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Hi guys! 

This is a 29er hull as you can tell and the trolley got its surface well-well damaged sadly while going to the water.. luckily its only the gel but the question : what to do with this? how does it affect the boat speed? much much thanks guys.. !IMG_4585.JPG.fba7043a58b796e3bb631f8ea1f22e22.JPG

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Another photo pleaae from another angle. Just looks like superficial gelcoat damage.  Could just we&dry it down, re polish. But Ineed anotherangle.

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Yes, thank you very much the only problem is if that the hull damaged like in depth so that line is a little bit broke because the damage caused by metal so it was pretty harsh on it sadly.. i can remove scratches with wetsand paper, thanks for that! but if I dont use ++ gel to get the default shape or the default hull, will it affect the boat speed or speeding up or things like that? 

29er..thumb.png.c872f20212816518f56f027674831cc6.png

(THIS ISNT MY BOAT, ITS A GOOGLE IMAGE) im speaking about this line here, it doesent continue that "downhill", it does have that damage shown in the picture which brakes that line for that 10cm.

 

thanks!

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It looks like the gelcoat is quite thick in the damaged area and now has a flat spot along the length of the scrape. First prize would be to sand the area down and apply some new gel that you could re fair to the original shape, then polish it up to the original gloss. Being sailing anarchy I am sure someone will be along shortly to tell me I know nothing about repairing boats………

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1 hour ago, Major Tom said:

It looks like the gelcoat is quite thick in the damaged area and now has a flat spot along the length of the scrape. First prize would be to sand the area down and apply some new gel that you could re fair to the original shape, then polish it up to the original gloss. Being sailing anarchy I am sure someone will be along shortly to tell me I know nothing about repairing boats………

You know nothing

The front did not fall off (yet)

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Like Major Tom says would be the best way. Back when I did this for a living that's what I'd do. But a refinement is to avoid sanding as much as possible. We stayed away from coarse paper. Masking tape, chisel, and body file (the secret weapon--from the old coachbuilder's days). You mask right up to the edge of that gouge. Right to it. Then you carefully sand it to be roughed up and clean--with 220 at the very coarsest. Start with 320. see how it looks after a bit. Then switch down if not really doing enough. Then apply gelcoat. We never waxed it. Once it cures you carefully scrape down the excess. If you see a low you fill it. Then scrape again. Leave the tape on. Do NOT apply gelcoat to the tape. That is there to prevent scratching. Once you have it almost all done with file and tape on, then start at 400. With tape on. You may have to replace the tape. Do not touch the interface with anything coarser than 600 if you can help it. 400 wet will take gelcoat down fast.

Then after 600 you go to 800 then 1000. All with a little block. No fingers. Then polish it. You can actually use paper to 1500 effectively.

Did a lot of repairs this way including colour matching. (That is a whole other story how to get THAT to work!)

 

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Yes thats the best way I think, too!

But you gotta be really careful and patient to get that hull right, like that bend but I think that wont be that hard, right? :O

We can make the gelcoat but how can we match the color the best way? Our gel is a bit too white always, you know just for the look!

Or if anyone have done a work like this if you guys have any advice about applying the gelcoat to the hull to do not brake the bend, or matching the colour I would be really really helpful!

 

Also i will give everyone + )if I find it out how to), because im really thankful to you guys for helping me out!

Have a nice day.

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The color is very likely Matterhorn White, which is 2 or 3 parts of black in 1000 parts of white,   Yes 0.2-0.3%.

I'm guessing it's a Ovington/English hull, really dose not matter, they are all within 0.4mm, so the shape will be very "true".

Do the gel-coat repair as has been suggested above, and just try to maintain the sharpness of the "Vee".    If you sharpen it up too much, you may run the gauntlet of the measurer!     If you overly round it off, it wont carve as nicely, but you really only have 1mm max to play with.

Just fix it and get back out on the water, and have as much fun as you can while you can.

They are bloody tough boats, they will take a punishing!

                 jB

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Yes, we used that the other time and its a bit white and looks a bit off, haha.

Thanks for the tips, I hope I can make a good color which doesent stand that much out and make the perfect shape!

Will work on it a bit :)

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Get styre e pigment if you cando color tests with catalyst. At correct ration. Use medical syringe. Mekp moves colour.

Red + green = blackbrown also. Red green blue is very black but "rich"

This is how I move warm to cool

 

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