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Black and Yellow Sea Snakes are the worst. If you are dragging a line in the water, or a dinghy painter that keeps "dipping" into the water, they climb up them and try to board.

Extremely deadly bastards.

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By extremely deadly i guess you mean shy and only interested in doing their own thing?

Fangs about 1.5 mm long, pretty animal, that one yeah?  No recorded deaths in Australia I believe even though they are common.  How often do you get sea snakes trying to board?  Why would they be doing that, they aren't great out of the water...

Like all snakes for some reason people get completely irrational around them.  Even had a lady shy away in fear from a carpet python pet draped around a teenage girl's shoulder, she had some ugly ridgeback cross brute on a leash.  I laughed a lot.  My daughter tried to point out the predator / prey relationships but you can't fix ?? a religious mind ?  Is it a bible thing?

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18 minutes ago, Timur said:

Who knew swimming in Lake Travis was so dangerous?  I would have thought getting run over by some shitty rich plebe from UT on a rented Seadoo would pose the biggest risk.

 

Lake Travis must've changed in 40 years...back then the wildlife we saw was mainly all the naked hippie chicks.

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5 hours ago, Timur said:

Haha and how! We used to cruise my dead buddies powerboat around Hippie Hollow in the 80s.  All nice big breasts blazing in the sun.  Then in the 90s it turned queer and nothing but swinging dicks admiring and groping one another.  Now, hell I don't know.  Haven't been to Travis in couple years.  One thing different between then and now...the beavers are all shaved and smooth skinned.... bwaaaaaaa!

Yep it was a damn good time in the early 80s in Austin. We sailed a buddy's Hobie 16. Went out to Hippie Hollow one Saturday and by God there was one of my teachers naked right down to the beaver! And she wasn't bashful when she recognized me. I feel for kids today with their noses in phones. They don't know what they missed.

Don't get that shaving thing. 

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

It's a visceral thing.

Yes, you are correct, I just can't understand where it originated.

Jealousy over not needing legs?  Jealousy of calorific efficiency?

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7 hours ago, ROADKILL666 said:

Well in Florida you better figure it out,They are every where.

What, naked shaved teenagers?

And there's a whole thread about 'Don't Move To Florida'

- DSK

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I’d always heard the venom was among the deadliest. Not so? I happened upon a pair mating once when free diving off the Philippines and figured they might get aggressive so I didn’t hang around to observe their shy behavior. 

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15 hours ago, kinardly said:

I’d always heard the venom was among the deadliest. Not so? 

You are correct, however they mostly have small fangs which are placed back in the mouth so they don't often manage to inject much if any venom through our mighty epidermis.

Also it takes a fair bit of energy for a snake to produce venom so they usually only try to use it on prey, mostly when a snake bites you it is a warning, "hey, stop stepping on me", or "you're big and I'm little and afraid".  For a rear fanged snake to inject venom it is almost a chewing action.

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On 6/19/2021 at 1:06 AM, sparau said:

Yes, you are correct, I just can't understand where it originated.

Jealousy over not needing legs?  Jealousy of calorific efficiency?

Research has shown a certain degree of innate, instinctive fear and aversion to snakes and spiders (tho the only universal human phobias are loud noises and falling; maybe abandonment, tho that one is harder to test for). Makes evolutionary sense: human babbies once spent a fair amount of time on the ground semi-attended. Screaming when a potentially venomous animal came near was a useful trait. (Tho probably hyenas were a bigger threat....)

The rest of our snake antipathy is socialized. Sea snakes are extremely venomous, with some of the lowest LD50 ratings among reptiles. But they are shy and non-aggressive toward humans, mostly biting fishermen trying to remove them from their nets

Terrestrial snakes in the water can be dangerous, because they often want to climb on board your boat to rest and our panic reaction is to slap or kick them away, at which point they might nail you.

 

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Great video, Fred.  I was thrilled to see a diamond back water snake included.  Very common on the San Antonio River in the King William district.  One can see young ones in the shallows pretending to be sticks as tilapia fry swim by unaware.  Caught a four footer once on a bridge there near a restaurant that people were freaking out about and trying to get cars to run over it.  It was very pissed off, not that they have a pleasant disposition around people in the first place, but I managed to get a handhold without either of us getting hurt.  Got a few kids to check it out as I explained how to know it wasn't venomous and that it was just trying to make a living.  Carried it down to the water's edge and turned it loose in the River Authority's butterfly garden.  Felt good saving it.

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I found this one on our driveway.  He normally lives in the shed and eats a possum when he's hungry.

Just have to be aware that our dog is bite sized for this guy.

Snake.thumb.jpg.17557a14de169a9ded9b4317ae2c2f03.jpg

 

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4 hours ago, random. said:

I found this one on our driveway.  He normally lives in the shed and eats a possum when he's hungry.

Just have to be aware that our dog is bite sized for this guy.

Snake.thumb.jpg.17557a14de169a9ded9b4317ae2c2f03.jpg

 

Looks like a nice Coastal Carpet Python.   Hope you treated him/her ok.

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2 minutes ago, slap said:

Looks like a nice Coastal Carpet Python.   Hope you treated him/her ok.

Put it in a bag, took it away a few hundred metres to get it off the track.  I have relocated a few before, sometimes for the neighbours.  The only way they do not come back is if you take them to different catchment area.  This one came back.

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