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Departure Wx- Chesapeake to Maine


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To quote George Takei- "oh my..." What an incredible day.  Clear and sunny,  beautiful temps. The wind was right so I sailed off the mooring and out of the guts of Cuttyhunk.  I'm close hauled fo

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I'd like to thank everyone for their great advice on getting through LIS. Even more, I'd like to thank everyone for the advice provided throughout my entire trip from technical information to places t

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3 hours ago, dylan winter said:

If she is happy then go slow

When alone I sail for 15 hours a day

 

Jill likes to use the boat as a walking and exploring base....then we only sail for a few hours a day... and drop the hook for lunch

A happy wife is the most precious thing a sailor can have....closely followed by a boat. A dinghy that rows well is essential for us now

D

Same. I fitted davits to my boat so we could launch/retrieve the dinghy quickly & easily. Lot of trouble to go to but my GF likes to go ashore for walks and exploring.

It was totally worth it. She's happy, she comes sailing with me, I eat well and life is good.

FKT

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I found a great hoisting bridle for the dinghy. I use the spinnaker pole lift line to lower it into the water. 

Much exploring today,  miles walked.  Fresh Maine berries for breakfast tomorrow. 

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Hey Ajax - have been following your trip with so much interest!! Congrats again!

 Had 2 ideas I wanted to share since you are in the neighborhood - but have to admit I have lost track of your schedule and timing!

1) Butter Island is a great trip from Camden/ Rockport / North Haven area.  Sand beach on SE side w very nice anchorage and a short hike on a marked trail from the beach to an overlook w amazing views - very quiet for an overnight. From there you have great options - Go north to Castine, East to Stonington and Merchants Row (Billings Marine is a great fuel stop) or south to Vinalhaven or Isle Au Haut, or other points south

2) If you around and want some serious classic boat watching,  the Camden Classic cup and the parade of sail is on Sat July 31.

https://www.camdenclassicscup.com/parade-of-sail

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Wife departs Saturday morning to return home by car. I keep getting warnings that I need to allot 2X the amount of time to return home. If I adhere to that, I need to start working my way back soon and will not have time for wooden boat porn.

I punished myself to get here by jumping straight from New Bedford, MA to Rockland.  I'd like to shorten that by jumping off from Port Clyde or Monhegan (but only if it's very calm).

Question: If I arrive at the CCC at the wrong tidal cycle, is the Sandwich Marina at the mouth a safe place to sit until it flips? I saw a couple of boats anchor at the mouth of the canal but I'm looking for a safer alternative in case the weather is bad.

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31 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Wife departs Saturday morning to return home by car. I keep getting warnings that I need to allot 2X the amount of time to return home. If I adhere to that, I need to start working my way back soon and will not have time for wooden boat porn.

I punished myself to get here by jumping straight from New Bedford, MA to Rockland.  I'd like to shorten that by jumping off from Port Clyde or Monhegan (but only if it's very calm).

Question: If I arrive at the CCC at the wrong tidal cycle, is the Sandwich Marina at the mouth a safe place to sit until it flips? I saw a couple of boats anchor at the mouth of the canal but I'm looking for a safer alternative in case the weather is bad.

A few good spots in and around Port Clyde to spend the night. Tenants Harbor too (And long cove) put you in the Gulf quickly. 

Sandwich: We easily reserved overnight dockspace by cell phone in 2018. If they have space I wouldn't doubt they let you tie up for a small fee or maybe fuel, water, etc. 

You'll most likely be in the lee of southerly winds (but that may not be so) so you can drop the hook off one of the beaches for a few hours. It's calm out of the canal flow in a southerly. 

We've usually found it pretty easy to adjust speed to arrive at a good time.

Cape Cod Bay (or Mass. Bay?), can be nasty if wind and seas of any size are on the nose. 

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28 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Wife departs Saturday morning to return home by car. I keep getting warnings that I need to allot 2X the amount of time to return home. If I adhere to that, I need to start working my way back soon and will not have time for wooden boat porn.

I punished myself to get here by jumping straight from New Bedford, MA to Rockland.  I'd like to shorten that by jumping off from Port Clyde or Monhegan (but only if it's very calm).

Question: If I arrive at the CCC at the wrong tidal cycle, is the Sandwich Marina at the mouth a safe place to sit until it flips? I saw a couple of boats anchor at the mouth of the canal but I'm looking for a safer alternative in case the weather is bad.

If you want a "free" and open anchorage - Maple Juice Cove - is just around the corner from Port Clyde. Tenants Harbor and Long Cove are also a good jumping off points. 

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The Sandwich Marina is an absolutely safe place to wait for the tide, BUT...

Until about 35 years ago, that man-made divot in the Canal was known as "The Harbor Of Refuge".  You could duck in and throw a hook and spend the night, or just wait for a fair tide.  Then greedier heads got together and it became what it is now, a marina, with no room in the inn for a transient.  For a while you could pay for a spot on the fuel dock as long as you beat feet by 0800, but that wasn't possible in the late '80s/ early '90s when I had reason to need it from time to time.  It was known as "The Harbor Of Refuse" for those of us who had multiple bad experiences there.

For all I know those days are gone and you'll be welcomed with open arms.  I doubt it, it's pretty small and I bet those slips are at a premium for seasonal owners.  However there is nothing to prevent you from ducking in there and lurking out of the current for a while, though if the same douchenozzles are running the place they may try to tell you you can't. 

If for some reason you can get through the Canal, but it is blowing 25 -30 Southwest, which happens occasionally, especially on hot afternoons there are a couple of ways to keep from getting the crap kicked out of you. Onset,  the dolphins opposite Onset, the hole inside the dolphins where you can anchor, and the old entrance, on the Pocasset shore (hang a left at Toby I) come to mind.

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@Ajaxre:wooden boat porn. 
 

the Shipyard Cup is running this weekend in Boothbay harbor. 
 

not the same level as the ERR or Camden Classic, but there is a good fleet assembled 

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7 hours ago, mgs said:

@Ajaxre:wooden boat porn. 
 

the Shipyard Cup is running this weekend in Boothbay harbor. 
 

not the same level as the ERR or Camden Classic, but there is a good fleet assembled 

I came in late, anchored just outside Marilee. If you want, we can probably get you in the crew tomorrow. I’ve just got 4 now, can likely include party tix.

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34 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I came in late, anchored just outside Marilee. If you want, we can probably get you in the crew tomorrow. I’ve just got 4 now, can likely include party tix.

What’s happening tomorrow (Friday)?

 

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8 hours ago, Nettles said:

The Sandwich Marina is an absolutely safe place to wait for the tide, BUT...

Until about 35 years ago, that man-made divot in the Canal was known as "The Harbor Of Refuge".  You could duck in and throw a hook and spend the night, or just wait for a fair tide.  Then greedier heads got together and it became what it is now, a marina, with no room in the inn for a transient.  For a while you could pay for a spot on the fuel dock as long as you beat feet by 0800, but that wasn't possible in the late '80s/ early '90s when I had reason to need it from time to time.  It was known as "The Harbor Of Refuse" for those of us who had multiple bad experiences there.

For all I know those days are gone and you'll be welcomed with open arms.  I doubt it, it's pretty small and I bet those slips are at a premium for seasonal owners.  However there is nothing to prevent you from ducking in there and lurking out of the current for a while, though if the same douchenozzles are running the place they may try to tell you you can't. 

If for some reason you can get through the Canal, but it is blowing 25 -30 Southwest, which happens occasionally, especially on hot afternoons there are a couple of ways to keep from getting the crap kicked out of you. Onset,  the dolphins opposite Onset, the hole inside the dolphins where you can anchor, and the old entrance, on the Pocasset shore (hang a left at Toby I) come to mind.

We dock at Sandwich Marina every year on our way to the Vineyard and Nantucket.   Its easy to get a slip for the night if you plan ahead and book one on Dockwa.com.  On occasionally you can get away with parking at the fuel dock for the night.  We only attempt that in a pinch.

 

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1 hour ago, ChrisJD said:

You're in New England now. You're doing it wrong.

 

 

That is absolutely fucking brilliant.  (Except we never do get to see or hear from “Jay” in the video.)

This one takes it to the next level, and the some.  Just try to keep your composure, like Chief Brody (the town sheriff in Jaws).

 

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10 hours ago, mgs said:

What’s happening tomorrow (Friday)?

 

Just check in, but crew need to be listed at the website and do an electronic waiver. I think I got extra party tickets thinking Ajax might join.

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26 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Is Sparky now Cygnus?

Parked next to me and gorgeous. 

Sparky is now Serendipity. Owned by a yacht broker for Hinckley. 

MGS just came by and gave me some nice beers. Lovely guy, young, much smarter than me, I set that bar low but he clears it by miles.

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21 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Style trumps status

2102364542_Baittruckpubliclanding(1of1).thumb.jpg.c1e3e5ddc3e254fb27eac024f0a1ac6e.jpg

 

Still Life With Blue Barrels :-)  (when you start to look like your environment...)

Word is that he is actually the owner of REX IMPERIALUS, the 1937, fully restored Hinckley 80 that is a 10 time Eggemoggin Reach Regatta winner for most heavily varnished yacht... :-)

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32 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Seems like the Maine summer sailing scene involves checking out people’s pretty boats and sizing up their social status.  Interesting :-) :-)

You're doing it wrong. There's an appreciation for nice boats, but a bigger appreciation for what you do with it. 

Once I commented on how nice a wooden lobster boat looked and the owner pulled alongside to tell me how he rebuilt it....before going back to pulling traps.  

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20 minutes ago, Elegua said:

You're doing it wrong. There's an appreciation for nice boats, but a bigger appreciation for what you do with it. 

Once I commented on how nice a wooden lobster boat looked and the owner pulled alongside to tell me how he rebuilt it....before going back to pulling traps.  

For sure, nothing but respect for those who do it themselves. (On our quaint little island there is an annual summer house and garden tour - you can go and “ooh and ahh” at the beautiful gardens and houses.  And they’re lovely.  Except that the owners didn’t do the work - they simply paid tens of thousands of dollars to have their gardens built and maintained...oh well, so it is.  The victors write the history books. :-) )

Don’t mind me- just in a rascally shit-disturbing mood this morning since I’m away for a month as of tomorrow :-)

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3 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

For sure, nothing but respect for those who do it themselves. (On our quaint little island there is an annual summer house and garden tour - you can go and “ooh and ahh” at the beautiful gardens and houses.  And they’re lovely.  Except that the owners didn’t do the work - they simply paid tens of thousands of dollars to have their gardens built and maintained...oh well, so it is.  The victors write the history books. :-) )

People who write checks for nice things get appreciation for writing those checks and creating nice things. People who do it themselves get respect for doing that.  Really special people do both.  Not everything has to be class warfare.  With that said, I'm going back to talking about cruising in Maine. 

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14 minutes ago, Elegua said:

People who write checks for nice things get appreciation for writing those checks and creating nice things. People who do it themselves get respect for doing that.  Really special people do both.  Not everything has to be class warfare.  With that said, I'm going back to talking about cruising in Maine. 

For sure - no class warfare.  The billionaires and others have already long since won :-) (And Covid was a banner year for many.)

Speaking of Maine cruising I wonder how Nova Scotia compares to Maine, cruising-wise?  More remote areas I imagine?  Or maybe sort of more of the same?   I’ve never been to either - part of the long range plan is to get up to the Maritimes.

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7 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Speaking of Maine cruising I wonder how Nova Scotia compares to Maine, cruising-wise?  More remote areas I imagine?  Or maybe sort of more of the same?   I’ve never been to either - part of the long range plan is to get up to the Maritimes.

The Maritimes are surely worth a trip. I've gone as far as the NE coast of Newfoundland a long time ago - up to Bonavista Bay.  It's definitely more remote, especially now that the fishing and outports are gone. Maybe someone who's been there more recently can comment.  

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I apologize for not being able to get over to the wooden boat races.  I really have to put the wife ashore very early in the morning so she can get home. She has a family obligation on Sunday and back to work on Monday. 

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26 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I apologize for not being able to get over to the wooden boat races.  I really have to put the wife ashore very early in the morning so she can get home. She has a family obligation on Sunday and back to work on Monday. 

Sucks when real life intrudes.....

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Speaking of Maine cruising I wonder how Nova Scotia compares to Maine, cruising-wise?  More remote areas I imagine?  Or maybe sort of more of the same?   I’ve never been to either - part of the long range plan is to get up to the Maritimes.

The East Coast of Newfoundland is amazing, beats Maine hands down in almost all regards.  Personally I think it hits the sweet spot for east coast cruising.

Many people really love the south coast of Newfoundland and it is terrific, better than Maine in many regards, but you are so close to the east coast, which is a step up, that I have given it short shrift.

Nova Scotia has some special spots and it is different in many ways than Maine, but balancing out the pros and cons I rate it about equal to maine.

Labrador is a different world - you are really starting to get into remote cruising there with all that's pros and cons. 

And from Labrador you are only a short sail from greenland :)

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1 hour ago, MauiPunter said:

Sucks when real life intrudes.....

I have no complaints.  You have no idea how fortunate I feel that I made it here at all.  The whole thing has been an incredible experience. 

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@Ajax, glad the trip has been working out so well, hope you enjoy the sail home too.  It's been a pleasure just to follow vicariously through your planning and execution.  Lots of good gouge on here and the related threads that I hope to be able to put to good use in a few years.

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1 hour ago, estarzinger said:

The East Coast of Newfoundland is amazing, beats Maine hands down in almost all regards.  Personally I think it hits the sweet spot for east coast cruising.

Many people really love the south coast of Newfoundland and it is terrific, better than Maine in many regards, but you are so close to the east coast, which is a step up, that I have given it short shrift.

Nova Scotia has some special spots and it is different in many ways than Maine, but balancing out the pros and cons I rate it about equal to maine.

Labrador is a different world - you are really starting to get into remote cruising there with all that's pros and cons. 

And from Labrador you are only a short sail from greenland :)

I was once on a business trip through the Maritimes.  After meeting government folks in St. John’s, one free day I walked up to the top of Signal Hill, where Marconi sent the first transatlantic radio signal.  You do somehow feel you’re on the edge, so close to Europe, “just across” the N. Atlantic.  It opened my mind, being up there, hoping to see an iceberg down from Davis Strait. Anyway, from up there, I looked down at the port and then spied a little sailboat amidst all the ships.  Curious, I walked down and then continued all the way down to the port and found what turned out to be a 30’ sailboat with two young, bleached blonde hair Norwegian dudes aboard.  We got to talking.  Just up from the Caribbean and headed back to Norway via Greenland - and did I want to buy the boat, by chance?

I should’ve!  But then I wouldn’t be on the west coast, having sailed to Alaska with a kid and wife, and planning a Hawaii trip.  So - I’ve got a date with destiny — to get back to St. John’s - that’s where a goal of offshore sailing entered my head (after paying a visit to Maine, of course), and across the top to Norway :-)

 

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On 7/22/2021 at 1:12 PM, mgs said:

@Ajaxre:wooden boat porn. 
 

the Shipyard Cup is running this weekend in Boothbay harbor. 
 

not the same level as the ERR or Camden Classic, but there is a good fleet assembled 

I am going to be up in Maine the following week after racing from Marblehead to Boothbay in the Downeast Challenge on July 30/Aug 1.  Right now we have our marina lined for post race in Boothbay, but are going to be venturing out on Monday morning (Aug 2) after the race to some new location.

I am definitely going to be checking this post for ideas.  Definitely heading north.  Only constraint is I have to be back in Boston by Monday, Aug 9.  Wife wants to try to make it to Bar Harbor but I think that's a little too optimistic given needing to be back in Boston on the 9th.

Thanks , Ajax, for the information from which I can steal ideas from. :D

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If Ajax doesn't mind, I do have a Maine question since I am going to be in this neck of the woods soon.  Coming from Boothbay, and you were to pick one destination up north, where would you go for a harbor with a marina that offers slips and walkable town from the docks?  Rockport?   Camden?  Belfast?

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29 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

If Ajax doesn't mind, I do have a Maine question since I am going to be in this neck of the woods soon.  Coming from Boothbay, and you were to pick one destination up north, where would you go for a harbor with a marina that offers slips and walkable town from the docks?  Rockport?   Camden?  Belfast?

I’d vote Belfast. I think it’s less touristy than Camden and a little bigger than rockport. If youre on foot Id skip bar harbor. MDI is great but it’s got lots to see scattered about. 

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2 hours ago, estarzinger said:

The East Coast of Newfoundland is amazing, beats Maine hands down in almost all regards.  Personally I think it hits the sweet spot for east coast cruising.

Many people really love the south coast of Newfoundland and it is terrific, better than Maine in many regards, but you are so close to the east coast, which is a step up, that I have given it short shrift.

Nova Scotia has some special spots and it is different in many ways than Maine, but balancing out the pros and cons I rate it about equal to maine.

Labrador is a different world - you are really starting to get into remote cruising there with all that's pros and cons. 

And from Labrador you are only a short sail from greenland :)

Summer 2019 we did a seven day passage from Brunswick GA to Halifax, then we sailed a clockwise circumnavigation of Newfoundland including PEI, the Magdalene Islands and the Bras D'Or lakes. We spent 75 days on a 2,500 mile return to Halifax. So the first thing is that the distances are far greater than Maine - right now we're still less than 100 miles from our Eastport landfall (from Antigua) after six weeks of cruising!

Once we left the Halifax area there were many fewer resources for us or for the boat than Maine. There is almost zero tourist infrastructure in Newfoundland. Provisioning and fueling have to be planned and mapped out in advance.

The entire cruise was great, but the Eastern shore of the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland really stood out as one of the most remote-feeling places I've ever been. Not geographically so remote, but, whew, you really feel out there. The NE coast - Notre Dame Bay - was an absolute standout too - some call it "Penobscot on Steroids". Fogo Island was also a remarkable stop.

I think NS is mostly pretty much like ME, PEI seemed suburban, the Magdalenes were like Nantucket (of the 70's) for Toronto, Bras D'Or is a unique destination. Newfoundland (and our one stop in Labrador) is just a completely different experience - way more frontier. Few pics below.

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Lark Harbor

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Rounding Cape Bauld

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Noddy Bay

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Great Harbour Deep

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Great Cat Arm

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Little Bay Island

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Fogo Island

 

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35 minutes ago, Ajax said:

When you show up in a place like Fogo on a recreational yacht,  do people stare at you like you're nuts?

Not so much, they do get a steady trickle of visiting yachts. Of course once they've met us.....

And they haven't seen too many Atlantic 57 cats. They sure did give us a lot of cod!

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When I was there it was a big event - they lined the dock in many places.  Which is how I ended up in the basement of the mayor drinking home-brew with her son in one of those towns.  Even in St John's the fishing boats were very curious about us.  You mean you do this for fun?  Some harbors however, smelled really bad - think cat food left out in the sun - from all the fish processing.  I didn't eat cod for a long time afterwards. Fried cod tongue is highly underrated. 

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13 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

If Ajax doesn't mind, I do have a Maine question since I am going to be in this neck of the woods soon.  Coming from Boothbay, and you were to pick one destination up north, where would you go for a harbor with a marina that offers slips and walkable town from the docks?  Rockport?   Camden?  Belfast?

No telling what people like either Camden or Belfast will give you a downtown feel for a harbor town. Belfast has a more laid back 60's vibe and an interesting bohemia and art scene.

Camden has a prettier harbor that's entertaining in itself if you can get a slip or floating dock in the inner harbor. The downtown is touristy but you can find interesting stuff, plus there are easily accessible hikes that have scenic views over the bay. 

Both less touristy than Bar Harbor and better access harbors.

The west coast of Penbay, Rockland to Belfast, is about 20 nm so you can sail it and take a peak into the harbors along the way. You can get close along the Rockland breakwater to see the small city (go inside if you have time), pass by Rockport (or go into the head of the harbor, tie up for a walk ashore if you have time, desire), take a 'tour' through Camden inner harbor, then carry onto Belfast, another 10 NM. 

On your return, go through Gilkey Harbor off Islesboro for a scenic tour that's more or less on your rhumb line. 

That's just a couple days but you'll see a lot of it and spend time onshore of at least one harbor. 

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14 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

If Ajax doesn't mind, I do have a Maine question since I am going to be in this neck of the woods soon.  Coming from Boothbay, and you were to pick one destination up north, where would you go for a harbor with a marina that offers slips and walkable town from the docks?  Rockport?   Camden?  Belfast?

I've only scratched the surface here.  Listen to the long time visitors and residents.  

I will say this- the harbor masters and marina staff of Rockport and Camden were unfailingly courteous and helpful. Lyman-Morse is deluxe accommodations. The towns are clean and beautiful. 

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53 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I've only scratched the surface here.  Listen to the long time visitors and residents.  

I will say this- the harbor masters and marina staff of Rockport and Camden were unfailingly courteous and helpful. Lyman-Morse is deluxe accommodations. The towns are clean and beautiful. 

I noticed the floating docks not connected to the land in Lyman-Morse.  Was that a strange setup?  Never seen that before.

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2 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

And, just like that, its over all too soon.

Not quite like jumping in your car and going home.  I have the privilege and luxury of sailing out of here on an absolutely gorgeous day.  I'll get to see all the islands i missed, sailing in on the thick fog!

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Moored in Port Clyde. Rain Sunday and  brisk southerlies Sunday and Monday. 

Today was epic.  Crystal clear,  zero humidity,  I sailed through all these rock ledges and islands.  Sea doggos and porpoises everywhere. 

Wind was southerly but off the nose enough that only 2 tacks needed to get here. 

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Sorry we didn’t get to chat more in our passing.  We are planning on a stop at Port Clyde on our trip out of here.  We had a gorgeous night in Buck’s harbor last night and are sitting in NEH right now.  We will be here till Wednesday and then will start making our way to Portland.  I have some of my race crew meeting me there to help bring the boat back to MD.  Maybe we will see you again in the trip home!

I can totally understand why some people just leave their boats here and only cruise around these waters.  Life goals!

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7 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Any thoughts on Rockland?

As a town? It’s fine, it’s getting cleaned up a bit, not as rough as it once was. it’s got a good mix of tourist stuff and normal shops. There should be a new donut place open…Bixby chocolate makes good chocolate. Hamilton marine is right there. Walkable. The Farnsworth museum if you like those Wyeth characters (currently reading the NC illustrated Treasure Island to the boy). 
 

boat-wise you get the full spectrum from derelicts, schooners, to higher end stuff. @frozenhawaiian is working on his new boat there. 

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10 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Any thoughts on Rockland?

It is a decent staging area for exploring elsewhere.  Town docks and moorings are reasonably priced.  There are two private marinas as well. Just a note- they use coin operated laundry and showers. I'd never seen coin operated showers before.

The town itself shows signs of covid economic damage. There are many closed up business buildings and nearly every business has "now hiring" signs in the window, which seems to be a sign of revival. However, the streets are clean and I felt perfectly safe everywhere that I went. In fact, the police department is in a building at the harbor.

The town is walkable, car not required. There are coffee shops, cafes and tourist trinket shops. Due to the aforementioned labor shortage, they often have shortened operating hours.

My recommendation: The Brass Compass Cafe for breakfast/lunch. They open early (if you need to make an early departure) the staff is on their "A" game and the food is delicious. It's dated but cozy inside.

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Hm, I should have put more effort into meteorological education for this trip.

Today is no good for departure. A low passing through the GOM Wednesday into Thursday brings sustained strong southerlies, also not useful. Well, Wednesday starts off useful but I'd be bashing the last 1/3 of it.

Monday/Tuesday is workable. Overall, the wind intensity is manageable but direction is often changing. The GFS and Euro do not agree on some portions. There will be a brief period of low intensity breeze on the nose. If I crack off towards shore for awhile, the breeze will change back to beam or broad reaching after a few hours and I'll be able to resume a rhum line course. It's basically:

  • beam reach (5 kts)
  • motor (couple hours)
  • close reach (5-10 kts)
  • close haul towards shore/motor (3-7 kts, 4 hours?)
  • beam reach/broad reach (9 kts)

Tuesday/Wednesday are very different in the models. The GFS is a no-go for me. This window could work out but I'll wait until the next update this afternoon.

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Kicking myself because we were originally penciling in today as our departure date from the Boston area up to Maine, and we would have been surfing northward at eight knots on a broad reach.  Unfortunately, work intervened (a consistent theme ever since Covid turned our world upside down) and now we’re hoping to go for the last two weeks of August.  This week definitely looks like a northbound kind of week, other than that possible lull from Monday evening into Tuesday afternoon.

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The update is in. Not much has changed. 15 kts or less wind (usually much less) from several directions for around 40 hours. Waves 3 feet and declining at 5-6 seconds.  Parts of the models differ on wind direction and intensity.

Late Wednesday and Thursday, brisk southerlies on the nose will resume. It's a good time to sail to Maine. :)

I'm setting off early tomorrow morning with hopes of arriving in time to catch the CCC Express at around 0900 and anchor in Onset. Wednesday has favorable breezes on the beam-ish to sail to Block Island in about 9 hours. I want to see that place again, without the fog and hurricane.

From Block, I'll decide if it's LIS or the outside route.

 

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If it was me , I'd take LIS...I wouldn't want to miss sledding down the East River, the Manhattan skyline, and popping out with Lady Liberty off the the starboard bow (and I'm not even American!) YMMV.

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If you decide to take the LIS ride down and have the chance to pull into a spot at the entrance to Seven Mile Pond, or whatever they call it now, by Point Judith in Rhode Island/Blue Collar side of Narragansett Bay, there is, or at least according to Google Maps, still is, a restaurant named "Little George's", great chowder and one of RI's specialties, "Clam Cakes". If they are still willing, order the chowder the way my dad used to....."clear". While you are there,... If you can  pick up a box of "Jonny Cakes" for breakfast, well,.....Definitely an acquired taste especially if you're expecting pancakes,  but hey, you're in it for the experience right?!!! Been over six decades since I lived in RI and about three since I last visited, but your trip brings back memories. My .02

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Yeah or Maybe, Yeaahh, Quahaugs, Little Necks, Mussels, Soft Shelled Crabs, Razorbacks,.. Did I mention Mussels? The Calamari State?? If I was just passing through, maybe an assortment but that contradicts specialties doesn't  it? If the weather is not co-operating, why not stop and taste the seafood? After all the cannery is not there anyhow, blue collar side, no pretenses, good food, good company, = good times.

Last Time I was In NY, Hurricane Floyd Hit...., Kinda,... I told my now wife, I'm going to buy everyone (in the bar across the street from our hotel a drink, ((when the power was out)). Never bought another drink for hours, and had one of the most fun evenings of my life. She still remembers it fondly today

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All the books about Maine trading schooners talk about the westbound vessels anchoring in somewhere to "wait for a chance along ", i.e., favorable winds. The Tartan gets upwind better than the schooners, though.

Something I learned in my very limited cruising career was that you can stand for half a day what you can't stand for a whole day. Brisk weather that is too punishing for a 12 hour, 60 mile passage might be tolerable for a hop to the next good harbor. A little progress is better than no progress.

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On 7/24/2021 at 8:48 AM, MauiPunter said:

I noticed the floating docks not connected to the land in Lyman-Morse.  Was that a strange setup?  Never seen that before.

The individual floats in the middle of the inner harbor at Camden are moored for and aft, so they don't move. Both sides of each float are used to accommodate boats up to 42', more than doubling the capacity of the inner harbor. Just think of them as fixed moorings rather than floats. Lyman Morse only owns a couple of these floats. There are also conventional floats and docks around the edges of the inner harbor.

Other crowded harbors have similar arrangements. They only work in very protected inner harbors like Camden. NE harbor has a similar arrangement in addition to conventional single-point moorings.

The outside harbor at Camden has conventional floats, but we've spent some miserable, rolly nights on those, and only go into Camden when we can get into the inner harbor.

Ajax has seen his share of fog on this trip. We are sitting in Buck's Harbor right now, in thick fog.

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11 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Buck's Harbor has one of the best outdoor showers in the area. 

Buck's is absolutely packed this summer. Reservations required. They do their best but it can still be a zoo.

 

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36 minutes ago, accnick said:

Buck's is absolutely packed this summer. Reservations required. They do their best but it can still be a zoo.

 

I can imagine.  Usually people flock to the moorings and places where you need to anchor are empty, but not this year.  Almost every hidey hole I have was packed.  We visit Bucks occasionally to pump-out and re-water. Often there are an interesting mix of people there. 

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17 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Usually people flock to the moorings and places where you need to anchor are empty, but not this year.  Almost every hidey hole I have was packed.

For those of us new to anchoring in Maine, how packed is "packed"? As in, "Gosh, there are a bunch of boats here in this place I usually have to myself!" packed, or "I'm not sure where to drop to avoid hitting someone or something" packet?

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Boothbay Classics was fun, Elegua's son left last night, fantastic person, steered at lot during the races, I hope he sends his dad pics to post. 

MGS and SSBob introduced themselves

The owners of Chicane (Mylne, 1926), Polly (Nevins, 1945), and  Vixen (NYYC 32) were aboard Restive last night for tale spinnin', wine and supper.  We're all taking our time getting to Camden for the next series. I'm cruising solo and going to find an empty cove or two along the way. 

 

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5 minutes ago, ChrisJD said:

For those of us new to anchoring in Maine, how packed is "packed"? As in, "Gosh, there are a bunch of boats here in this place I usually have to myself!" packed, or "I'm not sure where to drop to avoid hitting someone or something" packet?

There's a lot of variety. Some of the more interesting places are only one or two boat harbors, so if you see someone, you move on. Other places have more space. Yet other places have a tight mooring field and few places to anchor.  It's rarely an issue as there is always somewhere decent to move on to. 

 

6 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Boothbay Classics was fun, Elegua's son left last night, fantastic person, steered at lot during the races, I hope he sends his dad pics to post

I hope he send me some too! Glad he behaved. Maybe now you'll let me onboard.... some day.... :D 

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Best restaurant in RI is near Pt. Judith and close to Snug Harbor inside the inlet on the western side - Matunuk Oyster Bar.  Could probably dinghy there.

Ajax,  LIS adds about 40 miles to the trip, but as others have said, it is an amazing experience.  You can moor in Port Washington overnight if you need to time the tide in the East River.  https://www.portwatertaxi.com/mooring-services

 

 

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Ajax, if you're still around I'm resting in Boothbay all day, at the YC. Those other guys put the hurt to me.

With the rain and cold, yesterday afternoon we lit the wood burning fireplace and poured rum. 

 

6 hours ago, accnick said:

Buck's is absolutely packed this summer. Reservations required. They do their best but it can still be a zoo.

 

Go  around the corner to Horseshoe Cove. Or around Cape Rozier to Holbrook for a wonderful anchorage with great hiking. 

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6 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Ajax, if you're still around I'm resting in Boothbay all day, at the YC. Those other guys put the hurt to me.

 

Dude - Hurt?  I was singlehand yesterday!  (But you may have won the party)

Ajax, if you put in around BBH send up a flare here.  CL - when are you heading to Camden?  We're planning for Thursday. Looks sporty!

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11 hours ago, sshow bob said:

Dude - Hurt?  I was singlehand yesterday!  (But you may have won the party)

Ajax, if you put in around BBH send up a flare here.  CL - when are you heading to Camden?  We're planning for Thursday. Looks sporty!

Alcohol related injury, incurred after the races. 

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8 hours ago, ChrisJD said:

Lovely morning for it.  Looks like it would have been a pleasant beam reach all night.

Wind was light and on the nose 2/3 of the trip.  The only thing more soul crushing than motoring 30 hours,  is doing it twice. 

Luckily, the breeze filled in and went more west for the last 65 miles or so.  It was bliss when I shut the engine down and took a short nap in the pilot bunk. 

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... and holy smoke, getting into Onset when the CCC is puking at max velocity is no joke!

The water churns so hard at the channel entrance that me depth finder went nuts. I crabbed the boat in sideways!

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Yea, Onset is really tough at max flow.   Also, the mosquitoes in Onset are legendary.  Hope you brought bug spray and screens on your boat.

You probably understand clearly now why you can't go against the tide there on a sailboat.

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7 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Yea, Onset is really tough at max flow.   Also, the mosquitoes in Onset are legendary.  Hope you brought bug spray and screens on your boat.

You probably understand clearly now why you can't go against the tide there on a sailboat.

It's blowing stink right now so no mosquitoes. I had no idea. I'll put the nets up now. 

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