Jump to content

Final Details- Trip Planning


Recommended Posts

35 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Up the coast and out NW a ways is possible, like Vancouver Island-Homer or Seward, AK but that’s too much of a commitment solo. And it’s likely hard on the wind the whole way (NW is prevailing wind direction in summer.)  Solo to California doesn’t sound terribly interesting - I suppose I’d like to get California one day, but apart from San Francisco, I’m not terribly interested in the crowds of humans.  (And how do you get back N?  Basically, you don’t —not easily! California Current and prevailing N/NW winds)  Solo to Hawaii?

In 2002, Bill Teplow singlehanded his West Wight Potter 19 from San Francisco to Hawaii (24 days).  The following year, he singlehanded the same boat from  Port Angeles WA to Alaska.  He eventually upgraded to a J-35 and does charters on S.F. Bay: https://sailreddress.com/

http://www.wingojo.com/billsvoyage/
http://www.wingojo.com/billsvoyage/technotes.html

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 517
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Ajax carries a deflated Achilles. (Inspect heel of tubes for arrow puncture!)

Seriously - Is the weather that bad in summer? I'd be worried about a lack of wine, but that's just me.

Do you have a towel???   A towel is just about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can carry. Partly because it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you f

Posted Images

2 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

In 2002, Bill Teplow singlehanded his West Wight Potter 19 from San Francisco to Hawaii (24 days).  The following year, he singlehanded the same boat from  Port Angeles WA to Alaska.  He eventually upgraded to a J-35 and does charters on S.F. Bay: https://sailreddress.com/

http://www.wingojo.com/billsvoyage/
http://www.wingojo.com/billsvoyage/technotes.html

Yeah, my point was not about the vessel or even about ability - it was about the committing quality of the west coast: ain’t really no place close to ocean sail to/from.  East coast Canada and US have more options.  Mexico is appealing - but getting back N not easy.  Might as well keep going...
 

Ajax’s planned jaunt sounds good, with various legs, and topographical variety (from the brutal hot flatlands of the mid-Atlantic [may I never return there :-) ] , to the rocky, chilly northeast coast.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/28/2021 at 4:39 PM, Blue Crab said:
10 Sailing Superstitions
  • No Redheads Allowed Onboard. ...
  • No Women Onboard. ...
  • Bananas are Banned. ...
  • Always Step onto a Boat with Your Right Foot. ...
  • No Whistling. ...
  • Never Start a Voyage on a Friday. ...
  • Never Change a Boat's Name. ...
  • Don't Say “Goodbye” When Departing.

Never wear anything green. 

Never speak out the word “rabbit” aloud.

Never scratch the mast.

The first portion of anything alcoholic except beer always goes to Neptune / Poseidon / Rasmus.

Never shake it off with your left hand. 

 


 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...
On 6/14/2021 at 3:20 PM, toddster said:

So how'd they taste?  

BTW: US canned rations always used to come with a little gadget called a P38.  Used to have tons of them around when we were kids.  But that was before the days of pull-tabs on soda cans, too...:ph34r:  There was one in every box.

P-38-Can-Opener-3.jpg

Have a bunch of those. Local army surplus store gives them away with purchases. Have them in my wallet, EDC kit, survival bags, glove compartment, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...
On 6/10/2021 at 1:54 PM, Not My Real Name said:

Our Luke is only a storm/emergency thing. I couldn't envision wrestling that big hairy beast for anything else.

If you look at the first picture, you'll see that the chain runs forward where it attaches to the Manson on the roller, then around the bow back over the lifelines where the bitter end attaches to the Luke. In this case, we set it up as a backup/extra weight at the end of the rode behind the Manson in case that pulled out.

@Not My Real Name Just remembered your post above from earlier (last year, June!). I’ve finally acquired, just a few days ago, the Luke anchor I got for cheap last year.  It’ll be super easy to stow aboard in pieces as a third anchor - I.e., in case I lose the main bower or, indeed, to back it up in the event of real storm anchoring, as you describe above.  I know they’ve fallen out of favour, but it’s very easy for me to stow on board as a third and heavy “just-in-case” anchor.

Anyway, I finally actually have the anchor in hand now and was thinking through deployment/retrieval and remembered your detailed posts above.  Very useful info - at first, after assembling the anchor at home, I was perplexed how to drop and retrieve such a heavy anchor that’s not on the bow roller!  Now I basically see how.

But I’m not clear on how you’re doing what you describe above.  It’s set up here in your pic as a back up to your main Manson anchor.  Have you basically just shackled a short length of chain (say, 15 ft/5 m) to your Manson and led it back to the Luke?  Something like that?  But you say the bitter end of the chain attaches to the Luke, so the Manson is somehow shackled “mid-stream” on the chain, say 15 ft/5 m away from the bitter end?

D41968FC-D0DE-47F8-A966-EE9F056B953F.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

But I’m not clear on how you’re doing what you describe above.  

jfyi - in all your spare time you might google 'tandem anchor'. There is some controversy about if/when and how exactly to best do it.

It was used by a bunch of boats in chile - those who arrived with anchors which worked just fine elsewhere but which were a bit undersized for the conditions down there.  The Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego Nautical Guide has the best written description of how to do it that I have seen, and is a very nice guide to dream about on quiet evenings in any case.

We used Tandems very occasionally.  It is best used when you are pulling in a fixed straight line - like when shore tied, and in certain bottom conditions.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, estarzinger said:

jfyi - in all your spare time you might google 'tandem anchor'. There is some controversy about if/when and how exactly to best do it.

It was used by a bunch of boats in chile - those who arrived with anchors which worked just fine elsewhere but which were a bit undersized for the conditions down there.  The Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego Nautical Guide has the best written description of how to do it that I have seen, and is a very nice guide to dream about on quiet evenings in any case.

We used Tandems very occasionally.  It is best used when you are pulling in a fixed straight line - like when shore tied, and in certain bottom conditions.

Good to know - I had no idea “the Italian guide” had info on tandem anchoring in it, thinking it was strictly a pilotage guide.

I wasn’t really thinking that Not My Real Name’s description above was a tandem anchoring set up - he said it was for just in case the main anchor doesn’t hold— bit I guess that is, effectively, a tandem set up.  (I’d always thought a tandem set up would be more two similar sized anchors.)

(Re: people finding out their normal anchor was a bit undersized in Patagonia, reminds me that I probably should’ve gotten a 25kg Rocna (or whatever) instead of a 20kg one when I replaced my lost 20kg Bruce a coupla years ago...if it would fit in roller, that is...)

Definitely will pick up the Patagonia guide if only for dream planning for now.  I have a feeling that this will hold my attention for only so long... :-) (but it is the key first step)...

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/4/2022 at 3:14 PM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Good to know - I had no idea “the Italian guide” had info on tandem anchoring in it, thinking it was strictly a pilotage guide.

I wasn’t really thinking that Not My Real Name’s description above was a tandem anchoring set up - he said it was for just in case the main anchor doesn’t hold— bit I guess that is, effectively, a tandem set up.  (I’d always thought a tandem set up would be more two similar sized anchors.)

(Re: people finding out their normal anchor was a bit undersized in Patagonia, reminds me that I probably should’ve gotten a 25kg Rocna (or whatever) instead of a 20kg one when I replaced my lost 20kg Bruce a coupla years ago...if it would fit in roller, that is...)

Definitely will pick up the Patagonia guide if only for dream planning for now.  I have a feeling that this will hold my attention for only so long... :-) (but it is the key first step)...

There is a lot more than pilotage info in the 'Italian Book' but I have just had my 2nd edition down off the shelf and there is nothing on tandem anchoring in it. You have to go to the RCC guide for that.

I must say that I have never used it and haven't met anyone else who has. Mind you I got shot of my CQR and bought a Rocna very early on. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cisco said:

there is nothing on tandem anchoring in it.

well, hell, mea culpa.

I 100% remembered a diagram and description in there, but you are right it is not.  I vividly remember a good drawing where I learned how/where to use floating line between the two anchors to make recovery of the first one easiest, but IDK what/where it is from.  I'm simply getting old I guess.

Beth does have a description in her book, but she had original illustrations made so there is no source for the drawing I remember.

We got on well with tandoms.  Did not use them often but they always helped when we did.  There was an anchorage in SW australia (albany I think) which had the hardest smoothest bottom I remember. Big 4x4's could drive on the beach and leave no tracks.  Neither our 50kg rocna or bruce would penetrate at all, and would start dragging at around 25kts even with all our chain out . . . .but when I put them both out in tandem there was just enough mass and friction to hold for as much wind as we got - ould not want to have trusted it in a hurricane but was good thru a gale.

And the couple times we prepped for a potential hurricane strike, we would be in muddy/sandy good penetrating bottoms, I would put fortress in from of rocna on one rode and danforth in front of bruce on another separate rode - seemed like the best way to use 4 anchors to best effect.  In those cases I dove and adjusted/placed the front anchors by hand to make sure they were all good and set.

And after the regalvanizer in chile broke our main bruce, but before we got other big anchors delivered, we used tandoms with our secondary anchors on one run down the channels whenever we thought it might be particularly windy - never dragged never had any setting or recovery issues.

But, as I said in my original comment above . . . . it is a 'controversial' topic, mostly stirred up between the previous collection of various strong willed anchor developers.

as an aside . . . not to make it an anchor thread, but I personally did not get along with the rocna all that well.  My experiences were more consistent with Steve's results than with the prior testing art on the topic.  I'm not say at all it is 'bad', just that in my experience it is not a extraordinarily good as 'reputed' - I objectively dragged with it more often than with my manson ray (both same weight), always on 'bad' bottoms so not so much the fault of the anchor but still more 'failures'.  But that is just my anecdotal experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, estarzinger said:

....

We got on well with tandoms.  Did not use them often but they always helped when we did.  There was an anchorage in SW australia (albany I think) which had the hardest smoothest bottom I remember. Big 4x4's could drive on the beach and leave no tracks.  Neither our 50kg rocna or bruce would penetrate at all, and would start dragging at around 25kts even with all our chain out . . . .but when I put them both out in tandem there was just enough mass and friction to hold for as much wind as we got - ould not want to have trusted it in a hurricane but was good thru a gale.

........

Age is always a good excuse - I use it often.

Re WA anchorages. Well known for hard sand as is South Australia.

The local anchor of choice is the Swarbrick - with the flukes sharpened. 

https://pachucaroundtheworld.blogspot.com/2007/05/swarbrick-anchor.html

I've only used mine twice , once round the corner from Wineglass bay in Tasmania and the other time in Waratah Bay, Victoria. Worked good where the CQR did nothing.

Be seen in NSW with one though and they will accuse you of planning to destroy their eel grass beds.

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, estarzinger said:

well, hell, mea culpa.

I 100% remembered a diagram and description in there, but you are right it is not.  I vividly remember a good drawing where I learned how/where to use floating line between the two anchors to make recovery of the first one easiest, but IDK what/where it is from.  I'm simply getting old I guess.

Beth does have a description in her book, but she had original illustrations made so there is no source for the drawing I remember.

We got on well with tandoms.  Did not use them often but they always helped when we did.  There was an anchorage in SW australia (albany I think) which had the hardest smoothest bottom I remember. Big 4x4's could drive on the beach and leave no tracks.  Neither our 50kg rocna or bruce would penetrate at all, and would start dragging at around 25kts even with all our chain out . . . .but when I put them both out in tandem there was just enough mass and friction to hold for as much wind as we got - ould not want to have trusted it in a hurricane but was good thru a gale.

And the couple times we prepped for a potential hurricane strike, we would be in muddy/sandy good penetrating bottoms, I would put fortress in from of rocna on one rode and danforth in front of bruce on another separate rode - seemed like the best way to use 4 anchors to best effect.  In those cases I dove and adjusted/placed the front anchors by hand to make sure they were all good and set.

And after the regalvanizer in chile broke our main bruce, but before we got other big anchors delivered, we used tandoms with our secondary anchors on one run down the channels whenever we thought it might be particularly windy - never dragged never had any setting or recovery issues.

But, as I said in my original comment above . . . . it is a 'controversial' topic, mostly stirred up between the previous collection of various strong willed anchor developers.

as an aside . . . not to make it an anchor thread, but I personally did not get along with the rocna all that well.  My experiences were more consistent with Steve's results than with the prior testing art on the topic.  I'm not say at all it is 'bad', just that in my experience it is not a extraordinarily good as 'reputed' - I objectively dragged with it more often than with my manson ray (both same weight), always on 'bad' bottoms so not so much the fault of the anchor but still more 'failures'.  But that is just my anecdotal experience.

Evans - at the risk of drifting Ajax’s fine thread further, but it is all related and on topic really - would you be using back up snubbers in potential hurricane anchoring set ups as you describe here?  Having just acquired the 3-piece Luke, which I can only justify owning (as they’ve apparently “fallen out of favour”) since it was so cheap and since I can stow it on board very  easily, as compared to other spare anchors [my 33 lb Danforth] on our small boat, I’m finally thinking through a more comprehensive anchor and related gear inventory on board.  Realizing I should probably have another snubber, and I want to learn to splice some soft shackles as back ups/replacements for my chain hook.

I think you described elsewhere your snubbers set up - more than one if conditions warranted it - the second one also set up, too, just in case the first/main one failed?  So much to learn...

(If this is in Beth’s book, I’ll have a look on board - don’t want to bug you, if so!  I also recall you writing about it in detail in a thread here last year perhaps - can’t recall exactly where, but I’ll find it...)

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

would you be using back up snubbers in potential hurricane anchoring set ups as you describe here?  

I'm sure beth talks about snubbers but idk what sort of detail she goes into.

We experimented with numerous snubber solutions.  In the storm/hurricane scenario, yes I would usually have our 'normal' snubber on (which was for much of our cruising dynamic climbing line) plus a heavier back up snubber which would take up load as the climbing line stretched. The climbing line never broke, but we did once chafe thru its cover.  IDK how much value this complication had, but I like back-up's and alternatives.

Beth always handled the snubbers when we were double handed and I honestly did not have much first hand experience with them when I started soloing.  I reorganized the systems when I had to actually handle them.  That's when I started using the soft shackles, and I switched mostly to 8-plait line.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...