikely event of.

Or an old tire makes a great drogue. Dispose of it when you get to your destination.

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On 6/4/2021 at 10:07 AM, Ajax said:

Well, I didn't want to state it publicly but I did pack the blow up doll.  Your comment is encouraging so I'll start to relax.

wifeinabox.thumb.jpg.7476d22e9ed37ee99497bf6b85f1782f.jpg

 

 

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19 hours ago, Ajax said:

I had the anchor rig prepared and sitting in my cockpit.  I just wanted one final set of opinions before I stuffed it down below.  Based on this morning's opinions, it sounds like a backup anchor is appropriate for me to bring, and not paranoia.

Take the 2nd anchor & rode. Definitely a case of better to have it & not need it than need it & not have it.

Yeah I anchor using my Excel on all chain but if I ever have to abandon it I've still got the 20kg CQR on 20m of chain and 60m of multibraid. It's rigged on the port side roller, maybe 2 minuted to attach the shackle and put a cable tie through the pin hole.

FKT

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8 hours ago, Tunnel Rat said:

You may want to consider some sort of drogue.  Doing a 600Nm race on a friend's boat, the rudder sheared off 150Nm offshore in some nasty conditions.  Using a drogue on a bridle allowed us to move in the right direction to a place where we could get a tow.  We had a Seabrake which I would recommend without reservation.  Jordan Series Drogues are spoken of very highly, but I have no direct experience of them.

Alternatively, you may want to use the space for an extensive porn collection.

Enjoy your trip.

Good news! I actually have a drogue and porn is digital now so it doesn't take up any space!

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9 hours ago, estarzinger said:

you are solo so you need to be a bit Schizophrenic.  You need one personality saying 'this is scary I really need to be careful', and the other saying 'this is cake lets go go go'.  You actually seem to be managing that balance pretty well :)

I dont know if I have ever mentioned this, but before a passage I liked to read up about real Darwin award idiot who had done the passage.  Then when things got tough and I was feeling stressed I would repeat to myself "if that fool could do this, I can damn well do it with my eyes closed and hands tied behind my back'.  It actually helped me quite a bit early on - reminded me that this was not brain surgery and I was not really out of my depth or at least not any more than many other cruisers have been. It may just be my personal psychology - Beth found it a bit odd.

Rimas Meleshyus is my spirit animal.

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23 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ok, I seek the opinion of the quorum-

Is bringing a second anchor and rode overkill?  I have it all assembled, it's just bulky and heavy.

My primary anchor is a Rocna Vulcan 33lb. Of course, it's not that the primary is inadequate, it's that the backup anchor is in case I lose the first anchor or the rode parts.

Honestly...Maine is chock-a-block with moorings. In the highly unlikely event you manage to lose your anchor, you can either "borrow" an empty mooring for a couple of hours or pick up a rental for the night while you take a trip to Hamilton Marine to get a new one. It won't kill anything but your waterline, storage space, and bow weight to have two, of course, so there's no real harm in bringing it.

But it's not like you're headed to someplace without easy access to a fully stocked chandlery...there's almost always one of some kind in the larger towns on the coast, and I'm sure they can deliver one in a day or two to where you are if there isn't.

The only time I've ever used anything but primary anchor in 15 years with my current boat was riding out Hurricane Sandy in Deltaville, and we skipped right past the backup 105# CQR and went right to the 150# Luke Storm anchor on the same rode as the 100# Manson Supreme. But I do have an all-chain 12mm rode which isn't likely to part accidentally.

IMG_1604.thumb.JPG.bb0c3032207284844743685eb65aab9c.JPG

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

we skipped right past the backup 105# CQR and went right to the 150# Luke Storm anchor on 

IMG_1604.thumb.JPG.bb0c3032207284844743685eb65aab9c.JPG

BJ - How do you handle am anchor like that on deck, to get it off the deck and overboard, etc.?  It’s a monster.  I know they come apart - but still, you have to handle them/deal with them when they’re put together, no?

And your back up CQR at 105# - it doesn’t even come apart.  Where do store it and how did you deal with moving it, etc. (Just curious, as I recently got a very cheap 75# Luke and while I know it comes apart, I haven’t thought through yet how I’d *actually* set it up/manage it...like assemble it —then how do you get it over the bow rail into the water...)

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

 

 

What I want to know - do you have different life lines on port vs stb side?  Stb looks like bare wire or grey dyneema, but port looks to be either plastic coated wire or white dyneema?

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11 hours ago, Slim said:
13 hours ago, Blue Crab said:

"Slim" is asking weight loss advice?

True. Working from home for a year plus has me pretty un-Slim these days. 

Heh. I just got an ebay notice that those 34" waist Koppen shorts I wanted LAST YEAR were in stock. 

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I'd say you're well equipped for the average blue water crossing and getting close to expedition level preparedness.

Relax, no matter how much you plan, you'll still forget something obvious and when it's over will have a list of 'Next time I'm gonna bring...' items.

That said, and you've got the spare impeller covered, I'd recommend getting spare impeller cover plate screws. You know when you need to replace it you'll be in rough water on a lee shore in heavy traffic and fog and will drop one or more in the bilge. I wound up getting knurled knob/ allen head screws for mine since an allen wrench is easier to use than an offset phillips on those back screws and much more secure handling them when you're getting bashed about.

I'd be more concerned with the trip up the Jersey coast than New England waters. That stretch of water always scares me.

Best of luck, have fun and let me know if you wind up in the Basin and I'll run you out some oysters!

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21 minutes ago, Willin' said:

I'd say you're well equipped for the average blue water crossing and getting close to expedition level preparedness.

Relax, no matter how much you plan, you'll still forget something obvious and when it's over will have a list of 'Next time I'm gonna bring...' items.

That said, and you've got the spare impeller covered, I'd recommend getting spare impeller cover plate screws. You know when you need to replace it you'll be in rough water on a lee shore in heavy traffic and fog and will drop one or more in the bilge. I wound up getting knurled knob/ allen head screws for mine since an allen wrench is easier to use than an offset phillips on those back screws and much more secure handling them when you're getting bashed about.

I'd be more concerned with the trip up the Jersey coast than New England waters. That stretch of water always scares me.

Best of luck, have fun and let me know if you wind up in the Basin and I'll run you out some oysters!

On the topic of the raw water pump-  It was the first thing I replaced when I bought the boat. The type that I bought uses an O-ring instead of a disposable gasket on the cover and the cover has captive, knurled screws.  The raw water pump is on the front of the engine and is 100% accessible.

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6 minutes ago, Ajax said:

 The raw water pump is on the front of the engine and is 100% accessible.

I hate your guts! :D

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2 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

BJ - How do you handle am anchor like that on deck, to get it off the deck and overboard, etc.?  It’s a monster.  I know they come apart - but still, you have to handle them/deal with them when they’re put together, no?

And your back up CQR at 105# - it doesn’t even come apart.  Where do store it and how did you deal with moving it, etc. (Just curious, as I recently got a very cheap 75# Luke and while I know it comes apart, I haven’t thought through yet how I’d *actually* set it up/manage it...like assemble it —then how do you get it over the bow rail into the water...)

It might be the "lift a car off trapped infant effect." Any situation requiring a 150# sheet anchor provides you enuf motivation to lift one.:lol:

Weighing it later, when you are exhausted and the adrenal gauge is on 'E' ... that might take two people.

Plus, you can lift lots of heavy things once. I hoiked a cast iron vault sink into its cabinet this week. It weighs twenty pounds more than I do.:unsure: My spine has filed its usual 'toxic workplace' complaint with HR, but it's its one of those occasional/doable things. Ibuprofin covers up a multitude of sins.

Excited for you, Ajax. Look forward to the trip reports!

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14 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

It might be the "lift a car off trapped infant effect." Any situation requiring a 150# sheet anchor provides you enuf motivation to lift one.:lol:

Weighing it later, when you are exhausted and the adrenal gauge is on 'E' ... that might take two people.

Plus, you can lift lots of heavy things once. I hoiked a cast iron vault sink into its cabinet this week. It weighs twenty pounds more than I do.:unsure: My spine has filed its usual 'toxic workplace' complaint with HR, but it's its one of those occasional/doable things. Ibuprofin covers up a multitude of sins.

Excited for you, Ajax. Look forward to the trip reports!

Yeah, but I think these kinds of systems/gear need thinking through before you actually need to use then.  I’ve no idea how I’d actually deploy a 75# Luke that I’ve just assembled on the deck...maybe hoist with a halyard?

I saw a pic of IRONBARK’s Luke assembled on deck and lashed, standing up, to a stanchion.  Occurred to me maybe that’s how he deploys it (in heavily kelp-strewn high lat waters)?

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I'm sure there is some scale effect, but the fisherman tested disappointingly poorly, even in the cobbles. 

Halyards and hand billies for heavy stuff. 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I'm sure there is some scale effect, but the fisherman tested disappointingly poorly, even in the cobbles. 

Halyards and hand billies for heavy stuff. 

 

 

Well, the Luke cost me only $200, and it stows very compactly, so it’s good enough for now...

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38 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Yeah, but I think these kinds of systems/gear need thinking through before you actually need to use then.  I’ve no idea how I’d actually deploy a 75# Luke that I’ve just assembled on the deck...maybe hoist with a halyard?

I saw a pic of IRONBARK’s Luke assembled on deck and lashed, standing up, to a stanchion.  Occurred to me maybe that’s how he deploys it (in heavily kelp-strewn high lat waters)?

Have you considered adding catheads? 

370px-Le_galion_Gale%C3%B3n_Andaluc%C3%ADa_%2874%29.JPG

:lol:

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13 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Do you remember where you were in Clam when you fouled?  I know there's one area someone could get hooked up in but it's well marked.  I'd be interested as it's my launch pad for the last day if I've been spending time on that side.    

Marked with an X. We had anchored there several times before, but got unlucky and snagged a 1" steel cable on the bottom and had to bring it up to the surface to get the anchor free. It was very heavy and took a long time. If that hadn't worked it was going to be time to lasso the anchor with a chain loop and try and drag it out backwards. Old aquaculture areas are a huge pain, they are frequently not remediated so there is all sorts of trash on the bottom. Entire popular bays are like that, such as Anderson Bay on Texada. I do carry a fender to use as an anchor marker, I should use it in those places...

clam.thumb.jpg.563ebe27771accfe06a39e5b849728ee.jpg

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3 hours ago, Elegua said:

I'm sure there is some scale effect, but the fisherman tested disappointingly poorly, even in the cobbles. 

Halyards and hand billies for heavy stuff. 

 

 

Further thoughts on this (at the risk of turning it into another ANCHOR THREAD!! :-) :-) )

Looking a bit further on IRONBARK’s site, I see that he lists the Fisherman as, “Port bower anchor: Either 20 kg Spade or 75 lb Herreshoff pattern fisherman (depending on bottom)”

(Which means he’s an ever bigger hero in my mind :-). I’d assumed he just relied on the Fisherman as a general back up/high latitude anchoring anchor...well, he does, but for specific situations [i.e., specific bottom types]).  A lot can be learned looking at the gear he’s selected, and other articles on his site.  Eventually, especially if in high latitudes, I can sort of see having the Fisherman stowed below in pieces as a just-in-case one [main anchor lost; or very difficult conditions/heavy winds/kelp, etc], as well as having a second “bower” anchor on the roller, ready to go with the 20kg. Rocna I  already have.  Would be nice to have a larger main bower anchor instead, but don’t think I can really upsize my main bower anchor from 20 kg much more [fitting on the roller is the issue...which I’ve just finished extending, since the 20kg Rocna shank and flukes are curvier than the former 20kg Bruce, so the fucking tip had been  chopping into my bow/stem for far too long...)

http://iron-bark.blogspot.com/2019/08/iron-bark-is-for-sale.html?m=1

C5D9DA29-BB66-477F-99C9-7E111582D99F.jpeg

CE0F494C-584A-4FCA-9F04-5D8A96B7B439.jpeg

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I know this wrong but it'll be quick: Ajax et al:

I have one Fortress FX 11 $100, and one FX 16 $150 plus shipping. Gently used just in mud on Sundays.

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50 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Further thoughts on this (at the risk of turning it into another ANCHOR THREAD!! :-) :-) )

Looking a bit further on IRONBARK’s site, I see that he lists the Fisherman as, “Port bower anchor: Either 20 kg Spade or 75 lb Herreshoff pattern fisherman (depending on bottom)”

(Which means he’s an ever bigger hero in my mind :-). I’d assumed he just relied on the Fisherman as a general back up/high latitude anchoring anchor...well, he does, but for specific situations [i.e., specific bottom types]).  A lot can be learned looking at the gear he’s selected, and other articles on his site.  Eventually, especially if in high latitudes, I can sort of see having the Fisherman stowed below in pieces as a just-in-case one [main anchor lost; or very difficult conditions/heavy winds/kelp, etc], as well as having a second “bower” anchor on the roller, ready to go with the 20kg. Rocna I  already have.  Would be nice to have a larger main bower anchor instead, but don’t think I can really upsize my main bower anchor from 20 kg much more [fitting on the roller is the issue...which I’ve just finished extending, since the 20kg Rocna shank and flukes are curvier than the former 20kg Bruce, so the fucking tip had been  chopping into my bow/stem for far too long...)

http://iron-bark.blogspot.com/2019/08/iron-bark-is-for-sale.html?m=1

C5D9DA29-BB66-477F-99C9-7E111582D99F.jpeg

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To quote Ted Lasso, "Thread drift is life". That looks very sturdy. Nice ! I was headed that way since a folding Luke would fit under the frames in the bilge nicely. But then I suggested/begged/beseeched our Steve to test a 66lb Herreshoff pattern that another member generously leant to him to test. The answer was sadly that they were best left keeping the lawn from dragging.   It's in the Anchor Geekdom thread.  Maybe it is the only thing that works in kelp? 

 

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Hey @Ajax

First and foremost have a great time.

Guessing this is your first coastal offshore and/or solo so its good to be cautious but don't overthink / over worry. 

Two things I didn't notice on your list... a highly reliable means to secure weather forecasts (if far enough offshore that phone or VHF ain't gonna cut it) and a few tubes of fast set underwater two part epoxy.

If multi day offshore routing be sure the radar target alarm will wake you up and the autopilot off alarm will do same as well as steer relative wind course.

The fastest way to die out there doing this comes from lack of sleep so think through offshore legs and how far you want to push.  Other than that, this is just a series of daysails with tons of fun and adventure.  Enjoy it.

 

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7 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

BJ - How do you handle am anchor like that on deck, to get it off the deck and overboard, etc.?  It’s a monster.  I know they come apart - but still, you have to handle them/deal with them when they’re put together, no?

And your back up CQR at 105# - it doesn’t even come apart.  Where do store it and how did you deal with moving it, etc. (Just curious, as I recently got a very cheap 75# Luke and while I know it comes apart, I haven’t thought through yet how I’d *actually* set it up/manage it...like assemble it —then how do you get it over the bow rail into the water...)

Very carefully...note the engine room pad under the anchor! Launching that was a rare thing, and if memory serves we put that little line on it to lift it with the spin halyard on a powered winch, then lowered it over the side then blew the shackle. Pulling it up was the reverse of the process, except I think we sent someone in the dinghy to attach the halyard and swing it around from the bow.

The CQR I'd just horse in and out of the anchor locker if I needed it. It was heavy, but not so heavy I couldn't lift it and move it.

The biggest pain with either one would be getting it over the lifeline and into the water without banging things up.

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7 hours ago, estarzinger said:

What I want to know - do you have different life lines on port vs stb side?  Stb looks like bare wire or grey dyneema, but port looks to be either plastic coated wire or white dyneema?

That's just the lighting and lens bokeh I suspect, they're steel wire on both sides. If the first pic they're not really in focus and could be solid or covered.

In the second (bad) picture you can see where the camera caught the focus on the lifeline, not the sailfish in the water.

In the anchor picture, I think the sun is to starboard, so the inside of the lifelines on the port side is lit, but the backside of the starboard lifelines is not.

 

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5 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Yeah, but I think these kinds of systems/gear need thinking through before you actually need to use then.  I’ve no idea how I’d actually deploy a 75# Luke that I’ve just assembled on the deck...maybe hoist with a halyard?

I saw a pic of IRONBARK’s Luke assembled on deck and lashed, standing up, to a stanchion.  Occurred to me maybe that’s how he deploys it (in heavily kelp-strewn high lat waters)?

Halyard is the answer. We put that little rope on it to hoist with a halyard, figuring if I couldn't get the shackle to blow under the load, I could always cut it. Also, the snap shackle wasn't going to close over that whacking huge shackle on the anchor.

 

image.png.da1fa0b158b2250d1a44641e448177a6.png

 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

To quote Ted Lasso, "Thread drift is life". That looks very sturdy. Nice ! I was headed that way since a folding Luke would fit under the frames in the bilge nicely. But then I suggested/begged/beseeched our Steve to test a 66lb Herreshoff pattern that another member generously leant to him to test. The answer was sadly that they were best left keeping the lawn from dragging.   It's in the Anchor Geekdom thread.  Maybe it is the only thing that works in kelp? 

 

Our Luke is only a storm/emergency thing. I couldn't envision wrestling that big hairy beast for anything else.

If you look at the first picture, you'll see that the chain runs forward where it attaches to the Manson on the roller, then around the bow back over the lifelines where the bitter end attaches to the Luke. In this case, we set it up as a backup/extra weight at the end of the rode behind the Manson in case that pulled out.

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

To quote Ted Lasso, "Thread drift is life". That looks very sturdy. Nice ! I was headed that way since a folding Luke would fit under the frames in the bilge nicely. But then I suggested/begged/beseeched our Steve to test a 66lb Herreshoff pattern that another member generously leant to him to test. The answer was sadly that they were best left keeping the lawn from dragging.   It's in the Anchor Geekdom thread.  Maybe it is the only thing that works in kelp? 

 

Thanks go to @Fah Kiew Tu for his suggestions and help, and to a local friend for machining help (he made my rollers).

I think Fisherman anchors primarily reply on weight to hold, and are said to work well in kelp - perhaps they penetrate it well?  Or hold on to it well?! (and are not necessarily the only thing that works on kelp, I don’t think).  Somewhere I have a scary picture of somewhere near Sitka, AK, after pulling up the Bruce, discovering we’d been hooked to a clump of kelp all night...

 

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8 hours ago, Willin' said:

I hate your guts! :D

So do I - having just changed the impeller on my Bukh DV36.

One of the things I did before installing the motor was piss off those slotted head feeble screws and replace them with M4 stainless socket head cap screws.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:
10 hours ago, Willin' said:

I hate your guts! :D

So do I - having just changed the impeller on my Bukh DV36.

One of the things I did before installing the motor was piss off those slotted head feeble screws and replace them with M4 stainless socket head cap screws.

FKT

When I was replacing our Westerbeast genset with a Northern Lights, one thing that almost instantly sold me was that the raw water pump would be on the inboard side of the genset when installed, not the outboard side and underneath like the Westerbeast. To replace that impeller I had to hang over the top of the generator and work blind and mostly blind and by feel.

image.png.65365895b7f9b2e5cbf0c7d737028d4c.png

Yee, haw. Look were that thing is.

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4 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

When I was replacing our Westerbeast genset with a Northern Lights, one thing that almost instantly sold me was that the raw water pump would be on the inboard side of the genset when installed, not the outboard side and underneath like the Westerbeast. To replace that impeller I had to hang over the top of the generator and work blind and mostly blind and by feel.

image.png.65365895b7f9b2e5cbf0c7d737028d4c.png

Yee, haw. Look were that thing is.

It's been said many times, but if design engineers were forced to actually service the equipment maybe they'd think more carefully about how & where they placed items needing routine servicing.

But you'd also have to get the bean counters & sales reps on side, so perhaps a financial penalty for each extra minute it takes to change out a routinely serviceable component. Including cleanup time for dribbling oil into bilges.

With bonus penalty doubling for each & every special tool required.

One can dream...

The other thing I did was move the oil filter to a more sensible place and mount it vertically. Presto, oil changes are clean, simple and fast plus you can pre-fill the new filter before installing it.

Relocating an engine driven water pump presents more difficulties, alas. But possible if it annoys me sufficiently.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

So do I - having just changed the impeller on my Bukh DV36.

One of the things I did before installing the motor was piss off those slotted head feeble screws and replace them with M4 stainless socket head cap screws.

FKT

Not to distract from this otherwise great thread but I'll just interject this little story...

It's my second trip on my newly bought old wooden yawl, when we drop the mooring it's cloudy and calm with a strong ebb on the Kennebec and my crew is my wife, a sailing novice after 5 years of sailing together on the west coast, my young co worker who swears he has lotsa sailing exp. and my Palestinian buddy who has never set foot on a sailboat in his life. The 6 mile trip motoring down the river in a dead calm is largely uneventful with each taking turns at the helm and the GPS keeping them off the major obstacles as we raise sails and I work to get the stbd bow light bright.

We reach the river mouth at exactly slack tide with zero wind when the fog hit us from seaward and the eng. temp alarm went off. The gps shows us mid river but the cursor is spinning wildly as we're not moving in any direction. I shut her down and run down to commence the water pump surgery, which I've never done before on this boat. I'm frantically removing the 6 screws that each require my wrist to articulate in a plane or two that it was never meant to with hands never meant to fit in such a small, awkward space blindly with a short phillips driver that won't fit squarely on 2 of the back screws.

So I managed to catch the plate just before it followed  the last bronze screw that came out into the bilge. Fuck me, I have no spare screws and you can't fish bronze out of the bilge with a magnet.

Bad words were uttered, OK, maybe they were shouted, but after a few moments of very tense, sweaty silence someone in the cockpit asks quietly 'Anything I can do to help?'

Thinking the only thing that would work is a smaller hand and at the end of my rope I scream 'Are any of you a fucking dwarf?' as I fish through my repair kit for the spare impeller and gasket. I'm hot, angry and scared all at once and not sure I can thread the screws I have back in, and trusting that they've got things under control topside.

Thirty seconds of fogbound silence and a very small, meek voice calls down 'Actually, we prefer to be called Little People!'

Thereafter the difficulty was getting the fucking screws in while laughing too hard, but fortunately the remaining 5 went in and snugged up tight. That small joke may have prevented a grounding or worse as when I came up after finishing the job and fired her back up we were perilously close to Pond Island, but I swear, nothing was working for me until we started laughing.

That's when I learned to carry spare water pump screws... and keep a sense of humor around handy for when you might need it.

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

When I was replacing our Westerbeast genset with a Northern Lights, one thing that almost instantly sold me was that the raw water pump would be on the inboard side of the genset when installed, not the outboard side and underneath like the Westerbeast. To replace that impeller I had to hang over the top of the generator and work blind and mostly blind and by feel.

image.png.65365895b7f9b2e5cbf0c7d737028d4c.png

Yee, haw. Look were that thing is.

Seems there's common thread here. Hard to believe Westerbeke hasn't figured out a way to make maintenance items easier for cruisers.

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

It's been said many times, but if design engineers were forced to actually service the equipment maybe they'd think more carefully about how & where they placed items needing routine servicing.

The impossible dream, an engineer that asks an operator for an opinion before designing a complex system he'll never have to touch ever after. Hard to believe they've never gotten the message.

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5 minutes ago, Willin' said:

The impossible dream, an engineer that asks an operator for an opinion before designing a complex system he'll never have to touch ever after. Hard to believe they've never gotten the message.

Yep.

As a software designer every year I spend 2-3 months in labs talking with and working with the people who use my software. I take careful note on how they do things and often go away to tweak the defaults, move items on screens, add configurable back end data in the database, whatever I can to cut down on keystrokes and mouse movements/clicks. I regard this as part of what they're paying me for - not only to design stuff that does the job, but does it as seamlessly as possible. And unless it's something that will break other systems or logic, they get their change requests done.

Anyway carrying spare screws and impellers is something we all should be doing. I wedge an ice cream container and a bunch of rags under my pump so that WHEN (not if) I drop a screw there's some chance it'll not end up where I can't reach it. Because the stainless ones are not really magnetic either. OTOH they stick better to the end of a ball nose Allen key with a bit of grease than the slot headed ones do to anything - and they don't have half the head break off.

FKT

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5 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

As a software designer every year I spend 2-3 months in labs talking with and working with the people who use my software. I take careful note on how they do things and often go away to tweak the defaults, move items on screens, add configurable back end data in the database, whatever I can to cut down on keystrokes and mouse movements/clicks.

So you're the one! I always thought you were a myth! :P

Here's another thing I find amusing these days, the difference a few keystrokes/ clicks makes. Such misplaced value.

Of course I don't get NFTs  nor crypto currency (the very name crypto should set off alarms to my addled mind) either. I guess I just wasn't made for these times...

 

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13 hours ago, Willin' said:

knurled knob/ allen head screws

best thing since sliced bread .

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12 hours ago, Willin' said:

I hate your guts! :D

only IF a oil exchange system is also fitted ...

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1 hour ago, Willin' said:

Seems there's common thread here. Hard to believe Westerbeke hasn't figured out a way to make maintenance items easier for cruisers.

How fucking hard is it to put the oil dipstick, filter, raw water pump, and air filter all on roughly the same side of the engine??

Or maybe not put the raw water pump in so it's not only underneath something, but facing backwards?

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Assuming the front of the engine is where the disks and belts go, in our space the engine faces the stern, on the starboard side off centerline.

So that raw water pump was conveniently installed on the far side of the engine, UNDER the exhaust manifold, facing backwards relative to the front of the engine. The dip stick, oil filter and other maintenance stuff was on the other side.

This whole thread drift brought back flashbacks of this, I think I'd suppressed the memory because such a fuck-stupid design seemed improbable, I had to go dig up a parts schematic to prove to myself this was not a rum-induced repressed memory.

This is what the install looked like in 2006 when I bought the boat. There's a catwalk down the middle between the Volvo and the Westerbeke. So to get to that raw water pump, you had to lay over the engine, reach around UNDER the exhaust manifold and remove it by feel in a tight space. Eventually, my wife took to doing that because her wrists and hands are much smaller than mine (I could barely get my hands in there on all the nuts) and she could get back in the space better. (She's fairly small)

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With the new Northern Lights generator the raw water pump is easily accessible at the front.

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25 minutes ago, Mid said:
13 hours ago, Willin' said:

knurled knob/ allen head screws

best thing since sliced bread .

+1.

I got a set with my SpeedSeal Life retrofit and liked them so much I ordered a set of spares. Unfortunately, SpeedSeal went TU shortly thereafter. McMaster doesn't have anything directly comparable but they do have a wide variety of thumb nuts that you can modify with a screw shaft and some locktite to make the equivalent:

https://www.mcmaster.com/thumb-nuts/?SrchEntryWebPart_InpBox=knurled+allen+screws

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I have a lot of respect for the East coast. Been sailing it short handed and single handed since the 70’s. One thing I didn’t see on your list is a separate emergency diesel fuel container. Always good to have a few gallons not in the tank in case of loss, contamination, miscalculation, etc. Harbor fuel. Only other thing I’d emphasize is the autopilot - having that extra hand when you’re alone is the most critical advantage I think. Being able to control the heading of the vessel often makes solving any other problem much easier. I’d double down there, full back up. 
 

have fun, it can be a great trip, especially if you have time and can wait for the right weather for each leg. 
 

we just arrived in Eastport Maine direct from Antigua, heading slowly west from here - see you out there!!

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3 minutes ago, CapDave said:

I have a lot of respect for the East coast. Been sailing it short handed and single handed since the 70’s. One thing I didn’t see on your list is a separate emergency diesel fuel container. Always good to have a few gallons not in the tank in case of loss, contamination, miscalculation, etc. Harbor fuel. Only other thing I’d emphasize is the autopilot - having that extra hand when you’re alone is the most critical advantage I think. Being able to control the heading of the vessel often makes solving any other problem much easier. I’d double down there, full back up. 
 

have fun, it can be a great trip, especially if you have time and can wait for the right weather for each leg. 
 

we just arrived in Eastport Maine direct from Antigua, heading slowly west from here - see you out there!!

Yes, I'll be carrying 1 or 2 jugs of diesel.

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I just scored a new coolant recirculation pump for the engine for a very good price. This is something I've wanted to have on hand anyway.

My engine is 39 years old and the pump has never been replaced. I would not be at all surprised if the shaft seal finally started leaking during a long, hot motor up the coast. In fact, this very thing happened to a friend of mine on his way to Block Island. He had a spare pump onboard which saved him a major headache.

The final items remaining:

  • Install the new line cutter
  • Purchase a parachute flare a dye pack and another air horn cartridge
  • Install the washboard barrel bolts
  • Rig the radar reflector
  • Fill the ditch bag
  • Send my buddy aloft to inspect my upper rigging fittings
  • Load a dinghy
  • Notarize my will

If I have time:

  • Rig a 3rd leg to my lazy jacks

Since it's getting hot, I'm holding off on loading my provisions until a day or two before I depart. They are all assembled at the house where the environment is more controlled.

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8 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Or maybe not put the raw water pump in so it's not only underneath something, but facing backwards?

This!  And it's a half a boat buck to replace. Bet I find the newer version needing an impeller for $10 along the way.

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50 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I just scored a new coolant recirculation pump for the engine for a very good price. This is something I've wanted to have on hand anyway.

My engine is 39 years old and the pump has never been replaced. I would not be at all surprised if the shaft seal finally started leaking during a long, hot motor up the coast. In fact, this very thing happened to a friend of mine on his way to Block Island. He had a spare pump onboard which saved him a major headache.

The final items remaining:

  • Install the new line cutter
  • Purchase a parachute flare a dye pack and another air horn cartridge
  • Install the washboard barrel bolts
  • Rig the radar reflector
  • Fill the ditch bag
  • Send my buddy aloft to inspect my upper rigging fittings
  • Load a dinghy
  • Notarize my will

If I have time:

  • Rig a 3rd leg to my lazy jacks

Since it's getting hot, I'm holding off on loading my provisions until a day or two before I depart. They are all assembled at the house where the environment is more controlled.

Were it me, I'd skip the will thing....no reason to encourage sabotage. 

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I just scored a new coolant recirculation pump for the engine for a very good price. This is something I've wanted to have on hand anyway.

My engine is 39 years old and the pump has never been replaced. I would not be at all surprised if the shaft seal finally started leaking during a long, hot motor up the coast. In fact, this very thing happened to a friend of mine on his way to Block Island. He had a spare pump onboard which saved him a major headache.

The final items remaining:

  • Install the new line cutter
  • Purchase a parachute flare a dye pack and another air horn cartridge
  • Install the washboard barrel bolts
  • Rig the radar reflector
  • Fill the ditch bag
  • Send my buddy aloft to inspect my upper rigging fittings
  • Load a dinghy
  • Notarize my will

If I have time:

  • Rig a 3rd leg to my lazy jacks

Since it's getting hot, I'm holding off on loading my provisions until a day or two before I depart. They are all assembled at the house where the environment is more controlled.

When are you leaving, by what route/legs, and how are you getting weather when offshore?

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1 hour ago, Wess said:

how are you getting weather when offshore?

baro.thumb.jpg.7bb45986645e9a357925615e63e786be.jpg

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btw @Ajax , in all this planning has anyone mentioned a camera for the pic thread you are going to do ?

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On 6/10/2021 at 9:07 AM, Ishmael said:

Marked with an X. We had anchored there several times before, but got unlucky and snagged a 1" steel cable on the bottom and had to bring it up to the surface to get the anchor free. It was very heavy and took a long time. If that hadn't worked it was going to be time to lasso the anchor with a chain loop and try and drag it out backwards. Old aquaculture areas are a huge pain, they are frequently not remediated so there is all sorts of trash on the bottom. Entire popular bays are like that, such as Anderson Bay on Texada. I do carry a fender to use as an anchor marker, I should use it in those places...

clam.thumb.jpg.563ebe27771accfe06a39e5b849728ee.jpg

I usually just anchor right outside the cut so I can find my boat when I dinghy back from the pub...

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1 hour ago, climenuts said:

I usually just anchor right outside the cut so I can find my boat when I dinghy back from the pub...

Too much traffic from everyone else coming back from the pub. Now we anchor close to the 9.1 depth marker. 

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7 hours ago, Mid said:

btw @Ajax , in all this planning has anyone mentioned a camera for the pic thread you are going to do ?

It's onboard. 

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An acquaintance of mine set off on an unplanned trip from Annapolis to Cape May a few days ago.

The weather turned against him as he exited the C&D canal and he smashed his way all the way down the Delaware Bay in a nasty short chop and strong headwind. This is an impressive feat if you're racing but he was just trying to get to Cape May to rendezvous with friends.

This is exactly the kind of thing that I will *not* be doing.

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So Ajax, what is your YouTube channel that you will be posting your adventures on?

And are you going to be selling "Ajax Swag"?

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Have fun, and stop before you need to.

The corollary to that is go when you feel up to it.

We used to cruise Down East out of Portsmouth NH, and typically would head out in the afternoon, go overnight to Matinicus Rock and then find some place in Penobscott Bay. Getting as far as we wanted to be in the first day(s) would allow a leisurely return.

The concept of a "Hudson Bay Start" is well worth perusing, spend your first night onboard and depart in the AM, having cooked Dinner and breakfast and confirmed all stores and systems nominal.

 

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1 hour ago, slap said:

So Ajax, what is your YouTube channel that you will be posting your adventures on?

And are you going to be selling "Ajax Swag"?

Pffft...nope. You guys will be lucky to get any photos. I'm no @Kris Cringle.  He photographs the area the best.

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4 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

We used to do that before a big through-hike in the Boy Scouts.  What it didn't do was significantly break-in muscles and equipment... shoulda been training every day for a month or more.  Pushing an analogy too far, maybe?

Well, we have had two wildfires in the last ten days, close enough to see the smoke, but both fortunately down wind.  Pretty good sign to get the go-bags (backpack, car) and the boat packed up and ready to go.  Then of course, they'll need to be tested... ;)

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10 minutes ago, toddster said:

What it didn't do was significantly break-in muscles and equipment... shoulda been training every day for a month or more.  Pushing an analogy too far, maybe?

Training and conditioning are separable from ensuring that you didn't forget the can opener or that the lighter has butane in it...

 

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21 minutes ago, toddster said:

 Then of course, they'll need to be tested... ;)

Funny enough, yesterday I opened up the old ditch kit that came with my boat.  It had ancient gear in it.  I pulled out the can of life raft survival rations, just for fun.  One had stuff that was still loose in it when I shook the can- I reasoned it was still good (as good as 25 year old survival rations could be).  The other can didn’t shake- seemed like moisture likely got in.  So, reasoning that my 17 year old daughter would also be interested to know what was inside, we pulled out the new-ish looking Swiss Army knife that was in another sealed container inside the main ditch kit container.

Problem was, slight corrosion on the aluminum divider pieces (between blades and tools) inside the Swiss Army knife made it literally impossible to open the blades and tools with a stiff thumbnail - I needed a flat blade screw driver to open the can opener...and, then, the survival rations can itself was very difficult to open with the knife’s can opener, eventually requiring pliers to roll/tear off the small bit of metal we managed to open.  Would be absolutely brutal to be stuck in a raft trying desperately to open rations.......test your stuff! :-)

 

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