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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Probably the most un-funny famous comedian in history.

He never even made me smile.

I won't argue with you too much on that point.

There were a few exceptions - the one that comes to mind is the necrophilia morgue sketch:  ... you faced death ... and a calm comes over your soul ... wait a minute - what's this?  OH OH IT NEVER ENDS!!!

 

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13 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Probably the most un-funny famous comedian in history.

He never even made me smile.

But, but, he screamed a lot, that must count for something!   

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8 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Only a sailor could come up with this.

May be an image of car and outdoors

The number of insects (bees in particular) that I had fly into the truck with those triangular twisty windows was annoying.  This idea takes bug collecting to the next level.

Or is it designed that the P trap fills up with water?

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23 minutes ago, Windward said:

The number of insects (bees in particular) that I had fly into the truck with those triangular twisty windows was annoying.  This idea takes bug collecting to the next level.

Or is it designed that the P trap fills up with water?

i could see being able to incorporate screen in the main intake...i feel that you aren't giving this idea a fair shake! :D

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3 hours ago, RedTuna said:

baking soda block buster.png

Had a similar experience in 2009 when I was cleaning out my parents house after dad died.

Found a bottle of Nabob almond extract that had a logo they stopped using in the early 70's.

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On 11/5/2021 at 8:22 PM, Jkdubz808 said:

252856249_10200359537413425_4231494320205648230_n.jpg.147f23f1c5ffed0dcbbbe75d8c28691a.jpg

fucking minesweeper   gaaaahhhhhhhhhhhcccckkkkkk

 

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May be an image of 2 people and text that says '物Oを Life is short! Make sure you spend as much lime as possible on the internet arguing with strangers.'

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8 tracks man .... just sayin'

 

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7 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

8 tracks man .... just sayin'

 

78's

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1 hour ago, More Cowbell2 said:

78's

dang! yer older than I thought ya were!

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2 hours ago, More Cowbell2 said:

78's

Once we got a record player……I think I was around 10-11, it was a Sears Silvertone……my parents bought a few 78’s. One I remember - Mario Lanza - got played a lot. After a year or so they liked the whole “record thing” so much they bought one of those big furniture record players with AM/FM radio built in as well so…….guess who got the Silvertone. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

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3 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Once we got a record player……I think I was around 10-11, it was a Sears Silvertone……my parents bought a few 78’s. One I remember - Mario Lanza - got played a lot. After a year or so they liked the whole “record thing” so much they bought one of those big furniture record players with AM/FM radio built in as well so…….guess who got the Silvertone. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

we had a pioneer era phonograpgh in the farm house.  it was a substantial furniture piece, you lifted the top to reveal the turntable complete with a heavy arm that rotated up out of the way.  the stylus was a piece of sharpened steel about 1/2 long as i remember it and there was an inset steel dish in that compartment that held spare stylus'  !  you wound it up with a crank handle inset in the side of the cabinet, put a 78 rpm slab of vinyl (cowboy music from the 20's as i remember it) took off the brake (!) and round and round it went and that faraway scratchy sounding music came out...no electricity required.

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32 minutes ago, Proneshooter said:

Why does the music you hear when on hold still sound like it is playing on a dragging eight track?

Because it is? :lol:

What I loved about the 8 track was the huge "clunk clunk" when it changed tracks in the middle of a song. I had one in high school....and ugly green two piece that came apart to play "stereo" with a cord between. It had battery power as well as 110v plug in. When the batteries got a little low it would do that dragging you speak of. When it got really low you'd only get 1 "clunk" and it would stop. So when driving mom's ford falcon station wagon with the fake wood paneling on the side, I could put the tape player in the car...put on my letterman's sweater......turn it up and cruise chicks at the Foster Freeze or the Burger Barrel. It had a low success rate. 

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3 hours ago, Point Break said:

Once we got a record player……I think I was around 10-11, it was a Sears Silvertone……my parents bought a few 78’s. One I remember - Mario Lanza - got played a lot. After a year or so they liked the whole “record thing” so much they bought one of those big furniture record players with AM/FM radio built in as well so…….guess who got the Silvertone. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

My parents had several Mario Lanza albums.

The 78s were not mine.

Wish they hadn't gotten rid of them.  It would be fun to go through them again.

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When I was eight years old, my mom threw a 40th BD party for my dad.  The next morning the house looked like a bomb went off.  Parents were hung over so I had the run of the place...found a gift among the carnage...a 33 rpm record (smaller than a normal LP)...by a guy named Tom Lehrer...funny songs and lyrics that didn't make much sense...only as I became older did the meaning come out...Old Dope Peddler, Boy Scouts Marching Song and many more...one I always remember from the boy scout song:  "don't solicit for your sister, unless you get a good percentage of her price"...

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14 minutes ago, foamy1946 said:

When I was eight years old, my mom threw a 40th BD party for my dad.  The next morning the house looked like a bomb went off.  Parents were hung over so I had the run of the place...found a gift among the carnage...a 33 rpm record (smaller than a normal LP)...by a guy named Tom Lehrer...funny songs and lyrics that didn't make much sense...only as I became older did the meaning come out...Old Dope Peddler, Boy Scouts Marching Song and many more...one I always remember from the boy scout song:  "don't solicit for your sister, unless you get a good percentage of her price"...

"Keep those refers hidden where you're sure that they will not be found, / and be careful not to smoke them when the Scoutmaster's around, / for he only will insist that they be shared! / Be prepared!."

Lehrer was a maths prof. His song based on the periodic tables was responsible for helping more than one person pass chem.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Danceswithoctopus said:

"Keep those refers hidden where you're sure that they will not be found, / and be careful not to smoke them when the Scoutmaster's around, / for he only will insist that they be shared! / Be prepared!."

Lehrer was a maths prof. His song based on the periodic tables was responsible for helping more than one person pass chem.

 

 

If you enjoy that, you should check out some of Canada's greatest, MacLean & MacLean.  They are responsible for classic songs like Dolly Parton's Tits, I've seen public hair and Fuck ya, which they used to close their shows.

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6 hours ago, foamy1946 said:

When I was eight years old, my mom threw a 40th BD party for my dad.  The next morning the house looked like a bomb went off.  Parents were hung over so I had the run of the place...found a gift among the carnage...a 33 rpm record (smaller than a normal LP)...by a guy named Tom Lehrer...funny songs and lyrics that didn't make much sense...only as I became older did the meaning come out...Old Dope Peddler, Boy Scouts Marching Song and many more...one I always remember from the boy scout song:  "don't solicit for your sister, unless you get a good percentage of her price"...

Similar situation, but it was Allen Sherman. My Son, the Folksinger

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14 hours ago, warbird said:

May be an image of text that says 'Remember WHAT THE VALET WHO PARKED YOUR CAR LOOKS LIKE BECAUSE WE DO NOT HAVE VALET PARKING'

Every year the State Fair of Texas makes a public service announcement stating that they do not have valet parking.  Every fricken year.  the old scams are the best scams

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

The metal ones were worse…….

At least they had that handy ergonomic cooking pot around the base.  With the no-burn handle for boiling the water over an open flame.

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12 minutes ago, Windward said:

At least they had that handy ergonomic cooking pot around the base.  With the no-burn handle for boiling the water over an open flame.

And don’t forget the handy “insulated” belt carry case……

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

The metal ones were worse…….

I had a metal one my first time in the Army, and a plastic one when I went back in 12 years later.  I didn't enjoy the taste of either but in my opinion the plastic was worse. 

The other problem with the plastic ones is if you put anything but water in it, it would hold that taste forever.  The metal ones didn't have that problem.   

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14 minutes ago, Windward said:

At least they had that handy ergonomic cooking pot around the base.  With the no-burn handle for boiling the water over an open flame.

The plastic ones still come with the metal cup and 'insulated' carrier.  

@Point Break If you soaked the furry 'insulation' that would keep the water a little cooler for a little while.  Sometimes. 

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3 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

The plastic ones still come with the metal cup and 'insulated' carrier.  

@Point Break If you soaked the furry 'insulation' that would keep the water a little cooler for a little while.  Sometimes. 

Having carried and drank out of every version of a “canteen” for over 50 years I have to say, they all sucked. But when you are thirsty…..I mean REALLY thirsty, you just don’t care. I was thrilled when they finally updated the water on the fire line to disposable commercial bottles and the web gear to cylindrical holders to accommodate those. No crappy taste, easy to grab when heading out on the line, easy to helo sling load in to a drop point to replenish the crews right on the line. I even carried the little single use packets of flavored powder to drop in the bottles……

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2 minutes ago, Point Break said:

I was thrilled when they finally updated the water on the fire line to disposable commercial bottles...

The military saw the light during the Persian Gulf War in 1991 and used huge amounts of bottled water.   Much more practical and convenient especially in the desert heat.  Probably the most use of canteens nowadays is during basic training.  

Speaking of water in the military, nothing like filling your canteen from a big old 'water buffalo' tank trailer or even worse, a canvas 'lister bag' hanging out in the sun.

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Just now, Ed Lada said:

The military saw the light during the Persian Gulf War in 1991 and used huge amounts of bottled water.   Much more practical and convenient especially in the desert heat.  Probably the most use of canteens nowadays is during basic training.  

Speaking of water in the military, nothing like filling your canteen from a big old 'water buffalo' tank trailer or even worse, a canvas 'lister bag' hanging out in the sun.

Or a big igloo cooler hanging on the side of the engine……important point……do not EVER take the top off and look inside……not EVER. 

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

And don’t forget the handy “insulated” belt carry case……

Did any of those damn things not leak??  Still remember walking around with a soggy canteen holder attached to my belt..  Ahhhh the good old days...  

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3 hours ago, Point Break said:

The metal ones were worse…….

My first water bottle as a kid was a metal mil surplus canteen. Might have even been my dad's from his stint in the army, but don't remember anymore. Used it in boy scouts for years until the early Coleman predecessors of quart Nalgene's came out. The little metal chain that kept you from losing the lid had broken and I remember spending a lot of time hunting for the lid if I dropped it while camping.  Just thinking about it I can taste metal from that thing.

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3 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Who's Gary Webb?

 

Gary Stephen Webb (August 31, 1955 – December 10, 2004) was an American investigative journalist.

He began his career working for newspapers in Kentucky and Ohio, winning numerous awards, and building a strong reputation for investigative writing. Hired by the San Jose Mercury News, Webb contributed to the paper's Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

Webb is best known for his "Dark Alliance" series, which appeared in The Mercury News in 1996. The series examined the origins of the crack cocaine trade in Los Angeles and claimed that members of the anti-communist Contra rebels in Nicaragua had played a major role in creating the trade, using cocaine profits to finance their fight against the government in Nicaragua. It also stated that the Contras may have acted with the knowledge and protection of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The series provoked outrage, particularly in the Los Angeles African-American community, and led to four major investigations of its charges.

The Los Angeles Times and other major papers published articles suggesting the "Dark Alliance" claims were overstated and, in November 1996, Jerome Ceppos, the executive editor at Mercury News, wrote about being "in the eye of the storm". In May 1997, after an internal review, Ceppos stated that, although the story was right on many important points, there were shortcomings in the writing, editing and production of the series. He wrote that the series likely "oversimplified" the crack epidemic in America and the supposed "critical role" the dealers written about in the series played in it. Webb disagreed with this conclusion.[1][2]

Webb resigned from The Mercury News in December 1997. He became an investigator for the California State Legislature, published a book based on the "Dark Alliance" series in 1998, and did freelance investigative reporting. He died by suicide on December 10, 2004.

The "Dark Alliance" series remains controversial. Critics view the series' claims as inaccurate or overstated, while supporters point to the results of a later CIA investigation as vindicating the series. The follow-up reporting in the Los Angeles Times and other papers has been criticised for focusing on problems in the series rather than re-examining the earlier CIA-Contra claims.[3]

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7 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Gary Stephen Webb (August 31, 1955 – December 10, 2004) was an American investigative journalist.

He began his career working for newspapers in Kentucky and Ohio, winning numerous awards, and building a strong reputation for investigative writing. Hired by the San Jose Mercury News, Webb contributed to the paper's Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

Webb is best known for his "Dark Alliance" series, which appeared in The Mercury News in 1996. The series examined the origins of the crack cocaine trade in Los Angeles and claimed that members of the anti-communist Contra rebels in Nicaragua had played a major role in creating the trade, using cocaine profits to finance their fight against the government in Nicaragua. It also stated that the Contras may have acted with the knowledge and protection of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The series provoked outrage, particularly in the Los Angeles African-American community, and led to four major investigations of its charges.

The Los Angeles Times and other major papers published articles suggesting the "Dark Alliance" claims were overstated and, in November 1996, Jerome Ceppos, the executive editor at Mercury News, wrote about being "in the eye of the storm". In May 1997, after an internal review, Ceppos stated that, although the story was right on many important points, there were shortcomings in the writing, editing and production of the series. He wrote that the series likely "oversimplified" the crack epidemic in America and the supposed "critical role" the dealers written about in the series played in it. Webb disagreed with this conclusion.[1][2]

Webb resigned from The Mercury News in December 1997. He became an investigator for the California State Legislature, published a book based on the "Dark Alliance" series in 1998, and did freelance investigative reporting. He died by suicide on December 10, 2004.

The "Dark Alliance" series remains controversial. Critics view the series' claims as inaccurate or overstated, while supporters point to the results of a later CIA investigation as vindicating the series. The follow-up reporting in the Los Angeles Times and other papers has been criticised for focusing on problems in the series rather than re-examining the earlier CIA-Contra claims.[3]

Thanks. 

So the upshot is that while Nicaragua had an unpleasant choice between two competing groups of authoritarian nightmares - the Contras and the Sandinistas - we backed the one that was selling crack to our kids.

 

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3 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Thanks. 

So the upshot is that while Nicaragua had an unpleasant choice between two competing groups of authoritarian nightmares - the Contras and the Sandinistas - we backed the one that was selling crack to our kids.

 

 

Brings new meaning to "Counter Intelligence"!  :lol:

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1 minute ago, Left Shift said:

Thanks. 

So the upshot is that while Nicaragua had an unpleasant choice between two competing groups of authoritarian nightmares - the Contras and the Sandinistas - we backed the one that was selling crack to our kids.

 

Gary Webb died by "suicide".....TWO .38 shots to the head.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Webb#Death

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17 minutes ago, hobot said:

pretty dark thread drift.... oh, look...a puppy!

 

 

I had the pleasure of going dog sledding with the Seavey family (Iterad Champions) in Alaska, and I was so surprised about what REAL sled dogs looked like.  They do not look like Huskies, they do not look like Wolves.  They are really smaller skinny dogs that are all muscle and called 'Malamute', or something like that.  These are the dogs that win the races.

Here are some photos:
No photo description available.

No photo description available.

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Just now, MauiPunter said:

 

I had the pleasure of going dog sledding with the Seavey family (Iterad Champions), and I was so surprised about what REAL sled dogs looked like.  They do not look like Huskies, they do not look like Wolves.  They are really smaller skinny dogs that are all muscle and called 'Malamute', or something like that.  These are the dogs that win the races.

Here are some photos:
No photo description available.

No photo description available.

malamutes are not small dogs...      but they do like to pull, friend raised them and took them to pulling  contests,  2000+lbs ontop of a wooden sled

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4 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

malamutes are not small dogs...      but they do like to pull, friend raised them and took them to pulling  contests,  2000+lbs ontop of a wooden sled

When I say small, I mean LEAN.  They are dwarfed by Huskies and dogs like that.  I think a standard lab would be a taller dog in stature.  I guess I had been expecting beasts before I showed up to go sledding.

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9 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

 

I had the pleasure of going dog sledding with the Seavey family (Iterad Champions) in Alaska, and I was so surprised about what REAL sled dogs looked like.  They do not look like Huskies, they do not look like Wolves.  They are really smaller skinny dogs that are all muscle and called 'Malamute', or something like that.  These are the dogs that win the races.

Here are some photos:
No photo description available.

No photo description available.

Malamutes are generally larger than huskies. Mine never pulled a sled but loved to run! I will have to see if I can find a picture its been over 40 years.

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Just now, Gangbusters said:

Malamutes are generally larger than huskies. Mine never pulled a sled but loved to run! I will have to see if I can find a picture its been over 40 years.

I wonder why these racing dogs were so small.  You can see in the photo I posted their size.  They were just over knee high.  Maybe these aren't Malamutes.  I thought that's what the guy was calling them.  Maybe the ones bread for racing are bread to a smaller size?  I have no idea.  

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9 minutes ago, Gangbusters said:

Malamutes are generally larger than huskies. Mine never pulled a sled but loved to run! I will have to see if I can find a picture its been over 40 years.

Found this link:  https://www.gi.alaska.edu/alaska-science-forum/why-are-sled-dogs-so-small

So, I guess the breed is called 'Alaskan Husky', not Malamute as I had thought.

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1 hour ago, Left Shift said:

Thanks. 

So the upshot is that while Nicaragua had an unpleasant choice between two competing groups of authoritarian nightmares - the Contras and the Sandinistas - we backed the one that was selling crack to our kids.

 

The others were commies.

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4 hours ago, shaggy said:

Did any of those damn things not leak??  Still remember walking around with a soggy canteen holder attached to my belt..  Ahhhh the good old days...  

That canteen holder acted as a chiller when it was wet.  The evaporation chills the contents.  Curiously, 2 12oz beer cans fit nicely and after a morning of fishing in the mountains, pulling a cool one out of the canteen carrier is refreshing..

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