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50 yachts that changed the way we sail


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hall-of-fame-yachts-mariquita-credit-Guido-Cantini-seasee

Photo: Guido Cantini / Panerai / Sea&See.com

1. Mariquita

Built: 1911
Design: William Fife III

Mariquita is a living link between the ‘Big Class’ behemoths, such as Britannia, the J Class and all that went after, including the hugely popular 12-metres. The 125ft gaff cutter was launched as part of a new 19-metre class designed to pitch matched yachts against one another.

Just four were built. Mariquita performed well, particularly in light airs. She also, uniquely, survived. Having been used as a houseboat for many years, she was discovered in the mud in 1991 and lovingly restored to relaunch in 2003, and she still races today.

rest are here https://www.yachtingworld.com/extraordinary-boats/hall-of-fame-50-boats-changed-sailing-99989

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Nice!  I would have included the DN Iceboat, and especially the C Class Little America's Cup boats, along with Aussie 18s, Open BICs for kids, Laser, Hobie Cat, Sunfish, and I'm sure the masses could come up with a whole slew of others.  But maybe it is sticking with bigger more offshore, even though Moth is one.

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How about Wild Oats IX / Wild Joe ? 

She was one of the first fully crewed canting keel twin rudder 60 foot designs in the world from Reichel / Pugh and built back in 2002 on the Gold Coast.

 

I remember seeing her coming out of the shed for the first time and the buzz around the marina. I had mates that were into power boat racing and they couldn't understand at first just how cutting edge the design was. In order to get her to open water they needed to put air bags under the hull to lift her out of the water as the Coomera river is so shallow.  

 

Great boat and design

Pulpit

 

Wild Joe is one of the world’s fastest 60 foot sailboats, built by the Australian Azzura Marine boat factory in 2002, based on the design of the world renowned Reichel/Pugh design team. The boat was introduced in the offshore sailing circuit as the first boat with a collapsible kiel. Its first owner was Australian winemaker Bob Oatley, who intended to use the boat for quick family trips, however, only three weeks after its launch, Wild Oats (by its original name) proved to be so quick and maneuverable for racing purposes that its owner was able to beat larger boats with better performance capabilities in the handicapped roster (time-adjusted racing), such as Wild Thing or Alfa Romeo and captured a trophy at its very first regatta. Since then, the boat’s performance has been unbeatable and is today rated as one of the fastest sixty footer sailboats in the world, it possesses an outstanding IRC number, hence can achieve magnificent results in handicapped (time corrected) racing. Following a change of ownership, the boat received a new name, Wild Joe, since Oatley insisted in keeping the name of his boats intact and all his new boats were also designated Wild Oats. The name and ownership change did not interrupt the boat’s success series, and up to now, it holds the record at the Pittwater Coffs Harbour Race, a regatta at which it captured four IRC victories. It also came out on top at the Sydney Gold Coast IRC regatta, twice at Hamilton Island Race Week, and it proved to be the fastest boat at the Sydney-Moolooabah regatta as well. It primarily showed its capabilities at distant overseas regattas, but had multiplied wins at both in shore (close to shore), offshore, and long ocean racing events alike. At offshore, or open water races, the boat is guided by a 9-10 member crew, while at in shore, or close to shore races, such as the Rolex Capri Sailing Week, or the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup, it typically needs 16 experienced sailors, so that the team can execute all necessary tasks at ease. The Hungarian team was able to acquire the legendary boat and would like to achieve respectable results at the most famous offshore cup racing events, at the Rolex Trophy, and by doing so, it aims to take a first step towards professional open sea team regatta sailing, so that it can pioneer the way for ambitious and proven domestic small boat racers towards this challenging and heretofore relatively scantly known, yet attractive and tough racing format.

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12 minutes ago, pulpit said:

How about Wild Oats IX / Wild Joe ? 

She was one of the first fully crewed canting keel twin rudder 60 foot designs in the world from Reichel / Pugh and built back in 2002 on the Gold Coast.

 

I remember seeing her coming out of the shed for the first time and the buzz around the marina. I had mates that were into power boat racing and they couldn't understand at first just how cutting edge the design was. In order to get her to open water they needed to put air bags under the hull to lift her out of the water as the Coomera river is so shallow.  

 

Great boat and design

Pulpit

 

Wild Joe is one of the world’s fastest 60 foot sailboats, built by the Australian Azzura Marine boat factory in 2002, based on the design of the world renowned Reichel/Pugh design team. The boat was introduced in the offshore sailing circuit as the first boat with a collapsible kiel. Its first owner was Australian winemaker Bob Oatley, who intended to use the boat for quick family trips, however, only three weeks after its launch, Wild Oats (by its original name) proved to be so quick and maneuverable for racing purposes that its owner was able to beat larger boats with better performance capabilities in the handicapped roster (time-adjusted racing), such as Wild Thing or Alfa Romeo and captured a trophy at its very first regatta. Since then, the boat’s performance has been unbeatable and is today rated as one of the fastest sixty footer sailboats in the world, it possesses an outstanding IRC number, hence can achieve magnificent results in handicapped (time corrected) racing. Following a change of ownership, the boat received a new name, Wild Joe, since Oatley insisted in keeping the name of his boats intact and all his new boats were also designated Wild Oats. The name and ownership change did not interrupt the boat’s success series, and up to now, it holds the record at the Pittwater Coffs Harbour Race, a regatta at which it captured four IRC victories. It also came out on top at the Sydney Gold Coast IRC regatta, twice at Hamilton Island Race Week, and it proved to be the fastest boat at the Sydney-Moolooabah regatta as well. It primarily showed its capabilities at distant overseas regattas, but had multiplied wins at both in shore (close to shore), offshore, and long ocean racing events alike. At offshore, or open water races, the boat is guided by a 9-10 member crew, while at in shore, or close to shore races, such as the Rolex Capri Sailing Week, or the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup, it typically needs 16 experienced sailors, so that the team can execute all necessary tasks at ease. The Hungarian team was able to acquire the legendary boat and would like to achieve respectable results at the most famous offshore cup racing events, at the Rolex Trophy, and by doing so, it aims to take a first step towards professional open sea team regatta sailing, so that it can pioneer the way for ambitious and proven domestic small boat racers towards this challenging and heretofore relatively scantly known, yet attractive and tough racing format.

It's on the list.  Or one of the WO is.

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Would have to include the Australian 18ft skiff.

It has lead the way in developing the current style of skiff sailing, including being the starting point for the current Olympic skiffs.

And so much of the technology developed for that class has bleed into modern yacht racing too; including gennakers and the fixed pole

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5 minutes ago, Timur said:

LMFAO.  Dragging a 50HP outboard around ain't considered "sailing" by any stretch the imagination.

Good for a laff though. I chuckled. Then I thouhht, " hey, what happened to the Lancer power sailer?"

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Lightning. Designed in 1938 by Olin Stephens, she is a classic proper sailboat with main, jib, and large spinnaker and has introduced many to yacht racing on a stable, affordable, easily-trailerable one-design platform. 15,500+ built so far. 

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Folkboat, Star, Comanche, Optimist, Laser, Hobie 16, Albin Ballad, Sonderklasse, ENZA New Sealand, Swan 65, Mar Mostro, J/24, Melges 24, 18 Foot Skiff, Steinlager II, Luffe 37, etc etc etc... Whats the point in making those lists?

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10 hours ago, sailman said:

Morgan Out Island 41, started the charter industry in the Caribbean.

for power boats...

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How about the Tempest 22 

 

This is a boat that was designed back in the early 1960's to replace the very out dated Star class at the Olympics in 1972. When you look at the Tempest it was very much ahead of it time and 1 of the very first sports boats. 

 

LOA       22 foot

Beam     6 foot 6 inch

Draft      3 foot 7 inch

Displacement 463 kgs

Ballast    200 kgs in a lifting bulb keel.

2 crew skipper and 1 on a trap 

 

As far as the Melges 24 ? 

What a out dated design when you look at the boats that have been designed in both Oz and NZ many years before it was even thought of that have lead the world in high performance designs.

 

I've seen a Hartley 16, designed back in 1956 as a plywood home built design, turboed with a dagger board keel and bulb and a mast head kite kick ass and it's a amazing little sports boat.

 

Pulpit

 

 

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Just now, Couta said:

Mirror Dinghy......a mass participation break through in design, construction and marketing

 

Couta,

They are a great boat and design and a winner if a newspaper competition long before the laser was even thought of. 

 

It would have to be up there.

 

Pulpit

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Flatpack, stitch & glue home build...mail ordered....revolutionary in so many ways....the "red Tide" democratised the sport previously 'owned ' by the elites! (no wonder the sails were RED!! ;-) )

 

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CONE!

 

not really but someone had to say it....

 

it's an interesting list.. and no subjective list like this is gonna please everybody. 

there are a few names that kept popping up like Stephens, Juan Kabcdefgh, Farr, Johnstone and a couple others.  

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8 minutes ago, Couta said:

Flatpack, stitch & glue home build...mail ordered....revolutionary in so many ways....the "red Tide" democratised the sport previously 'owned ' by the elites! (no wonder the sails were RED!! ;-) )

 

The sails were Red and the design called a "Mirror" because it was the Daily Mirror in England that run the design competition and had naming rights to the design the rules said the winner had to have red sails because the Daily Mirror's banner was in red.

 

Pulpit

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27 minutes ago, pulpit said:

 

As far as the Melges 24 ? 

What a out dated design when you look at the boats that have been designed in both Oz and NZ many years before it was even thought of that have lead the world in high performance designs.

 

 

 

 

were they as popular and mainstream as the melges 24? The OD fleet of melges 24 is something else as well.

Not downplaying on your other design, since i dont know ALL of them , but i think the melges 24 really is the benchmark (even if its slower like you said) of  what a sportboat should be. Simplicity , planning , furling jib , good OD ... etc

 

 

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36 minutes ago, Couta said:

Mirror Dinghy......a mass participation break through in design, construction and marketing

 

The GP 14 (1949) and the Enterprise (1959) both preceded the Mirror (1962), all three could be home built. So the GP is really the start of mass participation in sailing. However the Newspaper backing the Mirror provided the big push..

Unfortunately  the papers especially the left wing ones like the Mirror have reverted to sailing is for the rich mode these days..

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1 hour ago, The Q said:

The GP 14 (1949) and the Enterprise (1959) both preceded the Mirror (1962), all three could be home built. So the GP is really the start of mass participation in sailing. However the Newspaper backing the Mirror provided the big push..

Unfortunately  the papers especially the left wing ones like the Mirror have reverted to sailing is for the rich mode these days..

In the U.S. the Rudder magazine published Crosby's Snipe plans in the 1930s. I read an original copy of the magazine while at school.

That may be the American veginning of widespread one design dinghy racing.

Before that fleets were more local...like the Brutal Beast.

Town class. Duster, Comet class all came a year or two after Snipe.

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12 hours ago, fastyacht said:

Good for a laff though. I chuckled. Then I thouhht, " hey, what happened to the Lancer power sailer?"

 

With over 5000 hulls sold, the MacGregor 26X must be considered on this list.

As a sailboat, one only needs to thoroughly read this testimonial on the Mac 26X's performance to fully understand why it is one of the most popular production boats ever designed.

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Probably The Boat that Most changed the way we sail was a Snipe.  Not just any Snipe, not the first Snipe but the Snipe built by Ray Green in Toledo, Ohio in 1942.  

What was unusual about that Snipe.   It is thought to be The Very First SailBoat Built of Fiberglass

 

 

F4FC9588-9716-4397-A155-8D5627435652.jpeg

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I can't find the earliest UK dinghy plans published, but I suspect one of the woodworking magazines published something pre ww2 but if they did. It certainly wasn't as successful as the Snipe. Although we say the Mirror dinghy brought sailing to the masses, it took some commitment to spend the average workers month's pay on a kit..

Our local dinghy class, the Norfolk dinghy was designed and sold in 1931 for £65  as a cheap boat, that's about the price of the mirror dinghy kit in 1962. But in 1931 the average wage was £13 a month..

Oh I'll add another boat to the list. The Lysander 17, a small 2 berth sailing cruiser for home construction. Designed by the late Percy Blandford in 1963 an estimated 4000 boats have been built.

I used to own Lysander 722 and met Percy at a class AGM about 40years ago.

 

image.png.8c1a1b12ee44cee8b50d31072223b382.png

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16 hours ago, sailman said:

Morgan Out Island 41, started the charter industry in the Caribbean.

oh please, as a sailboat, the MOI 41 is a great office building...  :)

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Don't shoot me..

The Flying Scot.  

early mass-production in fiberglass starting in 1958.  Rugged construction and could handle breezy weather better than most 19-footers.  Yeah, not exciting upwind.  But thousands of kids in hundreds of camps or clubs, got their start on the Scot, and learned to race. 

Also the 210. Ray Hunt was way ahead of his time with the fin-type keel and spade rudder, flat bottom, fast downwind.  And marine plywood, which was new in 1939.  As was plywood and the flat bottom.

 

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7 hours ago, pulpit said:

How about the Tempest 22 

 

This is a boat that was designed back in the early 1960's to replace the very out dated Star class at the Olympics in 1972. When you look at the Tempest it was very much ahead of it time and 1 of the very first sports boats. 

 

LOA       22 foot

Beam     6 foot 6 inch

Draft      3 foot 7 inch

Displacement 463 kgs

Ballast    200 kgs in a lifting bulb keel.

2 crew skipper and 1 on a trap 

 

As far as the Melges 24 ? 

What a out dated design when you look at the boats that have been designed in both Oz and NZ many years before it was even thought of that have lead the world in high performance designs.

 

I've seen a Hartley 16, designed back in 1956 as a plywood home built design, turboed with a dagger board keel and bulb and a mast head kite kick ass and it's a amazing little sports boat.

 

Pulpit

 

 

The Tempest was a nice boat.  I owned one.  But...too bad it was built like a ripe banana.  It's biggest impact may have been on the way we recycled fiberglass.

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17 hours ago, pulpit said:

How about Wild Oats IX / Wild Joe ? 

She was one of the first fully crewed canting keel twin rudder 60 foot designs in the world from Reichel / Pugh and built back in 2002 on the Gold Coast.

 

I remember seeing her coming out of the shed for the first time and the buzz around the marina. I had mates that were into power boat racing and they couldn't understand at first just how cutting edge the design was. In order to get her to open water they needed to put air bags under the hull to lift her out of the water as the Coomera river is so shallow.  

 

Great boat and design

Pulpit

 

Wild Joe is one of the world’s fastest 60 foot sailboats, built by the Australian Azzura Marine boat factory in 2002, based on the design of the world renowned Reichel/Pugh design team. The boat was introduced in the offshore sailing circuit as the first boat with a collapsible kiel. Its first owner was Australian winemaker Bob Oatley, who intended to use the boat for quick family trips, however, only three weeks after its launch, Wild Oats (by its original name) proved to be so quick and maneuverable for racing purposes that its owner was able to beat larger boats with better performance capabilities in the handicapped roster (time-adjusted racing), such as Wild Thing or Alfa Romeo and captured a trophy at its very first regatta. Since then, the boat’s performance has been unbeatable and is today rated as one of the fastest sixty footer sailboats in the world, it possesses an outstanding IRC number, hence can achieve magnificent results in handicapped (time corrected) racing. Following a change of ownership, the boat received a new name, Wild Joe, since Oatley insisted in keeping the name of his boats intact and all his new boats were also designated Wild Oats. The name and ownership change did not interrupt the boat’s success series, and up to now, it holds the record at the Pittwater Coffs Harbour Race, a regatta at which it captured four IRC victories. It also came out on top at the Sydney Gold Coast IRC regatta, twice at Hamilton Island Race Week, and it proved to be the fastest boat at the Sydney-Moolooabah regatta as well. It primarily showed its capabilities at distant overseas regattas, but had multiplied wins at both in shore (close to shore), offshore, and long ocean racing events alike. At offshore, or open water races, the boat is guided by a 9-10 member crew, while at in shore, or close to shore races, such as the Rolex Capri Sailing Week, or the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup, it typically needs 16 experienced sailors, so that the team can execute all necessary tasks at ease. The Hungarian team was able to acquire the legendary boat and would like to achieve respectable results at the most famous offshore cup racing events, at the Rolex Trophy, and by doing so, it aims to take a first step towards professional open sea team regatta sailing, so that it can pioneer the way for ambitious and proven domestic small boat racers towards this challenging and heretofore relatively scantly known, yet attractive and tough racing format.

The thread title is boats that changed the way WE sail not how "THEY" sail.

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Did those 50 boats "change" the way we sail?  I don't think we have changed the way we sail 50 times.  Here's my list of boats that actually "changed" anything...

Catalina 22 - Sailing became accessible to the middle class masses.

IACC - Big roach mains and asymmetric spinnakers. 

J/105 - first critical mass one design with a bowsprit.

Melges 24 - first critical mass small one design sport boat

J/24 - EVERYONE has sailed on a J/24

Hobie 16 - proved sailing doesn't have to be boring.

ETNZ 2013 - because FOILING!

Merlin - because SLED's!

IMOCA - foils, canting keels, scow bows... truly the innovators offshore

TP52 - They spawned more than 100 45-56' boats that were light, high-tech and rate well under various rules.

Farr 40 - Changed the way rich people raced by driving their own boats.

Alfa Romeo - Because 100 (ahem, 98) footer's

Macgregor 26 - changed the landscape of people who had access to sailing

Laser - any single handed dinghy is still trying to catch up.  

Moore 24 - Because fast is fun in small boats too.

Capri 25 - Because I own one and it's the boat that changed me from crew on OPB's to boat owner.  So fuck yeah Capri 25's!

 

 

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International 14's

Boom vangs, Cunningham, Trapeze all got their start in 14's and they were early adopters of myriad other developments such as Assy kites etc.

They have seeded more sailing innovations than perhaps any other class

Fourteens Forever!

international14-daggerboard-2.jpg.23739f129b8a2557c6f381fc86676e4e.jpg

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13 hours ago, The Q said:

The GP 14 (1949) and the Enterprise (1959) both preceded the Mirror (1962), all three could be home built. So the GP is really the start of mass participation in sailing. However the Newspaper backing the Mirror provided the big push..

Unfortunately  the papers especially the left wing ones like the Mirror have reverted to sailing is for the rich mode these days..

The GP 14 and Enterprise preceded the Mirror in terms of design....but they didn't influence the market in the way the Mirror did. The Mirror went international on a massive scale (hence the term "Red Tide") giving affordable access to a sport that had been the enclave of the privileged ( a major issue in the class wars of 1960's UK). Mass marketed, flatpack, homebuilt with stitch & glue technique (plywood and fibreglass were emerging technologies) the class was innovative in so many ways. In Australia, cheap to acquire & maintain & easy to transport, rig & sail the class took off and became the mainstay of many sailing clubs attracting family participation. As for the media "reverting" to positioning "sailing for the elite"....well, with some very few exceptions (Hobart "Hobie" Alter the most obvious!) the industry and sport's administration has done most of the damage to itself...the media just tagged along.

So I'd throw the Hobie 14 & 16 into the Top 50 - they repositioned the sport as "Lifestyle" and "fun". No stuffy boring expensive club membership required, just off-the-beach adventure...racing was considered optional (and when you did, the regattas were focussed on Fun!). GRP meant mass production and lower costs (both in purchase and maintenance). marketed as Young, Sexy, Adventurous, Individualist - Hobie captured the zeitgeist of the 60's & 70's and the numbers reflected its appeal. We didn't see this approach again until the Windsurfer came along (and Hobie Alter was there too)

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And while I'm at it....there has to be mention of the revolution that was Trailer Sailing - from the brilliant simplicity of the stitch & glue plywood Hartley TS 16, to the mass production of GRP designs like the Boomerang 20 and Sunmaid/Coronet, these boats increased accessibility, bypassed club hierarchies and brought families to the sport....Australia & NZ went crazy for them. It was the 70's - The sport was never healthier, participation numbers were peaking....the middle class had fallen in love with sailing...we're still living on the remnants of that legacy (sadly!) but the trajectory is not good.

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6 hours ago, blunted said:

International 14's

Boom vangs, Cunningham, Trapeze all got their start in 14's and they were early adopters of myriad other developments such as Assy kites etc.

They have seeded more sailing innovations than perhaps any other class

Fourteens Forever!

international14-daggerboard-2.jpg.23739f129b8a2557c6f381fc86676e4e.jpg

Specifically, Uffa Fox's Avenger, the first planing dinghy.

image.thumb.png.23c4a758acee4c796921e29f3242ee1f.png

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Ian Farrier F27

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/66/Corsair_F-27_Sport_Cruiser_trimaran_sailboat_Zephyr_4044.jpg

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11 hours ago, Swimsailor said:

Did those 50 boats "change" the way we sail?  I don't think we have changed the way we sail 50 times.  Here's my list of boats that actually "changed" anything...

Catalina 22 - Sailing became accessible to the middle class masses.

IACC - Big roach mains and asymmetric spinnakers. 

J/105 - first critical mass one design with a bowsprit.

Melges 24 - first critical mass small one design sport boat

J/24 - EVERYONE has sailed on a J/24

Hobie 16 - proved sailing doesn't have to be boring.

ETNZ 2013 - because FOILING!

Merlin - because SLED's!

IMOCA - foils, canting keels, scow bows... truly the innovators offshore

TP52 - They spawned more than 100 45-56' boats that were light, high-tech and rate well under various rules.

Farr 40 - Changed the way rich people raced by driving their own boats.

Alfa Romeo - Because 100 (ahem, 98) footer's

Macgregor 26 - changed the landscape of people who had access to sailing

Laser - any single handed dinghy is still trying to catch up.  

Moore 24 - Because fast is fun in small boats too.

Capri 25 - Because I own one and it's the boat that changed me from crew on OPB's to boat owner.  So fuck yeah Capri 25's!

 

 

Rather than the Farr40, the Farr45 was the first "light" boat with small jibs and large main and spinnaker; carbon mast, .... The Farr40 followed suit, as did all boats after it.

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15 hours ago, Santana20AE said:

Probably The Boat that Most changed the way we sail was a Snipe.  Not just any Snipe, not the first Snipe but the Snipe built by Ray Green in Toledo, Ohio in 1942.  

What was unusual about that Snipe.   It is thought to be The Very First SailBoat Built of Fiberglass

 

 

F4FC9588-9716-4397-A155-8D5627435652.jpeg

Do you have a specific link for that? I haven't had any luck googling  "The Very First SailBoat Built of Fiberglass"

I'm gathering material about the Trailer Class (which the original Snipes were part of) and  I think this distinction for the Snipe would be relevant.

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5 hours ago, Couta said:

The GP 14 and Enterprise preceded the Mirror in terms of design....but they didn't influence the market in the way the Mirror did. The Mirror went international on a massive scale (hence the term "Red Tide") giving affordable access to a sport that had been the enclave of the privileged ( a major issue in the class wars of 1960's UK). Mass marketed, flatpack, homebuilt with stitch & glue technique (plywood and fibreglass were emerging technologies) the class was innovative in so many ways. In Australia, cheap to acquire & maintain & easy to transport, rig & sail the class took off and became the mainstay of many sailing clubs attracting family participation. As for the media "reverting" to positioning "sailing for the elite"....well, with some very few exceptions (Hobart "Hobie" Alter the most obvious!) the industry and sport's administration has done most of the damage to itself...the media just tagged along.

I was part of the Western Australian Mirror fleet in the 80's as a young teenager sailing out of Fremantle Sailing Club initially and then I got back into them in the late 00's as a father with two pre-teen sons who I tried to get into sailing. That didn't quite work but I still enjoyed it. We hosted the Mirror World Championships in 2010/11 and I was fairly pleased with my top 20 result. 

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Information regarding the Ray Greenes Snipe being the first boat built of fiberglass.

The information can be found in the Book “Heart of Glass” by Dan Spurr.  A reference to this is listed below.

https://goodoldboat.com/birth-of-fiberglass-boats/

We are at our son’s home currently and the book is at our home.  That book is your best reference.

 

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On 7/7/2021 at 6:25 AM, Ripple Rider said:

ETNZ Americas Cup 2013, a big foiling boat. Yeah sue it got 2nd in the final but these guys came up with the idea. 

D5C3940A-053D-4C70-B04A-62DB244BAEDB.jpeg

How did that boat change the way you sail?  

They were cool to watch but I personally haven't spend much time on foiling wing sail cats.  

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I would include the Muscadet as it’s the ocean going boat for the everyday French people and one of the original mini transat boats. 48E1B5C2-792C-4A6C-93FA-2642DDAEBE9A.jpeg.4c88aca0f5eb998e6cbf0a5fe6b8e802.jpeg

I would add the Figaro 2 to my list purely because of the calibre of ocean racers and solo sailors the fleet has produced.  
66A9FA19-4702-41DA-AEE8-9C032460AAAD.thumb.jpeg.d34df5e72c722cdd1cc6af6dd85475d5.jpeg

i’d also add the MOD70 because it manages to be one of the fastest sailing boats ever built straight out of the box and originally was built with very little custom deck gear to reduce costs (black magic blocks rather than blocks built from unobtanium for example) F9AFD8E0-30EB-41FF-80C1-D0DD9AA8BF50.thumb.jpeg.1e01bcacd41999378fa5cb7496854136.jpeg

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The question is somewhat misleading. Who is we to start with? it is all relative.

An FD (flying Dutchmen) for me was a rocket ship  when i was sailing a 4 knt shit box dinghy some 40 years ago.

The yacht so called A  (The ironing equivalent of a yacht) belonging to a Russian billionare might be the  the the way he has changed it all.

I would have asked which boat was the one which changed your understanding of sailing.

 

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12 hours ago, zenmasterfred said:

What about the fuckin' Cone?

As awesome as the Cone was and is, I think it was the product of a lot of the changes that have been mentioned.  However, maybe the Cone did make it more acceptable to plaster the interior of a boat with porn.

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4 hours ago, some dude said:

How did that boat change the way you sail?  

They were cool to watch but I personally haven't spend much time on foiling wing sail cats.  

The moth changed the Americas cup rather than the other way around.

All the real changes of significance came from dinghies. Almost every one of them.

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3 hours ago, Swimsailor said:

As awesome as the Cone was and is, I think it was the product of a lot of the changes that have been mentioned.  However, maybe the Cone did make it more acceptable to plaster the interior of a boat with porn.

was posted tongue in cheek, yes, loved the decor of the interior.  hope it was saved w/ a light epoxy cover, probably not in the pc days we live in.

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13 hours ago, Mikel_new said:

Rather than the Farr40, the Farr45 was the first "light" boat with small jibs and large main and spinnaker; carbon mast, .... The Farr40 followed suit, as did all boats after it.

If we are looking at Farr boats that changed the hull forms and speed potential of mid-sized cruiser/racer types, then Swuzzlebubble and it's follow-ons were the first off the board and into the water.  A next-generation leap over the Ganbare/Petersons.

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3 hours ago, Swimsailor said:

As awesome as the Cone was and is, I think it was the product of a lot of the changes that have been mentioned.  However, maybe the Cone did make it more acceptable to plaster the interior of a boat with porn.

"Acceptable" may not be the word you are looking for.  

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10 hours ago, fastyacht said:

The moth changed the Americas cup rather than the other way around.

All the real changes of significance came from dinghies. Almost every one of them.

The Moth is a great dinghy and a driver of many significant developments in yachting but the step from a dinghy to ETNZ 2013 America's Cup challenge took it another level. 
Then regardless of whether we get to sail a 72ft foiling cat or not is not the question. The question is the '50 yachts that changed the way we sail". ETNZ has inspiring foil development for many race yachts now, everything from Beneteau Figaro to Vendee yachts, even the new Club Swan, all using foils. It's the technology and yacht design in the ETNZ boat that changed race yachts. 

Maybe it was inspired by Moths? The technology to overcome the huge engineering loads, sail designs, electronics, stability etc is why I nominate the ETNZ 2013 boat. 

If you don't think ETNZs big foiling Cat changed sailing, that's your opinion, nothing right or wrong in this discussion. 

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1 hour ago, Ripple Rider said:

The Moth is a great dinghy and a driver of many significant developments in yachting but the step from a dinghy to ETNZ 2013 America's Cup challenge took it another level. 
Then regardless of whether we get to sail a 72ft foiling cat or not is not the question. The question is the '50 yachts that changed the way we sail". ETNZ has inspiring foil development for many race yachts now, everything from Beneteau Figaro to Vendee yachts, even the new Club Swan, all using foils. It's the technology and yacht design in the ETNZ boat that changed race yachts. 

Maybe it was inspired by Moths? The technology to overcome the huge engineering loads, sail designs, electronics, stability etc is why I nominate the ETNZ 2013 boat. 

If you don't think ETNZs big foiling Cat changed sailing, that's your opinion, nothing right or wrong in this discussion. 

For offsjore it was Hydroptère not AC that inspired.

Once AC went foil all tje players bought motjs C cat and A cat to see how it isrrally done.

AC is derivative

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yep, forgot about Hydroptere. Fair point. Moths, A Class Cats = dinghies. The change to sailing wasn't whether a dinghy could foil, Moths prove that, it was the technology in every aspect of design and construction to get a big boat on foils and out of the water so yes I agree with Hydroptere. 

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On 7/7/2021 at 10:15 PM, arr4ws said:

this is totally missing . Should replace the J/80.

Well, if you're going to mount that argument then the Thompson 7 was around earlier than the Melges 24. 

T7 Phone Pic.jpg

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On 7/7/2021 at 9:08 PM, The Q said:

The GP 14 (1949) and the Enterprise (1959) both preceded the Mirror (1962), all three could be home built. So the GP is really the start of mass participation in sailing. However the Newspaper backing the Mirror provided the big push..

Unfortunately  the papers especially the left wing ones like the Mirror have reverted to sailing is for the rich mode these days..

The Enterprise was backed by a newspaper as well if I remember correctly. As a teenager I raced in a fleet of over 20 which included 2 world Champions - really helped sharpen one up. It was - and still is - a great boat.

 

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These lists are always about opinion, we disagree with some, whole heartedly agree with others. 

For my own pennyworth, the boats that got people into sailing are the ones that changed the game from being for the elites to being more available to the masses.

The two biggest changes were firstly the availability of waterproof glues in marine plywood. Developed for the likes of the Mosquito bomber in WW2 it made home building more accessible and it is noteworthy that many of the popular designs of the era were either hard chine or double chine, Enterprise, GP14, Mirror 10 (there were several Mirrors all of which could be built at home), Optimist.

I used to crew with a guy call Gumper. He was a cabinet maker and built 2 Enterprises from plans. His mate Stewartie was a master painter & decorator, he painted and varnished them and they had a boat each.

The other big change was the arrival of GRP, Glass Reinforced Plastic with some early boats still around to this day.

I believe these two materials changes had a much greater impact on sailing and particularly the accessibility of the sport and pastime to maybe even the whole list of 50 influential boats.

Just my opinion, but then again the 50 boat list is just someone else's opinion :-)

BTW this BBC Documentary is worth watching 

SS

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Ha., Barry Bucknell and his hard boarding over doors.. I've had to remove tons of that off my Edwardian house.

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5 minutes ago, The Q said:

Ha., Barry Bucknell and his hard boarding over doors.. I've had to remove tons of that off my Edwardian house.

Ha ha - they do say that fashion is cyclic. Personally I hate them.

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Before there was IMP and Improbable, there was Lively Lady, a winning boat that not only help usher in the era of lighter displacment boats but actually changed boat design. From Gary Mull, her owners and terrific crew who made some of the best american sailors of the generation; the ones they still tell stories about and inspired so many others to follow.

 

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still racing today...

 

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The Enterprise was backed by the News Chronicle, A superb boat for restricted waters, agile, roll tack and gybe on the proverbial sixpence (dime!). The most aggressive start lines I have ever been on, because the boats where so evenly matched. Shame I was too fat except when it blew.

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11 hours ago, Ripple Rider said:

yep, forgot about Hydroptere. Fair point. Moths, A Class Cats = dinghies. The change to sailing wasn't whether a dinghy could foil, Moths prove that, it was the technology in every aspect of design and construction to get a big boat on foils and out of the water so yes I agree with Hydroptere. 

I like your point "nothing right or wrong in this discussion. " in that some are inspired later others earlier, etc. So goes many directons.

To me, the real kernel of offsjore hyrofoil is Dave Keiper. 50 year ahead. Why hydrofoils sat in suspended animation until 2000 and the Moth is a great mystery even as plain as day. It was stuck" in the AYRS and for a little while looked like the original Windsurfer with foil (early 80s) would break out. But didn't. Then Hobie tri-foiler. That didn't.

I suppose the class racing aspect was key. But others such as the R class didnt blow up. Of course the moth was and is international....

I will forever find this an interesting story.

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This thread and the original article once again show how geographically separated sailboat racing still is. I think more than half of the boats (or classes) mentioned are kompletely unknown in continental Europe. OTOH, how many of you Anglo-Saxons have ever seen a Folkboat, H-Boat, Skerry Cruiser, Banner 23, Dyas, Trias, Requin, DB-1, BB-10, Luffe-Anything, X-Anything, Varianta, Optima, Albin-Anything, ... in the flesh?

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