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hi guys. ok, so i am just getting into trailering  since moving to the New Mexico. I have a nice little Supercat 17. Picked it up a few years back in New Hampshire, sailed it in Rhode Island for a couple of years out of the Herreshoff museum, and then dragged it out here behind my 06 Toyota Matrix.

 The question I have is, how far are you guys willing to trailer with the trampoline still rigged?

cheers

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2 hours ago, eastern motors said:

Why would you take the tramp off for trailering?

Windage. My Matrix is a smallish light car. She did ok cross country with no tramp..... 

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Does your S17 trailer flat like a Hobie or angled up like a Tornado?

Flat has minimal windage, layed out parallel.with the ground and mostly sheltered by the hulls. Angled up, I could see your concern in crosswinds, though.

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6 minutes ago, randii said:

Does your S17 trailer flat like a Hobie or angled up like a Tornado?

Flat has minimal windage, layed out parallel.with the ground and mostly sheltered by the hulls. Angled up, I could see your concern in crosswinds, though.

Its flat. The 17 is street legal. My concerns are just that I have never done this before.

 Thanks heaps for your input. Makes me feel more comfortable. Cheers mate

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Nice thing about a car that narrow/low and a boat that wide is that you will be able to see exactly what's going on behind you in your side mirrors and maybe even under the tramp in your center mirror!

If you're going to be trailering a ton, IMHO the best Investments you can make are in tie downs, trailer tires, and wheel bearing maintenance. 

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towed our Prindle Cat with a 68 VW to San  Felipe and back about 400 miles never had a problem. had a coffee cup that road all the way back home still sitting on the tramp.

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I towed the ARC-22 450 miles from Moss Point, MS to J'ville, FL with a 4 cyl Subaru Outback. The boat was dismounted to 8ish feet with two 38.5' masts, a bunch of sails, and extra parts. It was mostly flat ground, but the hills in Tallahassee were a bit of a pain at 70 mph. Otherwise the car and rig did fine.

 

ARC-22TrailerSm.jpg

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My brother was a long haul trucker who owned his trucking company with a dozen rigs.  He went with me when I bought my Prindle 18-2 and drove my Sprinter van back to his ranch.  After that I drove it to the marina where I store it over 200 miles away.  Tramps in place on both trips.  The first advice he gave me was do the double nickel.  I kept the Sprinter at 55mph on cruise control with no problems.  One thing I noticed in lots of the pix is no shots of the stern of the boat.  My brother also said it is a good idea to put a red/orange flag (or multiple ones) back there; especially if the mast sticks back over the stern.  It is also important to not just use straps to keep the boat from moving around but also to make sure the boat is located on the trailer so the tongue weight is what it should be.

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The chances are that you will do better with the tramp on than off in terms of windage and drag as it will organise the airflows. Without the tramp, you will get more eddies and turbulent airflow around beams and hulls. Whether it is enough to make a noticeable difference I am not sure, but it's definitely an effect.

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Back in the days when I was younger and better quality I towed my many beach cats with Ford Probe:)  you really will not feel the difference with or without trampoline. As noticed already removing the tramp may actually make it worse. Tie-up, make sure that nothing robs anywhere, especially any loose wires, and service your trailer regularly. Also stop after first 50 miles and touch hubs. If they are hot to touch, look for place to service the trailer and at least pump grease into. Towing a beach cat is easy.

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I've pulled cats thousands of miles, coast to coast.  Tramp on or off doesn't seem to matter.  If you have a stiff crosswind, go fast enough to keep the apparent wind forward.

That being said, if you're pulling an A-cat on a light weight aluminum trailer, fill the boxes up with as much weight as possible.  I have seen the trailer flying a wheel...

 

N20 Tilt.jpg

IMG_0324.jpeg

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We trailered a Dart 18 all around Maine behind a 4cyl Nissan Pickup up to 150 miles per trip.  Never had a problem with windage, it was always a light, manageable load.  

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I was headed west from Florida with a Raider in tow and an 8' Trinka yacht dinghy in the back of the truck. I agreed to put Jay and Pease Glaser's F-16 from Falcon boat works in Melbourne up on the roof. The boat had been stuck in Florida and needed to get to Long Beach, California. The shop guy quickly welded up a strut for the mast that attached to the tow bolt under the front of the Tundra with topper. The boat went on the roof, upside down. Looked normal, with those reverse bows upside down.

Had no problem. Got one pucker when crossing the Columbia River on the way to Seattle to drop the Raider. REALLY strong cross wind. I swear the Tundra seemed to lift a bit and the Raider trailer was very close to the rail, pulled to the right. Didn't appreciate how windy until crossing the bridge and there were cars and big rigs off to the side of the road with damage where they had been pushed into the right rail.

Later, driving south along 395 near Yosemite there were "NO RVs OR TRUCKS" signs. A highway patrol car pulled up behind and followed for a while. Kept it really steady...... The ribbon on the front of the mast would occasionally fly forward as I travelled at 55 mph.

So, tie it down to a really strong support (not the roof rack) and tie it fore and aft. Then tie id down some more. You'll be OK at reasonable apparent wind speed.

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On 6/7/2021 at 10:16 AM, Mikey Don’t Like Sh*t said:

That being said, if you're pulling an I have seen the trailer flying a wheel...

At thebeachcats.com, you can see the Tilley tilting trailer which solved the heeling problem just like catamaran does: widen the axle to max road legal width.

Dave had made two of those trailers: my wife had one of them for her Square. She towed in a 30 crosswind one time, tramp on, and although the trailer slewed a little, the wheel never lifted

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  • 4 weeks later...

1700 miles each way from Ottawa to Key Largo with a Prindle 16.  Boat has a wind break from the van.  I don't see an issue.

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