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Small Trimaran Day sailor to be used for overnighters....


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Hi,

I don't know the tiny trimaran world well. We are thinking about our next return trip home to the family property (roadless; boat only access) on Manitoulin Island and looking for recommendations for a tiny trimaran that we can launch from our very rocky/stone shore and bottom ( it's about 3 feet deep 25 feet out and 12" deep about 3 feet out from waters edge). Then something we could also trailer to the North Chanel for some overnight exploration. I'm looking at something along these lines: https://www.astusboats.com/astus-16-5-copie.html 

As background...I've owned a KH26/28, still sail on a F36/39 ,and a PT-11 that I'm sailing. I'm sure a WETA would be too small and would desire a cuddy cabin. Light weight would be essential for 'hand' launching.

Here is a picture of our shore line...

DSCN1616.JPG

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Windrider 17, but no cabin.  To launch from there you aren't going to want anything heavier than about 400 pounds.  Unless there's a way to get a vehicle and a trailer there that we can't see.  With that kind of shore I'd want a plastic hull.

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Pulse600, F-24, Dash 750. All have about 1 foot of draft with the daggerboards up. Bring an inflatable or a kayak to get the last 25 feet.

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1 hour ago, bhyde said:

Pulse600, F-24, Dash 750. All have about 1 foot of draft with the daggerboards up. Bring an inflatable or a kayak to get the last 25 feet.

Hey Hyde,  Thanks for the suggestions.

However, These are all larger boats that I am considering, I need to be able to roll the trimaran up on shore and onto the hard. Even the Pulse-600 seems way too heavy to handle on that shore. 

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Kanka is a cool project.  The NW Multihull Assn. in Seattle had the designer, Francois Perus, give us a show and tell about designing the Corsair 880, but he also spent time describing a couple of his other projects including the Kanka 14.  Here is a link to the zoom presentation.

 

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14 hours ago, 2flit said:

Hey Hyde,  Thanks for the suggestions.

However, These are all larger boats that I am considering, I need to be able to roll the trimaran up on shore and onto the hard. Even the Pulse-600 seems way too heavy to handle on that shore. 

The local Pulse weighs in at 1500 pounds, so no need to look at that--even my SeaRail weighs 900 and it's not a beach boat.  Is there a reason you want a trimaran?  A beach cat seems a better fit.  I'd still go with plastic hulls with those rocks.  

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11 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

The local Pulse weighs in at 1500 pounds, so no need to look at that--even my SeaRail weighs 900 and it's not a beach boat.  Is there a reason you want a trimaran?  A beach cat seems a better fit.  I'd still go with plastic hulls with those rocks.  

Hi Multi,

Basically.. I want more stability than the small catamarans I have sailed provide. Doing solo overnighters in the protected waters of the North Channel above our family home on Manitoulin Island would be a regular event for this little boat, I don't want something that is as 'tippy' as  the  (admittedly small number) of beach cats I have sailed. I think that roto-molded cross linked poly boats would weight a ton?

We don't get waves or swell at that spot very often in the summer. If there were, I would temporarily moor the boat. So bringing her ashore would be a calm water even with at most maybe an 4-7" chop, and usually just rather calm with cats paws on the water. It's not the small surf landing you might be thinking of.

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2 minutes ago, 2flit said:

Hi Multi,

Basically.. I want more stability than the small catamarans I have sailed provide. Doing solo overnighters in the protected waters of the North Channel above our family home on Manitoulin Island would be a regular event for this little boat, I don't want something that is as 'tippy' as  the  (admittedly small number) of beach cats I have sailed. I think that roto-molded cross linked poly boats would weight a ton?

A hobie getaway and windrider 17 weigh about the same-400 pounds.  I understand wanting more stability, sold my getaway just because I never felt safe from capsize.  Have you looked at any expedition type kayak/trimarans?  http://smalltrimarans.com/blog/sponge-bob-square-outrigger/#more-19843

I think you may have to build your own to get what you want.  Lots of small tris featured at the above link.  Hard to build it large enough for a cuddy and still be light enough to manhandle on a rocky beach.  

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My Scarab 16 is about 440lbs, you certainly don't want to go much heavier. It's on a trolley and is manageable on grass, I wouldn't like to be pulling the trolley and boat over those rocks without assistance though, pretty heavy.

Honestly. A beach cat will be lighter and have more usable room. 

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3 hours ago, eric1207 said:

Kanka is a cool project.  The NW Multihull Assn. in Seattle had the designer, Francois Perus, give us a show and tell about designing the Corsair 880, but he also spent time describing a couple of his other projects including the Kanka 14.  Here is a link to the zoom presentation.

 

Eric,

What a two hour marathon, that was great. Thank-you very much for linking me to this. Especially so because I wrote Francois a while back and it was very rewarding to hear him speak at length and see him on the screen. I like the guy allot. His little Kanka is great since it's built to be carried down and assembled in the water on shore line and the estimated weight is rather good for ply construction. His design constraints and cost to have it built match my expectations for the project 

Only thing missing is the cuddy and I suppose that is not a total 'make or break' item depending on the rest of the dimensions. Tghe boat will be much - much lighter and easier to deal with on our shoreline than either the Astus or Scarab.

Thanks,  John

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John, I'm glad it meets your needs.  If you build one start a thread on it or at least show us the end product. 

Francois was very generous with his time and patiently answered all our many questions very thoroughly.  If I ever built a custom multihull I'd certainly consider him as I think he would be very easy to work with.

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The Tremolino is one of my all-time favorite boats and seems like it may be a candidate.

Just watched our friend Inger finish a 70 mile rowing race in the same dinghy you have, 2flit.

She was well ahead of her usual sub-20 hour pace when she hit a wall of gale force westerly wind. The last 7 miles took about 5 hours. We were on a bluff watching her thrashing through big chop and heavy gusts near the end. I can't believe she finished, especially after going non-stop all night and half the day before hitting the wall. The fist thing she said was "did you bring the beer?" She had serious surfing conditions last night and then a gale on the nose today, but she said she only had to bail rainwater. We helped her out of the boat but she didn't really need it. 

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Hi Cyclone and Russel...

I'll look at that now. His other Trimarans have been so large.. I did not realize he designed something as tiny as I'm looking for, Thanks!

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58 minutes ago, 2flit said:

Hi Cyclone and Russel...

I'll look at that now. His other Trimarans have been so large.. I did not realize he designed something as tiny as I'm looking for, Thanks!

Oh my. the Tremolino is a bigger Tri.. At 1000 pounds, much too much boat for what our beach presents to us. http://dicknewickboats.com/tremolino/ 

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On an unfriendly shore like the one in the pix your biggest issue will likely be finding some type of beach dolly to help you launch and recover what ever you wind up with.  This is a vid showing a dolly used for a Windrider.  Cat Trax makes a dolly for beach cats.  If you can't manhandle the boat your self you can use something like a come along or a winch for more power.
(193) Loading Hobie TI on a beach dolly - YouTube

 

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Anything with a cuddy will be way over your weight limit.  Close to perfect would be a Hobie 21 sc.  It's possible to flip em but it's also pretty easy to keep em on their feet.  With the wings and storage you could camp cruise nicely, add a little motor and you're in business.  The Getaway would be good too or a H18 with wings.  Yes, all can flip but so can a Weta.  A Hobie 14 would provide just as much fun and if you happen to flip it's pretty rightable and you wouldn't care that much if you hit a rock, buy another one for 500 bucks and carry on.  

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I agree about the Windrider 17. They are just about unbreakable and uncapsizable and pretty good rough water boats. Some have done remarkable crossings and expeditions. They have a fixed skeg and spade rudder and no centerboard. They go upwind better than you might think for not having a board. I thought they sailed well upwind and I've sailed one quite a bit, but others here think they suck upwind. They get a lot of love for a plastic and aluminum boat.

Sorry about my thread hijack last night. I wasn't going to start a thread about it, but was so proud of Inger and had to tell someone. 

Where is Manitoulin island?

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2 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

Where is Manitoulin island?

 

2021-06-07_06-29-00.png

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This video at the 12:00 minute mark shows a Windrider 17 rocky beach launch. The boat is pretty indestructible, with the exception of the rudder, and that's usually protected by the skeg.

 

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Nice video, Skip to 1430 if you only want to see carrying it on the rocks.  I do routinely knock the WR17 since it doesn't point worth a darn and I dislike sitting in one spot while sailing and like the feedback of a tiller.  But for lake sailing or adventure sailing where durability is more important than getting where you want to be upwind, can't really beat the fun factor.  

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59 minutes ago, hobiedd97 said:

This video at the 12:00 minute mark shows a Windrider 17 rocky beach launch. The boat is pretty indestructible, with the exception of the rudder, and that's usually protected by the skeg.

 

Nice to see this video. I went to school with John and have known Andy for 25 years or more. He introduced me to Jim Brown many years ago and we've had some great conversations.

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47 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

Nice video, Skip to 1430 if you only want to see carrying it on the rocks.  I do routinely knock the WR17 since it doesn't point worth a darn and I dislike sitting in one spot while sailing and like the feedback of a tiller.  But for lake sailing or adventure sailing where durability is more important than getting where you want to be upwind, can't really beat the fun factor.  

I need (actually hope) to be able to sail an upwind angle of 37 AWA easily and efficiently. Most of the boats that I hope to consider are aws boats and bring the wind forward to the extent that they tend to be sailing upwind allot of the time. I don't know any of the WindRiders and will take a look, especially since Tom (who owners the Astus 16) is giving it a thumbs up... Oh just see a post from him as I am typing this....

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I do give it a "thumbs up" if you want to explore, travel, camp, handle heavy water and weather. And in high winds it's a blast to sail if safety is your concern. I sailed the prototype way back when and had Andy's own WR17 here in my building for a year whilst I sailed it off and on.

The only downside is that it simply won't point terribly high. It does okay but it is not going to get as high as most modern multi-hulls can. I'd peg it a full 5 degrees lower than about anything else I've ever sailed.

The company does offer a flat cut spinnaker that is a plus downwind however.

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1 hour ago, 2flit said:

I need (actually hope) to be able to sail an upwind angle of 37 AWA easily and efficiently. Most of the boats that I hope to consider are aws boats and bring the wind forward to the extent that they tend to be sailing upwind allot of the time. I don't know any of the WindRiders and will take a look, especially since Tom (who owners the Astus 16) is giving it a thumbs up... Oh just see a post from him as I am typing this....

It will easily sail 37 AWA, but TWA will be closer to 55.  As you see in the vid above, though, it is still pretty heavy to single hand up from that rocky shore...the skeg will be difficult to slide up and likely you will lose the rudder once or twice until you get it figured out.  Hobie Getaway has two skegs so boat is flat while you drag while pulling on the substantial front bar and rudders are lifted up so you don't lose them.  Put a reef point in the getaway main for high wind and use the wings--no boom to worry about ... not a tri and yes, can capsize while WR 17 or 16 is really unlikely to be topdown.  

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Here's a video of both Windrider 17 and Getaway on same piece of water at the same time; shot from both boats (my Getaway, neighbor with Windrider).  

 

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On 6/5/2021 at 1:37 PM, MultiThom said:

Windrider 17, but no cabin.  To launch from there you aren't going to want anything heavier than about 400 pounds.  Unless there's a way to get a vehicle and a trailer there that we can't see.  With that kind of shore I'd want a plastic hull.

Thorn,

Very good advice, and you were the first to give it on the WR17!

Thanks for all your input and everyone else's continuing thoughts and advice. The lousy rocky beach makes this one a very hard nut to crack and many of these designs are impressive....e.g.... still a bit stunned by the WR16 header on the dock video segment!  The weight of the WR17 looks like it may be? too high after seeing four fit old farts struggling a bit on an easy rocky shore to get it above tideline. I'm sure a dolly would have helped and one of them could have possibly pulled it and easy for two. There are obvious advantages to the roto-molded hull (I've white water boated in them) That plastic is impressive stuff!  However, I remain somewhat skeptical... I'd want to heft and sail one first here in New Zealand because the seated position and the performance to windward could be an issue. The payload  carry capacity appears very good for the conditions they took on, (Baja can be unforgiving at times and without water cashes... the loads must have been very high for 2-wk trip). All that said, I would still prefer an open cockpit and tramp to move my body around on as opposed to a kayak seated position.

I'm also still looking very closely at the Kanka 14, but I'm sure that the development curve on a hull number one will be steep. This boat appears to fit my sailing 'personality' quite nicely.

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3 minutes ago, OldmateFred said:

So there is the WR17 (Windrider 17) and the W17 https://smalltridesign.com/W17/study-profile.html just to add to the confusion :)

Yeesh.... Thanks!!!

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I went ahead a ordered an astus 16.5 first one in Hawaii or any VPLP design all together.. Should be here in august and plan on making videos about it setup etc because hard to find solid vids and the boat is in a class of its own!!

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Well, I'm surprised you settled on this one as the cuddy is not really worthwhile for the most part. It is very powerful and very fast for a 16.5 footer, but it won't be as comfortable as the WR17 on long voyages. It will be one hell of a lot faster, of course, and it points higher and can sail deeper. I believe the new ones have a swing up/down daggerboard and a new rudder system, so that certainly improves it over the original.

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19 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

Well, I'm surprised you settled on this one as the cuddy is not really worthwhile for the most part. It is very powerful and very fast for a 16.5 footer, but it won't be as comfortable as the WR17 on long voyages. It will be one hell of a lot faster, of course, and it points higher and can sail deeper. I believe the new ones have a swing up/down daggerboard and a new rudder system, so that certainly improves it over the original.

Don't be surprised, Tom! Skirret is not the OP

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The biggest thing I have had success dragging into and out of the water in bad circumstances it a Hobie Bravo.  Probably does not meet your needs, and performance is not awesome, but the roto molded hull is pretty tough and its light enough that one person can drag it over rocks, logs etc.  Super quick to setup and break down.

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Seems like whatever you wind up with, a custom cart / set of beach wheels would help if you can leave them on the beach. Cat Trax can be modified to whatever width you need... maybe set up an extra long axle that extends beyond each wheel to support the amas and have a wheel on either side of the main hull? 

You would drag the hull less, and have better control. I have helped drag boat lifts in and out of a lake with similar wheels. Way better than carrying all the weight and the wheels did pretty well over sizable rocks at low tire pressures.

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In Dutch we have a saying that translates into “You want a horse with 5 legs” …..

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46 minutes ago, Paranda said:

In Dutch we have a saying that translates into “You want a horse with 5 legs” …..

It's always good on SA to suffer some admonishment. It's paying your dues around this environment.

However, I'm not so sure about this. As the post has progressed... I've indicated that the cuddy cabin (which was only vestigial in my mind anyways) can fall to the wayside to save weight and design constraint. We are then left with a small trimaran that can be used as a day sailor by two people and is either light enough or easily demountable... so that two of us can deal with it on the rocky shore shown. I can probably make a bail of hay work for an overnighter and a two-up day sailor will suit my longer solo ambitions. Solo tiny boat endeavors tend to be a bit of a hair shirt affair anyways. I don't mind that part of it much.

Far more seasoned folks than myself have made some excellent suggestions, many quite workable to varying degrees. I could make at least three of them suit my needs. Reviewing all these suggestions has been rewarding and truly helped me to sort my priorities. I'm following up on slightly longer version of the Kanka 14, still considering the wisdom of the WR17 by sea trialing. And trying to figure out if there is a good way to deal with a sub 400 pound boat like the Scarab. They all run on five legs in my world.

And I've never found the Dutch to be anything but ingenious, sharp witted, and likeable sorts... so I bet you have a few" horses with an extra leg" that you can pull out of your hat.

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I'm not entirely clear on the beach setup; you show a small spot with bushes to one side of a fairly narrow path, what appears to be a boardwalk, etc. But if there's a spot with a rocky shore and a mild uphill slope, I'd think about making a cart with three wheels, not two. Let the cart carry all the weight of the boat. Big balloon tires. Then plant a big post 100' or so above the high tide mark, and put a winch on it.

The hard part here is pulling the cart up the beach on the rocks. So let the winch do that. Now to launch all you have to do is push the cart downhill, a much easier task.

If it were me I'd still keep the boat weight under control, I wouldn't want to try it with a F24 or something. But the fact that you want to do this in the same place every time makes me think about improvements in the landing point as well as limitations on the boat.

 

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As a fairly new Weta owner I've used the trolley a few times pulling up the ramp by hand, also used beachcat wheels many times.  I would highly recommend investing in a good rechargeable winch system. Plenty of trees for anchoring it.  I would also point out that the Weta weighs about as much as a beachcat and in many ways is less boat.  Just my opinion, the Weta has lots of great features, but it's wetter, less comfortable and has virtually no storage.  I've sailed cats and tris in the ocean for decades and i honestly believe that if you sail conservatively the beachcat can be quite safe.  When you demand the tri there will be some tradeoffs.  I think my multi 23 was 900ish pounds, lots of fun but lots of pain too. I would have really hated trying to get it up and over a pile of rocks, pure misery.

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I was going to say that the Weta is lighter than most beachcats (Weta is 25lbs lighter than an H14 and 100lbs lighter than an H16) but the Weta is only 14 feet long. It's a blast to sail in good wind but I've never seen it as a boat for long distance cruising or camping. In fact, I don't consider it a two-person boat, although I know a lot of people do run 2-up on it. On any sort of a long voyage I have no doubt whatsoever you'd be much more comfortable in a Windrider 17.

Other than some beachcats, what you seem to want isn't going to lend itself well to much other than direct trailer launching.

Now there is one other boat I don't think anyone has mentioned here yet, and it's probably one of the most versatile saiing boats in the world - the Hobie Tandem Island. It will allow you to do things no other boat can do, in conditions you'd hardly believe possible and it can be launched from beaches and similar. However, it is basically a long, large sailing kayak so the speed/performance isn't going to match many multihulls of any description. And, you will get wet. I know some people who moved to one after sailing beachcats for years. I thought they'd be disappointed but was surprised to learn that they loved it. I suppose it's all about where you are in life and the specific thing you're wanting out of a boat.

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TI owners have done lots of stuff on their boats.  One guy fitted his with dual honda 2.3s to sail in the keys.  They would be a good choice for getting on and off that launch area.  

 

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The AI/TI may not be for you or what you want to do. But just in case, here is one of the better videos that show some of its capabilities and what people do with them.  The boat has come to dominate expedition type races and there are groups and clubs assembled all over the world now. Even if you're not interested in this type vessel, I think you'll enjoy this video which in my opinion is one of the very best and most enjoyable sailing videos I've ever seen.

 

 

 

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I know I'll burn for saying this but there are some very nice little dinghies that I've been investigating, specifically RS and Topper as well as the new Fulcrum.  I'd wager that many would outsail the Hobie kayaks, be more comfortable than many tris for longer trips and fare better going up and down rocky beaches.  I think the Windrider would get the job done too.  I haven't sailed one but I'm guessing the lack of pointing ability would be offset by several other attributes.  Another thought would be the venerable Wayfarer dinghy or a Core Sound.  If you're serious about adventure camping and sailing those boats offer a lot too.  Now you may light the pyre.  

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I don't see anything wrong with that. It could be that a small monohull is the one that ticks most of the boxes. But I would mention that the Hobie "kayaks" aren't bad sailing vessels, particularly when you put them up against monohulls. The AI/TI boats will do 8 to 12 knots in good conditions, have a furling mainsail (furl on the fly) to allow sailing in some pretty wicked conditions, offer a spinnaker and with the mirage drive there are few places you can't go, even in skinny water (can motivate in 10 inches of water if you feather pump the fins). The Mirage Drive is like riding a bicycle on level ground. Very efficient. And they're easy to transport and launch.

The Hobie AI/TI and the Windrider 17 are very likely the most unique and capable small sailing vessels on the market if you want to actually go places, camp, fish, explore, etc.

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On 6/15/2021 at 4:19 PM, dnlambler said:

https://duckworks.com/sardine-run-plans/

This little tri could fit the bill if you were prepared to build. 300kg lightship displacement. Maybe a bit of extra kevlar on the bottom for the rocks?

(Oh and if you want to offload your Farrier tri before you leave NZ I'd love to check her out.)

 

Interesting off set front beam setup .

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Check out "Raid" boats. not trimarans necessarily, but tough, light, camping boats.  It's not a brand, it's a category

 

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20 hours ago, Waynemarlow said:

One of the better NZ designers Tim Clissold has pretty much what you want, the cabin is bigger than what you would expect and the weight is good for its size.

https://www.tcdesign.co.nz/TC_Design/Sport_Multihulls/Pages/New_TC_601_Wedge.html

 

Looks this boat has never been completed, any news available ? the weight seems realistic

If anyone interested , my Strike 20 is able 16 + kt downwind, and 11 kt upwind (VelociteK Doppler GPS data), for sale with complete inventory including carbon mast and boom.

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5 hours ago, patzefran said:

Looks this boat has never been completed, any news available ? the weight seems realistic

The main hull came in on weight schedule nicely,

We then got into a bit of a scenario with the F18 donor boat hulls coming in way over weight what was talked about by the manufacturer. This then totally screwed with the way we wanted to fold the boat with simple water stays and simple folding on the water. That extra weight led on testing to be a real pain as the main hull is more skiff like and is simply not stable on the water with uncontrolled AMA folding. That then led back to a heavier but more sturdier Farrier style folding, doable but we have had to rethink the AMA beams. The joys of the first boat .

Then we got into a situation of work just took over for nearly a year and finally to really slow things up, the yard where it’s sitting on the trailer was locked up over the COVID lock down and despite having the time to complete it, couldn’t get to it. It’s still on my priority list as unfinished business.

image.jpeg.3df9f8078a2912c9f0138a6c7fd3584e.jpeg

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On 6/19/2021 at 3:52 PM, Waynemarlow said:

The main hull came in on weight schedule nicely,

We then got into a bit of a scenario with the F18 donor boat hulls coming in way over weight what was talked about by the manufacturer. This then totally screwed with the way we wanted to fold the boat with simple water stays and simple folding on the water. That extra weight led on testing to be a real pain as the main hull is more skiff like and is simply not stable on the water with uncontrolled AMA folding. That then led back to a heavier but more sturdier Farrier style folding, doable but we have had to rethink the AMA beams. The joys of the first boat .

Then we got into a situation of work just took over for nearly a year and finally to really slow things up, the yard where it’s sitting on the trailer was locked up over the COVID lock down and despite having the time to complete it, couldn’t get to it. It’s still on my priority list as unfinished business.

image.jpeg.3df9f8078a2912c9f0138a6c7fd3584e.jpeg

Looking at the market, unless very expensive technology, all the production Tris finishes much heavier than the designer planned (and  heavier than advertised !) !

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Oddly enough if we used purpose built Amas we would have been underweight. Still at the now projected 280kgs it’s still light.

This boat had been always designed for the home builder using the abundant F18’s sitting around and the really good masts sails fittings and ancillaries. We thought at the time we designed it that it was unique and would have been a good seller to put into production ( just the main hull, you supply the F18 ) then the Pulse 600 arrived, failed to sell and were back on the market for for not much more than we could sell a main hull + a modernish F18. At that point the project was effectively dead financially.

Which leaves me with just unfinished business lol.

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Though I do really like the smaller tris like the Windrider 17, even they are too much weight for me to wrestle up a beach much less a rocky one. And I understand the drive to have more boat that has at least some spartan cuddy. With that, I agree with the posts above suggesting that you get the boat you want and adapt your island property for the boat. A wheeled beach cart could work but in case it really is too rocky or if you want a more permanent installed system, I'd look at building some DIY marine railway up your rocky beach. I can't tell if you have space there at that landing site and I'd want to be able to move it up out of the ice zone for winter (presuming you get ice up there) but here are some examples to give an idea on what I'm thinking about.

See https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-forum/1114342-boat-ramp-systems-using-rollers-winches.html

https://www.overtons.com/shore-docker-boat-ramp-systems---shore-docker-2000-315058.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=ppc&utm_campaign={Campaign}&gclid=CjwKCAjw8cCGBhB6EiwAgORey_7jjR1AS4wUyT2d7GyIUhjoy4PqpRpeW7oYkNkkOe0JKPn_KnqW1RoCUfgQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

ramp02_e7d5a1603af2dff3b62f5c85f96b06fdc

or

Rollers on the right | House boat, Lake dock, Boat dock

image.jpeg.52256535f8e91dda0ef5a6c2adc03004.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Waynemarlow said:

would have been a good seller to put into production ( just the main hull, you supply the F18 ) then the Pulse 600 arrived, failed to sell and were back on the market for for not much more than we could sell a main hull + a modernish F18. At that point the project was effectively dead financially.

Which leaves me with just unfinished business lol.

Pulse 600, like all Corsairs, is heavy and overpriced for its length.  Local one here was 680 kg in a ready to race package.  And at 55K $US I'm surprised you didn't think you could get significantly under that price.  My boat weighs in at 400 kg rdytorace and folds on the water, the first several were even lighter since they didn't have on the water folding.  SeaRails sold for 30K $US.   I still think the 20 footish boat is viable if you could build them for under 1100$US/foot.  But that is probably not possible even with cheap labor built with fiberglass/epoxy sandwich in moulds.  

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New price for the Pulse 600's were in the expensive bracket, they used to tend to change hands here in the UK for about the £ 22K bracket 2nd hand after a year, which made us think that it wasn't worthwhile following up making molds and setting up a production line. The other thing that staggered us was just how few sold.

Spent an afternoon on one, nice boat to sail and I still think that 20 footer is a great big harbour and sheltered water, fun boat that you can dry store/launch off a trailer and sail short handed pretty easily. Sorry its just too big for launching off a beach.

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Unfortunately, we're back to a 5-legged horse. A trimaran that is light enough to easily haul ashore isn't going to afford you with much in the way of storage or carrying capacity. A boat that does offer those things isn't going to be be easy to haul ashore.

Your first thought, the Astus 16.5, might be your best best after all, although I wouldn't like dragging mine onto anything other than sand. The Hobie Tandem Island will do what you want, minus the carrying capacity and storage. The Windrider 17, while not perfect for you, appears to check more boxes than all the rest. There is a guy in Texas, Ziggy Lavengood, that is doing much of what you want to do and he does it well with his Windrider 17. Maybe watch a few of his videos and reconsider the WR17. I just don't know of anything else out there that is going to tick as many boxes for you as this boat...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTQ1yxRIJx1gt7Cqtn4-ESw

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  • 3 weeks later...

You might check out the X-Cat.  Not a trimaran, but fits otherwise fits the bill.  Very stable, reasonably fast (I've hit 10 kts with about 10-12kt windspeed), and you can assemble/disassemble at water's edge.  The heaviest part is 38 lbs, total boat weight 165 lbs, and easily cartopped.  Carries 550lbs, with a deck net for gear.  

https://www.x-cat.com

 

 

 

 

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On 6/23/2021 at 5:19 AM, Rasputin22 said:

Check this!

May be an image of body of water

No image shown? Maybe the link is broken

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1 hour ago, Puzman said:

You might check out the X-Cat.  Not a trimaran, but fits otherwise fits the bill.  Very stable, reasonably fast (I've hit 10 kts with about 10-12kt windspeed), and you can assemble/disassemble at water's edge.  The heaviest part is 38 lbs, total boat weight 165 lbs, and easily cartopped.  Carries 550lbs, with a deck net for gear.  

https://www.x-cat.com

 

 

 

 

Looks small for sailing with two adults, Have you tried this? I am 6'5" and 189 pounds and my wife's 5'8",  seems like the boat would slow to a crawl sailed two up?

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Not at all related to the OPs needs, but there is a small daysailor catamaran listed in Lattitude 38 which is 20 feet long and trailerable.  A TomCat 6.2.  

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